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Resurrection Men

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Inspector John Rebus has messed up badly this time, so badly that he's been sent to a kind of reform school for damaged cops. While there among the last-chancers known as "resurrection men," he joins a covert mission to gain evidence of a drug heist orchestrated by three of his classmates. But the group has been assigned an unsolved murder that may have resulted from Inspector John Rebus has messed up badly this time, so badly that he's been sent to a kind of reform school for damaged cops. While there among the last-chancers known as "resurrection men," he joins a covert mission to gain evidence of a drug heist orchestrated by three of his classmates. But the group has been assigned an unsolved murder that may have resulted from Rebus's own mistake. Now Rebus can't determine if he's been set up for a fall or if his disgraced classmates are as ruthless as he suspects. When Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke discovers that her investigation of an art dealer's murder is tied to Rebus's inquiry, the two—protègè and mentor—join forces. Soon they find themselves in the midst of an even bigger scandal than they had imagined-a plot with conspirators in every corner of Scotland and deadly implications about their colleagues. With the brilliant eye for character and place that earned him the name "the Dickens of Edinburgh," Ian Rankin delivers a page-turning novel of intricate suspense.


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Inspector John Rebus has messed up badly this time, so badly that he's been sent to a kind of reform school for damaged cops. While there among the last-chancers known as "resurrection men," he joins a covert mission to gain evidence of a drug heist orchestrated by three of his classmates. But the group has been assigned an unsolved murder that may have resulted from Inspector John Rebus has messed up badly this time, so badly that he's been sent to a kind of reform school for damaged cops. While there among the last-chancers known as "resurrection men," he joins a covert mission to gain evidence of a drug heist orchestrated by three of his classmates. But the group has been assigned an unsolved murder that may have resulted from Rebus's own mistake. Now Rebus can't determine if he's been set up for a fall or if his disgraced classmates are as ruthless as he suspects. When Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke discovers that her investigation of an art dealer's murder is tied to Rebus's inquiry, the two—protègè and mentor—join forces. Soon they find themselves in the midst of an even bigger scandal than they had imagined-a plot with conspirators in every corner of Scotland and deadly implications about their colleagues. With the brilliant eye for character and place that earned him the name "the Dickens of Edinburgh," Ian Rankin delivers a page-turning novel of intricate suspense.

30 review for Resurrection Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Karl

    I own both the Little Brown Hardcover and an Uncorrected Proof of this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James Thane

    Scottish Inspector John Rebus has always had a problem with authority, but he gets particularly exorcised one morning and hurls a cup of tea at his supervisor. For this, he is assigned to a stint at Tulliallan, a police academy where problem officers are sent for retraining and to see if their careers can be resurrected. The approach is to take an old case and assign it to the "resurrection men" working under the close supervision of an instructor who will teach them the teamwork necessary to Scottish Inspector John Rebus has always had a problem with authority, but he gets particularly exorcised one morning and hurls a cup of tea at his supervisor. For this, he is assigned to a stint at Tulliallan, a police academy where problem officers are sent for retraining and to see if their careers can be resurrected. The approach is to take an old case and assign it to the "resurrection men" working under the close supervision of an instructor who will teach them the teamwork necessary to good police work. But Rebus smells a rat when the case chosen for the exercise "accidentally" turns out to be an old problematic case in which Rebus himself played a large role. He realizes that he must trod very carefully while he tries to figure out what is going on here. Meanwhile back home, Rebus's protege, Detective Siobhan Clarke, is investigating the murder of an art dealer. There appear to be any number of suspects, but finding the killer and a motive is proving particularly difficult. Rebus and Clarke wind up sharing thoughts about their independent problems, both of which turn out to have much more working below the surface than initially appeared. This is another good installment in Rankin's long-running series and once you get caught up in it, it's hard to put it down. (view spoiler)[ I did enjoy this book but as much as I love this series, I'm giving it three stars rather than four because of the way the plot is developed. In earlier books, Rebus has taken Siobhan Clarke under his wing and we've seen the two working together as Rebus has taught her a great deal about good police work. In some of the more recent books, though, as in this case, Rebus and Clark have often wound up working two totally separate cases. They often get together to bounce ideas off each other about their cases and then, somehow at the end, the two cases become magically linked. That's what happens here. Without going into great detail, Rebus is actually sent to the academy to go undercover in an effort to get the goods on three dirty cops who are also assigned to his class. Through the whole book he attempts to do so, while Siobhan investigates the murder of the art dealer. Either of the cases would make an entertaining story in and of itself, but at the very end it turns out that, for convoluted reasons, the dirty cops Rebus is chasing are the ones who killed the art dealer. While you're actually reading the book, you get so caught up in it that the implausability of the whole thing sort of slips by you. But ten minutes after you put it down, you slap yourself in the forehead and say "What????". The conicidences involved in making these two story lines come together don't just stretch credulity, they smash it into a thousand pieces. It's still a great deal of fun watching Rebus work, bending the rules as necessary to achieve a just end. But I enjoyed these books even better when Rebus and Clarke were working together on a single complicated case and when it wasn't necessary for the reader to completely abandon disbelief to make the climax of the book work. (hide spoiler)]

