Hot Best Seller

A Death In Tuscany

Availability: Ready to download

Personal clashes with professional for Michele Ferrara in the second book in the series of compelling and authentic Italian police procedurals In the picturesque Tuscan hill town of Scandicci, the body of a girl is discovered, scantily dressed and lying by the edge of the woods. After a week the local police investigating the case haven't even identified her, let alone Personal clashes with professional for Michele Ferrara in the second book in the series of compelling and authentic Italian police procedurals In the picturesque Tuscan hill town of Scandicci, the body of a girl is discovered, scantily dressed and lying by the edge of the woods. After a week the local police investigating the case haven't even identified her, let alone gotten to the bottom of how she died. Frustrated by the lack of progress, Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara, head of Florence's elite Squadra Mobile, decides to step in. Because toxins were discovered in the girl's body, many assumed that she died of a self-inflicted drugs overdose, but Ferrara quickly realizes that the truth is darker than that: he believes that the girl was murdered. When he delves deeper, there are many aspects to the case that convince Ferrara that the girl's death is part of a sinister conspiracy—a conspiracy that has its roots in the very foundations of Tuscan society.


Compare

Personal clashes with professional for Michele Ferrara in the second book in the series of compelling and authentic Italian police procedurals In the picturesque Tuscan hill town of Scandicci, the body of a girl is discovered, scantily dressed and lying by the edge of the woods. After a week the local police investigating the case haven't even identified her, let alone Personal clashes with professional for Michele Ferrara in the second book in the series of compelling and authentic Italian police procedurals In the picturesque Tuscan hill town of Scandicci, the body of a girl is discovered, scantily dressed and lying by the edge of the woods. After a week the local police investigating the case haven't even identified her, let alone gotten to the bottom of how she died. Frustrated by the lack of progress, Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara, head of Florence's elite Squadra Mobile, decides to step in. Because toxins were discovered in the girl's body, many assumed that she died of a self-inflicted drugs overdose, but Ferrara quickly realizes that the truth is darker than that: he believes that the girl was murdered. When he delves deeper, there are many aspects to the case that convince Ferrara that the girl's death is part of a sinister conspiracy—a conspiracy that has its roots in the very foundations of Tuscan society.

30 review for A Death In Tuscany

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten McKenzie

    I really really enjoyed this one. The interconnectedness of the plot and the characters was the key component of my enjoyment. In addition the characters were well rounded, and the authors obvious comfort with writing a police procedural came through in spades. A plot riddled with crime and criminals, this was a page turner. Finishing so quickly was helped when I took it with me to the airport to pick up a friend and their plane was delayed an hour! The author kept me on tenterhooks, as I waited I really really enjoyed this one. The interconnectedness of the plot and the characters was the key component of my enjoyment. In addition the characters were well rounded, and the authors obvious comfort with writing a police procedural came through in spades. A plot riddled with crime and criminals, this was a page turner. Finishing so quickly was helped when I took it with me to the airport to pick up a friend and their plane was delayed an hour! The author kept me on tenterhooks, as I waited to find out the fate of one of the characters. There were parts which made me uncomfortable, I won't spoil the plot by describing them, but I felt that the author dealt with them in a realistic way - in a way law enforcement would have to deal with it. My own work experience means I'm a little more aware of the truth of some of what the author wrote (although I wish I didn't have that knowledge). All in all, a fabulous crime novel / police procedural. And I'd happily read more by this author. Helps too that it's set in Italy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    A DEATH IN TUSCANY is the second book from former Florence police chief Michele Guittari, billed as a bestseller in Italy and translated into nine languages. I was particularly interested to read this as the first book A FLORENTINE DEATH had a number of elements which didn't work at all for me, and I wanted to see if this was first book syndrome or more to do with this particular author's style of storytelling. A DEATH IN TUSCANY starts out with the discovery of the body of a girl near a small A DEATH IN TUSCANY is the second book from former Florence police chief Michele Guittari, billed as a bestseller in Italy and translated into nine languages. I was particularly interested to read this as the first book A FLORENTINE DEATH had a number of elements which didn't work at all for me, and I wanted to see if this was first book syndrome or more to do with this particular author's style of storytelling. A DEATH IN TUSCANY starts out with the discovery of the body of a girl near a small Tuscan hill town. Scantily dressed, no identification, the problem for police is discovering who she is - let alone who killed her. Stepping into lead the investigation is Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara, head of Florence's elite Squadra Mobile, although he is soon distracted by conspiracies to the left and right of him. Part of my problems with the first book was the overt self-aggrandisement of the central character - I don't think it was too much of a stretch to imagine that it's very much autobiographical, and frankly, the self-reverential tone got really tiresome, really quickly. The second book is only marginally better in this respect, as once again Ferrara seems to be the only person in the entire cast that knows anything, can see anything, understands the clues. Combine that with a plot that just simply did not work, and this book was very disappointing. At the centre of the story is the discovery of this young girl, who quickly becomes the catalyst for a crusade and much righteous (and reasonable) indignation at her fate. That is until Ferrara's best friend goes missing and he heads off in that direction. Which leaves the reader with absolutely no doubt whatsoever that somehow these two seemingly unconnected events will eventually be connected. Which was disappointingly drawn out and overly convoluted to the point where the whole plot became almost laughably contrived. Add to that the requisite shadowy influence of a secret society (in this case the Freemasons as well as the Mafia), political corruption, international drug running and a greatly put upon and misunderstood Ferrara and the whole thing not only lacked credibility, it got dangerously close to silly at points. The action either lurched forward in chunks of Ferrara's personal brilliance, or bogged down in endless drives, bizarre chats, and detailed descriptions of procedural elements that frankly got so boring it was a real struggle to stay with the book. Which is a pity. Because the death of young people at the hands of sick adults in powerful positions should be a storyline that makes the reader stop and think about what's going on in the world.

