Hot Best Seller

Legacy

Availability: Ready to download

One of the most respected writers in the field of speculative fiction, Lois McMaster Bujold has won numerous accolades and awards, including the Nebula and Locus Awards as well as the fantasy and science fiction genres most prestigious honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel, four times (most recently for Paladin of Souls). With The Sharing Knife series, Bujold creates a One of the most respected writers in the field of speculative fiction, Lois McMaster Bujold has won numerous accolades and awards, including the Nebula and Locus Awards as well as the fantasy and science fiction genre’s most prestigious honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel, four times (most recently for Paladin of Souls). With The Sharing Knife series, Bujold creates a brand new world fraught with peril, and spins an extraordinary romance between a young farm girl and the brave sorcerer-soldier entrusted with the defense of the land against a plague of vicious malevolent beings. Legacy continues the tale of Fawn Bluefield and Dag Redwing Hickory—the dangerous repercussions of their rebellious marriage and the strengthening of their love in the face of dark magic—as duty and disaster call the Lakewalker patroller away from his new bride and toward a peril that could forever alter the lovers and their world.


Compare

One of the most respected writers in the field of speculative fiction, Lois McMaster Bujold has won numerous accolades and awards, including the Nebula and Locus Awards as well as the fantasy and science fiction genres most prestigious honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel, four times (most recently for Paladin of Souls). With The Sharing Knife series, Bujold creates a One of the most respected writers in the field of speculative fiction, Lois McMaster Bujold has won numerous accolades and awards, including the Nebula and Locus Awards as well as the fantasy and science fiction genre’s most prestigious honor, the Hugo Award for Best Novel, four times (most recently for Paladin of Souls). With The Sharing Knife series, Bujold creates a brand new world fraught with peril, and spins an extraordinary romance between a young farm girl and the brave sorcerer-soldier entrusted with the defense of the land against a plague of vicious malevolent beings. Legacy continues the tale of Fawn Bluefield and Dag Redwing Hickory—the dangerous repercussions of their rebellious marriage and the strengthening of their love in the face of dark magic—as duty and disaster call the Lakewalker patroller away from his new bride and toward a peril that could forever alter the lovers and their world.

30 review for Legacy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lightreads

    The second volume of the Sharing Knife series, following directly on from Beguilement. Dag and Fawn, newly married, travel to Dags home with the Lakewalkers. There they meet resistance to their cross-cultural marriage, family drama, a new malice threat, and some strange new developments with Dags Ground powers (life force magic, basically). Since it does not seem possible to review this book without addressing it, Ill pause here to register my continued bafflement over the splitting of the The second volume of the Sharing Knife series, following directly on from Beguilement. Dag and Fawn, newly married, travel to Dag’s home with the Lakewalkers. There they meet resistance to their cross-cultural marriage, family drama, a new malice threat, and some strange new developments with Dag’s Ground powers (life force magic, basically). Since it does not seem possible to review this book without addressing it, I’ll pause here to register my continued bafflement over the splitting of the volumes. It makes perfect sense! I mean, my God, we could never have a 200,000 word fantasy novel! Utterly unheard of! And everyone knows those romance readers all have teeny attention spans, anyway! I’m annoyed because I think I would have liked the two books as one better than I liked either separately. Also, I gather the impetus to split them was an editorial one, and given I think it was a bad call on literary grounds, that leaves moneymaking motives. And that alienates me. A lot. Ahem. The book itself is nice enough. I complained about some of the la-di-dah patness of the first volume, and this book turns around and delivers a nasty, prickly mess of people who never did and never will reconcile, let alone accept each other. I appreciated that, as well as the thematic topnote about living forward and prescribed paths and asking questions and how to know when you’re doing right and when you’re just compounding tragedy. Dag murmured, "It used to happen up in Luthlia sometimes in the winter, someone would fall through rotten ice. And their friends or their kin would try to pull them out, and instead be pulled in after. One after another. Instead of running for help or a rope though the smart patrollers there always wore a length of rope wrapped around their waists in the cold season. Except if someone's slipped under the ice-well, never mind. The hardest thing. . . the hardest thing in such a string of tragedy was to be the one who stopped. But you bet the older folks understood." The book is about being the one who stops, and in that sense it’s lovely, if unsubtle. I do have to admit to snorting more than once, particularly when the profundities tipped right over into clichés. Fawn took a long breath, considering this painful thought. "Some_ times," she said distantly, with all the dignity she could gather, "it isn't about having the right answers. It's about asking the right questions." My God, if only someone had ever said that to me before! To be fair, these are appropriate things to come out of Fawn’s mouth, considering who she is and where she’s from, but I still rolled my eyes pretty hard. The bottom line, though, is that this book entertained me, but it never moved me beyond occasional mild indignation on Fawn’s behalf. Dag is interesting (though a bit too close a reiteration of several recent Bujold male leads, if you ask me), and Fawn is all right, but I wasn’t there with them, and I certainly wasn’t feeling the romance the way I wanted to. Shame, really.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sherwood Smith

