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ECCE HOMO (SELECCIÓN CLÃSICOS UNIVERSALES)

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Je suis disciple du philosophe Dionysos, je préférerais encore être un satyre plutôt qu'un saint. (Ecce homo, Préface, 2). Peut-être l'expression totale dont Nietzsche se fait le héraut, malgré ses dénégations, se donne-t-elle à lire dans le monstre surprenant et shakespearien, grinçant et éraillé, chaleureux, bouillant et glacé, confiant et hautain, grave, profond en « Je suis disciple du philosophe Dionysos, je préférerais encore être un satyre plutôt qu'un saint. » (Ecce homo, Préface, 2). Peut-être l'expression totale dont Nietzsche se fait le héraut, malgré ses dénégations, se donne-t-elle à lire dans le « monstre » surprenant et shakespearien, grinçant et éraillé, chaleureux, bouillant et glacé, confiant et hautain, grave, profond en même temps que superficiel et bouffon qu'est Ecce homo, fausse autobiographie, traité de non-morale, récit apocryphe et hymne véritable à la valeur suprême, la belle humeur. Ecce homo : Ecce Hamlet, Ecce Nietzsche ? On donnerait, pour le Nietzsche qui exprime là et pour celui du dernier écrit, Nietzsche contre Wagner, tout le reste de l'œuvre — comme Nietzsche donnait, à la fin, « tout le reste de la musique pour Chopin ».


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Je suis disciple du philosophe Dionysos, je préférerais encore être un satyre plutôt qu'un saint. (Ecce homo, Préface, 2). Peut-être l'expression totale dont Nietzsche se fait le héraut, malgré ses dénégations, se donne-t-elle à lire dans le monstre surprenant et shakespearien, grinçant et éraillé, chaleureux, bouillant et glacé, confiant et hautain, grave, profond en « Je suis disciple du philosophe Dionysos, je préférerais encore être un satyre plutôt qu'un saint. » (Ecce homo, Préface, 2). Peut-être l'expression totale dont Nietzsche se fait le héraut, malgré ses dénégations, se donne-t-elle à lire dans le « monstre » surprenant et shakespearien, grinçant et éraillé, chaleureux, bouillant et glacé, confiant et hautain, grave, profond en même temps que superficiel et bouffon qu'est Ecce homo, fausse autobiographie, traité de non-morale, récit apocryphe et hymne véritable à la valeur suprême, la belle humeur. Ecce homo : Ecce Hamlet, Ecce Nietzsche ? On donnerait, pour le Nietzsche qui exprime là et pour celui du dernier écrit, Nietzsche contre Wagner, tout le reste de l'œuvre — comme Nietzsche donnait, à la fin, « tout le reste de la musique pour Chopin ».

30 review for ECCE HOMO (SELECCIÓN CLÃSICOS UNIVERSALES)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Glenn Russell

    For whom am I writing this review? If Nietzsche were by my side I suspect he would want me to start with the following quote from Ecce Homo: "To you, the bold venturers and adventurers, and whoever has embarked with cunning sails upon dreadful seas, to you who are intoxicated with riddles, who take pleasure in twilight, whose soul is lured with flutes to every treacherous abyss." If you are, in fact, intoxicated with riddles, take pleasure in twilight, and your soul is lured with flutes to every For whom am I writing this review? If Nietzsche were by my side I suspect he would want me to start with the following quote from Ecce Homo: "To you, the bold venturers and adventurers, and whoever has embarked with cunning sails upon dreadful seas, to you who are intoxicated with riddles, who take pleasure in twilight, whose soul is lured with flutes to every treacherous abyss." If you are, in fact, intoxicated with riddles, take pleasure in twilight, and your soul is lured with flutes to every treacherous abyss (note - Nietzsche says `every' treacherous abyss not `some' or `most'), then this book is for you. We all know there is a time of transition hovering about age nineteen when the emotions of sensitive souls are heightened and experience is intensified, intensified to such a point that even thoughts and concepts have a highly-charged emotional tone; one's life deepens, exaggerates, strengthens, amplifies, ignites and one borders on becoming an inflamed madman, even if the madness is only known internally. This time of disequilibrium and hormonal topsy-turvy ordinarily settles down into the next phase of life: early adulthood, where the soul pursues a more specialized field of study and then earnestly begins a profession or career. But for Nietzsche this transitional phase didn't stop; quite the contrary, rather than settling into any conventional groove, the gap of spiritual and artistic disequilibrium grew progressively wider over the years and was eons away from any semblance of `civilized' balance. Additionally, to add fuel to the emotional and philosophical fire, Nietzsche was not only sensitive but hyper-sensitive to music and the arts and had extraordinary linguistic and literary abilities. Thus, we are well to remember all of this when we read in Ecce Homo: "Philosophy as I have hitherto understood and lived it, is a voluntary living in ice and high mountains - a seeking after everything strange and questionable in existence, all that has hitherto been excommunicated by morality." After an impassioned forward and two intoxicatingly stunning chapters, Why I Am So Wise' and Why I Am So Clever, (each line of these chapters deserve an underline and is worthy of committing to memory) we come to the chapter, Why I Write Such Good Books, and read: "Ultimately, no one can extract from things, books included, more than he already knows. What one has no access to through experience one has no ear for." So, how can one `understand' Nietzsche when living a conventional life, since living according to convention is itself a life of compromise, that is, not living with full, passion-soaked intensity but life as humdrum routine? This is a question any aspiring reader of Nietzsche must ask. A self-portrait of Egon Schiele appears on the cover of this Penguin edition, which is most appropriate since this artist courageously and without compromise created a deeply personal expressive style of art causing much controversy in his brief life (he died at 28). Here are a few of the artist's quotes: "I am so rich I must give myself away." -- "To restrict the artist is a crime. It is to restrict germinating life." -- "Art is not modern. Art is primordially eternal." By his commitment to living with intense zeal in his art and his life, Egon Schiele climbed the Nietzschean high mountains cleanly and fully. This is what it takes. What commitment are you making to live with passion and intensity in your life? If you have not been deeply moved by art and music and have not transformed yourself again and again, what chance do you think you stand in understanding Nietzsche? Perhaps it would be better for you to go on the academic head trip: read Kant and Quine and Rorty and then write papers with all the properly formatted footnotes. Nietzsche devotes a short chapter to each of his books and then ends with a chapter entitled Why I Am A Destiny. Since this review is of Nietzsche's autobiography, Nietzsche gets the last word, but being Nietzsche, the last word is three quotes. Here they are:: --From the chapter The Birth of Tragedy: "`Rationality' at any price as dangerous, as a force undermining life!" -- From the chapter Twilight of the Idols: "If you want to get a quick idea of how everything was upsidedown before me, make a start with this writing. That which is called idol on the titlepage is quite simply that which has hitherto been called truth." --From the chapter Why I am a Destiny: "The concept `sin' invented together with the instrument of torture which goes with it, the concept of `free will', so as to confuse the instincts, so as to make mistrust of the instincts into second nature."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gaurav