  3. 5 out of 5

    C.S. Boag

    When I was young, my mother used to take me to Austinmeer beach and I'd find Phantom comics in a cupboard at the boarding house. I don't know why they were there but I loved them. I loved too "A Death in Tuscany", a copy of which I found in this house in a French village we were renting. What a find ! I had never heard of Giuttari. He is a former boss of the Florence police who has turned his hand to novel writing. The writing is clunky- whether the fault of the writer or the translator, I don't When I was young, my mother used to take me to Austinmeer beach and I'd find Phantom comics in a cupboard at the boarding house. I don't know why they were there but I loved them. I loved too "A Death in Tuscany", a copy of which I found in this house in a French village we were renting. What a find ! I had never heard of Giuttari. He is a former boss of the Florence police who has turned his hand to novel writing. The writing is clunky- whether the fault of the writer or the translator, I don't know. But it doesn't matter- in fact it gives the book a certain charm. Two distinct cases present themselves Superintendent Ferrara- the death of a young girl, presumably of drugs, and the disappearance of an old friend. Given the author's background, the knowledge of police procedure has to be- and is- stupendous. Painstaking detective work follows, mingled with details of Ferrara's private life. It makes for engrossing reading- I couldn't put it down. Thank heavens for people who leave books- and comics- behind when they stay somewhere. The practice made a young boy and an old man very happy. 5/5

  4. 5 out of 5

    Els

    A Death in Tuscany was a good read, it moved along nicely and wasnt hard to follow. It was translated into English from Italian, and I think that added to the atmosphere of the book. The characters actually seemed Italian (imagine the old Italians at our local fruit shops or mercato) The explanations of the modern technology being used by the police were outdated of course, since the book was written in 2005, but it also added to the quaintness of this novel. To me it read like a TV movie. I won A Death in Tuscany was a good read, it moved along nicely and wasn’t hard to follow. It was translated into English from Italian, and I think that added to the atmosphere of the book. The characters actually seemed Italian (imagine the old Italians at our local fruit shops or mercato) The explanations of the ‘modern’ technology being used by the police were outdated of course, since the book was written in 2005, but it also added to the quaintness of this novel. To me it read like a TV movie. I won’t be keeping this on my bookshelves but I did enjoy it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    Another book from my 'had this on my shelf for a long time' collection, and another book I thoroughly enjoyed. Fabulous police procedural set both in Florence and on the Versilian Coast.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This is the second book in the series. The author is writing a novel based on his experiences as the chief of the Florence 'Flying Squad'. The character even has the same first name as he does. When he's telling the story it's a good read. There are little bits here and there that seem too much about him though and they irritated me a little. As the story gets going these tail off. The story begins with the death of a young unidentified girl. Never a nice place to begin. It has plenty of twists This is the second book in the series. The author is writing a novel based on his experiences as the chief of the Florence 'Flying Squad'. The character even has the same first name as he does. When he's telling the story it's a good read. There are little bits here and there that seem too much about him though and they irritated me a little. As the story gets going these tail off. The story begins with the death of a young unidentified girl. Never a nice place to begin. It has plenty of twists and turns. The inevitable 'hero coming up against the system' parts. It also has some dark subject matter. This is dealt with well though. The horrible tale is told but without any unnecessary dwelling on the horrific parts. The story shows the differences Italians feel between the old states. Also the way Europe is changing. The differences between the Italian regions fascinates me. I never tire of it being brought up in novels. All in all this is a good story that, once it finds its feet, rips along at a good pace. I'm not sure how fanciful some of the plot points are. I'm not entirely sure I found them all believable but it didn't hinder my enjoyment. I'm looking forward to the next book in the series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A better level of realism comes through with the character of Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara compared to Leon's Commissario Brunetti and Dibdin's detective Aurelio Zen. The references to Freemasonry and the Albanian Eastern Mafioso were cleverly intertwined throughout the plot to keep you intrigued as Operation Stella unfolded. With the Italian towns of Carrara, Massa and Montecatini in the background, mixed in with character names such as Ciuffi, Serpico, Rizzo, Chief Superintendent A better level of realism comes through with the character of Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara compared to Leon's Commissario Brunetti and Dibdin's detective Aurelio Zen. The references to Freemasonry and the Albanian Eastern Mafioso were cleverly intertwined throughout the plot to keep you intrigued as Operation Stella unfolded. With the Italian towns of Carrara, Massa and Montecatini in the background, mixed in with character names such as Ciuffi, Serpico, Rizzo, Chief Superintendent Mazzorelli, Deputy Prosecutors Anna Giulietti and Erminia Cosenza and Simonetta Palladiani and Massimo, the reader feels deeply immersed in an italian crime thriller. A quote from Petra: "She felt guilty about her friend and mortified by her husband's thoughtlessness. She loved Italy, her adopted country, but she didn't always like the Italians' devil-may-care attitude, which was so different from German rigour. In important things, she found that rigour - and admired it...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Zampetti

