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Lies They Teach in School: Exposing the Myths Behind 250 Commonly Believed Fallacies

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It is a cliché that history is written by the victors, but what we accept as history is replete with stories of great men and events that either never happened or didnt happen the way we were told they did. Such items are taught in schools. They are passed down to us by our families and friends and have become part of our shared cultural knowledge. And they are wrong. It is a cliché that history is written by the victors, but what we accept as history is replete with stories of great men and events that either never happened or didn’t happen the way we were told they did. Such items are taught in schools. They are passed down to us by our families and friends and have become part of our shared cultural knowledge. And they are wrong. Touching on a number of topics— including history, current events, government, sports, geography, and popular culture—Lies They Teach in School exposes errors that have been perpetuated for far too long. It will enlighten and entertain. It will certainly start a number of arguments, and settle a few others.


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It is a cliché that history is written by the victors, but what we accept as history is replete with stories of great men and events that either never happened or didnt happen the way we were told they did. Such items are taught in schools. They are passed down to us by our families and friends and have become part of our shared cultural knowledge. And they are wrong. It is a cliché that history is written by the victors, but what we accept as history is replete with stories of great men and events that either never happened or didn’t happen the way we were told they did. Such items are taught in schools. They are passed down to us by our families and friends and have become part of our shared cultural knowledge. And they are wrong. Touching on a number of topics— including history, current events, government, sports, geography, and popular culture—Lies They Teach in School exposes errors that have been perpetuated for far too long. It will enlighten and entertain. It will certainly start a number of arguments, and settle a few others.

30 review for Lies They Teach in School: Exposing the Myths Behind 250 Commonly Believed Fallacies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Charles van Buren

    A poor imitation Review of Kindle edition Publication date: May 1, 2012 Publisher: Skyhorse Language: English ASIN: B00872FQZ2 Amazon.com Sales Rank: 7523 🔚 177 pages In his preface, Mr. Reich wrote, "In college, I remember alienating a few professors by frequently asking How can we be sure? or Where is it written and by whom? Good questions which we should always ask but perhaps not out loud of people who are grading us. Unfortunately Mr. Reich does not answer these questions. Instead, he states A poor imitation Review of Kindle edition Publication date: May 1, 2012 Publisher: Skyhorse Language: English ASIN: B00872FQZ2 Amazon.com Sales Rank: 7523 🔚 177 pages In his preface, Mr. Reich wrote, "In college, I remember alienating a few professors by frequently asking “How can we be sure?” or “Where is it written and by whom?” Good questions which we should always ask but perhaps not out loud of people who are grading us. Unfortunately Mr. Reich does not answer these questions. Instead, he states generalities without any reference as to where he found either them or his information refuting them. Frequently these generalities are obviously strawmen set up solely for the purpose of demolition. He offers no footnotes, bibliography or any type of reference for his information which is alleged to be erroneously taught or for his refutations of that information. This is a poorly assembled work possibly compiled to profit from the success of a similarly titled book by James W. Loewen, LIES MY TEACHER TOLD ME: EVERYTHING YOUR AMERICAN HISTORY TEXTBOOK GOT WRONG.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A more accurate title might be "Slight Misconceptions and Semantic Quibblings You Might Pick Up from the Mass Media," but that probably wasn't as marketable.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lackey

    A bunch of minor trivia about unimportant things; basically one page "gotchas" about commonly believed things which turn out to be false due to technicalities (e.g. Jackie Robinson not being the first black baseball player because there was an Ohio guy from the 1880s.). The good thing is they're short on or two page stories about history, but none of them were particularly interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Angie Cory

    Meh So so. Difficult to get pass the ridiculous amount of spelling errors. Doesn't give much credence to the facts. Meh.

  5. 5 out of 5

    C. Varn

    Somewhat random and often only superficially busted, Herb Reich goes through 250 rifts without many themes connecting them. While I did learn some interesting facts in a breezy way, most of the facts weren't particularly important or I had not heard taught in school in many decades. It's worth reading for a few interesting factiods and for a very readable style, but it's not mind-blowing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    The information found here is interesting. My husband, a history enthusiast, and I enjoyed reading the book together and discussing the content. There are some questionable "fallacies" and some things that we were already aware were not true. For the most part, though, the author did a good job of presenting information that is interesting and unknown. I only offered three stars due to the writing style. The 'tongue in cheek' presentation grew annoying at one point, and there were some dull The information found here is interesting. My husband, a history enthusiast, and I enjoyed reading the book together and discussing the content. There are some questionable "fallacies" and some things that we were already aware were not true. For the most part, though, the author did a good job of presenting information that is interesting and unknown. I only offered three stars due to the writing style. The 'tongue in cheek' presentation grew annoying at one point, and there were some dull moments that made following the book through somewhat difficult.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    A lot of these I had already heard about, nothing really groundbreaking. A lot were also very nit-picky. Like Washington not being the first president of the US because the Articles of Confederation had a presiding president. The only one that I disagreed with was the one about Eve from the Christian Bible. The story of Adam and Eve is that, just a story. I felt in shouldn't be included in a book like this which is about finding the true facts.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marsha