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ammar

    Another Rebus down. Rebus is punished and sent to school again for a refresher course. He meets a Wild Bunch of officers and they have to work together to solve a cold case. At the same time, an art dealer is killed at his home after an exhibition. DS Siobhan Clarke is investigating this crime, and Rebus is giving her some back up while he is in schooling. A fast past novel. Realistic and noir. Rankin is one of the best novelist who take you from wherever you are to the dark, rain stained Another Rebus down. Rebus is punished and sent to school again for a refresher course. He meets a Wild Bunch of officers and they have to work together to solve a cold case. At the same time, an art dealer is killed at his home after an exhibition. DS Siobhan Clarke is investigating this crime, and Rebus is giving her some back up while he is in schooling. A fast past novel. Realistic and noir. Rankin is one of the best novelist who take you from wherever you are to the dark, rain stained cobblestone streets in Edinburgh, Glasgow or Dundee. He exposes the underbelly of the city and let us all gawk in and watch. Corruption and insubordination are the two major themes in this novel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Resurrection Men by Ian Rankin. Have you ever read a book that you seriously not only couldn't stop reading but didn't want it to end? This was the Inspector Rebus that ranks among my favorites. This was not a 200 or 3oo page book. These Scottish mysteries are a good 438 page bools and often more. So I'm just saying this Ian Rankin is one gifted author to keep an audience (and I mean audience) enraptured in the life of the main character book after book is saying he's earned the rave reviews and Resurrection Men by Ian Rankin. Have you ever read a book that you seriously not only couldn't stop reading but didn't want it to end? This was the Inspector Rebus that ranks among my favorites. This was not a 200 or 3oo page book. These Scottish mysteries are a good 438 page bools and often more. So I'm just saying this Ian Rankin is one gifted author to keep an audience (and I mean audience) enraptured in the life of the main character book after book is saying he's earned the rave reviews and the many awards. This series and this author answers the question why there are other successful Scottish authors such as James Oswald and Stuart MacBride. An Edinburgh art dealer is brutally murdered and it was during this same time that Rebus is sent to the Scottish Police College. The other officers sent into exile with him are referring to themselves as the resurrection men. They are supposedly being re-educated in team work in order to redeem themselves and return to their original headquarters. This was a time for Inspector rebus to rebuild his relationship with his significant other, Jean. This also proved to be just the opportunity for Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke and Rebus to put their heads together and uncover the truth lurking under everyone's noses.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hobart