    The Sharing Knife: Legacy is the second half of the story that begins with Beguilement. It begins with a leisurely honeymoon scene before Fawn and Dag, who had spent most of the last book with her family, go to meet his--while the problems with malices continue to get more sinister as well as mysterious. Fawn, the young heroine, is smart, capable, full of energy, and knows her own mind. She's emotionally balanced--probably more than Dag is. She is possessed of a generous spirit, and an equally The Sharing Knife: Legacy is the second half of the story that begins with Beguilement. It begins with a leisurely honeymoon scene before Fawn and Dag, who had spent most of the last book with her family, go to meet his--while the problems with malices continue to get more sinister as well as mysterious. Fawn, the young heroine, is smart, capable, full of energy, and knows her own mind. She's emotionally balanced--probably more than Dag is. She is possessed of a generous spirit, and an equally vast curiosity about how the world works: she would never have been happy settling down to wifedom on the farm, though she would have done her duty without martyrdom, because she also finds satisfaction in the work of her hands, no matter how humble, and in her interest in and sympathy with the people around her. But she's capable of more, and Dag seems the one to give her the world. In this book, Bujold widens the lens on how this fascinating world works. She does not just give us terrifying monsters in order to keep the plot zippy, she hints at layers and depths below, or behind, those monsters, raising more and more questions about the development of history and culture, about how its magic works. About everything. And because it's Bujold, we know that future stories will depend on all these tantalizing hints; we do learn that there was an apocalypse, after the people's ancestors gained far too much power. The Lakewalkers, with their grubby existences, actually have a surprising history. As the stakes build, the questions become more important--and it's clear that these two books are the opening of a larger story. Meanwhile the characterization is complex and involving, and overall there is that nifty, hard-to-define humor that I believe springs from a sense of grace. Terrible things can, and do, happen in Bujold's books, but they are never mean books. Compassion, sorrow, hard-won wisdom, infuse the humor with a lingering depth so that I spend days after I finish one of her books thinking it over, then retrieving it to reread passages.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Butterworth

    I opened up Vol 4, and realized that I couldn't remember the series well enough to understand what was going on, so I went crazy and got all four books from the library and devoted my week to reading them all in a row. What a lovely week it was. I am just so enthralled by this world she has created, the ground sense magic, the ancient immortal malices growing out of the earth, the difficult cultural divides, and so many lovely and starkly real characters. This wasn't the most fun I've had I opened up Vol 4, and realized that I couldn't remember the series well enough to understand what was going on, so I went crazy and got all four books from the library and devoted my week to reading them all in a row. What a lovely week it was. I am just so enthralled by this world she has created, the ground sense magic, the ancient immortal malices growing out of the earth, the difficult cultural divides, and so many lovely and starkly real characters. This wasn't the most fun I've had reading a Bujold book, not packed with bigger than life action and rollicking good times. The pacing was lovely, but it was a very grown-up book (with magic) full of real adult problems: (magical) in-laws that won't accept you, a world not ready to make the changes it must make, and no easy answer for the questions what next. The world is falling behind the malice threat, and the so clever culminating battle with this beautiful powerful malice, and easy ending that turns out to be so difficult, the solutions (such as they are) coming from an outsider, a farmer girl, who doesn't know better than to try something wildly different. And the horrifying mound of bodies that pile up at the end. It's heart wrenching. and the only solution is to get their two cultures (lakewalkers and farmers) to somehow work together, but the barriers to this happening are vast and so difficult. I LOVE Bujold, she is a master.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    In withdrawal from the the ending of the Vorkosigan series, I am sticking with this one, but it is a slog. Bujold writes great relationships, and political schemes, but I just can't get into this limited rural world of nomadic rangers vs. farmers vs. some ancient evil thing that has to be killed with a laboriously complicated process the nomadic rangers think they have a monopoly on. So really, this is 400 pages of the minutiae of peasants camping.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marijan

    I was afraid thart the plot would be repetative, but it would seem that LMMB managed a new twist for every book int he series. higly recommended.

