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A Liga Extraordinária - Volume II

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Baseada nos grandes clássicos da literatura fantástica do final do século XIX, como Drácula, As Minas do Rei Salomão, O Médico e o Monstro, 20.000 Léguas Submarinas, O Homem Invisível e outras, A Liga Extraordinária Volume II mostra Allan Quatermain, Capitão Nemo, Hawley Griffin, Dr. Jekyll, Sr. Hyde e a Srta. Mina Murray enfrentando uma ameaça vinda do planeta Marte Baseada nos grandes clássicos da literatura fantástica do final do século XIX, como Drácula, As Minas do Rei Salomão, O Médico e o Monstro, 20.000 Léguas Submarinas, O Homem Invisível e outras, A Liga Extraordinária Volume II mostra Allan Quatermain, Capitão Nemo, Hawley Griffin, Dr. Jekyll, Sr. Hyde e a Srta. Mina Murray enfrentando uma ameaça vinda do planeta Marte quando cilindros metálicos começam a cair nos arredores de Londres e estranhas criaturas provocam o pânico na população numa revisitação do clássico livro A Guerra dos Mundos, de Herbert George Wells.


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Baseada nos grandes clássicos da literatura fantástica do final do século XIX, como Drácula, As Minas do Rei Salomão, O Médico e o Monstro, 20.000 Léguas Submarinas, O Homem Invisível e outras, A Liga Extraordinária Volume II mostra Allan Quatermain, Capitão Nemo, Hawley Griffin, Dr. Jekyll, Sr. Hyde e a Srta. Mina Murray enfrentando uma ameaça vinda do planeta Marte Baseada nos grandes clássicos da literatura fantástica do final do século XIX, como Drácula, As Minas do Rei Salomão, O Médico e o Monstro, 20.000 Léguas Submarinas, O Homem Invisível e outras, A Liga Extraordinária Volume II mostra Allan Quatermain, Capitão Nemo, Hawley Griffin, Dr. Jekyll, Sr. Hyde e a Srta. Mina Murray enfrentando uma ameaça vinda do planeta Marte quando cilindros metálicos começam a cair nos arredores de Londres e estranhas criaturas provocam o pânico na população numa revisitação do clássico livro A Guerra dos Mundos, de Herbert George Wells.

30 review for A Liga Extraordinária - Volume II

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    It was entertaining in its own way, but not really my taste. (view spoiler)[If you think you would enjoy seeing the wrinkled ass of Allan Quartermain while he humps Mina Murry, then this is the book for you. As an added bonus, you will also get to witness Mr. Hyde butt-rape the Invisible Man to death. Yes. You read that right. Also, in case you are a huge fan of animal/human hybrid-making mad scientists, Dr. Moreau makes a cameo appearance. The actual story going on in the background involves an It was entertaining in its own way, but not really my taste. (view spoiler)[If you think you would enjoy seeing the wrinkled ass of Allan Quartermain while he humps Mina Murry, then this is the book for you. As an added bonus, you will also get to witness Mr. Hyde butt-rape the Invisible Man to death. Yes. You read that right. Also, in case you are a huge fan of animal/human hybrid-making mad scientists, Dr. Moreau makes a cameo appearance. The actual story going on in the background involves an invading force of evil Martians, but to be honest, it wasn't very interesting. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    I don't know why, but I don't much care to write a review, yet I feel compelled to do so. And because of that you get point form adapted from a discussion I've been having about the comic while reading it. One of my favourite parts of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol 2 are Kevin O'Neill's pencils. The way he exaggerates features through understatement is difficult to describe, but there is a sort of Victorian reality that he captures that is really effective. Another cool bit of pencilling I don't know why, but I don't much care to write a review, yet I feel compelled to do so. And because of that you get point form adapted from a discussion I've been having about the comic while reading it. •One of my favourite parts of League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Vol 2 are Kevin O'Neill's pencils. The way he exaggerates features through understatement is difficult to describe, but there is a sort of Victorian reality that he captures that is really effective. Another cool bit of pencilling is when O'Neill places the League in the background and foregrounds the people of England, fleeing from the cities, getting drunk in alleys, whatever. It creates a sense of the people surrounding Alan Moore's anti-heroes, which isn't something you always get in comic books. •There is a cool cameo from Dr. Moreau and all his "Moreauvians" (thanks for the new word, Amber), all of whom live in a forest. The art is bizarre, almost comical, and I had trouble getting into it to begin with. It turned out well though, and I think it really suited the general aesthetic. And there were plenty of extra references to children's lit that I liked. •Big fan of Wilhelmina Harker in the second volume. I see now that Moore is trying to show us a strong woman in a Victorian England which completely frowns on strength in a woman. Quartermain's control begins to slip, and it is banished entirely once Mina takes him to bed. Mina is in control of who she and Quartermain are. •I liked the first sex scene in the Inn, but I didn't care much for the outdoor sex scene that is intruded upon by the Moreauvians. Together they show an interesting shift back and forth between Mina in control and Quartermain trying to regain the control he's lost, and it is nice to see that his attempt to regain control is Moreauvians (I just like hearing that name in my head). SPOILER ALERT (look away)•The rape(s). What to say? I wasn't convinced that Griffin actually raped Mina, although there seems to be some implication of that in her diary response after the Invisible Man's attack, but since the only violation from Griffin we actually see is Mina's severe beating, the question of rape remains up in the air. Interesting, then, that her rape (if that is indeed what it was) is withheld, but we are given a clear view of Hyde raping Griffin for revenge. It is a unsavoury piece typical of Alan Moore’s work, His heroes are nowhere near as heroic as heroes are supposed to be. And even calling them anti-heroes seems too kind. They are villains whom we delude ourselves into thinking are heroic; they’re not heroes.SPOILER OVER •Volume 2 is much better than Volume 1. •I wonder if any of those who died are actually dead. I doubt it. It is a comic book after all, and there was much talk amongst the characters about staged deaths. A little foreshadowing, I've no doubt. •I love Nemo. Mina's my favourite. And Quartermain is my least favourite, but I appreciate the role he plays. And Griffin and Hyde fascinate me. •Avoid this movie at all costs. It is utter crap. Such a shame that it will likely be the last movie Sean Connery ever makes. •The Almanac contains tons of interesting stuff, but it is boring. Seriously boring. Sleep inducing, in fact. That’s it for my lazy list. Hope you enjoyed it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Maddock