    Not really like a traditional autobiography yet very intriguing; the book is satirical. Nietzsche's belief in his own greatness lies in the fact that he has understood the condition of human race unlike any other. Traits of existentialist nihilism could be found in the book as Nietzsche believes that there in no inherent meaning in one's life, rather one's compelled to invent meaning of one's life and then live life accordingly !!!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chris_P

    I was once asked, if I could meet and have a conversation with one writer/poet/philosopher of any era, dead or alive, whom would I choose? The answer was and always has been Nietzsche. I would sit down and have a hell of a talk with the guy, although, I'm sure, we would end up with our hands on each other's necks. I remember the first time I read something of his, it was Antichrist, 10-odd years ago and my mind was blown. Thus Spoke Zarathustra is perhaps my favorite book ever and I go back to it I was once asked, if I could meet and have a conversation with one writer/poet/philosopher of any era, dead or alive, whom would I choose? The answer was and always has been Nietzsche. I would sit down and have a hell of a talk with the guy, although, I'm sure, we would end up with our hands on each other's necks. I remember the first time I read something of his, it was Antichrist, 10-odd years ago and my mind was blown. Thus Spoke Zarathustra is perhaps my favorite book ever and I go back to it from time to time when I need a kick in the ass. My point is, I always feel a closeness to Nietzsche. Every time I open one of his books, it's like we're sitting in a small cafe, round metallic tables and all, just the two of us, and I'm leaning close so I can suck in as much of his brilliance as I can. I can't tell if he enjoys my company but I sure as hell enjoy his. And so it was that I opened Ecce Homo and let him talk to me about himself, his views, his books and how come he's so fucking brilliant. So much self-importance only from Nietzsche I can take. I can't say that I fully grasped his points, as I'd have to be an übermensch to do so but, as always, I felt the same comfort that by the time we finish, I'll have a tiny bit more wisdom than I did before, even if it's only in theory. Another utterly enlightening book and one more proof that Nietzsche was way ahead of his time and all times as a matter of fact.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    I was a very serious student during the last two years at Grinnell College. Senior year had a pattern of working in the library all day, going to the work-study job at its Pub Club at night, heading back to the Vegetarian Coop after cleaning up the bar to study in until too weary to continue. It was then that I seriously read Goethe's Faust, most of Nietzsche and, of course, a lot of C.G. Jung, particularly his alchemical writings. Until the very end of senior year I had no girlfriend. Indeed, I I was a very serious student during the last two years at Grinnell College. Senior year had a pattern of working in the library all day, going to the work-study job at its Pub Club at night, heading back to the Vegetarian Coop after cleaning up the bar to study in until too weary to continue. It was then that I seriously read Goethe's Faust, most of Nietzsche and, of course, a lot of C.G. Jung, particularly his alchemical writings. Until the very end of senior year I had no girlfriend. Indeed, I hadn't had a girlfriend for a while, but I'd gotten over obsessing about it by the end of the second year. I was no longer a virgin, no longer worried that I was ever to be alone. Study was pretty much all-absorbing. Social life was taken care of by bartending and by living in a commune. I didn't have to seek it. Then, one night at work I was introduced to Mindy by a mutual friend. What was special about her was that she was going to study that summer at the Jung Institut in Zurich, the center of world analytical psychology. I was still deeply immersed in the field and quite impressed. This news and some conversation with her about it got me very interested in Mindy, now transformed into desire's ideal. Of course, this was crazy and I knew it. I was obsessed with her after one meeting, in a group, lasting no more than a couple of hours. Furthermore, she'd given no indication of being attracted to me. Consequently, I resolved to let the infatuation have free reign, but tell no one of it. Instead, I'd use the power towards the purposes of self-transformation, making of myself the alchemical krater, hoping to change common sexuality into something more. As a part of this discipline I refrained from masturbation. Of course I saw Mindy and spoke to her at every opportunity. There weren't that many, so deep was my cover, but the few occasions for further conversation stoked the fires of passion quite excruciatingly. I thought of Mindy all the time, always reminding myself that the object of desire was not this college girl but what she represented: "All things on earth, but as symbols are sent." Then, one night when everyone in Vegie House had gone to some campus concert and I'd gone to bed early, I awakened feeling odd, like there was something in my room. I got up, turned on the miserable fluorescent on the desk, sat down. Out of the corner of my eyes I saw things, dark things scuttle in the corners, out from the radiator, under the bed. "It's happening!" I thought, afraid and excited, as the dark forms began to take to the air, gain form, swoop about. I could feel the rush from their wings--like bats. Indeed, as they gained form and became more clearly visible, now in the center of vision, they looked like crosses between bats and owls, more the size of the latter, fat with humanoid faces. This was rather too much. I was fully awake now and, for the first time in a "normal" state of consciousness, having vivid hallucinations. The beings, and there were lots of them, moving very quickly, did not seem benign. Indeed, they seemed the opposite. Scared, I turned on the overhead light, using the switch beside the door, and headed out into the hallway, shutting my room, turning on all the lights. Then, realizing they weren't following (though I could hear them back there, in the room), I settled down in the brightest of all the rooms in the house, the kitchen, and sat there, slowly calming, until my coop-mates started filtering back from the concert. Nietzsche, who had his own issues with love and his own ambitions that went beyond the merely human, wrote Ecce Homo shortly before his psychotic break. Although Kaufmann and others have entertained the speculation that he may have gone mad through some physical agency, such as tertiary syphilis, my little experience suggests that one may actually be able to think oneself to psychosis. In any case, my dream of reason having led to nightmare, I retreated from the fulness of ambition, stopped seeking chance encounters with Mindy, started masturbating again and shared this story with a friend or two. The weirdness ended, not to be repeated. By year's end I even had entered into a romantic relationship with a woman.