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Knife Edge

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WHEN TRUTH AND JUSTICE ARE NO LONGER BLACK AND WHITE ISSUES . . . Sephy is a Cross, one of the privileged in a society where the ruling Crosses treat the pale-skinned noughts as inferiors. But her baby daughter has a nought father . . . Jude is a Nought. Eaten up with bitterness, he blames Sephy for the terrible losses his family has suffered . . . Now Jude's life rests on a WHEN TRUTH AND JUSTICE ARE NO LONGER BLACK AND WHITE ISSUES . . . Sephy is a Cross, one of the privileged in a society where the ruling Crosses treat the pale-skinned noughts as inferiors. But her baby daughter has a nought father . . . Jude is a Nought. Eaten up with bitterness, he blames Sephy for the terrible losses his family has suffered . . . Now Jude's life rests on a knife edge. Will Sephy be forced, once again, to take sides? A razor-sharp and intensely moving novel, the second in the Noughts & Crosses sequence.


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WHEN TRUTH AND JUSTICE ARE NO LONGER BLACK AND WHITE ISSUES . . . Sephy is a Cross, one of the privileged in a society where the ruling Crosses treat the pale-skinned noughts as inferiors. But her baby daughter has a nought father . . . Jude is a Nought. Eaten up with bitterness, he blames Sephy for the terrible losses his family has suffered . . . Now Jude's life rests on a WHEN TRUTH AND JUSTICE ARE NO LONGER BLACK AND WHITE ISSUES . . . Sephy is a Cross, one of the privileged in a society where the ruling Crosses treat the pale-skinned noughts as inferiors. But her baby daughter has a nought father . . . Jude is a Nought. Eaten up with bitterness, he blames Sephy for the terrible losses his family has suffered . . . Now Jude's life rests on a knife edge. Will Sephy be forced, once again, to take sides? A razor-sharp and intensely moving novel, the second in the Noughts & Crosses sequence.

30 review for Knife Edge

  1. 5 out of 5

    Reading Corner

    Wow.This book is amazing and I'd say it's even better than the first book.I literally flew through this book in one sitting because I didn't want to put it down till I finished it. Malorie Blackman's writing skills are phenomenal,she manages to completely submerge you into her fictional world and continuously pull on your heart strings.The characters complexity is just fantastic and I even felt pity for the worst characters as my opinions of the characters kept altering. I loved every narrative as Wow.This book is amazing and I'd say it's even better than the first book.I literally flew through this book in one sitting because I didn't want to put it down till I finished it. Malorie Blackman's writing skills are phenomenal,she manages to completely submerge you into her fictional world and continuously pull on your heart strings.The characters complexity is just fantastic and I even felt pity for the worst characters as my opinions of the characters kept altering. I loved every narrative as you really do get a glimpse into the characters,like Jude who I even began to like for a short while.The story is completely unpredictable and highlights so much unjust that still exists in our own society and the forgotten aspects of racial inequality. This book hooked me from the start and outlines so much about racial injustice which you'd forget about.I really loved this one and I can't wait to start Checkmate.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James