  6. 4 out of 5

    MsMiz (Tina)

    Bujold's story of Fawn, Dag, Farmers and Lakewalkers continue in Legacy. You learn very quickly how deep seated tradition closes off family and clan to that which is unknown and forbidden. Again, it is a story of how ignorance and close mindedness hurts not only those that you love, but those that could benefit from an open mind and understanding. Luckily asking new questions and always sticking together keep Dag and Fawn together and safe through a lot that happens in this book. This book Bujold's story of Fawn, Dag, Farmers and Lakewalkers continue in Legacy. You learn very quickly how deep seated tradition closes off family and clan to that which is unknown and forbidden. Again, it is a story of how ignorance and close mindedness hurts not only those that you love, but those that could benefit from an open mind and understanding. Luckily asking new questions and always sticking together keep Dag and Fawn together and safe through a lot that happens in this book. This book proves that listening to your own intuition will always out way listening to those that think they know best for you. Bujold is a beautiful story teller.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Well crap now I'm too invested.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    One of my lower ratings for one of Bujold's books but still a very good one. This one was more a continuation of the story in the the first book than its own stand alone story, so don't skip Beguilement.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan Baxter

    I love Lois McMaster Bujold. Just love her books, the complexity and the particular knack she has for writing a third act that pushes beyond what most authors would have taken for an end point, to see the larger repercussions. The Vorkosigan books are very dear to my heart, and while I've only read The Curse of Chalion from her main fantasy series, I loved that too. So when I saw this at the library book sale last year, I had to snap it up, even though it was second in a series, and there was no I love Lois McMaster Bujold. Just love her books, the complexity and the particular knack she has for writing a third act that pushes beyond what most authors would have taken for an end point, to see the larger repercussions. The Vorkosigan books are very dear to my heart, and while I've only read The Curse of Chalion from her main fantasy series, I loved that too. So when I saw this at the library book sale last year, I had to snap it up, even though it was second in a series, and there was no sign of the first book on the SF/F table. Note: The rest of this review has been withheld due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn F.

    Audiobook This series just gets better with each book. I really liked the first book in the series and this one was even better. I just hate when people do something for someone's own good knowing that they're driving them away. Ugh! That part of the story had me totally invested. The malice part seemed really brushed over on how he was killed, it was more a story of the aftermath. Great fantasy series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Hilari Bell

    I'm rereading this quartet for roughly the 4th time, but I love, love, love all the Fawn and Dag books. I think they're right up there with her Vorkosigan books in terms of character (which is high praise) and the plotting is less hit and miss than with some of the Vorkosigan books. If you like Bujold and haven't read these four books, you're in for a treat!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    This second book in the series is improving on the points I didn't like about the first book, the characters are starting to flesh out a bit and become more believable and not so caricature-like. The world is also starting to expand. Perhaps one of the reasons it is getting better is because Bujold is starting to bring more cultural conflict into the story now. This is one of the areas of her genius when she shows how different belief systems crash and merge between people but it was kind of This second book in the series is improving on the points I didn't like about the first book, the characters are starting to flesh out a bit and become more believable and not so caricature-like. The world is also starting to expand. Perhaps one of the reasons it is getting better is because Bujold is starting to bring more cultural conflict into the story now. This is one of the areas of her genius when she shows how different belief systems crash and merge between people but it was kind of lacking in the first book, perhaps because the first book was more of an introduction than anything else. Ha. You have to love epic fantasy, the first 300 odd page book is just the introduction.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    This series probably isn't for everyone, but I really dug it. It's definitely the characters that do it for me and also the way Bujold writes. I think she can write about Dag and Fawn doing any number of boring mundane things and I'll probably still enjoy reading it. Even so, I was glad for the action in this book, which made up for the slower pace of the first book. Legacy picks up immediately where Beguilement left off, with newlyweds Dag and Fawn heading up north to Lakewalker country to meet This series probably isn't for everyone, but I really dug it. It's definitely the characters that do it for me and also the way Bujold writes. I think she can write about Dag and Fawn doing any number of boring mundane things and I'll probably still enjoy reading it. Even so, I was glad for the action in this book, which made up for the slower pace of the first book. Legacy picks up immediately where Beguilement left off, with newlyweds Dag and Fawn heading up north to Lakewalker country to meet his family -- and boy, are Dag's brother and mother real pieces of work. Needless to say, Fawn's arrival is met with suspicion and open hostility. While Dag tries to settle her in, a malice outbreak happens at the worst possible time, forcing him to leave his farmer bride at home while he heads up a patrol to handle the problem. This novel is more interesting than its predecessor for a couple reasons. First of all, there's a lot more conflict in this novel -- aside from the protagonists having to deal with Dag's bitchy mother and asshole brother, the book also turns its focus back on the Lakewalker vs. malice war, which is good news for those disappointed by the first book because of its lack of progress on that front. Second, we also get a lot more lore and background of the world, as well as more details about Lakewalker magic. The magic system here involving "grounds" can get pretty convoluted, but is admittedly quite interesting and unique. I also love the world building, especially when it comes to Lakewalker culture. Consider how in many fantasy worlds, magic-users are usually the lords, the masters, and the upper class who live in castles and mansions holding power over the common magic-less folk. In contrast, Bujold's Lakewalker sorcerer-soldiers in this series live lives of sacrifice. Their existence is spartan, rustic and they dedicate their lives to protect the land and the farmers living on it. I want to note, Beguilement and Legacy should be read back-to-back, since both were apparently written together. Whatever the reasons (I really don't feel like opening up that can of worms right now), the publisher decision to split them up was a pretty stupid one, since in my opinion the story would have been so much more cohesive as one big book, and it's not like 600 pages these days is considered too long for a fantasy novel.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Trin