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) began the composition of this most unusual book on his 44th birthday, October 15, 1888, the last birthday before he believed himself to be the King of Italy, then Napoleon, then God, ultimately sliding into the final catatonic phase in which he passed the remaining 11 years of "life". Ecce Homo (Behold the Man), his last book, has as subtitle Wie man wird, was man ist (How one becomes what one is). It is a final summary of the significance of Nietzsche the prophet Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) began the composition of this most unusual book on his 44th birthday, October 15, 1888, the last birthday before he believed himself to be the King of Italy, then Napoleon, then God, ultimately sliding into the final catatonic phase in which he passed the remaining 11 years of "life". Ecce Homo (Behold the Man), his last book, has as subtitle Wie man wird, was man ist (How one becomes what one is). It is a final summary of the significance of Nietzsche the prophet written by himself shortly before his ascension. Here are some of the Chapter headings: Why I Am So Wise Why I Am So Clever Why I Write Such Good Books Why I Am Fate So, yes, one has gone well past megalomania... After his many early and mid-period critical texts and the mid-period and late prophetic books (in which he never revealed all of the visions/emotions he confided to his notebooks), he knew he was due to write a systematic presentation/justification of his new ideas/visions/hallucinations. In his letters to friends and in his notebooks he made plans for a 4 volume summa, but he knew that, even if he had had the time, he was not up to the task. He was exhausted and ill in body and mind, and systematic thought was never his strength. But I also suspect that he knew there was no there there; that is to say, he was riveted primarily by visions and emotions, not by thoughts and ideas. He expressed the visions and emotions beautifully in his prose poems and poetry, but when he went to find ideas and arguments, they were inchoate, at least during his last few years of intelligent life. In the letters he wrote in Bologna during his last weeks of relative sanity to the two remaining contacts he maintained, he was ebullient, at a new peak above all his previous manic phases - everything was so perfect then, his health, the weather, the music, the food. And one last time he wrote a book - Ecce Homo - in one go, in approximately two weeks (he did this several times during the last 3 years of his more or less sane life). Though he couldn't write his summa, he could write about his favorite topic - the global significance of his role and his work. These are the first lines of the Foreword: In Voraussicht, dass ich über Kurzem mit der schwersten Forderung an die Menschheit herantreten muss, die je an sie gestellt wurde, scheint es mir unerlässlich, zu sagen, wer ich bin. (In anticipation that I soon will have to approach Mankind with the weightiest challenge ever posed to it, it seems to me indispensable to say who I am.) Up until this point of his life, the disparity between the enormity of his task and the superficiality of his fellow human beings had as consequence that nearly no one had taken notice of him (outside of a few academic philologists, who had derided him, and the Wagnerians, who had seen him as a useful tool - and none of these had taken notice of his actual task, as he saw it). So it was necessary that Mankind be told who he was, in order that it finally take notice of his work. This was clearly not an undertaking with a great promise of success, and he actually did stop the production of the book at an advanced stage (though the reasons he gave for this act to various persons were all contradictory). But it was published later, even though his sister and mother consigned to the flames the copy of the manuscript he had sent to them. In this book one can clearly see his state of mind shortly before he became king, emperor, god: Wer die Luft meiner Schriften zu athmen weiss, weiss, dass es eine Luft der Höhe ist, eine starke Luft. Man muss für sie geschaffen sein, sonst ist die Gefahr keine kleine, sich in ihr zu erkälten. Das Eis ist nahe, die Einsamkeit ist ungeheuer—aber wie ruhig alle Dinge im Lichte liegen! wie frei man athmet! wie Viel man unter sich fühlt! (Who knows to breath the air of my texts knows that it is the air of the heights, a strong air. One must be made for it, otherwise the danger is not small to become ill in its cold. The ice is close, the loneliness enormous - but how quietly all things lie in the light! How freely one breathes! How much one feels is beneath one!) Umwertung aller Werte: das ist meine Formel für einen Akt höchster Selbstbesinnung der Menschheit, der in mir Fleisch und Genie geworden ist. (Transvaluation of all values: that is my formula for an act of highest self-awareness for Mankind, which has become flesh and genius in me.) Ich bin bei weitem der furchtbarste Mensch, den es bisher gegeben hat; dies schliesst nicht aus, dass ich der wohlthätigste sein werde. Ich kenne die Lust am Vernichten in einem Grade, die meiner Kraft zum Vernichten gemäss ist,—in Beidem gehorche ich meiner dionysischen Natur, welche das Neinthun nicht vom Jasagen zu trennen weiss. (I am by far the most fearsome man who has ever existed; this does not exclude that I will be the most charitable. I know the desire to destroy to a degree which is quite suitable to my power to destroy - in both I obey my Dionysian nature, which cannot separate no-doing from yes-saying.) Along with these and similar sayings, one also finds instruction on when and how strong one should take one's tea (coffee only darkens the mind), as well as assurances that all women love him... This book left me saddened for many reasons, not least of which is the sight of a human being disappearing down a rat hole. Moreover, it reminds me that he never delivered on his dark promises, and the great transvaluation was never made. What seems to remain of Nietzsche's philosophical work, at least for me, is the criticism of mid-nineteenth century thought and life, of which a portion was a profound cynicism with respect to knowledge and values. Underneath that, however, there was a gaping nihilism, which, it appears to me, he tried to fill up with his visions/hallucinations. His overman, his Zarathustra, his transvaluation, his doctrine of eternal return are all emperors without clothes. Either they remained in his unpublished notes or were little more than announced with a trumpet fanfare without any real follow up. On the other hand, his critical works contain the seeds of much of 20th Century thought,(*) and as a prose stylist, and even, towards the end, as a poet, Nietzsche has few equals in the German language. How can it be that everyone from the far right to the far left has found what they wanted to find in Nietzsche's writings? One reason, presumably, is that in the thousands of pages of notebooks, letters and books he produced, many "ideas" were tried out; he did not care the least about contradicting himself, even in print. For in its core, the part he really cared about, his thoughts/feelings were very consistent - "No" to present day society and thought; "Yes" to Nietzsche and his visions. So there is grist for almost every mill in his pages, even without the deliberate falsification of his views carried out by the Nazis with his sister's eager collaboration. Another reason is that his multifaceted criticism of mid 19th century German society could serve as a starting point for the revolutionaries, both on the left and the right, who wanted to replace it with their own dreams. After dissolving it in Nietzsche's acid, the way was clear for a new start... (*) However, as I have been learning through other readings of 19th century authors, many of the criticisms credited to Nietzsche were anticipated in print well before Nietzsche's books were written. More on this elsewhere. Rating http://leopard.booklikes.com/post/762...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Luís C.