    Even better story than volume one. However, Alan Moore's seeming obsession with creating ancilliary documents as companion pieces to his stories is getting a bit tiresome. The New Traveller's Almanac included with volume two is insufferably long and tedious prose. Moore melds all manner of details from sundry novels into one universe in the context of a travelogue of weird phenomena (perhaps channeling Charles Fort if Fort had a PhD in Victorian literature), but it quickly loses all redeeming Even better story than volume one. However, Alan Moore's seeming obsession with creating ancilliary documents as companion pieces to his stories is getting a bit tiresome. The New Traveller's Almanac included with volume two is insufferably long and tedious prose. Moore melds all manner of details from sundry novels into one universe in the context of a travelogue of weird phenomena (perhaps channeling Charles Fort if Fort had a PhD in Victorian literature), but it quickly loses all redeeming value when it stops being a humorous novelty. This is a shame because the graphic portion of this book is damn near perfect, but the Almanac takes up almost a quarter of the book for no good reason that could have been much better spent on the actual freaking plot.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jacquelyn

    This is one of those situations where there was just more stuff I disliked than stuff I liked. I almost quit after the first few pages because I wasn't interested in the story that began there, if it was going to continue (sorry vague but trying not to be spoilery). I'm also very disappointed in Mina. She has the potential to be the most awesome character, but instead, she's a forceful if sometimes clueless leader, a victim, a sexual object, a maternal figure... Basically all the stereotypical This is one of those situations where there was just more stuff I disliked than stuff I liked. I almost quit after the first few pages because I wasn't interested in the story that began there, if it was going to continue (sorry vague but trying not to be spoilery). I'm also very disappointed in Mina. She has the potential to be the most awesome character, but instead, she's a forceful if sometimes clueless leader, a victim, a sexual object, a maternal figure... Basically all the stereotypical woman roles without ever demonstrating the attributes that got her into this secret club to begin with. Hyde was the only one that lived up to his potential; otherwise I would have rated it one star.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    League Vol. 2. Moore casts his nets wider in this second volume by incorporating the tales of H.G. Wells, primarily The War of the Worlds, but with an amusing diversion to The Island of Doctor Moreau. The result is a very different sort of adventure tale from the first, but one that's both more evocative and engaging. (And that's not even counting the wonderful first issue, which mashes together a few Martian planetary romances.) Meanwhile, Moore dramatically develops the pulp heroes that we met League Vol. 2. Moore casts his nets wider in this second volume by incorporating the tales of H.G. Wells, primarily The War of the Worlds, but with an amusing diversion to The Island of Doctor Moreau. The result is a very different sort of adventure tale from the first, but one that's both more evocative and engaging. (And that's not even counting the wonderful first issue, which mashes together a few Martian planetary romances.) Meanwhile, Moore dramatically develops the pulp heroes that we met in the first volume, turning them into true characters with character arcs all their own. It's wonderful to see how they all change (after the foundation of their characters in V1). Is this volume a bit too violent and explicit? Perhaps. It's certainly part of the deconstruction that Moore began in V1, but it may go too far for the faint of heart [4+/5].