    The continuing adventures of Lakewalker patroller Dag and his new farmer-girl bride Fawn. To my surprise, I actually enjoyed this less than Beguilement, the first part of the duology. This one starts out, as that book ended, with a lot of domestic/culture clash stuff, but the Lakewalkers giving Fawn the cold shoulder was much less interesting that the farmers getting all up in Dag's face. The book really picked up when a new malice pops up, and that entire sequenceDag riding off through Fawn's The continuing adventures of Lakewalker patroller Dag and his new farmer-girl bride Fawn. To my surprise, I actually enjoyed this less than Beguilement, the first part of the duology. This one starts out, as that book ended, with a lot of domestic/culture clash stuff, but the Lakewalkers giving Fawn the cold shoulder was much less interesting that the farmers getting all up in Dag's face. The book really picked up when a new malice pops up, and that entire sequence—Dag riding off through Fawn's eventual entrance into the fray, as it were—was fabulous and exciting. However, the way the story finally wrapped up was frustrating to me: the jerks in the camp mostly get away with being jerks, whatever's going on with Dag's "ghost hand" is never fully explained, and, most disappointing of all for me, the relationship between Fawn and Dag doesn't really progress or change at all beyond the point it was at when Beguilement ended. All the conflict is external; apparently there is no more internal conflict once you're happily married. This book was still totally worth reading, but I felt, especially since Bujold is such a good writer who creates such interesting characters in such fascinating worlds, that the plot of this book could have gone somewhere more interesting. Maybe if Fawn and Dag had set out on their journey a little earlier. Or maybe that's a book she still intends to write? I'd definitely read it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