    This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- Another ghost in need of justice. Rebus had confessed to her once, after too many late-night drinks in the Oxford Bar, that he saw ghosts. Or didn’t see them so much as sense them. All the cases, the innocent -- and not so innocent -- victims . . . all those lives turned into CID files . . . They were always more than that to him. He’d seemed to see it as a failing, but Siobhan hadn’t agreed. We wouldn’t be human if they didn’t get to us, This originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader. --- Another ghost in need of justice. Rebus had confessed to her once, after too many late-night drinks in the Oxford Bar, that he saw ghosts. Or didn’t see them so much as sense them. All the cases, the innocent -- and not so innocent -- victims . . . all those lives turned into CID files . . . They were always more than that to him. He’d seemed to see it as a failing, but Siobhan hadn’t agreed. We wouldn’t be human if they didn’t get to us, she’d told him. His look had stilled her with its cynicism, as if he were saying that “human” was the one thing they weren’t supposed to be. Thanks to sickness, a little bit of travel, and general increased busy-ness in my non-blog life, I almost missed my monthly check-in with John Rebus. Thankfully, for my Bookish-OCD, I made it just in time. Even better? This was one of the best in the series. Rebus' drinking and displeasure at Gill Templar's handling of a murder investigation results in him being sent back to school. Literally. There's a "retraining" course at the Police College for long-serving officers with discipline problems -- sort of a last chance before the end of the road. These detectives are pretty similar, they've (mostly) been at this for years and aren't going to change, no matter what happens in the course. Most of them know each other by reputation, Rebus is well-known, apparently -- and he knows another classmate by reputation, he's "the Glasgow Rebus." After some counseling sessions, and some class lectures, the detectives are given a cold case to work to help learn something about teamwork. A couple of the detectives were associated with the original investigation in Glasgow, and even Rebus brushed up against it in Edinburgh. It's not so clear how much teamwork is being learned, it's clear that there are people who know things about the case that aren't in the files -- and they're not sharing. There is something about the case that could involve Big Ger, so guess who gets volunteered to talk to him? Rebus is not the only one talking to Cafferty, Siobhan Clarke (now a DS) has a couple of conversations with him. Watching Cafferty try to treat the two of the similarly, with different results, was quite entertaining -- Clarke reacts to him differently than Rebus, but she doesn't take the same angle with him that I think most would. I look forward to seeing the two of them lock horns in the future. Speaking of Siobhan -- never call her Shiv, by the way -- once again, she threatened to take over the book for the first half or so. Rebus' drinking with the other problem police and their cold case just didn't grab my attention at first. But Siobhan's dealing with the investigation -- without her mentor to bounce ideas off of -- and the various and sundry male detectives around her. Some of which work with her just fine, others . . . not so much -- at the end of the day, DS Clarke is the one who puts the case together, and in a pretty compelling way. Did I enjoy things a little bit more when Rebus came along to interact with a bit? Yeah, but it wasn't necessary. I also like the way that Rebus and Templar were the ones (along with Siobhan herself) noticing her doing things like Rebus this time, not just other police. He's clearly left his stamp on her -- for good or ill, the trick is watching her approach things the way he would, but remaining her own person. Which she has so far -- and, I bet, will continue to do so. But this is a Rebus novel, at the end of the day, and he does get the better material -- as I mentioned, he interacts with Siobhan some because he and the others come to Edinburgh to follow a pretty shaky lead (mostly, it's an excuse to get away from the college and drink somewhere else). Around this point, that storyline became more intriguing -- and it did end up being the better part of the novel. No one will ever say that the Rebus novels are a fun romp, but there was something about Rankin's writing in Resurrection Men that seemed darker than usual -- not a darkness because of violence or anything, just in the telling. Everything seemed worse, everything seemed sinister -- it's hard to put my finger on it exactly, but there was something grim going on. Yeah, I laughed a couple of times, smiled more often than that, but overall, the noir in this book was blacker. We see areas of Rebus' psyche we haven't seen much of before -- ditto for Clarke -- we also get some good Rebus/Cafferty backstory. The structure of this novel is the real star -- it was just perfect -- we get a couple of mysteries to watch our detectives solve, plus a couple of other things go on. It even seems like Rankin doles out the information in an unusual way, only telling us what we need to know when we need to know it -- there are times when we're more in the dark than Rebus because he's hiding the information from his fellow Last-Chancers and us (what does that say about Rankin's readers?), but it works -- this isn't a case of a mystery writer cheating, it's a deliberate attempt to build suspense. Complex without being complicated, brilliantly plotted but not in a way that feels totally organic. At a certain point, the way that all the storylines end up seem inevitable (even when you're still not sure who the various killers are going to be), yet you're surprised when the inevitable happens. But along the way, each step in the stories, each reveal, each development catches you off guard. Just fantastic structure to the book. I thought it was strange that Rankin started this one off (I'm guessing for the American edition only) with a little description of the Scottish Police's organization and rankings, which was nice (but most readers can figure it out on their own). Also included was a list of the cast of characters -- organized by storyline. That was helpful, too. Unnecessary, but very nice. I'm not sure why these were used, but I'll take them. This one checked almost every one of my boxes -- at least once, and never didn't hold my interest. Rankin clearly knows what he's doing and you should read this one -- and the twelve before it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Moira Russell