    Set in a dystopian 21st century near future British society the Noughts & Crosses award winning series of novels (initially a trilogy, subsequently extended to a quadrilogy) opens following a period of alternative history, a post slavery period where the white population (Noughts) have been enslaved by the ruling black elite. Now post emancipation, it is the non-black population who are distinctly disadvantaged and impoverished in this alternative future society which is ruled and Set in a dystopian 21st century near future British society – the ‘Noughts & Crosses’ award winning series of novels (initially a trilogy, subsequently extended to a quadrilogy) opens following a period of alternative history, a post slavery period where the white population (Noughts) have been enslaved by the ruling black elite. Now post emancipation, it is the non-black population who are distinctly disadvantaged and impoverished in this alternative future society which is ruled and controlled by the dominating blacks (Crosses). The ‘Noughts & Crosses’ series provides us with an explicit flip and twist on both the history and current political and cultural demographic of British society – where racial politics is turned on its head and power structures are completely reversed. The fundamental premise underlying this series is a vitally important one – what Malorie Blackman seems to have set out to do, is to robustly challenge (what may be many) readers’ current perceptions, presumptions, assumptions and views on race and (British) society. An attempt to provoke thought and to revisit the absurdities of a society(ies) run along lines on racial disadvantagement and the domination of one ethnic group or groups in society by another controlling ethnic (almost always white) group. The books successfully challenge and encourage particularly the non-black reader to reconsider and think again about being part of and party to, a racially privileged white society – and by extension, to consider the real life alternative in the light of the fictional world that is portrayed here in the ‘Noughts & Crosses’ series. Moreover – to consider the possibility of a third way – a society run entirely along non-racially defined power structures. This is an original, intelligent, perceptive and though-provoking series of books – and whilst squarely aimed at the Young Adult market, it clearly transcends the restrictive boundaries of that genre. The first installment ‘Noughts & Crosses’ is the strongest of the series, closely followed by the second and third parts of the original trilogy namely ‘Knife Edge’ and ‘Checkmate’. Whilst ‘Double Cross’ is well-written and ostensibly does add value to the series, it does feel ultimately a little superfluous and does not provide the same impact as the preceding three novels. Moreover, apart from being politically and culturally astute, what makes the ‘Noughts & Crosses’ series of books so successful is not merely the originality and the ever-present / underlying theme of racial politics, but the fact that Blackman has created great characters who inhabit great page-turning stories which are both compelling and engaging. These are increasingly important books to be read by all – particularly in view of the current political climate and the ever more disturbing rise in the so-called ‘alt right’ / white supremacist groups in certain parts of the world. It is very encouraging that Blackman's series of books has been so successful and is widely read and made available in UK schools – as it quite rightly should continue to be. Throughout the course of the ‘Noughts & Crosses’ series of novels, Malorie Blackman successfully shines a light on the absurdities of racial domination and subjugation of one group by another and the fundamental racist agenda (implicit and explicit, covert and overt – at both personal and societal levels) that underpins and perpetuates this ridiculous cultural dialectic. In the words of Nelson Mandela (as recently quoted by Barack Obama): “No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin or his background or his religion…”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emily B

    Im loving this series. I read them a long time ago and so I dont remember them much but they feel familiar. I couldnt stop reading knife edge, something about this story captivates me. I wasnt so keen on the format of this one and the song lyrics, for me it would have been better without them. I’m loving this series. I read them a long time ago and so I don’t remember them much but they feel familiar. I couldn’t stop reading knife edge, something about this story captivates me. I wasn’t so keen on the format of this one and the song lyrics, for me it would have been better without them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    MY FEELS OH MY GOSH MY FEELS! This is absolutely the most heart wrenching, gut tearing, depressing novel I have ever been blessed to read! Literally for the first half of the novel I was just sitting here like: AND THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN MY VISION STARTED TO GET BLURRY AND THE GATEWAY OF TEARS JUST FLOODED OUT AND NO MATTER HOW MUCH I TRIED- I COULDN'T STOP THEM! SERIOUSLY , THIS BOOK WAS THE DEATH OF ME I JUST SAT IN MY ROOM AT 4:30 IN THE MORNING WITH A BOX OF TISSUES AND UGLY CRYING AND NOT MY FEELS OH MY GOSH MY FEELS! This is absolutely the most heart wrenching, gut tearing, depressing novel I have ever been blessed to read! Literally for the first half of the novel I was just sitting here like: AND THEN ALL OF A SUDDEN MY VISION STARTED TO GET BLURRY AND THE GATEWAY OF TEARS JUST FLOODED OUT AND NO MATTER HOW MUCH I TRIED- I COULDN'T STOP THEM! SERIOUSLY , THIS BOOK WAS THE DEATH OF ME I JUST SAT IN MY ROOM AT 4:30 IN THE MORNING WITH A BOX OF TISSUES AND UGLY CRYING AND NOT BEING ABLE TO STOP. HANDS DOWN, THIS IS THE ONLY BOOK IN MY LIFE WHERE I WASN'T JUST CRYING BUT, FULL ON SOBBING WITH TISSUES. First off I really did enjoy this beautiful masterpiece its filled with sorrow, hate, passion, revenge, depression, pain, rage, second chances, love and so so so much more. There was so many different things going on this novel at once I don't even know where to begin. Can I just give a hand to Sephys mom though like ohmygosh all the awards to you. I seriously admired her and if anything good that came out of this novel it was her. Sephy... all I can say is Sephy is not the same little naive girl who thought she and Callum could be friends without a second glance. Then there was that whole Jude P.O.V and ohmygosh I don't even know what to express in words of what I feel for Jude. There was so so so much potential for him to live a good life if he could just let go of all that rage and hate that was accumulating inside of him.(view spoiler)[ And Cara ohmygosh for heavens sake my heart just sank at that point like she was the one who could make a difference. She was the change. How could Jude be so delusional I just wanted to scream out to the world and rip my hair at that part. That being said I truly believe Sephy should've let him die but, I can understand why she didnt (hide spoiler)] So if you want to look like this ----> then this is the right book for you (view spoiler)[Me reading Callums letter but times 1200... I'm not even joking i think i died a little at this part because even though we knew it was not true it was just the most gruesome and cruel letter I have ever read (hide spoiler)] Actual rating 4.5 just because i didnt like it as much as noughts and crosses but, it was still amazing