  6. 5 out of 5

    J

    Whew, the travelogue at the end was rather tedious even if it did have some interesting bits to it. One of the weaknesses of late-Moore is his tendency to over-written expansive prose. The clean poetry of his earlier years has given away to long-windedness. The illustrated comic parts were fun and the plotting is enjoyable and the art is a treat. I'd trade all the end papers nonsense for six more pages of illustrated adventure where Moore's word count is more curtailed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    In my opinion, this is a hell of a good read. The author took famous characters from Victorian popular literature and put them together into a 'special action group' that works for MI5 in the last decade of 19th Century England. MI5 is lead by Mycroft Holmes by the way. The League consists of Mina Murray, Alan Quartermain, Henry Jekyll and his alter-ego, Captain Nemo and Hawley Griffin, otherwise known as the Invisible Man. And the situation they have to deal with is the invasion of Earth by Mars. In my opinion, this is a hell of a good read. The author took famous characters from Victorian popular literature and put them together into a 'special action group' that works for MI5 in the last decade of 19th Century England. MI5 is lead by Mycroft Holmes by the way. The League consists of Mina Murray, Alan Quartermain, Henry Jekyll and his alter-ego, Captain Nemo and Hawley Griffin, otherwise known as the Invisible Man. And the situation they have to deal with is the invasion of Earth by Mars. I've read it many times. the artwork is excellent. Every frame just reeks of Victorian. If you look you can find a website that deconstructs this book frame by frame. And it's amazing how much the artist jammed into his work. The story is excellent, much more human than most of these 'grand adventures' are. None of the characters breaks character, and I got to like all of them, for the most part. I'd recommend this book for a pleasant, amusing and very different read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    What a disappointment! Nowhere near as good as the first one. Started off fantastic with the use of War of the Worlds but then it just deteriorated as it went on and the story lost all direction and focus. Biggest disappointment was seeing Mina reduced from the strong independent character she was in the first volume to the sex object she became in this one.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Not as good as the first book, but it's such a brilliant concept, one barely notices the difference.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kienie

    So Alan Moore hates women. I guess having read V for Vendetta and Watchmen should have made me aware of that, but call me slow. While the story and art were as interesting as in the first book, the details were mostly gross. First of all, two whole sex scenes between Mina and Allan, which I could have tolerated if not for the mutual professions of love. Then there is an assault on Mina where she doesn't vamp out and fight back. Lastly, someone is raped to death. Oh yeah, and Martians are So Alan Moore hates women. I guess having read V for Vendetta and Watchmen should have made me aware of that, but call me slow. While the story and art were as interesting as in the first book, the details were mostly gross. First of all, two whole sex scenes between Mina and Allan, which I could have tolerated if not for the mutual professions of love. Then there is an assault on Mina where she doesn't vamp out and fight back. Lastly, someone is raped to death. Oh yeah, and Martians are invading. The most interesting character turned out the be Hyde. I wish we could have seen more of him. Nemo, for all that is was his ship, was barely there. I guess the story relies on previous knowledge of these characters, but this does not excuse lack of development.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Siobhan

    Volume one of this graphic novel left me on the fence. I wasnt overly interested in carrying on, yet because my friend had let me borrow her omnibus I decided it couldnt hurt. After all, it was something that could be completed in no time at all. Truthfully, I enjoy volume two much more than I enjoyed volume one. There was more substance to it than the first book, with more happening throughout. We truly see our characters, watching them interact with each other, seeing the way they deal with a Volume one of this graphic novel left me on the fence. I wasn’t overly interested in carrying on, yet because my friend had let me borrow her omnibus I decided it couldn’t hurt. After all, it was something that could be completed in no time at all. Truthfully, I enjoy volume two much more than I enjoyed volume one. There was more substance to it than the first book, with more happening throughout. We truly see our characters, watching them interact with each other, seeing the way they deal with a catastrophic event. Whilst I wouldn’t say it was full of twists and turns, it did provide more than just a straight fact-telling story. Overall, much more enjoyable than the first volume.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Very good follow on story. The characters get more intense. Very recommended