    Sadly disappointing....somehow, this book never lived up to its brilliant premise: Rebus, a walking nightmare of an employee, throws a mug of tea at his female boss and ex-lover and gets sent to a combination boot camp for recruits/rehab center for cops on their last chance. But really he's there undercover, trying to secretly investigate a ring of dirty cops....without revealing his own secrets about a cold case they've been assigned by surprise. Or is his boss trying to get rid of Rebus once Sadly disappointing....somehow, this book never lived up to its brilliant premise: Rebus, a walking nightmare of an employee, throws a mug of tea at his female boss and ex-lover and gets sent to a combination boot camp for recruits/rehab center for cops on their last chance. But really he's there undercover, trying to secretly investigate a ring of dirty cops....without revealing his own secrets about a cold case they've been assigned by surprise. Or is his boss trying to get rid of Rebus once and for all? Is he setting up innocent men or being set up himself? (It can't be a coincidence that a book whose plot depends so much on modern art is all about being framed....) One cop is known as "the Glasgow Rebus" which is what inspires our antihero to get set up in the first place. Does he want to smash the mirror and bring his double to justice, or join him in finally going all the way over the line? Like I said, brilliant. But the story somehow just dies, unlike Rebus's beloved Saab, less than halfway through and I had to struggle to finish it, like chewing a bite of meat that in your mouth suddenly turns out to be all gristle. There's one sparking moment when Rebus and his double/nemesis Cafferty face each other in a tiny interview room, but the will-he nill-he ambiguity that should suffuse the pages is just....absent. Often these books read like novelizations of screenplays to me (yes I realize it's the other way round): good actors could bring the implicit tensions to life with eloquent voices and faces, but flat prose can't do it. I did like Siobhan very much, and her prickliness caused by the way she constantly has to keep charming and soothing the men in her workplace in order to get them to just do their jobs and work with her, but also turn them down when they keep trying to bag her, and the cautious empathy she and her female boss have for each other. A subtheme of this book is women working with men, working for men, being seen as men's possessions, and there's one terrifying moment when the sexualized violence threatens Siobhan herself. But a few moments aren't enough to redeem the whole book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Renée Mee

    One of my fave authors and I love Rebus but his character is becoming tedious. It's nice to see a realistic flawed hero but after all Rebus's experience he is starting to appear not jut disillusioned(you can only play that card so long) but stupid. He is always getting into situations where he is beat up or almost killed and like the heroine tied to the railroad tracks,the hero rescues him just in time. Also,be nice to see a few more wins. Although ,no matter university education he appears to One of my fave authors and I love Rebus but his character is becoming tedious. It's nice to see a realistic flawed hero but after all Rebus's experience he is starting to appear not jut disillusioned(you can only play that card so long) but stupid. He is always getting into situations where he is beat up or almost killed and like the heroine tied to the railroad tracks,the hero rescues him just in time. Also,be nice to see a few more wins. Although ,no matter university education he appears to have raw intelligence that you can't be taught at university. But as a seasoned,experienced cop,he is all emotion and reaction and gets into situations where is at risk his career and life. I have read so many of this series that I would like to think with the years Rebus and the the author Has let Rebus mature or have his Eureka moment. It would be nice to see some more dimension to this character.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David Highton

    Rebus is one of the series I have read out of order, and this trip to the library was part of doubling back and reading a couple I have missed over the years. An undercover plot against corrupt policemen proves a tough and dangerous assignment for Rebus