  5. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Jx PinkLady Reviews ♥

    Review thoughts to come 8

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    5/5 because this book is perfect! There was nothing I could fault and it's definitely the best book I've read in a long time. I know a lot of people say this isn't as good as the first, but I adored it and actually thought that it was maybe better because of the further development of the characters and the plot; I was hooked! CHARACTERS: + Sephy is such an incredible character - how she thinks about everything, how she acts about everything. She dragged me into her emotions and I really felt for 5/5 because this book is perfect! There was nothing I could fault and it's definitely the best book I've read in a long time. I know a lot of people say this isn't as good as the first, but I adored it and actually thought that it was maybe better because of the further development of the characters and the plot; I was hooked! CHARACTERS: + Sephy is such an incredible character - how she thinks about everything, how she acts about everything. She dragged me into her emotions and I really felt for her. + Callum's story is intense and intriguing as more is revealed throughout. A lot of what he said and did was packed full of all different kinds of emotions. + June is so exciting to read about and so believable too! + The side characters are well developed which immediately told me that this book would deserve a very high rating. PLOT: + So intense - right from the start it got going and I was hooked. It was so addicting and I couldn't put it down; a page-turner for sure. + Consistent excitement throughout between the characters and the different action scenes (because of the different perspectives.) + I loved how the theme of racism was explored in such a unique context. I've never read anything like it before and it was breathtaking. + The ending! OMG, SO SHOCKING! What's going to happen now? How's everything going to continue? Such a cliffhanger - I have to read the next one as soon as possible!! WRITING: + Easy to read with a great balance of description to dialogue; never too much of either side. This enabled me to power through it and really suited how it was a page-turner. + Loved the rainbow colour thing going on at the beginning of each section - this was a very clever idea which was seamlessly woven into the book with great intentions. + The two perspectives each had their own "feel" which made the characters distinctive when reading. It really showed how the characters thought in their own personal ways and because of how it felt different, it made them even more believable. + So happy that there were short chapters because it kept the action going without anything dragging on. It kept flashing between the two characters' perspectives but it was still kept very clear and never got confusing. OVERALL IMPRESSIONS: I have to give this a 5/5 because it would be unfair not to - it was faultless and, to me, a perfect read. I seemed to power through it and I can see why I was so addicted because I couldn't get enough of the awesomeness that this book contained! I highly recommend this series to anyone and I will be continuing on with the others very soon because I'm so excited to find out what's going to happen and how the rest of the story will pan out. Please read it; you won't regret doing so :D

  7. 5 out of 5

    Simone

    Ive never been so unsure whether or not to continue a series Compared to the first book, Noughts and Crosses, this one was just BORING! Not only that, but whats up with sudden poetic, lyrical snippets that have been added? Its airy-fairy nonsense. I highly doubt most readers read lyrics in fiction novels. This sequel also introduced newspaper clippings before reach section which did not add to the story, but seemed to be purely for world-building in a world that we are already familiar with I’ve never been so unsure whether or not to continue a series… Compared to the first book, Noughts and Crosses, this one was just BORING! Not only that, but what’s up with sudden poetic, lyrical snippets that have been added? It’s airy-fairy nonsense. I highly doubt most readers read lyrics in fiction novels. This sequel also introduced newspaper clippings before reach section which did not add to the story, but seemed to be purely for world-building in a world that we are already familiar with because we read the first book! Learning to see the human side of Jude was the saving grace of this book, but by the halfway point, his story was over, and I lost a reason to finish the book. In saying that, his never-ending hatred for all black people got tiring and uninteresting. He’s a two-dimensional character that has no profound thoughts of his own. Sephy is suffering from depression or something similar. It’s never explained, so she’s just down in the dumps all the time, acts like a brat, and just makes life difficult for herself. She’s up and down about whether she loves her baby or not, which could hold the promise of an interesting discussion, but her thoughts on the matter are shallow, so you don’t get to understand her thought process. Frankly, it’s hard to create a character suffering from depression interesting. Something that struck me while writing this review is that this book (and the first) are devoid of any intelligent characters. Malorie Blackman has done a good job of making us feel, amplified by the violence and heartache she’s written into the book. But there’s nothing in there to make us think.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rosanna Threakall

    I loved this and it's a really good sequel! I was totally hooked this weekend as you will see by how much of this series I managed to read.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shaz