  13. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    A mixed bag. The graphic novel part of this was much superior to that in Volume 1. It started on Mars, featuring a John Carter stand in and the Tharks fighting with some mollusk type beings who then fled in rocket ships to earth, and this turned out to be the War of the Worlds Invasion. The opening was interesting and sparked my imagination but it was irritating that much of the early dialogue was rendered in "Martian," meaning symbols that couldn't be read. Once the invasion of earth began, A mixed bag. The graphic novel part of this was much superior to that in Volume 1. It started on Mars, featuring a John Carter stand in and the Tharks fighting with some mollusk type beings who then fled in rocket ships to earth, and this turned out to be the War of the Worlds Invasion. The opening was interesting and sparked my imagination but it was irritating that much of the early dialogue was rendered in "Martian," meaning symbols that couldn't be read. Once the invasion of earth began, there was quite a lot excitement as the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen were tested to their limits. I certainly liked this part well enough that I might even have given it 4 stars. However, the book ended with a very lengthy travelogue that basically threw out imaginary names and lands as if they existed in reality and made an effort to connect them into a kind of coherent story. The problem with this part was that there was just too much of it, with no descriptions or real details. It read like an exercise in name dropping and it was extremely boring to me to the point that I finally began to just scan it. This took away a star.

  14. 5 out of 5

    William Thomas

    When I was sixteen, I was at a comic book convention in Chicago, waiting in line for the guest of honor's autograph- Frank Miller. Alongside him were others like garth Ennis and Alex Ross who were doing signings as well. For some reason or other they brought up Alan Moore and joked about how he was most likely sitting in a closet with a candle and a typewriter in a castle somewhere in England. Having only seen one picture of Moore at the time, used over and over again for all of his works and When I was sixteen, I was at a comic book convention in Chicago, waiting in line for the guest of honor's autograph- Frank Miller. Alongside him were others like garth Ennis and Alex Ross who were doing signings as well. For some reason or other they brought up Alan Moore and joked about how he was most likely sitting in a closet with a candle and a typewriter in a castle somewhere in England. Having only seen one picture of Moore at the time, used over and over again for all of his works and interviews, I thought this was completely plausible. I still do. I hear hear he is studying chaos magick now. A strange man, he is. But a brilliant one on the whole. Alan Moore is a victim. His work has been bastardized by Hollywood on more than one occasion. His art has been brutalized and raped and been turned into the typical horse shit that you see when you see V for Vendetta and the movie adaptation of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. And none of these movies can do his work any sort or form of justice because they do not express the very literary quality of the books but instead focus on the novel idea of it all and sensationalize the aesthetic, the surface tones, instead of the deeper meanings and the art of it all. So if you have only seen the Gentlemen movie, please read these books. These two volumes at least. Because they are a large part of the reason we can call comic books a legitimate art form. So here in this volume, Alan Moore takes us a little farther out there than the previous volume. He takes us to Mars. He shows us Gullivar. And then he brings us back to earth to rewrite War of the Worlds. And he does it in a way that makes it look effortless, literary and brilliant. The main focus of this book, the way I saw it, was on Mr. Hyde. I loved seeing his character become a focal point here, and I loved all of the humanizing aspects as well as the polarizing ones in his offhand racism and his casual violence. But most of all I loved his sense of duty and justice and his unrequited love and how twisted it all became in his hands. The most disturbing part of the book was probably Quartermaine sexing it up with Mina Harker. Because all I could then picture was Sean Connery having sex with a cartoon. And it frightened me. As for the artwork, it is not typically something I would enjoy but for this book seemed a perfect fit. O'Neill ha a way of making the inks look both frantic and sharp and I can't be sure but it looks like he works with a barely skeletal pencil layout before he dives in with the inks. Which may add to the urgency of some of his lines. The final verdict? Pitch-perfect.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow. Uhm. Yeah, so what to say here. This is one of those things that I sort of loved but will never, ever recommend to anyone. Ever. Moreso even than Game of Thrones. I actually really liked it, but... wow. It had these great bits in it where Hyde only listens to Mina, and they have this lovely moment, and I was like AWWWW. And even the part where Griffin attacks Mina was so heartbreaking and awful but wonderful because you knew Hyde was going to come back and save her. But then when Hyde did Wow. Uhm. Yeah, so what to say here. This is one of those things that I sort of loved but will never, ever recommend to anyone. Ever. Moreso even than Game of Thrones. I actually really liked it, but... wow. It had these great bits in it where Hyde only listens to Mina, and they have this lovely moment, and I was like AWWWW. And even the part where Griffin attacks Mina was so heartbreaking and awful but wonderful because you knew Hyde was going to come back and save her. But then when Hyde did exact his revenge, I was like "yup, didn't see that coming." Guys...he raped Griffin to death and then threatened to kill Nemo and the other guy if they told Mina. I was like... And then he lied about it to Mina so she wouldn't be upset! And the worst part of it all was I caught myself thinking "Griffin had it coming, he raped all those girls at the school, and he terrorized Mina." This book is bad for your soul. If you see this book your response should be: There was so much cartoon nudity it wasn't even funny! They had sex in the woods! And then there wass Nemo running around declaring his outrage at everything, and NO ONE LISTENED! And then there was Dr. Moreau with his hoards of hybrids: Moore managed to dredge up the most immoral and terrible people in the history of English literature (seriously, these people make Nemo look like the chaplain at your local parish), put them all together, and added some aliens for fun. It ends how you imagine it would. It's awful. And yet... there are these wonderful bits. There are moments of light. And even though they are quickly smothered by either sex or blood, there are moments of truth. Are they enough to redeem the comic? I don't know. Maybe not. Probably not, actually. So in closing, I liked it but don't read it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ma'Belle