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Excellent book, my first book read by this author and I really loved it, specially with the musical background BBC chose for it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    Another solid outing for everyone's favourite slightly rumpled, dissolute & clever DI. Rebus is sent back to the academy for retraining. It's the last stop on the career ladder for officers who have attitude problems or don't play well with others. Normally, he'd fit right in but this time he's a plant. Several of his classmates are suspected of helping themselves to the spoils of a drug war but the higher-ups have never been able to find the evidence they need. Many have long suspected Another solid outing for everyone's favourite slightly rumpled, dissolute & clever DI. Rebus is sent back to the academy for retraining. It's the last stop on the career ladder for officers who have attitude problems or don't play well with others. Normally, he'd fit right in but this time he's a plant. Several of his classmates are suspected of helping themselves to the spoils of a drug war but the higher-ups have never been able to find the evidence they need. Many have long suspected Rebus of being in the pocket of Big Ger Cafferty & the brass is hoping his reputation will allow him to get close to the bent cops. Back in Edinburgh, new DS Siobhan Clarke has a murder case on her hands. A local art dealer has met his maker & due to his lifestyle, the threads of the investigation stretch out in all directions. She has to take a hard look at sauna houses, galleries, artists, taxi companies & Big Ger, himself. The pressure is on & having a new junior partner, the return of an old colleague & no Rebus aren't helping. And soon there are more bodies. Rebus allows her to think he's actually been sent for "resurrection". As they compare notes, common names start to pop up in both investigations & it's clear they're each dealing with different parts of one big mess. As for playing well with others, well...in the end, they only trust each other & Rebus pays a high price. If you're a fan of this series you don't need this review. You'll pick it up because it's Rebus. He has become one of the most popular & venerated fictional characters for a reason. Reading these books by Rankin is one of the few sure bets out there. He's just that good. The characters he creates always feel like they're flesh & blood & following the reoccurring ones make each book required reading. You get invested in these people & their lives are never static. Their relationships, positions & jobs are always evolving, mirroring real life. The dialogue is tight, witty & each character has a distinctive voice. The plot is intricate & impossible to guess 'til it clicks into place in the final few pages. As usual, it's not only about the current cases but ghosts from previous ones reappear to complicate things. We know Rebus has always coloured outside the lines & some of his past actions threaten to come to light, actions that would not only skupper his undercover work but result in criminal charges. He has to wonder who they're trying to get the dirt on...him or the cops they sicced him on. If he didn't know better, he'd worry about being paranoid. It's a good thing, he jokes to a colleague, that not only does he know where all the bodies are buried but has the photos to prove it. But that's Rebus. Not the most strictly ethical man you'll ever meet but one you'd want in our corner. Typically well plotted, paced & intriguing, this is compulsive reading & you'll resent having to put it down.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Wow. #13 already in this wonderful series. Although a latecomer to Ian Rankin's and John Rebus' world, I always make sure every 2-3 books I go back to this terrific series in order to get my Rebus and Edinburgh fix. Resurrection Men is another intricately crafted mystery and, as with many of Rankin's books, manages to effectively tie in 2 or more seemingly unrelated crimes where solving either of them is entirely dependent on understanding the other. Forced into remedial training with some Wow. #13 already in this wonderful series. Although a latecomer to Ian Rankin's and John Rebus' world, I always make sure every 2-3 books I go back to this terrific series in order to get my Rebus and Edinburgh fix. Resurrection Men is another intricately crafted mystery and, as with many of Rankin's books, manages to effectively tie in 2 or more seemingly unrelated crimes where solving either of them is entirely dependent on understanding the other. Forced into remedial training with some potentially "dirty" cops Rebus, in his classic, "No holds barred" way, manages to entangle himself in all kinds of subterfuge. Tasked with solving a "cold case" with these individuals, he is left to question whether he too has been set up for a covert investigation of his role in the past crime by his superior. Concurrently, Siobhan is doggedly working on her own, current case, (the murder of an art dealer) and carries with her those suspicions that all is not as it seems that eventually lead her to find those associations with Rebus' work. It's when the two begin working together again that the true motive, means and murderers become apparent. As with all books in this series, it is the characters of Rebus, Siobhan and the many supporting players that transform the story into something far more than just another crime novel. Introspective and troubled, Rebus continues to belie authority and struggle with his personal relationships. Siobhan, more of a newbie to police work than her partner, also now finds herself more and more similar in behaviour, perspective and approach as her superior, mentor and friend and realizing that this job, in order to do it well, requires you put your heart and soul into it everyday, as it inevitably takes over your life.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Yngvild