    Giuttari's second Italian police procedural outranks the first, as his tight plotting and enjoyable lead, Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara, take center stage again. While there's still an element of intrigue - this time, Freemasonry - it appears less of an interruption to the plot and more an addition. Once more Giuttari's real-life experience as the head of Florence's Squadra Mobile helps him create a believable and thrilling plot as Ferrarra solves the murder of a young girl - who everyone Giuttari's second Italian police procedural outranks the first, as his tight plotting and enjoyable lead, Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara, take center stage again. While there's still an element of intrigue - this time, Freemasonry - it appears less of an interruption to the plot and more an addition. Once more Giuttari's real-life experience as the head of Florence's Squadra Mobile helps him create a believable and thrilling plot as Ferrarra solves the murder of a young girl - who everyone dismisses as a junkie prostitute - and the puzzling disappearance of his best friend, Massimo Verga, in connection with a seemingly un-related murder. Too, either Curtis appears to have improved as a translator, as the English prose of A Death in Tuscany is less stilted and Giuttari's voice more constant. Recommended for fans of mysteries set in far-flung locales who are more interested in the crime and less the setting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana Delamar

    Parts of this book were excellent, others were just okay. Guittari works some interesting ideas into the plot, and gives us another solid read; however, I think some of his other books are stronger than this one. I'd recommend "The Death of a Mafia Don" over this one, but I'd recommend reading this one first since some of the plot elements in this book tie into that one. (But it's not necessary to read them in order, or even to read this one at all to enjoy the other one.)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carolien

    I appreciate this series for the authenticity of both the setting and events. It is an intricate plot that requires one to apply your mind to the characters and chronological order of events. This is another book where local and international crime intersects and I find the difference in tone from contemporary English/American crime fiction refreshing.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I didn't really read this- I clicked on the wrong one and I don't know how to delete it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Judith