    4.75/5... I'd give it a 95% This book was amazing! For those who have read Noughts and Crosses and decided not to continue on with the series, I completely understand why (plot-wise) but also because Noughts and Crosses has such a good and full story arc that it works 100% fine as a stand alone novel. I myself was considering leaving it at that because I loved that book and it felt very complete so I wasn't really sure if I was going to read this book. I am so glad that I did. As I mentioned 4.75/5... I'd give it a 95% This book was amazing! For those who have read Noughts and Crosses and decided not to continue on with the series, I completely understand why (plot-wise) but also because Noughts and Crosses has such a good and full story arc that it works 100% fine as a stand alone novel. I myself was considering leaving it at that because I loved that book and it felt very complete so I wasn't really sure if I was going to read this book. I am so glad that I did. As I mentioned earlier, Noughts and Crosses is its own complete story and therefore this book takes the story to completely new heights. The entire tone of the story changes (with good reason) and I found it so enjoyable. My favourite way to describe it would be in Malorie Blackman's words herself. She explains that Noughts and Crosses is her book about love whereas Knife Edge is her book about hate and I think that really just about sums it up. For those interested in reading this series, you do have to read them in order despite what I said about the story taking completely different turns between books. They all follow the same characters therfore not reading them in order will spoil the previous plot lines. SPOILER TIME . . . Jude. Jude is so messed up. I really enjoyed reading from his point of view. He's so ridiculously hateful and it's so interesting to see such a young person (he's like what, 23?) have so much rage inside of him. I reckon it's for good reason though since the (in)justice system robbed him of his father and his brother and kind of (in a roundabout way) his sister. I must admit though that I laughed out loud at a lot of the things coming from inside his head. Although we didn't see much of Jude in Noughts and Crosses, I feel like from the bits that we did see, it really did make it seem plausible that he would turn out this way. For example, that scene when he beat Cara to death. It took me by surprise however at the same time it didn't shock me to see (or rather read) Jude do something like that; he is a very hateful person and it's very true to his character that he assaulted her in this situation. Take Callum for example, he has been told his entire life that noughts and crosses do not mix, crosses are bad news and to stay away from them. However, he finds himself in love with a cross and he lets what he's be taught down the toilet and he sticks with his judgement and continues to love said cross. Jude on the other hand, had been taught the same things and when finding himself falling for a cross, he's angry about and it and would rather dwell on the fact that him loving her is in some way her having a sort of hold on him than giving into that which he's feeling, and just letting go of his prejudices. ...and it really did seem like he was falling in love with her, but I suppose their ship name can only be 'Titanic'. Jude's announcement at the end was quite clever of him putting Sephy in it as well as Andrew Dorn while clearing his name. If anything, that guy is good at dishing out his revenge. The first quarter of the book, Persephone's point of view is in second person, addressing her daughter, which I found really interesting. I didn't like Sephy's POV the second quarter of this book because all the business in the band felt really irrelevant, however she made a lot of enemies in that section of her life therefore I have a feeling it's going to come back in the later books and bite her in the arse. During that 80 pages or so, her long POVs of irrelevant band stuff had me dying to know what was happening with Jude & Cara but just so, Jude's POVs in that bit of the book were like a paragraph long each! This was the only thing that stopped me from giving this book a full 5 stars. I find it so sad how negative things are for Sephy in this book as she was introduced as such a positive character in the first book to her negative counterpart, Callum. Callum's letter, I'm certain was dictated by Kamal Hadley. Minerva really did feel slightly like her dad in this book; she asserted her power where and when it was necessary and beyond. That scene where she directly addresses Meggie, in Meggie's own home, to bring her a beverage despite the fact that she was Sephy's visitor and Sephy had offered her a beverage already and she declined, really annoyed me. The random POVs from Jasmine and Meggie were exactly that and very random. I didn't feel they were relevant at all. I'll definitely be continuing on with the series. I doubt Callie is dead... why did Meggie keep saying 'what have you done?'? Did Sephy strangle her or something? I don't know and I'm keen to find out.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pam Baddeley