    Ecce Homo, a short philosophical autobiography easy to read, throws a raw light on Nietzsche's work, that emanating from an acute awareness of imminent madness held in reverence by an impressive megalomaniac power... This does not alter the intellectual quality of the work, in which the author recounts the genesis of his texts, but especially the way it is perceived. Even if it is never said clearly, we can guess a certain lucidity about its limits which allows the thinker to transcend not self Ecce Homo, a short philosophical autobiography easy to read, throws a raw light on Nietzsche's work, that emanating from an acute awareness of imminent madness held in reverence by an impressive megalomaniac power... This does not alter the intellectual quality of the work, in which the author recounts the genesis of his texts, but especially the way it is perceived. Even if it is never said clearly, we can guess a certain lucidity about its limits which allows the thinker to transcend not self but within oneself, within space and boundaries determined by his own humanity . Self-knowledge as the foundation of thought, an interrogation that goes through philosophy, from "know thyself" to Freudian psychoanalysis, which Nietzsche sees in this visionary text.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Philippe

    Nietzsche struck me like a bolt from the blue in my transition to adulthood. There was one darkly heroic phrase from The Birth of Tragedy that stuck: ein Pessimismus der Stärke, a pessimism that springs from power. Now that Im rediscovering Nietzsche this dichotomy has lost nothing of its relevance. And I admire, no I love this man for having been able to keep these opposing forces in balance, at least for a while. In my younger years I didnt read Ecce Homo, partly because the book has such a Nietzsche struck me like a bolt from the blue in my transition to adulthood. There was one darkly heroic phrase from The Birth of Tragedy that stuck: ein Pessimismus der Stärke, a pessimism that springs from power. Now that I’m rediscovering Nietzsche this dichotomy has lost nothing of its relevance. And I admire, no I love this man for having been able to keep these opposing forces in balance, at least for a while. In my younger years I didn’t read Ecce Homo, partly because the book has such a dismal reputation. Supposedly the fingerprints of the imminent breakdown are scattered all over these pages. Perhaps they are. The shrill voice of an almost absurdly pugilistic Nietzsche is unmistakably there. But in my experience this is not the key in which this book has been written. I’ve read it as a short but pure adagio, a backward glance suffused with elation and gratitude. The author of Ecce Homo is the man whom the Genoese referred to as ‚il piccolo santo’, ‚the little saint’. For me Nietzsche is a bodhisattva, a powerful and fragile human being on the threshold of enlightenment. This intense spiritual energy condensed itself in his ‚amor fati’, this most radical and dry-eyed commitment to life: „I fail to remember ever having made an effort — no trace of struggle is detectable in my life, I am the opposite of a heroic nature. To ‚want’ something, to ‚strive’ for something, to have an ‚end’, a ‚desire’ in mind — I know none of this from my experience. Even at this moment I look out upon my future — a broad future! — as upon a smooth sea: no desire ripples upon it. Not in the least do I want anything to be different from what it is; I myself do not want to be any different...But thus I have always lived. (…) My formula for human greatness is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not in the future, not in the past, not for all eternity. Not only to endure what is necessary, still less to conceal it — all idealism is falseness in the face of necessity — , but to love it …” I am happy with my belated discovery of this testament.

  8. 4 out of 5

    رؤیا

    It is certainly hard to review the last book of the greatest man ever lived. Ecce Homo, is Nietzsches interpretation of his works shortly before his madness. The book has divided into 15 small chapters with stunning names starting with why I am so wise and ending with why I am a Destiny. There is no doubt in Nietzsches greatness; however, he could be viewed as arrogant and self-centered by some readers who are not realized that all he did was to emphasize in his extraordinary finding of Human. It is certainly hard to review the last book of the greatest man ever lived. Ecce Homo, is Nietzsche’s interpretation of his works shortly before his madness. The book has divided into 15 small chapters with stunning names starting with ‘why I am so wise’ and ending with ‘why I am a Destiny’. There is no doubt in Nietzsche’s greatness; however, he could be viewed as arrogant and self-centered by some readers who are not realized that all he did was to emphasize in his extraordinary finding of Human. His prescription of a great man concluded in a simple formula called Amor Fati: “My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be other than it is, not in the future, not in the past, not in all eternity.” He simply wanted the human to have “love of fait” in everything that happens to them including suffering and loss as good. “As good” is necessary to one’s life and existence whether they like it or not. And this is what he did himself despite all the physical and emotional pain and suffering that he had gone through his life. He never looked at his pain as an obstacle but a new way of life so the suffering never stopped him of being an exceptional thinker of all time. To Nietzsche fresh air, healthy eating, no alcohol, and nature are human life necessities. Some of his rigid idea against Germany or family relationships I believe was solely related to that era and what he was going through with his personal life and was experiencing. His never ending hate against church and his famous quote of “God is dead!” is what we are experiencing today with most religion’s distortion fill up humans life with lies and limitation, the God that was men-made and with all wrongdoing was killed by men again!! Nietzsche felt responsible to get his genius thoughts and remedy for human get across in the cost of losing his mind. He believed that no one would be interested in his book or any other books if they have already knows, “Ultimately, no one can extract from things, books included, more than he already knows. What one has no access to through experience on has no ear for.” With the condition that Nietzsche had and the amount of pain and suffering, he probably would have a vivid idea of his short life and what he may have to go through so he decided to put together one of his best and greatest work in hope to reach the next generations attention in becoming a great human. Nietzsche believed to be insane, believed to be different, and sure believed to be the greatest philosopher of all time. “He who knows how to breathe the air of my writings knows that it is an air of the heights, a robust air. One has to be made for it, otherwise there is no small danger one will catch cold. The ice is near, the solitude is terrible – but how peacefully all things lie in the light! How freely one breathes! How much one feels beneath one! – philosophy, as I have hitherto understood and lived it, is a voluntary living in ice and high mountains.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    John

