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The Herb Book: The Complete and Authoritative Guide to More Than 500 Herbs

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The complete and authoritative guide to more than 500 herbs. The most complete reference catalog of nature's herbs ever published.


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The complete and authoritative guide to more than 500 herbs. The most complete reference catalog of nature's herbs ever published.

30 review for The Herb Book: The Complete and Authoritative Guide to More Than 500 Herbs

  1. 5 out of 5

    megHan

    This is an amazing book that I am glad to add to my collection. I have always been interested in botany, gardening and the different uses of plants and herbs and this book is full of over 2,000. It begins with lists of herbs that can be used for different situations (i.e. upset stomach, trouble sleeping), then continues on to specifics on individual herbs, including recipes/preparations for the use of each. There are some beautifully done hand-drawn pictures included throughout as well. A very This is an amazing book that I am glad to add to my collection. I have always been interested in botany, gardening and the different uses of plants and herbs and this book is full of over 2,000. It begins with lists of herbs that can be used for different situations (i.e. upset stomach, trouble sleeping), then continues on to specifics on individual herbs, including recipes/preparations for the use of each. There are some beautifully done hand-drawn pictures included throughout as well. A very interesting and helpful book that will be of quite a bit of use throughout the rest of my life. Note: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Avery Belenos

    I will never stop reading this book. John Lust opens with chapters on the shared histories of plants and humans, Botanical language and meanings, Wild crafting practice and ethic, growing your own herbs, purchasing, drying and storing herbs, basic guidelines to most traditional herbal preparations, a Glossary of Medicinal Effects and the Herbs that Produce Them, a condensed list of various human conditions and name lists of plants to treat them (with page number plant can be found in the book). I will never stop reading this book. John Lust opens with chapters on the shared histories of plants and humans, Botanical language and meanings, Wild crafting practice and ethic, growing your own herbs, purchasing, drying and storing herbs, basic guidelines to most traditional herbal preparations, a Glossary of Medicinal Effects and the Herbs that Produce Them, a condensed list of various human conditions and name lists of plants to treat them (with page number plant can be found in the book). Then, 350 pages of plants. The line drawings are very simple, and only really useful to remind you of the shape of plants you already know, to further connect their shape with the information about them. The information is VERY well-presented. Here's the format... [Plant name] Common names: ... Medicinal part: ... Description: ... [to what lands it is native, where else it has spread and can now be found wild. precise botanical and sensory description of plant. its seasons, including when it flowers and bolts.] Properties and Uses: ... [precise medicinal terms, i.e. soporific, astringent, etc. also, traditional medicinal and edible uses of the plant, perhaps even dye or other practical uses.] Preparation and Dosage: ... [information such as, "do not use rootstock once it has lost its odor"] [then, specific instructions for each preparation... i.e., "Decoction: 1 tsp. rootstock with one cup of water. take 1 Tbsp. three to six times a day."] After these pages, Lust describes recommended mixtures of plants, nutritional information and herbs' roles in nutrition, info to be conscious of the effects of culinary herbs used in food, beverages (including alcohol recipes), cosmetics, aromas, DYES!, and, one of my favorites, stories and myths about various herbs! While I've accumulated other books that fill roles in my apothecary and personal health that this book cannot, I have also never found a book that fills the role of The Herb Book, by John Lust. The plant information is so precise, and I absolutely love all of the cross-referencing and lists, all in very precise terminology. Not, "this herb helps you purge your pores," but rather, and simply, "soporific." Love, love, love this book! And it contains great primers on botany!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura Hartmark

    Most books on herbal healing wander and focus on what the author or editor pleases. This book is organized like a dictionary. It is a true reference. If you ever wondered what any herb really does, what other names it has, or how it has ever been used - then this is the book for you. At one point I saw that it was out of print. That would be a terrible oversight. It is *the* herb book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This book, for me, became the most sacred book in my herb collection. The information given, while concise, was complete and organized well so you can navigate through the book easily. Alas, I left my last copy in NY and don't know where to find another.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    The herb book is the best all natural medicine book I've ever come across. I carry it with me everywhere. Any kind of herbal mixture I've made out of the book has always worked wonders. Definitely a must have for any person who prefers holistic health