    Book 2 in the dystopian series in which a 360 degree turnaround focuses light from a different angle on racism, with the setting an alternative history in which Crosses, black people, have always been the dominant civilising force, with white people as former slaves only emancipated fifty years before the timeline of the story. Noughts, as they are known, face the sort of racism that in real life is directed against black people, including the abusive term 'blanker' and its inclusion in Book 2 in the dystopian series in which a 360 degree turnaround focuses light from a different angle on racism, with the setting an alternative history in which Crosses, black people, have always been the dominant civilising force, with white people as former slaves only emancipated fifty years before the timeline of the story. Noughts, as they are known, face the sort of racism that in real life is directed against black people, including the abusive term 'blanker' and its inclusion in seemingly innocuous everyday names such as 'Blanker's Delight' which is a white desert. As with the first book, there is a rather bitty structure where short section follows short section, each in an alternating viewpoint. This time, the switching is mainly between Sephy, the young Cross woman who was pregnant at the end of book 1, and Jude, the brother of Callum, the baby's now deceased father. Unlike book 1 there are a few sections in minor viewpoints, that of Sephy's mother and Jude/Callum's mother. In the short story 'An Eye for An Eye' which is included in the back of this edition and set between books 1 and 2, Sephy was about six months pregnant and resenting her unborn child for being the cause of Callum's death as she believes that if she had had the pregnancy terminated as her father, a high ranking politician demanded, he would have arranged for Callum's death sentence to be commuted to life imprisonment. At the start of 'Knife Edge', however, she is in a charity hospital where she had given birth to a baby girl and finds that, far from hating the child, she is now bonding to her with a fierce and protective love. The child, named Callie Rose, has breathing difficulties and has to spend about ten days in intensive care. Sephy, who usually acts on emotional impulse rather than rational thought, had put an announcement of the birth in the paper to annoy her father and - oddly I thought - given the address as the hospital, so when she stays there to look after Callie Rose, various people turn up at the hospital which she had not anticipated. One is her mother, with whom she has a reconciliation now that her mother has separated from her father and has cut out the drinking. At first the plan is to live with her, but then Callum's mother visits and Sephy finds herself promising to live with her instead because she feels sorry for her. Meggie has lost her husband all her children apart from Jude who is a wanted terrorist, on the run, all related in one way or another to the prejudice against Noughts. The rest of the story is partly about the difficulties Sephy faces while she is living with Meggie and facing increasing discrimination and hatred from the Noughts in the neighbourhood, which becomes worse after she briefly becomes the lead singer in a Nought band, through a contact made with the woman who was in the next bed in the maternity ward. Trying to help Meggie, she finds herself crossing a line to help Jude despite the fact that he terrorised her previously and has sworn vengeance on her for Callum's death. The other thread in the book is Jude's life on the run and his mission to avenge himself on the Nought who is deputy of the terrorist network - a man he believes has been betraying agents and betrayed his group at the end of book 1. He also, due to his rabid hatred of all Crosses, finds himself engaged in more and more extreme behaviour, with a harrowing scene about halfway through the book concerning a Cross woman with whom he forms a relationship, meaning to steal from her, and for whom he starts to have feelings - which he cannot accept and which lead to tragedy. The book spirals down into a darkness, which includes a depression that by the end has swallowed up Sephy with seemingly further tragic results. This book is rather downbeat because of the subject matter. Unlike book 1 which had the uplifting and light-hearted parts concerning the love between Sephy and Callum, here it is unrelenting bad news and very grim incidents. I understand that Callum's fate at the end of book 1 set the tone for this one, but the inclusion of (view spoiler)[a mysterious letter, seemingly written by Callum, in which he tells her that he hates her and was only stringing her along for sex (hide spoiler)] rather besmirched any fond memories of the happier parts of book 1. I also found some minor points a bit irritating: perhaps because of the book's age-group audience, but things that seemed really obvious to me are spelled out, such as Sephy and her sister reiterating to each other that the baby is Callie Rose, Meggie's granddaughter - as if they wouldn't know that. There are a few places like that where there is unnecessary info dumping though fortunately not in big chunks, just sentences thrown in which seem totally unnecessary. In view of the overall downbeat tone and very grim apparent ending, I can rate this one only as a 2 star read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    evelina

    I liked this better than the first one. In my opinion the characters gets more depth in this which makes it ugh so painful.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rikke

    This one is actually better than the first book. Which is great, of course, but I found one of the characters overly disagreeable, and that kinda influenced my liking of the story as a whole. And yet, it's cruel, almost unbearable at times, and it's free of romance, Checkmate will hopefully be less sinister, although I'm aware the setting isn't meant to be pleasant.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Martha Dawson

    I cried at the end... I cant believe it! If you haven't read this series already (I know I'm late to the party) then WHY NOT!?!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Char