    Well this is one of those difficult books to review. Nietzche's extensive influence on contemporary thought is certainly without question. This book is itself quite a funny read on its satirical level. However, it exaggerates for effect Nietzsche's belief in his own greatness, so while it may be technically overstated in the book, Nietzsche believes the underlying point: that he has understood the misdirection of the human race unlike any who have ever been created. Where 2000 years of human Well this is one of those difficult books to review. Nietzche's extensive influence on contemporary thought is certainly without question. This book is itself quite a funny read on its satirical level. However, it exaggerates for effect Nietzsche's belief in his own greatness, so while it may be technically overstated in the book, Nietzsche believes the underlying point: that he has understood the misdirection of the human race unlike any who have ever been created. Where 2000 years of human beings have been wrong, only he has risen above the masses to see the truth. The ways in which Nietzsche expresses this are often entertaining ("to take a book of mine into his hands is one of the rarest distinctions anyone can confer upon himself"), but ultimately pitiable due to the fundamental misunderstandings at the heart of his thought. Nietzsche sets himself up as a kind of anti-Gnostic, dismissive of religion for its emphasis on the soul, yet swinging the pendulum to the other side to emphasize the psychological. Nietzsche believes in creating one's reality rather than simply following after the conditions set by others. It seems the utmost critique of this idea is his own frustration at people's unwillingness to change their "taste" to be more accepting of his brilliance.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    I can't pretend to like Nietzsche. I know it is trendy to see him as not nearly as reactionary or as right-wing as he might have been considered in the past when he was viewed as one of the philosophical ancestors of the Nazis, and it is true that is unfair - but all the same, he is pretty reactionary. I could never read his stuff as if it was just about psychology, I could not avoid the 'most men are sheep and need to be lead' ideas and see these as a call for the superman to have the will to I can't pretend to like Nietzsche. I know it is trendy to see him as not nearly as reactionary or as right-wing as he might have been considered in the past when he was viewed as one of the philosophical ancestors of the Nazis, and it is true that is unfair - but all the same, he is pretty reactionary. I could never read his stuff as if it was just about psychology, I could not avoid the 'most men are sheep and need to be lead' ideas and see these as a call for the superman to have the will to power to rule over the sheep. I do understand that he is saying that slave mentality places pointless limits on our achievements and that it is only in allowing ourselves to transcend those limitations that we have any hope of living a life worth living. I also understand that in a world where God is dead that we are responsible for our lives and our morality and that responsibility is paramount. Yes, all very interesting. But there is a tonal thing with Nietzsche I can never get beyond. I mean some of the chapters in this book are called, Why I am a destiny, Why I am so clever. Why I write such wonderful books. Why you need a slap. Here is the man - I still don't like him, I still think he is too much of an individualist and there is a stench of far right politics off his writing I find it virtually impossible to get beyond. If you haven't read Nietzsche - Twilight of the Idols is a better place to start than here. He is also seriously up himself in that book, but this is in a class of its own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lukas

    Oh Nietzsche... how arrogant you are, how little you think of everyone but you. How bad the world is to you. You are such a cynic. I understand that you are bitter due to having been sick and weak most of your life and that you had visions due to migraine. At times it is very entertaining to read how you bash everyone (especially Germans and Christians) but then again it's annoying as it repeats itself over and over and over and over again.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ginger

    Let's play a Nietzsche drinking* game, shall we? Every time Nietzsche says something unbelievably pompous, take a drink. Actually, better just play this with water or juice or something or else you're going to be drunk off your bottom. It's almost comical how highly Nietzsche thinks of himself, but I actually respect him for it. As an atheist and an existentialist, he was the highest form in his world. In fact, I don't understand why more atheists don't take the lack of an objective moral standard Let's play a Nietzsche drinking* game, shall we? Every time Nietzsche says something unbelievably pompous, take a drink. Actually, better just play this with water or juice or something or else you're going to be drunk off your bottom. It's almost comical how highly Nietzsche thinks of himself, but I actually respect him for it. As an atheist and an existentialist, he was the highest form in his world. In fact, I don't understand why more atheists don't take the lack of an objective moral standard to its logical extreme and lie and cheat and steal and despise the poor and the weak, as he does. Why WOULDN'T they? Nietzsche is at least intellectually honest. The only thing that stands between him and "bad" (which he would argue is good) behavior are the practical consequences. The subtitle, "How One Becomes What One Is," sums up this volume. I can't say that I enjoyed it; I can't even say that I'd recommend it, but it was recommended by SWB's Well-Educated Mind, which I am working my way through. If you want a good gist of the themes in Ecce Homo, read the last chapter, "Why I Am a Destiny." (Yes, that's just one of the chapter titles like "Why I Am So Wise... Clever...") Nietzsche wrote Ecce Homo, and then went mad two weeks later, and that's about how it feels to read this. *I do not condone drinking games, or drinking, if you are under the legal age.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thrasymachus

    His funniest book by far, and an informative retrospective on his past works. Sad what became of him.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pinkyivan

    Comedy gold. It's what I imagine Elliot Rodger wrote like.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aung Sett Kyaw Min