    Mostly a trivia book that includes some gems that have been long touted in school, although most of them, although they may be emphasized by teachers, are generally details that aren't realemphasized treated as important. It was kind of interesting, but not such a big deal, and really a lot of the facts are kind of on the order of "ho-hum" Mostly a trivia book that includes some gems that have been long touted in school, although most of them, although they may be emphasized by teachers, are generally details that aren't realemphasized treated as important. It was kind of interesting, but not such a big deal, and really a lot of the facts are kind of on the order of "ho-hum"…

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    Amusing ... but, Can U Trust It ... ? The Reader would be tasked with double-checking everything written in this book, to try and know (FOR SURE???) if this compilation is any more trustworthy than the books previous read (and written) that might say otherwise. So? It THIS a good book? Sure! But dont trust it any further than you can throw it1 Amusing ... but, Can U Trust It ... ? The Reader would be tasked with double-checking everything written in this book, to try and know (FOR SURE???) if this compilation is any more trustworthy than the books previous read (and written) that might say otherwise. So? It THIS a good book? Sure! But don’t trust it any further than you can throw it1

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Haggett

    This book, originally published in 2010, covers some of the fallacies I included in my coursework when I taught EN 140: Rhetoric and Critical Thinking and other classes. These fallacies remind us to double check our knowledge and our presentations before we share though, of course, we are all fallible, especially me. :-)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

    LIES THEY TEACH IN SCHOOL Taught for 23 years. Would have loved to have had this sitting on the right hand side of my desk. What a way to start the day with the students. WAKE THEM UP!!!! 😁

  12. 5 out of 5

    Martin Dunn

    This is a light book with short chapters that you can easily read when you can't quite fall asleep. Generally, each chapter will offer random set of facts that are informative and entertaining. I don't remember encountering too many of these lies in school, but thin I was not educated in the United States! And for book premised on the ignorance of others, it is jarring to find that tourists visit England to see Westminster Cathedral (rather than Westminster Abbey) or that pharmaceutical companies This is a light book with short chapters that you can easily read when you can't quite fall asleep. Generally, each chapter will offer random set of facts that are informative and entertaining. I don't remember encountering too many of these lies in school, but thin I was not educated in the United States! And for book premised on the ignorance of others, it is jarring to find that tourists visit England to see Westminster Cathedral (rather than Westminster Abbey) or that pharmaceutical companies might direct research towards antibiotics to cure the common cold.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ayse

    Pretty interesting look at common fallacies. Too few sources for my liking given that it was about unmasking the truth of what people say based on just what this author says, without too much evidence

  14. 4 out of 5

    K. Counihan

    Just OK More of a rambling dissertation of truths becoming false becoming truths. A lot of this was already known to most people who had a decent history teacher.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    It's nice to have a little humor in your reading library and this blends in well. Some of articles I had heard before but not the reason it was giving until I read this book. Good entertainment.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Santurri

    An Enjoyable and teaching read. I enjoyed learning the new facts, its interesting to know the full story explained in an easy read. A fast read too. An Enjoyable and teaching read. I enjoyed learning the “new” facts, it’s interesting to know the full story explained in an easy read. A fast read too.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Slightly interesting points of trivia.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dee brown

    Fascinating, but silly.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Not overly impressed It was mainly just a bunch of quick facts that only took up about a page each. I felt that it didnt go into enough detail. Not overly impressed It was mainly just a bunch of quick facts that only took up about a page each. I felt that it didn’t go into enough detail.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Terri Chapin

    Its got some interesting facts and dispelling of myths. The dont you believe it got a little tedious. It’s got some interesting facts and dispelling of myths. The “don’t you believe it” got a little tedious.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Clarke

    Small fun read that makes you think. Just fact check a couple. Mostly right, but there are a couple that are little more "grey area" than I had hoped.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul Stewart

    The book as interesting, but a little suspect in some areas, IMHO. Not really very interesting

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Alkire

    Nice collection

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline R. Anderson

    Not what I expected The book was not quite what I expected. I found it to be very disappointing. I wouldn't recommend the book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jaime A Rosales

    Nice collection of fully accepted half truths Interesting set. Loved the one about the meaning of thumbs up. Easy reading, very enjoyable and yes, informative. Very Good

  26. 4 out of 5

    David Zona

    A very informative and well researched book that should be required reading for all teachers of history It was very enlightening. Most all I learned a lot. Interesting on a variety of topics which will begin some interesting convt

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steve Tetreault

    If you're looking to un-learn some of the things your history teachers taught you back in the day, this is the book for you! This was a quick read, but it was pretty interesting. There's a lot of info I had never seen before, and I got to feel smart a few times when I came across something I already knew.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Knudslien

    Great...interesting. Took the book on a lark..as I was always the questioning student..found that lots of things weren't as they stated in classrooms etc...being that pita student many years ago I felt vindicated after all those years of trying to debunk the so called facts in many conversations. Thank you hope to read more like this.

  29. 5 out of 5

    G Lee Graves

    Well documented, readable, entertaining and informative. Well documented, readable, entertaining and informative. Certainly a book for every serious reader who sits on the throne of perpetual meditation. Light reading at its best.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Taylor-Hamilton

    Learning and relearning I always love books like these. As a former teacher it is important to have your fact right. If you made a mistake or someone has made an error it is important to own it.

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