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fishface

    Terrific dictionary-format reference on every medicinal herb imaginable. Cross-referenced to find herbs based on the illness you have, to find which illnesses are treatable by which herb and so on.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is crammed full of case histories, herb formulas, full , yet concise descriptions of herbs, their properties and uses, the majority of them illustrated, The Herb Book explains in easy-to-understand languages how you may use Nature's gentle medicines to build a livelier healthier, happier life! Example inside the book: Tonsillitis (mostly as gargles) Carrot, celery, buttercups (all), black elder and( also show more herbs). Part 2 A Compendium Of Botanical Medicine also show illustrations This book is crammed full of case histories, herb formulas, full , yet concise descriptions of herbs, their properties and uses, the majority of them illustrated, The Herb Book explains in easy-to-understand languages how you may use Nature's gentle medicines to build a livelier healthier, happier life! Example inside the book: Tonsillitis (mostly as gargles) Carrot, celery, buttercups (all), black elder and( also show more herbs). Part 2 A Compendium Of Botanical Medicine also show illustrations of the species of plants and the medicinal purposes, and traditional remedies. Carrot (Daucus Carota) Common Names: Beesnet plant, Bird's-Nest root, Queen Anne's Lace Description: Carrot is an annual or biennial plant widely cultivated and also found wild in farmland, pastures, and meadows. The wild carrot has a tough, white, inedible root. The stem of the carrot plant is hairy and branched, the leaves bipinnate and cut into fine divisions. The lacy, white flower appear in a concave umbel from June to September. Properties and Uses: Anthelmintic, carminative, diuretic, stimultant. Carrot soup makes a effective remedy for diarrhea and is easily digestible for those suffering from stomach, and intestinal problems. Carrot is also useful for preventing putrefaction in the intestine and for gastro-intestinal catarrh. The carrot's content of potassium salts accounts for its diuretic action, and it contains an essential oil that is effective against roundworms as well (eat 2 to 3 raw carrots a day for several days). Take carrot juice for stomach acidity and heartburn. And of course their carotene content provides the material for the body to make vitamin A, which is important for proper vision, especially night vision. An infusion or decoction of the seeds of wild carrot can be used for flatulence, as a diuretic, and to promote the onset of menstruation. Preparation and Dosage: Infusion or Decoction: Use 1 tbsp. wild carrot seeds with 1 cup water. Take 1 cup a day. Juice: Take 1 to 2 cups a day, or eat 10 to 12oz. of freshly grated carrot for breakfast. An electric juicer makes fresh carrot juice easily available. Soup: Boil 1 pound peeled , grated carrot in 3/4 cup water until thick. Strain through a sieve. Then add 1 quart of meat broth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jan Garner

    There is NO comparison to this book. It covers not only description,but medical uses, folk lore, color used in dyes, culinary uses, it's amazing how much, & how thoroughly each herb/plant is covered! It's a "Must Have" book if you're learning about, or need/want to learn about an herb or plant's properties. An absolute 5 star rating. This book by John Lust should be (and is by many) considered the "standard" for its thorough information.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nichole

    This book has just about everything you need to know about herbs, it's easy to find your specific ailment and it then lists over 20 herbs that heal for each. It teaches you how to use the herbs in everyday cooking, as well as recipes for teas and how to make tinctures.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    The best book on herbal usage bar none. I am on my fourth copy, I keep lending it out and it never finds it's way back. . .

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robin Ferguson

    keeper for my reference shelf.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    A wide selection of herbs, but not that much information on each one

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marjorie

    Given To Me For An Honest Review John Lust's book The Herb Book: The Most Complete Catalog of Herbs Ever Published is a very good one to add to your book collection. It is a great reference book. You can look up herbs by their common name, their scientific name and what ailments you want to treat. I also helps you to identify herbs. This book also tells you how to use herbs but it does not tell you how to grow them. I recommend this book. I look forward to more from John Lust.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda Keith

    I'm not an herbalist, but I've tried a few of the herbal remedies listed in this book. It's a good, thorough reference, and it has the best indexing of any book I've ever seen: the herbs are alphabetical, but there are indexes for types of illnesses, types of remedies, and more, making it easy to find something when you don't know much of anything. It even lists remedies for boredom.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cesarcucio_saveearth

    The book was spectacular! In terms of information, that is. The contents were almost herbs from America and Europe (though cultivated) but I there were only a few herbs in the list that are naturally here in the Philippines, so I kinda doubt that it could be very handy for me. But at the last pages, it contained etymology of the herbs. I like mythology, so it hit the spot for me.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amethyst

    This is one of the classics of herbal medicine. My copy is filled with highlighter underlines. A must for anyone who is serious about learning the medicinal properties of herbs, plants, flowers, vegetables, and fruits.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Penny Carstens

    I couldn't say more, to sum up what you get, without repeating the complete title itself. If you want to learn about "everything" herbs, this is it! Descriptions (drawings are included to help identify) of plants, medicinal remedies with recipes. Expertly indexed!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adam White

    Great reference book. with nice clear illustrations which help when out wild gathering. Formated like a dictionary, and as someone who enjoys herbal teas - this book was a wee gem - also very helpful for cooking as well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Weird.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    A wonderful, comprehensive guide to herbs.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    This book is chock full of valuable information. I will keep this one with in arms reach for reference.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen O'Mara

    This is one of my favorites. I use it regularly for reference. I highly recommend this book for any herbalist's shelf and for those that only dabble.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cws

    635.7 Lus

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fenesha

    This book has been my first resource for herb uses, remedies and mixtures for nearly 20 years.

  25. 5 out of 5

    zaK young

    my mama had this book and i used to read it for hours.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joelle

    One of my most useful books. Great information on many herbs, well organized.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Essential reference book for the herbal remedy library

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rah~ri

    "My" herb book. mine's tattered and in shreds. much loved. only wish it had better pictures !

  29. 4 out of 5

    Donna Overall

    Good book every thing you would went to know about herbs. It has a large general section with what the plants looks like and what to use them for but then the book goes in to history, lore, vitamins, minerals, coffee substitutes, hormones, and teas just to name a few things. It is a very good reference book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laura Doyle

    Great reference book, easy to find information.

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