    This is the first real book by FN that I've actually managed to finish in one go. As far as philosophical substance is concerned, I don't feel like FN has a lot to offer except for excessive vitalism in a dionysian mode as an antidode to "idealism" (truth, god, justice, morality, etc), all the vehicles of decadence. Otherwise, it is a collection of pithy meditations on the views expressed in his major works. Obviously, Zarathustra, the untimely prophet, seems to hold a special place in his art, This is the first real book by FN that I've actually managed to finish in one go. As far as philosophical substance is concerned, I don't feel like FN has a lot to offer except for excessive vitalism in a dionysian mode as an antidode to "idealism" (truth, god, justice, morality, etc), all the vehicles of decadence. Otherwise, it is a collection of pithy meditations on the views expressed in his major works. Obviously, Zarathustra, the untimely prophet, seems to hold a special place in his art, as he would come back to it again and again throughout the book. His ex friendship with Wagner also figures prominently- an friendship that was ultimately aborted when Wagner become encolonized by the german culture and according to FN, became a phillistine. FN's stress is on the here and the now, in the actual world. For instance, he believes the practice of the care of the bodily self (proper nutrition, hygiene and acclimitization) has been unfairly neglected by thinkers who were motivated by decadence, to the detriment of all that is actually good, that is, all that augments the will to power. What is unmasked in the conspiracy of the idealism of the mind and the soul against the actuality of the flesh and the instincts, against life itself. As an amateur who hasn't read much Nietzsche, I found it difficult in some passages to tell if he's being deliberately playful with his bombastic declarations, or if he's actually lapsing into megalomania or if such a distinction is tenable at all in this case. Regardless, one has to admire the tremendous extent to which FN was prescient about his own posthumost legacy.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Because he was mad, because he was brilliant, because he was on the very brink of complete collapse, because he was Nietzschegrand and provocativeit is difficult, if even possible, to know what the author was up to in this book. Many things probably. Supposedly an autobiography, Ecce Homo is certainly a rich and incomplete psychological portrait. Perhaps just as Michael Tanner says of the subtitle, How One Becomes What One Is, in the introduction: one needs to read the whole book to see what it Because he was mad, because he was brilliant, because he was on the very brink of complete collapse, because he was Nietzsche–grand and provocative–it is difficult, if even possible, to know what the author was up to in this book. Many things probably. Supposedly an autobiography, Ecce Homo is certainly a rich and incomplete psychological portrait. Perhaps just as Michael Tanner says of the subtitle, ‘How One Becomes What One Is’, in the introduction: “one needs to read the whole book to see what it means and then read Nietzsche’s other books to see what it really means.” On full display: He has his ego: “…I was uninterruptedly creating nothing but things of the first rank which no man will be able to do again or has done before, bearing a responsibility for all the coming millennia,” He has his hang-ups: “God is a crude answer, a piece of indelicacy against us thinkers–fundamentally even a crude prohibition to us: you shall not think!” He has his moments: “I do not refute ideals, I merely draw on gloves in their presence.” And then he has all three in one: “It is not doubt, it is certainty that makes me mad… But to feel this way one must be profound, abyss, philosopher… We all fear the truth…” Even if one or the other makes you queasy, it may be worth your while to harden your stomach. “And how could I endure to be a man, if man were not also poet and reader of riddles and redeemer of chance!” –Zarathustra

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gary Beauregard Bottomley

    Nietzsche loves to mock his reader. This short book is better than any lecture you'll ever hear about Nietzsche, and it is in Nietzsche's own clearly written prose with his frustration at the world that just won't nibble at "the bait provided because it's not the bait it's the fish that just can't understand it as such". As Kierkegaard said "irony is jealous of authenticity", and Nietzsche just loves showing the paradoxes that make us human. He loves us so much. He must mock us. Post modernism Nietzsche loves to mock his reader. This short book is better than any lecture you'll ever hear about Nietzsche, and it is in Nietzsche's own clearly written prose with his frustration at the world that just won't nibble at "the bait provided because it's not the bait it's the fish that just can't understand it as such". As Kierkegaard said "irony is jealous of authenticity", and Nietzsche just loves showing the paradoxes that make us human. He loves us so much. He must mock us. Post modernism starts with Nietzsche. (Sure, Kierkegaard was the first but he was ignored in his life time and he was mostly interested in Christian being not human being itself). The right wing is always post modernist, but they never understand that because they can't connect the dots. They hate two things: modernism (the values of the enlightenment, equality and fairness) and Nietzsche. They do themselves a disservice. Nietzsche's starting position is antithetical to all reactionaries ( such as Ayn Rand, Leo Strauss, all of the Frankfurt school, Burke, David Brooks, and most vile of all: Donald Trump), but a synthesis would come out with the same conclusions, Hegel's dialectic would be completed and "the spirit would become aware of itself". Nietzsche is considered by those who haven't read him to be 1) a relativist, 2) a nihilist and 3) immoral. This is how his modern republican critics see him and they almost for sure haven't read this book. I want to consider each of the three items separately and then I'll comment briefly how they are antithetical to republican beliefs but can as easily derive republican conclusions. There were many places in this book where I would laugh out loud from what he was saying. The arrogance of the chapter start is clearly meant to invoke laughter: "why I am the greatest writer ever and the world is not capable of getting me" (or some similar such statement). "Wagner is a swine among Germans because he became more German than Germans". (That's actually a funny line). But what he is getting at is the nature of absolutes (the opposite of the first bullet item). We must rise above the idle chatter, the mood of the times, the false Idols that come from our idealism and see the real for what it really is. It is the opposite from the republicans who believe that the mythos creates the logos (our fictions create the real). Nietzsche believes the logos creates the mythos through our feelings (he is always an iconoclast, and despises the 'idea' and prefers the feeling, and he'll say as much multiple times in this book), but the difference between republicans and Nietzsche is of form not substance. Nietzsche in this book mentions that the most evil atom of all is the sin of essence, the soul of an item, or the soul of the person. He knows that 'perspectivism' gives us the best of all knowable truth, but he doesn't mention that within this book, but does in his other books. So I'll leave this at that. He'll use the expression "Christians and other nihilistic" multiple times within this book. For him (and I agree) the moment somebody outsources their belief to another entity they have become the most nihilistic of all. Nietzsche knows that our purpose for being must come from within us not outside of us. In this book, he'll say that three things make the person: climate, locality and recreation, and he only started to get the scales off his eyes removed when he stopped reading (his recreation) because of his illness. Republicans think they are not nihilistic, but they are the most nihilistic of all people because of the way they have outsourced their beliefs to a book, or 'patriotism' or their social class. They are antithetical to Nietzsche, but each are post-modern, and both get to justify their superiority of others who are not supermen like themselves or who are not Napoleon. Equality and fairness, who needs it when one can hate the others by shouting liberty and appealing to their primal gut instinct (Nietzsche is all about feelings and primal instinct and republicans believe truth must come from their gut or their holy book or the special nature of their birth). Nietzsche will say multiple times that he is for "trans-valuation of values" and that he wants our nutrition for our power to be "virtue free from moralic acid" (I really love that line!). Our morality, according to him, must be able to shout yes to the self, "the good" of Plato is a fiction and was perpetuated by later day Christians to enslave us. He's got all of that in this book. The thing is Nietzsche has a better handle on morality and he would give the Republicans what they want, a chance to defend their selfishness and the hating of others and a foundation for hating equality (freedom and democracy). At the core of republicans and Nietzsche is liberty subsumes equality. Fairness is never as important as freedom of the individual. Superman is real and you're not him (they don't really include women in their world). Republicans don't get that Nietzsche's conclusions are what they really crave and his starting point is usually the opposite from theirs. This little book provides a great overview of Nietzsche's world and shows how he starts from the exact opposite from modern day republicans, but comes up with the similar conclusions. Though, Nietzsche doesn't believe in Free Will and has 'will to power' with his eternal recurrence, and republicans always love to blame the victim and would reject those parts of Nietzsche's conclusions. I did not know 'Ecce Homo' was the Latin for what Pontus Pilate said to Jesus, "behold the man'. Nietzsche obviously meant it as a pun of sorts. Dionysus (Nietzsche) is not Jesus and both are merely men.