    Reviewing any of the three volumes in Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen series is a difficult task. Without reading the edited annotations of Jess Nevins, the story seems somewhat shallow and bland. However, the annotations of various librarians and connoisseurs of Victorian-era literature add so much insight into almost every panel that it can become overwhelming and the story itself can get lost in the backdrop. Another reviewer on goodreads has said half of the genius in LoEG is Reviewing any of the three volumes in Alan Moore's League of Extraordinary Gentlemen series is a difficult task. Without reading the edited annotations of Jess Nevins, the story seems somewhat shallow and bland. However, the annotations of various librarians and connoisseurs of Victorian-era literature add so much insight into almost every panel that it can become overwhelming and the story itself can get lost in the backdrop. Another reviewer on goodreads has said half of the genius in LoEG is in its often obscure literary references. I'd go so far as to say this accounts for at least 75% of its greatness. For this reason, it's hard for me to recommend the series to anyone who lacks the motivation and patience to read the annotations as well (which can also be found for free online), but easy to attribute a great amount of respect to Moore for this massive undertaking. It proves, more than anything else about the author, his ability to do exhaustive research and then adapt it to the comic book medium.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Quite a disappointment after the richness, complexity and wit of volume one. A stunning opening chapter whets the appetite, but thereafter the plot meanders in several directions at once, none of them satisfying. The members of the league (and writer Moore) seem more interested in internal frictions within the group than the threat they are facing. O'Neill's artwork is as accomplished as ever, and Jekyll has an interesting scene, but Nemo is given nothing whatsoever to do, and the "clever" Quite a disappointment after the richness, complexity and wit of volume one. A stunning opening chapter whets the appetite, but thereafter the plot meanders in several directions at once, none of them satisfying. The members of the league (and writer Moore) seem more interested in internal frictions within the group than the threat they are facing. O'Neill's artwork is as accomplished as ever, and Jekyll has an interesting scene, but Nemo is given nothing whatsoever to do, and the "clever" references to other famous literary characters seem perfunctory and pointless. At the end Moore splits the group up as if wishing to put an end to the series. I think he made the right choice. You're better off re-reading volume one instead.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    re-read! LoEG holds a very special place in my heart, and I try to read my copies at least once a year. Favorite things: - How young and untainted both Murray and Quartermain seem, in comparison to the later volumes. - Mister Hyde. Just thinking about him makes me feel like I'm on a rollercoaster. I think my feelings about him kinda went like this: excited -> curious -> respecting -> unnerved.... -> OH GOD NO THIS IS JUST TOO MUCH -> WHY -> angry apprehensiveness -> sadness - re-read! LoEG holds a very special place in my heart, and I try to read my copies at least once a year. Favorite things: - How young and untainted both Murray and Quartermain seem, in comparison to the later volumes. - Mister Hyde. Just thinking about him makes me feel like I'm on a rollercoaster. I think my feelings about him kinda went like this: excited -> curious -> respecting -> unnerved.... -> OH GOD NO THIS IS JUST TOO MUCH -> WHY -> angry apprehensiveness -> sadness - All the details, the foreshadowing, the hints, jabs and jokes both Moore and O'Neill managed to put into their work. It is beautiful. Things I would like to see more of: - Nemo, my man - Mars Still worth every star. Love it. Thank you Mr. Moore