    More from Lois McMaster Bujold. This time the action is with the Lakewalkers, who treat Fawn like a child or animal of some sort. Bujold is developing the world/civilization/society a bit more, which is interesting. We don't know how things got the way they are on what is clearly earth, or a planet almost entirely populated with earth life, but it seems something new is about to happen. Dag's becoming a maker of some type, and the malices are springing up faster and more frequently. The human More from Lois McMaster Bujold. This time the action is with the Lakewalkers, who treat Fawn like a child or animal of some sort. Bujold is developing the world/civilization/society a bit more, which is interesting. We don't know how things got the way they are on what is clearly earth, or a planet almost entirely populated with earth life, but it seems something new is about to happen. Dag's becoming a maker of some type, and the malices are springing up faster and more frequently. The human population is increasing, which is giving malices an advantage. Lakewalkers are dwindling. Dag's and Fawn's marriage, which joins farmer and lakewalker seems be the seed around which the new way of being will form. I'm speculating here. I ordered the next book in the series. I hope it comes soon, because I want to know what happens. This series so far isn't as good as my favorite Bujold book, Cordelia's Honor. But it's been a fun read. The gem so far came from the first book, the idea of Fawn being loved without being valued, and Dag being valued without being loved, neither of which really works or is satisfying. What everyone needs is to be loved and valued both. I find that to be a profound insight that explains why love is sometimes not enough. I'm vowing now (how convenient, right at new years) to both love and value my loved ones more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    In Legacy, Dag and Fawn go to Dag's Lakewalker home where they're not expecting much of a welcome once the Lakewalkers find out about their recent marriage. In the Lakewalkers eyes it's forbidden to marry outside their kind. Thankfully the head of Dag's patrol doesn't kick him out but his family is a different matter. A malice sighting interrupts their time together for a short while and even through Fawn plays a part in saving some patrollers, the Lakewalkers still treat their marriage as a In Legacy, Dag and Fawn go to Dag's Lakewalker home where they're not expecting much of a welcome once the Lakewalkers find out about their recent marriage. In the Lakewalkers eyes it's forbidden to marry outside their kind. Thankfully the head of Dag's patrol doesn't kick him out but his family is a different matter. A malice sighting interrupts their time together for a short while and even through Fawn plays a part in saving some patrollers, the Lakewalkers still treat their marriage as a negative. A lot of this book has Dag deciding for himself how much of the place is really his home and how much he's willing to put up with to stay here. I wasn't quite as impressed with this book as I was with the first. It was a very slow book compared to Beguilement. But there were a few parts that moved quickly too. I think my problem with the book was more because of all the ill treatment the couple get from the Lakewalkers. I would have hightailed it out of there about halfway through the book. But in general the book still kept my attention and I still enjoyed it. From the ending it looks like the next book should be a bit more eventful so I'm looking forward to it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    rivka

    Really enjoyed this two-book series. [Correction: First two books of 4, although these first two really must be read together.] This non-nuclear post-apocalyptic world is reminiscent in some ways of the early Sime-Gen universe. Life force as an energy that can be transferred, split of the human race into two distinct groups with different abilities and roles, and only vague remaining knowledge of the humans that preceded them. Not to mention strong cultural resistance from both groups at the Really enjoyed this two-book series. [Correction: First two books of 4, although these first two really must be read together.] This non-nuclear post-apocalyptic world is reminiscent in some ways of the early Sime-Gen universe. Life force as an energy that can be transferred, split of the human race into two distinct groups with different abilities and roles, and only vague remaining knowledge of the humans that preceded them. Not to mention strong cultural resistance from both groups at the idea of an intermarriage. The details, of course, are very different. The underlying pseudo-vampirism of the Sime-Gen relationships is not normal here; accusations of similar transfers are serious in this world, although donations of "ground" are common. And all people, Lakewalkers and farmers alike, both produce and use this life force, unlike the bifurcation in the Sime-Gen world. Sweet and fascinating by turns. Definitely recommended to all Bujold fans, and all spec fic readers who enjoy unique magic systems.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Martin

    Newly married, it is time for Dag and Fawn to go back to his home at Hickory Lake and introduce her to his family and culture. There they run into all kinds of problems starting with Dag's mother and brother. They don't accept that the marriage cords are valid despite being able to use their ground senses to see that they are. They can't accept that Fawn, let alone half-breed children in the future, can have anything to offer the Lakewalkers in their mission. Before matters can come to a head and Newly married, it is time for Dag and Fawn to go back to his home at Hickory Lake and introduce her to his family and culture. There they run into all kinds of problems starting with Dag's mother and brother. They don't accept that the marriage cords are valid despite being able to use their ground senses to see that they are. They can't accept that Fawn, let alone half-breed children in the future, can have anything to offer the Lakewalkers in their mission. Before matters can come to a head and a Council session be called, there is a major malice outbreak under a farmer town called Greenspring near the Lakewalker settlement of Raintree. They are calling for help. Fairbolt Crow, who is the Patroller Captain, drafts Dag to lead the rescue attempt. Dag isn't keen since his last leadership role cost him his hand, his wife, and most of his patrol. But he is the most experienced and knows the most people. He is also the tactician who might be able to prevail. Fawn asks if there is something he can do to their marriage cords that will let her know his condition they way Lakewalkers can tell about each other through theirs. He does something that lets her know where he is and if he's all right. Therefore, when they run into problems with this very powerful malice, Fawn is one of the first to know about it. Determined to go to him, Fawn takes off with a stolen map and her chubby horse despite being told that she should stay behind. Finding her husband groundlocked in some way despite the death of the malice and with the healer who traveled with her baffled, Fawn uses her brain and some clues that she put together to save Dag though he is gravely injured. Even though they killed the malice and Fawn saved Dag's life, they still find themselves facing the Council when they return. But Dag has grown because he loves Fawn. He's finally come out the other side of the grief that crippled him after his first wife's death. He's developed new abilities as a healer that he didn't have as a younger man. And his is starting to question the way things have always been done. The worldbuilding is fantastic. The writing is excellent. The book is filled with fascinating characters who grow and change as a result of the things they do and see. I am eager to see where Dag and Fawn go next in their journey together.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    This was split off from the first book for reasons of length rather than plot, but it manages well enough as its own story. I enjoyed seeing more of the lakewalker world (I'm a sucker for learning more about clever magic system design) and appreciated that the book doesn't particularly romanticize the life of a boat sorcerer over that of a farmhand. I still find Dag and Fawn adorable, and realistic in being entirely not predestined for one another. Merely lucky.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen A. Wyle