  18. 4 out of 5

    ATJG

    There is something refreshing in Nietzsche's writings, and I believe it may be the man himself, his lingering specter. Nietzsche is hauntingly present in every phrase, in every word, as if--crazy though this sounds to say--like Whitman he wants to hold your hand when you read him. I say that in spite of all his sharp edges and all his aggressive posturing. In the space between the words maybe, a melancholy care bleeds through, years be damned. It makes for fascinating reading. Ecce Homo was There is something refreshing in Nietzsche's writings, and I believe it may be the man himself, his lingering specter. Nietzsche is hauntingly present in every phrase, in every word, as if--crazy though this sounds to say--like Whitman he wants to hold your hand when you read him. I say that in spite of all his sharp edges and all his aggressive posturing. In the space between the words maybe, a melancholy care bleeds through, years be damned. It makes for fascinating reading. Ecce Homo was produced a matter of weeks before Nietzsche slid into permanent insanity, and some have understandably wondered whether the effects of tertiary syphilis infected the production of this final piece. Whether or not this may be the case, Ecce Homo seems a fitting capstone, cracked as it may be. There are observations and opinions in its pages that are so uncannily perceptive your eyes stop moving across the page while the words light balefires in the mind. I look on Nietzsche as Nietzsche looked on the world, as beautiful and terrible, as worthless and as the only worthy thing. As he is, as we all are, he urges us embrace.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew W

    Nietzsche's "autobiography" may not be the most honest book of its kind, but it certainly offers some insights into the "German"(who was obsessed with his assumed partial Polish ancestry) philosopher's dubious psyche. "Ecce Homo" manages to condense all of Nietzsche's pathological philosophical obsessions into a work not much longer than 100 pages. After all, Friedrich needed to summarize his whole career before he went insane to prove that there was an actual life behind his writings. But as Nietzsche's "autobiography" may not be the most honest book of its kind, but it certainly offers some insights into the "German"(who was obsessed with his assumed partial Polish ancestry) philosopher's dubious psyche. "Ecce Homo" manages to condense all of Nietzsche's pathological philosophical obsessions into a work not much longer than 100 pages. After all, Friedrich needed to summarize his whole career before he went insane to prove that there was an actual life behind his writings. But as Nietzsche states in "Ecce Homo": "I am one thing, my writings are another."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    "Ecce Homo" is Friedrich Nietzsche's autobiography. Ostensibly. There's not much autobiographical information in there, though. Just that he was born in Poland to parents with long Polish bloodlines. (He wasn't born in Poland.) That's about it for simple biographical information. The rest was a never-ending love letter from Nietzsche to Nietzsche. It's not nice to laugh at people, but I couldn't help myself. By the time Nietzsche got around to his autobiography, he was batshit crazy, just heaping "Ecce Homo" is Friedrich Nietzsche's autobiography. Ostensibly. There's not much autobiographical information in there, though. Just that he was born in Poland to parents with long Polish bloodlines. (He wasn't born in Poland.) That's about it for simple biographical information. The rest was a never-ending love letter from Nietzsche to Nietzsche. It's not nice to laugh at people, but I couldn't help myself. By the time Nietzsche got around to his autobiography, he was batshit crazy, just heaping praise on himself. Here are four of his chapter titles: Why I Am So Wise. Why I Am So Clever. Why I Write Such Excellent Books. Why I Am A Destiny. There were three basic themes in "Ecce Homo": 1) Nietzsche is not only the smartest person in the world, he's also the greatest writer in the history of words. 2) God & religion suck; 3) Except for Wagner, Germans suck. The biggest joke on Nietzsche is that many of his ideas (especially the "Superman" concept), along with Wagner's music, were co-opted by Adolf Hitler for Nazi Germany's Aryan cult. (NB: To be fair, Nietzsche does make a comment or two against antisemitism) This book is really a sad farce, though. By this time, Nietzsche's brain was pretty well worm-holed with syphilis, and you can just tell from the inane repetition and egomania that he'd lost it. In his day, he was a revolutionary thinker, and an excellent writer, combining both poetry and prose. This...this is just a hymn to himself, his vainglorious screed reminding us how unbelievably great he is and how ridiculously stupid we are. Here's how far gone he was: From ["Also Sprach Zarathustra"] onward all my writings are fish-hooks. If nothing was caught, it was not I who was at fault.  There were no fish...  (Kindle Locations 1585-1586). No fish? It must be dead God and those pesky Germans in cahoots. Or--more likely--that Nietzsche had simply run out of bait years before.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Catarina Martins Caeiro

    Since, sooner or later, one has to approach one of the most difficult tasks that has ever been asked of mankind, I thought Nietzsche could at least indulge us in telling how it went for him. It's the most ordinary thing, really - when a child hears of a certain subject for the first time he wishes to know how his parents handled it, and if their strategy was successful. And I think Nietzsche would have been an excellent father. However, this is not that kind of autobiography. Reading it, one can Since, sooner or later, one has to approach one of the most difficult tasks that has ever been asked of mankind, I thought Nietzsche could at least indulge us in telling how it went for him. It's the most ordinary thing, really - when a child hears of a certain subject for the first time he wishes to know how his parents handled it, and if their strategy was successful. And I think Nietzsche would have been an excellent father. However, this is not that kind of autobiography. Reading it, one can deduce Nietzsche didn't have a joyful existence, but can't be sure whether he wished for one. I regard Nietzsche as a true philanthropist - he goes so far in his mission to persuade us of living our own lives, he doesn't only lend us his hammer, he makes it sure we take it off his hands and strike of our own accord - if we forget his existence, to him all the better. I'm not skilled enough in the art of self-defence to accept such an outcome, however. Therefore, I wish I knew more - I want to listen to all his dionysian adventures - I hope at least he had some. Nevertheless, he can rest assured: I would always prefer Zaratustra to the man on the Cross. In fact, I would rather pick up the Twilight of the Idols than the Bible, and not for a matter of size - because, as Nietzsche said, "a god descending to this earth could do nothing but wrong; not to bring punishment on himself but take on the guilt - only that would make him divine".