    For my pre read thoughts and reasons for rating please visit my blog: From the Shadows I Review This was not on the same level as Noughts and Crosses. The writing was good, but the story felt lost for me. It wasnt the same. And while I get that were dealing with the aftermath of the conclusion of book one, I feel that this doesnt do it justice. I found myself dragging myself through the book, when with the predecessor I was racing through the book, praying that it wouldnt end. Jude Jude is For my pre read thoughts and reasons for rating please visit my blog: From the Shadows I Review This was not on the same level as ‘Noughts and Crosses’. The writing was good, but the story felt lost for me. It wasn’t the same. And while I get that we’re dealing with the aftermath of the conclusion of book one, I feel that this doesn’t do it justice. I found myself dragging myself through the book, when with the predecessor I was racing through the book, praying that it wouldn’t end. Jude – Jude is possibly my biggest reason for my dislike of this. He’s not a likeable character and reading his hatred and his prejudice and his anger was exhausting and it made me feel ill. I read for enjoyment and Jude is just as racist as the Crosses that he detests so much. His actions once again have repercussions on everyone but himself. He blames others for what he’s done and I really want to hurt him. He’s disgusting and vile and has nothing at all redeemable about him and I HATED being in his head and reading his POV. He’s possibly my main issue with this book. He’s awful. Just no. He needs a lesson in feeling things. Sephy – I miss the Sephy of ‘Noughts and Crosses’ this Sephy is a shell. She’s lost what made her. I know that the ending of book 1 hit her hard (Me too Sephy, me too) but that is no excuse to lose whatever it was that made her stand up against the world and scream eff you all. She made a deal with the devil in this and doesn’t seem to realise that he’s going to come back and burn her arse off. It will happen and when it does she’ll get no sympathy from me. I want the Sephy I grew to love back! Meggie – Meggie... hmmm... she’s a tough one to write about. She’s kind, she warm, she’s loving but she needs a reality check when it comes to Jude. I’m sorry, I know mum’s like to see the best in their kids but there’s an extent to this. I mean he’s not the nicest boy and he was always on his way to Jerktown and I want to know why she refuses to see that. However, I remember the time I got a poem published and my mum replied to my excitement with “jolly good” and I just know that Meggie is the kind of mum who’d have a full on party to celebrate that kind of thing. That’s what I like about her, her ability to love without question and do the best she can for her children and grandchild. It will be her downfall though. Trust me. Overall this is a book dragged down by a lost story and a lead that makes you feel worse than a month long hangover. Yea... he’s that painful (Don’t drink kiddiwinks!!! It’s not nice!!) . The writing is good and I won’t knock it. Malorie Blackman knows how to write a story and I like that. There are too many wannabes that takes someone’s idea contort slightly and get it published. ‘Noughts and Crosses’ is different. It feels original even though the idea is just a what if with black and whites switched. Although I personally feel it’s not the colour of your skin that makes you, it’s what you’ve got to give the world. Keep your hatred and prejudice, we don’t want it. And this story is a prime example of why judging on skin colour should remain in the past. EQUAL RIGHTS FOR THE WIN!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Josie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book shows us Jude's character in more detail than Noughts and Crosses did, because we have a lot of chapters from his POV, and we see him falling in love - with a Cross. So what I learnt from this book was that is a McGregor child falls in love with a Cross it ends with at least one death. Poor Cara. However, Cara's death - like Callum's - was completely necessary. If Jude had fallen in love with a Cross and just stayed with her it would've destroyed his character, he was too full of hate This book shows us Jude's character in more detail than Noughts and Crosses did, because we have a lot of chapters from his POV, and we see him falling in love - with a Cross. So what I learnt from this book was that is a McGregor child falls in love with a Cross it ends with at least one death. Poor Cara. However, Cara's death - like Callum's - was completely necessary. If Jude had fallen in love with a Cross and just stayed with her it would've destroyed his character, he was too full of hate to let it go for one Cross, he was too scared. So again Malorie Blackman shows her genius. From Sephy's POV, this book shows us how broken Callum's death left her and how a few well choosen words can have disasterous effects. If you've read Noughts and Crosses you just HAVE to read KnifeEdge and the rest (Checkmate, and Double Cross). Also the title. I love it again. Like Noughts and Crosses it was so carefully choosen. Sephy said in KnifeEdge that she felt like 'a little kid on a knife edge', and that line perfectly sums up how Sephy was in KnifeEdge. She was so desperate to move on with her life but Callum still had such a hold on her because she loves him so much. The title also works for Jude I think. Jude was full of hate through all of Noughts and Crosses, but Callum's death left him full off so much more hate. He was scared as he started to fall in love with Cara, too. Fear and hate, not a good mix, but it shows how Jude's life balances like a knife edge - one wrong move in either direction and the effects would be bad!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cliona