    I'm rounding up a bit. The two protagonists, Dag and Fawn, remain sympathetic and interesting characters. The secondary characters introduced here vary in depth and complexity. Unlike Book 1, which in retrospect seems mainly to set the stage, this novel has a suspenseful plot. But the book's, and the series's, best element is the worldbuilding.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I really like Dag and Fawn. They're both brave, compassionate, smart, stubborn, and so cute together! They're genuinely good for each other, despite all of the differences of their situations (age, culture, magic abilities). I've read very few romance couples with a bond as strong as theirs. I know I'm going to binge-read the next two volumes.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Elar

    Although there was a little bit less action in this book I liked it a lot more because background of Ground Powers and history of lake walkers are revealed. In addition to this we have innocent love story where young woman who tries to cope with a new hostile environment.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Smyth

    Really enjoying this series

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allie Grace

    Story about two characters and if they can stay married rather than about the monsters they need to kill (though theres some of that too) but it works somehow?

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Scudiero

    I reread all 4 books in the series and enjoyed them even more the second time. I am not a dedicated fan of fantasy but Bujold is one of my favorite authors.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (Giraffe Days)

    This second book in the series has the same pace as the first, Beguilement, the same laid-back tone, but the details are becoming more complex, the setting more detailed. Lakewalker history makes an appearance, and I have to say that the idea that the malices (the creatures spawned from the original malice that "hatch", as it were, and cause destruction, death, and blight to the land) were the direct result of human interference in the natural order of things, intriguing to the extreme. Add to This second book in the series has the same pace as the first, Beguilement, the same laid-back tone, but the details are becoming more complex, the setting more detailed. Lakewalker history makes an appearance, and I have to say that the idea that the malices (the creatures spawned from the original malice that "hatch", as it were, and cause destruction, death, and blight to the land) were the direct result of human interference in the natural order of things, intriguing to the extreme. Add to this the theory that this sparsely-populated land has been shut off by the peoples of the southern continents until the problem has been decisively dealt with, and we get the germs of an interesting and unique fantasy setting. Speaking of which, the land itself is a kind of southern United States type of setting (not that I've been there, but going by the books I've read and the movies I've seen ... it reminded me somewhat of To Kill a Mockingbird in landscape, for example), the people reduced to more primitive means of farming and minimal manufacturing since the Kings and nobles disappeared (or became malice, as the theory goes), and the gods became "absent". Now there are just the farmer folk, and the Lakewalkers, the descendents of the nobles who hunt and destroy malices from a mix of a feeling of responsibility, and because they are the only ones who know how and have the ability to do so. Beginning just two hours after the previous book ended, Legacy takes no detours into extrapolation or catch-up or anything like that, but does help jog the memory (if, like me, it's been nearly a year since you read the first book and your memory's hazy) with naturally-placed reminders and explanations. After their highly unusual wedding - because it is forbidden for Lakewalkers to marry farmers; it taints their lines and thus weakens their groundsense ability, which is what enables them to destroy malices - Dag and Fawn make their way to the Lakewalker camp at Lake Hickory. Their marriage is treated with a mixture of derision, scorn, disbelief, astonishment and anger. Dag's mother, Cumbia, and brother, Dar, are the most virulently opposed. Trying to get his marriage recognised isn't the only problem: Dag's broken arm is still healing, leaving him pretty much completely handicapped (he lost his left hand fighting a malice several years previous), and when the Raintree Lakewalkers call for help in fighting a strong and well-organised malice, Dag is given the job of captain, leaving Fawn alone, until she senses that he's in trouble and needs her. There's a lot of Lakewalker prejudice against farmers, which doesn't endear the reader to them as a whole, though they can also be loyal, friendly, generous and show much more gender equality than the farming folk (not that the farmers don't also have many