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was hoping that, as with some of the other graphic novels I've read, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen would get better as it went on. I was sorely disappointed. The mashing up of different classic novels felt forced, there was little character development, and, to be perfectl honest, I found some of the content disturbing and repellent. I'm not really into rape. At all, actually.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Edmund

    If like me, your first exposure to LOEG was the movie, then the original comic is likely to disturb and fascinate you. Rather than the garish action flick, the comic is almost satirical and definitely cynical. While perhaps not the most exciting a heroic piece you'll ever read there is something compelling about the flawed heroes and their escapades.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    My review for volume one is parallel to this volume. I will just add this tidbit: I thoroughly enjoyed the narrative blurbs at the end of each issue. It reminded me of Adam West's Batman; "Will Batman and the Boy Wonder meet their ultimate end? Tune in next week. Same bat-time, same bat-channel!"

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jalen NeSmith

    I appreciate the illustrations, the homage to classic fiction, and Alan Moore's talent for kickass scenes. It's too bad Alan Moore has never met a woman in his life, because the women he writes are laughably unreal. In this one, anyway.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    I liked this one better then the first because I was a easier to follow and the fact in had H. G. Well references.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul Weiss

    Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill continue to pay tribute to Victorian adventure classics! THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, VOL 2, like its stellar predecessor, is a graphic novel and is most assuredly not a comic book intended for children. Rather it is solid proof that mainstream comic books can be combined with exciting, imaginative adventure and story-telling, illustrated with serious, skilled artwork that merits close examination in each and every panel aimed at serious adult readers with Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill continue to pay tribute to Victorian adventure classics! THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, VOL 2, like its stellar predecessor, is a graphic novel and is most assuredly not a comic book intended for children. Rather it is solid proof that mainstream comic books can be combined with exciting, imaginative adventure and story-telling, illustrated with serious, skilled artwork that merits close examination in each and every panel aimed at serious adult readers with eclectic tastes in classic literature. THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN, VOL 2 is at once a pastiche and a tribute to the skills of an extraordinary, lengthy and almost bewildering list of adventure, mystery and horror writers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Moore's eclectic team of stalwart adventurers - Mina Harker of Bram Stoker's DRACULA fame; Edward Hyde, the brutal alter ego of Robert Louis Stevenson's gentler Dr Jekyll; H Merle Haggard's aging Allan Quartermain, the basis of modern Hollywood's INDIANA JONES; HG Wells' Hawley Griffin, better known as THE INVISIBLE MAN; and, finally, Captain Nemo, Jules Vernes' inscrutable captain of the fabulous Nautilus - defend the earth against an invasion from Mars. Moore's borrowed cast of characters leaps off the page and into life under the skilled artistry of Kevin O'Neill. But alert readers will quickly discover that it doesn't end with this short list of main players and will delight in scavenging for even the most fleeting references to an almost endless list of literary luminaries - John Carter of Edgar Rice Burroughs' Mars series; his likely inspiration, Lieutenant Gullivar Jones; Alphonse Moreau; Rupert the Bear (honest!); Badger and Toad from THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS; Ishmael; Fu Manchu ... the list just goes on and on! Be advised. Readers who consider themselves to be faint of heart should know that Kevin O'Neill has given himself full permission to display violence, fighting, bloodletting, death (and did I mention sex?) in the most graphic fashion. But this is far from a criticism, it is only a caution in the full understanding that some potential readers will simply not enjoy the degree to which O'Neill has visually let loose the free flow of blood, guts and unbridled sexuality. Thankfully, I am not on that list and can say that I enjoyed every single word and every single illustration immensely. I'm only sorry to realize that there are only two volumes left in the series which I will be purchasing just as soon as I finish this review. Paul Weiss