    WARNING: Spoilers alert. Don't read this review if you haven't read the first book. I was so excited, and eager to begin reading this book when my mum brought it home from the library. If you have read my review of Noughts and Crosses, you will know how much I loved it, and so obviously I wanted to read this one. Who doesn't love a good sequel?! And it certainly didn't disappoint! Knife Edge had some wonderful new characters, and plot twists all the way through, so it kept me on the edge of my WARNING: Spoilers alert. Don't read this review if you haven't read the first book. I was so excited, and eager to begin reading this book when my mum brought it home from the library. If you have read my review of Noughts and Crosses, you will know how much I loved it, and so obviously I wanted to read this one. Who doesn't love a good sequel?! And it certainly didn't disappoint! Knife Edge had some wonderful new characters, and plot twists all the way through, so it kept me on the edge of my seat, hungry for more. I found that this book explored the characters personalities more, whereas the first book concentrated more on the background of the characters, so that was interesting. I felt that we, as readers, got to know the characters better. On the subject of characters, I have to say, even though he has done some unforgivable things, I felt sorry for Jude the whole way through the book. He is filled with rage and hatred towards Sephy, because he blames her for his families,especially Callums death. He doesn't know where he's at, and what he wants from life, he is just focused on getting revenge on Sephy, which is an awful way to have to live your life. I think anyone considering reading this book should read Noughts and Crosses before doing so as it contains information that you need to know to understand what's going on. And I would definitely advise you to read them, ASAP! This book gets a rating of 6/5! Thank you so much Malorie Blackman, for writing these books!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    NO TIME FOR A REVIEW. GOTTA. FINISH. THIS. SERIES.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Morgane Moncomble

    Holy. shit. Every time I think I know what will happen, Malorie Blackman does WORSE. I'm speechless.

  19. 4 out of 5

    -amelia-

    that cliffhanger tho. All the books on my tbr have been shoved aside to finish this series because i need to know what the hell happened.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becky Lockyer

    This is a fantastic sequel in a timeless and moving series. Its gripping, and interesting with excellent exploration of characters. A very emotive continuation of an important and topical subject. This is a fantastic sequel in a timeless and moving series. It’s gripping, and interesting with excellent exploration of characters. A very emotive continuation of an important and topical subject.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Storer

    This is the second novel in the Noughts & Crosses series and as with the first book it is wonderfully written with well rounded and interesting characters and a story which pulls you in from the first few pages. The voices of each character alternate between chapters, and along with Sephy a black-skinned Cross, we see the world through the eyes of Jude, a white-skinned nought and Callum's brother, and occasionally from Sephy's mother, Jasmine, and Jude's mother, Meggie. The story continues on This is the second novel in the Noughts & Crosses series and as with the first book it is wonderfully written with well rounded and interesting characters and a story which pulls you in from the first few pages. The voices of each character alternate between chapters, and along with Sephy a black-skinned Cross, we see the world through the eyes of Jude, a white-skinned nought and Callum's brother, and occasionally from Sephy's mother, Jasmine, and Jude's mother, Meggie. The story continues on from Noughts and Crosses and we find Sephy coping alone following Callum's death with her new born baby, Callie Rose. Jude, Callum's brother, is still consumed with rage and animosity for all Crosses, but most of all Sephy, who he blames for his brother's death. A little way into the book Jude meets Cara. I was hoping that she was his salvation, that she would be the girl to ease his mind and mend his heart, but instead the outcome was totally unexpected and I didn't see it coming. It left me stunned. But, although Jude continues his vendetta on the Cross world with a seemingly heartless attitude, we hear his thoughts and realise that he his not a bad person but the product of a racist society that has created the cold, vengeful man he has become. Sephy also has her hardships and when given a letter written by Callum before his death, it leaves her in doubt of what was real and what was not regarding their relationship. She climbs inside herself and finds it hard to deal with life and with Callie. The book hints at post-natal depression and ends on a cliff-hanger that will make you want to rush out and buy the next book. Verdict: Although this is a great book, which I thoroughly enjoyed reading, it didnt have the same impact on me as Noughts and Crosses. It doesn't have the sweet love story behind it and as the characters have grown so has their cynicism and it leaves you with the feeling that there is no hope and this sometimes makes for bleak reading. There are several scenes where this story gives a powerful punch and I flinch at its brutality, but this is what makes the book so realistic and moving. It is still quick-paced and thought-provoking and I was in no way disappointed. It is a superb book and I urge you all to read it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Crazyjamie