positive attributes). The estrangement between farmers and Lakewalkers becomes a more central issue, and adds to a growing complexity that makes this story much more satisfying than, say, A Game of Thrones, with its lack of focus, unlikeable characters and sledge-hammer style plotting. I like subtlety, and while the first book was a pleasant read with some conflict, drama and tension, I wasn't expecting a great deal from this series. But with the pacing and tone perfectly matched to the setting and cultures, and the slowly revealed situations and history, I'm really starting to appreciate McMaster Bujold's talent, and I can understand why she's a multiple award-winner in both fantasy and scifi. One thing I just have to say: I'm still having trouble with "Dag" as a first name. Most of the time I can go with it, and it does fit the character, but it's just so hard... having used the word all my life for quite different meanings.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Ok yeah that was. Fine. I wouldnt have such a problem with it being Fine. Its just that, Bujold is one of my favourite authors, and one of the reasons why shes a fave is because when she wants to focus on romance, she does so wonderfully, and all her slice of life domesticity in the rest of her series (Vorkosigan in particular) is just so achingly heartfelt and wonderful. This did all that was was just. fine. But its made worst by the fact that I know she could do so, so much better. The conflict Ok yeah that was. Fine. I wouldn’t have such a problem with it being Fine. It’s just that, Bujold is one of my favourite authors, and one of the reasons why she’s a fave is because when she wants to focus on romance, she does so wonderfully, and all her slice of life domesticity in the rest of her series (Vorkosigan in particular) is just so achingly heartfelt and wonderful. This did all that was was just. fine. But it’s made worst by the fact that I know she could do so, so much better. The conflict becomes more prickly and real in this book, which was a vast improvement but overall the conflict was so intellectually boring. Reading about a relationship between two people of vastly different cultures and beliefs that just can’t be reconciled - that could be interesting, but LMB just boiled this one down to ‘oh but ACTUALLY it would all be better if they just TALKED to each other!’. In real life, cultural conflicts can’t be fixed by dialogue alone – the reason for these irreconcilable differences often go so much deeper than ‘they live different to us!’, there’s history and wrongdoing – and if your fake cultures CAN be reconciled through dialogue, well, you didn’t write much of a conflict to begin with. (and unfortunately, it smacks of some unfortunate author politics – LMB is good at understanding personal politics and power play, not so much geopolitics or cultural conflict. No, you can’t heal the wounds of violent annexation through cross-cultural marriages alone. You can’t solve the Israel-Palestine conflict by letting Jewish and Arab children go to school with each other. Individual action and institutional action need to go hand in hand) But Dag and Fawn are just… not terribly interesting. They can be easily compared, Dag especially, to a slew of Bujold protagonists, which again makes it all the worse to read. Dag could be as interesting as Aral or Cazaril; old, world-weary, beaten down soldiers who still have their integrity and their values, and can still do inspiring good in the world. And Fawn – Bujold has written really interesting, naïve but strong-willed boys and girls – I compare her to Penric, who really stood out amongst her protagonists as being… unformed, because he was a young third son of a minor lord who only knew how to hunt sheep really. Yet, Penric had charm, and humour. Why must Fawn be the blandest prairie wife who actually had Incredible Inner Strength ever dear god. I did feel bad for her, though. This whole novel I was just yelling WHY DIDN’T YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR MARRIAGE’S FUTURE OPENLY, especially to Dag. Fawn was SO dependent on Dag - on an everyday necessity level, not necessarily an emotional level which I WILL grant was good, it was quite mature on both ends. But otherwise, Fawn genuinely suffered when Dag wasn’t open with her about what to expect about the reality of their living situation and marriage, and I was more indignant about that than the way she was treated. This novel also left me thinking about domesticity in stories. I am a huge fan of historical and speculative fiction exploring the domestic world, the world of women for centuries and millennia past – giving as much focus on the wives and mothers as well as the gutsy young heroines who strike out into the world, because their stories are worthy of telling as well. But, oh my god. As with everything, they have to be told well. I was as bored with this as any dry military sci-fi.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eliza Baum