    It is practically impossible to write a review of one of Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus novels without using the word ‘gritty’, so I may as well just get it over with. For anybody who has not met him before, Inspector Rebus is the classic bad boy of the Scottish police, a hard drinking maverick guaranteed to annoy his boss and get his man (or woman). The difference is that Ian Rankin does it so well and Resurrection Men is one of the best of the series. Appropriately number thirteen of the series, It is practically impossible to write a review of one of Ian Rankin’s Inspector Rebus novels without using the word ‘gritty’, so I may as well just get it over with. For anybody who has not met him before, Inspector Rebus is the classic bad boy of the Scottish police, a hard drinking maverick guaranteed to annoy his boss and get his man (or woman). The difference is that Ian Rankin does it so well and Resurrection Men is one of the best of the series. Appropriately number thirteen of the series, Resurrection Men has Rebus pushing it one step too far and ending up in one of those dreadful attitude-adjusting courses. It lets him spend time with all the other bad dogs of the force going over an old case that rakes up awkward memories, and leaving us wondering exactly who the villains are – inside and outside the force. This was how the jobs got done: with a tainted conscience, guilty deals, and complicity. With grubby motives and a spirit grown corrupt.It says something about the writing that I have read the book several times and still enjoy it, even though I obviously know the ending perfectly well. The dialogue is good, the tension sustained and nothing is too eye-rollingly absurd. If you like the genre, which is detective fiction without guns and babes to prop up thin plots and increase the word count, this is one of the best.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Another excellent Rebus story. This book finds DI Rebus sent back to refinishing school (in a way) after an incident at his local police station. He throws a mug of tea at boss, Gill Templar, and finds himself sent for retraining with a group of other reprobates from other districts. But there is more to this assignment than meets the eye and I'll let you read the book to see what. In the meantime, DS Siobhan Clark, Rebus' protégé, is deeply involved with a team trying to solve the murder of an Another excellent Rebus story. This book finds DI Rebus sent back to refinishing school (in a way) after an incident at his local police station. He throws a mug of tea at boss, Gill Templar, and finds himself sent for retraining with a group of other reprobates from other districts. But there is more to this assignment than meets the eye and I'll let you read the book to see what. In the meantime, DS Siobhan Clark, Rebus' protégé, is deeply involved with a team trying to solve the murder of an art dealer. This brings her into contact with an old adversary of Rebus, Big Ger McCaffrey. I have enjoyed the Rebus stories so much over the past two or three stories. Ian Rankin has really hit his stride over the past couple of stories. I do like how the other characters, especially Siobhan have come into their own and are well-developed personalities. Rebus is still Rebus, although he now has a lady friend (I hope it lasts). This story moved along very nicely, had some very suspenseful moments and was entertaining from beginning to end. If you haven't tried the Rebus series, you really need to do so.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rob Smith, Jr.

    This is my first Rankin novel read. I was concerned the length would have me emerged in another contemporary over written book. The book is over involved with too much character introspection and not enough setting description. But, the whole mountain of words is built up to a peak of a very good conclusion. The character development is probably the best part of the book. Though there are many, many characters and there are those with very similar names and multiple nicknames that makes the plot This is my first Rankin novel read. I was concerned the length would have me emerged in another contemporary over written book. The book is over involved with too much character introspection and not enough setting description. But, the whole mountain of words is built up to a peak of a very good conclusion. The character development is probably the best part of the book. Though there are many, many characters and there are those with very similar names and multiple nicknames that makes the plot hard to follow at times. There is a character list at the beginning of the book, but if that is felt to be needed, maybe some editing should have been done. The Rebus character is a somber one. Odd that the one thing that gave levity to the character got irritating and, i felt, unneeded, was the soon predictable joshing that occurred throughout. All getting back to editing. Well, after writing all of this and seeing all of the 'but's I wrote of, I want to note this is a good book with lots of nifty parts throughout the book and a satisfying ending so that... Bottom line: I recommend this book. 6 out of ten points.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eadie

    While in a reform school for cops, Inspector John Rebus joins a covert mission to gain evidence of a drug heist orchestrated by some of his classmates known as "Resurrection Men." The investigation threatens to uncover a secret Rebus has spent years trying to conceal, and before long Rebus finds himself in the thick of a scandal with men who have no problem spilling blood to get what they want. You can't help but love John Rebus! He tries so hard to do the right thing but always seems to end up While in a reform school for cops, Inspector John Rebus joins a covert mission to gain evidence of a drug heist orchestrated by some of his classmates known as "Resurrection Men." The investigation threatens to uncover a secret Rebus has spent years trying to conceal, and before long Rebus finds himself in the thick of a scandal with men who have no problem spilling blood to get what they want. You can't help but love John Rebus! He tries so hard to do the right thing but always seems to end up with egg on his face. This was another great Rebus read with unique characters and an excellent complex plot. These books are great to read one after another as you can't get enough of Rebus. Ian Rankin makes you feel like you are in Edinburgh along with all these characters. Siobhan has turned out to be a great sidekick for Rebus and she is starting to sound just like Rebus. I love it! I'm now looking forward to reading the next book in the series and I would highly recommend this book to those who like gritty police procedurals.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Genevieve Andrews