    Fortunately our library has several of his books and so I am catching up; but it does not have all so i am reading them out of order. I'm rating this one 4 stars because the mystery brings in the Freemasons as the "bad guys". Possibly in Florence/Italy there are renegade Freemasons--as in any particular group however one defines it. But my father and husband were Masons, and I know several, and I also know of the good they do re: free optometrical services, support for Shriner Hospitals (and I Fortunately our library has several of his books and so I am catching up; but it does not have all so i am reading them out of order. I'm rating this one 4 stars because the mystery brings in the Freemasons as the "bad guys". Possibly in Florence/Italy there are renegade Freemasons--as in any particular group however one defines it. But my father and husband were Masons, and I know several, and I also know of the good they do re: free optometrical services, support for Shriner Hospitals (and I know one family that has really been helped by them with free treatment for their son, free travel support to see top doctors in the US). But given the popularity of the series of books made into movies about the Lodges and Christ and Mary Magdalene, making the Freemasons villains in this book and subsequent ones is something I regret. But perhaps this really is the case with some Freemasons in Florence and top echelons in the police, other services and Italian government--I don't know. The book, however, is cleverly plotted and the new police characters are interesting.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I didn't realise this was a #2 in a series featuring the same detective when I picked it up at an op shop... turns out the story was pretty much self-contained, although there were references to the periphery characters that I'm sure would have made more sense had I read #1 first. I found this an engaging read, with a pretty clever mystery, and an unusual plotting/pacing - I think due to it being written in Italian then translated to English... I found the unusual plotting/pacing charming, I didn't realise this was a #2 in a series featuring the same detective when I picked it up at an op shop... turns out the story was pretty much self-contained, although there were references to the periphery characters that I'm sure would have made more sense had I read #1 first. I found this an engaging read, with a pretty clever mystery, and an unusual plotting/pacing - I think due to it being written in Italian then translated to English... I found the unusual plotting/pacing charming, although if I had to read more of them perhaps the charm would start to rub off.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tarik Muftic

    I loved this book. I find the difference in the manner from English/American crime fiction energising and quite interesting. The plot seems real, thrilling and credible with the enjoyable lead character of Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara. Giuttari's real-life experience as the head of Florence's Squadra Mobile is obvious with details on how police instigation procedures work. Recommended for fans, of mysteries, who are more interested in the crime and less the setting. I will now need to I loved this book. I find the difference in the manner from English/American crime fiction energising and quite interesting. The plot seems real, thrilling and credible with the enjoyable lead character of Chief Superintendent Michele Ferrara. Giuttari's real-life experience as the head of Florence's Squadra Mobile is obvious with details on how police instigation procedures work. Recommended for fans, of mysteries, who are more interested in the crime and less the setting. I will now need to look for books # 1 and 3 in the series.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    This fast movie crime thriller was written by a former head of the Florence police force. It was translated into English in 2008. Crime: the body of a young girl is found in the countryside. Was it an overdose? Michele Ferrara, the superintendent of the Florence Squadra Mobile, delves deeper. People are kidnapped; people are killed; men in town are guilty of the unthinkable crimes as a conspiracy is uncovered. I dropped in on the middle of the series. I will read books 1 and 3.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    This was a good book. I did find the abundance of similar sounding Italian names a bit confusing at times. And there were parts of the story that I found sort of dull , when my interest waned and I had considered not finishing the read. But it ended well, some of the characters were delightful, and overall I liked it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mike Jones

    This was a good story, interesting and certainly a page turner. Somehow though it was a little disappointing...I'd have liked to have cared about some of the characters. That's why I only gave it three stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susan Banks

    The author is probably accurate on police procedure relying on his experience however the writing is ploddy and dull. The plot would have been fine if developed by Dibdin, Camilleri or Leon. I continued reading more for the locations than curiosity about the outcome.

  19. 5 out of 5

    L.J. Manning

    Holiday read of a book purchased at National Trust 2nd hand bookshop. Very similar to books by Donna Leon and also Montalbano. Sordid storyline. Incredible how the various storylines all came together at the end.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Svetlana

    The start was very promising but towards the end I lost all the interest ans just skimmed through the last 50 pages. There were so many characters in the book that I had trouble following who is who in the zoo. An okay police procedural.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Enter Michele Farrara, Florentine cop with Sicilian roots here to remind you that compromise is just a word. Mafia crimes, drugs, Albanian crooks, romance, fish with secrets, and Carrara marble. All in one passionately told story about friendship. What a great read!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julianabadescu

    Bought this in Florence, since it was set there, and enjoyed it. Good procedural. Will transport you to Florence, which is always a wonderful thing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Argiri Maglari

    It's a rather interesting book. The plot starts to clear after the middle of the book and the writer can definitely catch your attention.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave Froude

    Police procedural year 2000 Tuscany. Interesting battles between old and new criminals an police versus carrabinieri. Freemasons have the finger pointed at them big time.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Fast-paced and full of suspense.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chris McGarrry

    brilliant book

  27. 5 out of 5

    Georgia

    Not a moment was I bored - action-packed and engaging. Kept me on edge with all of the different twists, and I did not foresee the connections between the crime cases.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    It's an excellent plot although difficult to follow at times because of the similarity of many of the characters names. Also the writing is rather clunky but it may be the translation.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Miss J C Rowe

    Good old crime story with a likeable leading man

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    What did I think of this? Poor on the whole, struggled to get into it, don't like the main man, and as another person said...clunky. Would only read another if there was nothing else to read

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.