    First read 5/31/13; second read 5/10/16 Somehow I didn't review this book the first time I read it. I'm assuming that's mostly because I breezed through it and immediately started #3, but I think it's also because this book was so tense that I just had a hard time figuring out how to comment. I enjoyed this as much as the rest of the series. Dag is just...great. I loved his long, troubled past and how it shapes his present so profoundly, even as he's feeling his way into a different sort of First read 5/31/13; second read 5/10/16 Somehow I didn't review this book the first time I read it. I'm assuming that's mostly because I breezed through it and immediately started #3, but I think it's also because this book was so tense that I just had a hard time figuring out how to comment. I enjoyed this as much as the rest of the series. Dag is just...great. I loved his long, troubled past and how it shapes his present so profoundly, even as he's feeling his way into a different sort of future. I liked Fawn alright, but I wasn't nearly as interested in her solo scenes as in Dag's. Every discovery he made about his ground and groundwork was fascinating, and the same was true for his personal, emotional discoveries. I wanted to slap his brother and mother for not being able to see him past their prejudices. I also really liked the secondary characters here. Mari and Sean made reappearances, and then there were other Lakewalkers who somehow managed to be very vivid without even really having a lot of scenes. Fairbolt is probably my favorite, with Mari's husband being a close second (I know his name, but don't ask me to spell it...audiobooks are awful for that). I really appreciate these books for showing both sides of the misunderstandings and prejudices and making neither entirely right or entirely wrong. Once again, the audiobook was well done. The narrator does an excellent job of showing emotions through the dialogue. I laughed aloud a couple of times because of the way the lines were expressed even more than just for the words themselves. And yeah, I've already downloaded and started book 3, heh.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Estara

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The big plot point in the second book is the culture clash that Fawn experiences when she enters Lakewalker society - the fact that the Lakewalkers are much less willing to adapt to her role in Dag's life than her family was to his. I have the impression that this is the case because Farmer women leave their families to go off to the new family, whereas Lakewalker men leave THEIR families to go to their wife's family. So there is this lack of space in the normal society now that Dag is returning The big plot point in the second book is the culture clash that Fawn experiences when she enters Lakewalker society - the fact that the Lakewalkers are much less willing to adapt to her role in Dag's life than her family was to his. I have the impression that this is the case because Farmer women leave their families to go off to the new family, whereas Lakewalker men leave THEIR families to go to their wife's family. So there is this lack of space in the normal society now that Dag is returning to his mother's and his childhood home. Then - as with Fawn - there is the fact that his family has always seen him as something else than he is - never valued him for what he is (a classic case of "conditional love") - and THEN you add the fact that while his superiors and the patrollers are aware that he is a rare one in his field, they are too set in their views in many ways to appreciate HOW much he could bring in the way of openness. Basically they are scared of too much new thinking, and which society isn't? I give four stars but I liked Legacy less than Beguilement because Dag is starting to take on a Ghandi/Messiah-role - and I like this series best when it is him and Fawn exploring each other's thinking and appreciating each other. Fawn is very much his muse, but due to her age and inexperience in general, she also very much depends on him (she won't let it stop her and she does what she thinks is best, saving him again in the process) - but a lot of the book is her reacting. I like her to be as proactive as Dag is allowed to be. Hmm. This is more 3.5 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Serge Boivin

    I gave the first book in this series 3 stars, and this one 2, because I feel that both books are really just one long, somewhat boring book, and that 2.5 stars was about right overall. It really pains me to give this low rating. These 2 books were a big disappointment. I just finished the whole Vorkosigan saga, and I read the Chalion series a couple of years ago. I loved both of them, and was looking forward to another Lois McMaster Bujold series. Unfortunately, this one is very much a romance I gave the first book in this series 3 stars, and this one 2, because I feel that both books are really just one long, somewhat boring book, and that 2.5 stars was about right overall. It really pains me to give this low rating. These 2 books were a big disappointment. I just finished the whole Vorkosigan saga, and I read the Chalion series a couple of years ago. I loved both of them, and was looking forward to another Lois McMaster Bujold series. Unfortunately, this one is very much a romance story, with a bit of fantasy mixed in. The balance is pretty much reversed from previous series. If you are into romance novels, maybe you will love this series. I just had no patience for it. I slogged through the second book because the first book just didn't end, but it didn't get much better. There was so much "blah blah domesticity" padding the story. It's too bad, because the beginning of the first novel looks very promising, introducing and building a world with an interesting past and mythology. The romance part kind of smothered it. I have to also say that I listened to this book as an audio book. Although I quite enjoyed the reader's voice, some of her choices of tone and voices didn't help my enjoyment of it. Particularly, it often felt that she made Faun sound too naive and eager. I will not keep going with this series.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.