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Alan Moore's excellent League of Extraordinary Gentlemen continues in this second volume. Moore channels his inner H.G. Wells in this volume drawing deep influences from "War of the Worlds" and "The Island of Dr. Moreau". The League is forced to help Mycroft Holmes and the British government deal with an Alien invasion from Mars. This story has a little bit of everything from Martian invaders, the conflict between the invaders and normal humans, and an interesting cast of characters. The Mina Alan Moore's excellent League of Extraordinary Gentlemen continues in this second volume. Moore channels his inner H.G. Wells in this volume drawing deep influences from "War of the Worlds" and "The Island of Dr. Moreau". The League is forced to help Mycroft Holmes and the British government deal with an Alien invasion from Mars. This story has a little bit of everything from Martian invaders, the conflict between the invaders and normal humans, and an interesting cast of characters. The Mina Harker/Mr. Hyde/Alan Quartermain confluence of emotions makes a huge return in this issue. While Alan's relationship with Mina makes sense, it is Mr. Hyde's fascinating response to her that is interesting. No spoilers, but the Invisible Man will certainly regret his actions. I also enjoyed the strange look at Dr. Moreau and his hybrid solution to the invasion is excellent. Kevin Oniell's artwork, while not usually to my stylistic preference, seems to work for this story. The Victorian setting melds well with the artistic style and I rather appreciated it. Each of the six main issues combines into this volume. As with the first volume, after each story, there is a written addendum that details the world of the LOEG and the League itself. These are told in a newspaper pulp style and is rather interesting. It gives a hint as to the vast imagination that is Alan Moore. Highly recommended for anyone who appreciates a "different" type of super-hero group. Alan Moore's League is a great read and something very different from the usual comics.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leila Anani

    1898 - The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Alan Quartermain, Mina Murray, Captain Nemo, The Invisible Man and Hyde) have to deal with the Martian Invasion of War of the Worlds. Now I adored the first LXG but this 2nd volume because it's source material is so close to my heart is just a dream come true. For the Martian side of things we reference Wells War of the Worlds but mix in Martian politics from ERB's John Carter and Gullivar of Mars - big squeee here over how seamlessly this is woven 1898 - The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (Alan Quartermain, Mina Murray, Captain Nemo, The Invisible Man and Hyde) have to deal with the Martian Invasion of War of the Worlds. Now I adored the first LXG but this 2nd volume because it's source material is so close to my heart is just a dream come true. For the Martian side of things we reference Wells War of the Worlds but mix in Martian politics from ERB's John Carter and Gullivar of Mars - big squeee here over how seamlessly this is woven together and as for the rest... The literary referencing is so thick and fast that sometimes you have to re-read just to get the subtitles - Genius springs to mind. We have everything here from the Island of Dr. Moreau to Rupert Bear. The largest chunk of the additional material is the traveller's almanac which takes the reader on a tour of the globe from a fabulist's point of view from the 17th century to 1907 - we look at various past members of the league as they explore fantasy realms from literature. Now I'm fairly well read, but even so there are a lot of references here that escape me - Hope-Hodgson's house on the borderland, Carroll's Alice in Wonderland and the Hunting of the Snark, Haggard's She and Solomon's Mines, Lovecraft, Lear, Gulliver's travels are just a few of the worlds plundered here - The whole is a bit of a slog - it's text heavy and overly complex as we keep switching narrators but for those who know their literature there's much not to be missed - the Gilbert and Sullivan Lovecraftian operetta is the jewel in the crown of just why LXG is so great. Overall this is a graphic novel to be savoured and read and re-read - it's so rich in satire and tongue in cheek referencing that you keep finding more and more to delight. Love it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob Ryan

    Even better than the first!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arnab Ghosh

    I liked it more than the first part. My complains of it are the same as part one. But I did feel that this story was more enjoyable. Looking forward to the other volumes.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Noah Appelbaum

    There was some super problematic shit in this book and a couple full pages worth of totally skippable dreck, but overall this made good on a lot of the themes and stories that seemed to be often ineptly treading the surface in the first volume. If you read the first one and you wanted it to be better (not, like, a LOT better, but to be what it could be), then you should read this one. This is the story; the first one is the set-up.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    3.5 stars... there were aspects of this volume that I liked and there were aspects I didn't like. It did take me a bit to get into the story. I keep expecting it to be like the movie, but it's not.

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