    Noughts & Crosses was an excellent book. Not only did it surprise me in terms of its quality, but it struck that perfect balance between readability and grit. I was therefore looking forward to the second in the series. This book shifts its focus slightly, necessarily so due to the ending of the first book. The main characters are now Sephy and Jude, Callum's brother. Both continue to fight their way through life in a very racist world, with Judge continuing his role as a 'liberation Noughts & Crosses was an excellent book. Not only did it surprise me in terms of its quality, but it struck that perfect balance between readability and grit. I was therefore looking forward to the second in the series. This book shifts its focus slightly, necessarily so due to the ending of the first book. The main characters are now Sephy and Jude, Callum's brother. Both continue to fight their way through life in a very racist world, with Judge continuing his role as a 'liberation fighter', and Sephy trying to adjust to life as a mother of a mixed race child. Both are essentially starting new stages of their life at the opening of the book, and the story follows them through the first section of that adjustment. It should be said straightaway that Knife Edge does contain elements of what made Noughts & Crosses so good. It is easy to read and has a good pace about it, to the point where I actually finished it in a few sittings very comfortably. It also does have the (now trademark) shocks in terms of the culture and the institutionalised racism on both sides. Unfortunately what it lacks is a connection between the main characters. Sephy and Callum made the first book, not only in being strong characters themselves, but how the plot was intertwined around them whilst continually shifting perspective. There was also the added element of them growing up through the prejudice. Sephy and Jude do cross paths in this novel, but not nearly as much, and for the most part there are two separate plot lines at work here, which significantly dilutes the overall quality of the book. It doesn't stop me wanting to continue with the series, indeed the inherent readability of the series makes it inevitable that I will finish it. But this book feels less directed and weaker than the first book, most probably because it will prove to be padding for the overall story. In which case I am sure that Malorie Blackman will return to form with the third book. But for now this one has to stand as a weak link.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    1. Thought provoking 2. Strong but not preachy message 3. Deal with some very controversial issues superbly Just utterly amazing! To see my full review, click the link to my blog below: http://ohcakeycreativity.blogspot.co....

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Carter

    (4.75 stars)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    this is a solid DNF I'm gonna write a review when I'm not completely pissed off at this book :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Rae

    I find many series begin with a book thats so outstanding and fresh that creates an illusion to the reader that the rest of the books in the series are going to be the same. I wasnt too sure where this book was going, but I will stick with the series due to the important issues being raised within it. I didnt like the band scenes, I understand that they were part of Sephys development and growth after the death of Callum, but these scenes bored me. I actually love Jude as the Villain in this I find many series begin with a book that’s so outstanding and fresh that creates an illusion to the reader that the rest of the books in the series are going to be the same. I wasn’t too sure where this book was going, but I will stick with the series due to the important issues being raised within it. I didn’t like the band scenes, I understand that they were part of Sephy’s development and growth after the death of Callum, but these scenes bored me. I actually love Jude as the Villain in this book, and it’s not because I love the name, but I just love how he is represented. You start to see his softer side, which makes characters well rounded and human. I’m interested in how the series will end so I will continue.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mina

    Did it really need a sequel? The story is a bit all over the place and makes me dislike Jules a lot. I don't think it added much but a revengeful plan, though I didn't think hatred went that deep. Its once again a well written book with a strong character falling into depression. All the books are very symbolic and it is a cleverly thought out plan. however I think it didn't hit me as much as other people

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Sephy Hadley is one of my fave characters of all time and this entire book my heart aches for all she's lost and all she's trying to do; only re-reading it at the age I am now have I realised just how young she is and how much weight is on her brave little shoulders. Jude is such a conundrum - he's an awful guy there's no denying that but the loss and pain and hurt he's suffered in his short life and the way he's been treated are a direct correlation of that. He makes incredibly bad choices but Sephy Hadley is one of my fave characters of all time and this entire book my heart aches for all she's lost and all she's trying to do; only re-reading it at the age I am now have I realised just how young she is and how much weight is on her brave little shoulders. Jude is such a conundrum - he's an awful guy there's no denying that but the loss and pain and hurt he's suffered in his short life and the way he's been treated are a direct correlation of that. He makes incredibly bad choices but a tiny part of me still hurts for him and the monster he has become.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    I can't get enough of this series. I absolutely love it, I haven't been this compelled to read a series so much in a long time. This one was better than the first if that is even possible and all the way through you get the thought of just one more chapter, just one more last one then you will stop. I would recommend this series to everyone and it has made me want to read everything Malorie Blackman has written and will write in the future. This is becoming my favourite series in a long time!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ross Duffy

    A great read! I loved seeing Judes perspective as well as Meggie! This book definitely see a more in depth look to sephy. Also it kept my heart racing throughout. A great read! I loved seeing Jude’s perspective as well as Meggie! This book definitely see a more in depth look to sephy. Also it kept my heart racing throughout.

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