  22. 5 out of 5

    Esraa

    No one can hear more out of things, books included, than he already knows. Two quotes for me to keep in mind : "The concepts other world, true world invented in order to devalue the only world there is in order to leave no goal, no reason, no task remaining for our earthly reality! The concepts soul, spirit, at last even immortal soul invented in order to despise the body, in order to make it sick holy in order to display a horrible levity toward all those things which deserve to be taken No one can “hear” more out of things, books included, than he already knows. Two quotes for me to keep in mind : "The concepts “other world,” “true world” invented in order to devalue the only world there is — in order to leave no goal, no reason, no task remaining for our earthly reality! The concepts “soul,” “spirit,” at last even “immortal soul” invented in order to despise the body, in order to make it sick — “holy” — in order to display a horrible levity toward all those things which deserve to be taken seriously, questions of nutrition, housing, intellectual diet, treatment of the sick, cleanliness, and weather!" "The concept “sin,” together with the torture-instrument belonging to it, the concept “free will,” invented in order to perplex the instincts, to render mistrust of the instincts as second nature! In the concept of the “selfless,” the “self-denying one” the distinctive mark of décadence, the being allured by the injurious, the no longer being able to locate one’s advantage, self-destruction turned generally into a sign of value, into “duty,” into “holiness,” into” the divine” in man!" Ecrasez l’infâme!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Trav Rockwell

    I haven't read anything by Nietzsche so I thought I'd start with Ecco homo to give me a little insight into the man himself. This was written shortly before Nietzsche decline into schizophrenia. Ecco homo tells it as it is from the great philosophical mind of Nietzsche. An interesting look at life and the way of man. Nietzsche is highly opinionated and aggressively confident in everything he says. A man way ahead of his time and is as relevant today as it was then. This book is like a backstage I haven't read anything by Nietzsche so I thought I'd start with Ecco homo to give me a little insight into the man himself. This was written shortly before Nietzsche decline into schizophrenia. Ecco homo tells it as it is from the great philosophical mind of Nietzsche. An interesting look at life and the way of man. Nietzsche is highly opinionated and aggressively confident in everything he says. A man way ahead of his time and is as relevant today as it was then. This book is like a backstage pass into Nietzsche world.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Saint-Barthélemy

    I hate what the cover of the Penguin edition (a self-portrait by Egon Schiele) subcommunicates Nietzsche as mentally deranged. The difference between a self-important average joe and a self-absorded genius cannot be overlooked. That said, when Nietzsche calls himself the best poet ever he does sound like a crazy clown. I hate what the cover of the Penguin edition (a self-portrait by Egon Schiele) subcommunicates —Nietzsche as mentally deranged. The difference between a self-important average joe and a self-absorded genius cannot be overlooked. That said, when Nietzsche calls himself the best poet ever he does sound like a crazy clown.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Domhnall

    S4: Suppose I had published my Zarathustra under another name - for example, that of Richard Wagner - the acuteness of two thousand years would not have been enough for anyone to guess that the author of Human All Too Human is the visionary of Zarathustra S5: Scholars spend all their energies on saying Yes or No, on criticism of what others have thought - they themselves no longer think. S5 Early in the morning, when day breaks, when all is fresh, in the dawn of ones strength - to read a book at S4: Suppose I had published my Zarathustra under another name - for example, that of Richard Wagner - the acuteness of two thousand years would not have been enough for anyone to guess that the author of Human All Too Human is the visionary of Zarathustra S5: Scholars spend all their energies on saying Yes or No, on criticism of what others have thought - they themselves no longer think. S5 Early in the morning, when day breaks, when all is fresh, in the dawn of one’s strength - to read a book at such a time is simply depraved. S10: ...these small things - nutrition, place, climate, recreation, the whole casuistry of selfishness - are inconceivably more important than everything one has taken to be important so far. Precisely here one must begin to relearn. What mankind has so far considered seriously have not even been realities but mere imaginings - more strictly speaking, lies prompted by the bad instincts of sick natures that were harmful in the most profound sense - all these concepts, “God,” “soul,” “virtue,” “sin,” “beyond,” “truth,” “eternal life,” - But the greatness of human nature, its “divinity,” was sought in them. - All the problems of politics, of social organization, and of education have been falsified through and through because one mistook the most harmful men for great men - because one learned to despise the “little” things, which means the basic concerns of life. S11: My formula for greatness in a human being is amor fati: that one wants nothing to be different, not forward, not backward, not in all eternity. Not merely bear what is necessary, still less conceal it - all idealism is mendaciousness in the face of what is necessary - but love it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Lee

    This was a wild ride except not really... it was quite a boring ride but wild because i had no idea what he was talking about for most of it. it sounds like some weenie kid's rants in his diary after he's just been made fun of for getting the highest grades in class or something like that. there are some ideas in here that are pretty interesting but ecce homo was probably not the best of nietzsche's works to start with. anyway, happy new year everyone, remember that god and all your christian This was a wild ride except not really... it was quite a boring ride but wild because i had no idea what he was talking about for most of it. it sounds like some weenie kid's rants in his diary after he's just been made fun of for getting the highest grades in class or something like that. there are some ideas in here that are pretty interesting but ecce homo was probably not the best of nietzsche's works to start with. anyway, happy new year everyone, remember that god and all your christian "eternal ideals" like redemption & sacrifice & selflessness etc. are lies created by priests to con you into giving them money and also into neglecting to live your present life to the fullest.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ade Bailey

    Another snip from OUP's summer sale (two quid), a great bedside companion for those on the brink of insanity (Nietzsche went over the edge a few weeks after completing it). With section headings such as 'Why I am So Clever' who could resist? Plus, of course, his own commentary on his great books (preceded by a section, 'Why I Write Such Good Books'. It's sort of sad but gentle too, the second half slowing down some and almost undercutting the usual poetic at times. Well worth a dip now and then.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Plaidlad

    Nietzsche is a life changing author. His writing is of mind altering substance. I can't explain to you very much in this small space, you need to read it for yourself, I promise. I am writing almost the same thing about every book this man has ever written. Read or die.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Giorgi

    Perhaps no aspect of reading is more ambiguous and more puzzling than this case i call it nietzsche's paradox when one accurately i can love he despite that i don't love it

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo

    This book shows how Nietzsche is mentally disturbed. It is true that in the midst of his delusions he can speak some truths, but the book is horrible.

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