    Good Scottish mystery, makees you really want to go to the pub

  17. 5 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    Solid, but not great. Rebus is hit and miss for me. Maybe it is my addiction to Bosch and other American detectives that make him harder for me to follow. Either way, I will keep reading Rebus. I like him enough to keep entering his world.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Campbell

    Another solid outing for Rebus. This time he's on probation and undercover, trying to find the truth about some corrupt cops

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine

    4.5* for another great Ian Rankin read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    IslandRiverScribe

    This 13th novel in Ian Rankin’s John Rebus series won the Edgar Award for Best Novel in 2004. And every single page of the work speaks for why. The DI Rebus series is a character driven Scottish police procedural focusing on homicide. John Rebus is the main protagonist spanning each novel in the series and his character is deeply flawed: a functioning alcoholic, an aging “dinosaur,” a basically non-promotable maverick and thought to be bent. From the standpoint of the current times, he is all This 13th novel in Ian Rankin’s John Rebus series won the Edgar Award for Best Novel in 2004. And every single page of the work speaks for why. The DI Rebus series is a character driven Scottish police procedural focusing on homicide. John Rebus is the main protagonist spanning each novel in the series and his character is deeply flawed: a functioning alcoholic, an aging “dinosaur,” a basically non-promotable maverick and thought to be bent. From the standpoint of the current times, he is all those things - except bent. He's a dinosaur because he has an extensive street network and places his emphasis on investigative paths rather than on administrative statistics. He's non-promotable because he investigates where - and to whom - the evidence leads rather than where - or away from whom - the administrators want it to lead. And he does have a relationship with Morris Gerald Cafferty, the biggest mobster in Edinburgh. And while that relationship often helps him with cases, it is quite an adversarial relationship and he does not consider himself to be in Cafferty's back pocket. Finally, the ripple effect from all of Rebus's choices, both personally and professionally, in the previous novels accumulates into the tidal wave of consequences that is the premise of this novel. Rebus is now on desk duty. Therefore, his current disciplinary status, his street knowledge as a maverick investigator and his reputation as the resident "bad boy" puts him right in the crosshairs for becoming the lead investigator in an undercover Internal Affairs operation. Rebus's Chief Constable wants him to attend Resurrection School at the Police Academy to ferret out evidence to prove that a trio of cops, also assigned to the school, were complicit in foiling what is now a 7-year-old cold case - and who are rumored to have been continuing their bad acts in the years since. As part of their training to work as team members rather than as mavericks, the Resurrection group is assigned a cold case to work. They have all heard this is part of the remedial course and expect it. What John doesn't expect is that the cold case is one in which both he and one of the other Resurrection cops were involved several years prior, rather than the standard test case that the academy always uses. Blind-sided by the situation, John is no longer sure, and with good reason, whether he is really an investigator or whether the Chief Constable has set him up to be trapped right along with the others. Overall, this plot is a win-win situation for the Chief Constable. If Rebus unearths proof of the three officers’ culpability in the 7-year-old drug theft case, they are dismissed from the force and the CC wins. If Rebus’s culpability in the 6-year-old cold case being studied by the group is proved, a thorn-in-everyone’s-side Rebus is finally dismissed and the CC wins. If Rebus is not implicated and he fails to get proof on the trio, he simply finishes the remedial Resurrection course, returns to work a supposedly rehabilitated officer and the CC wins. The problem is what happens if the group Rebus is investigating finds out he is a mole. If they are guilty of what Rebus truly suspects, then Rebus could die. Oh well, the Chief Constable still wins. Back in 2002, when this book was published, Rebus’s survival was definitely an issue – it was the current book in the series and you never know, at the time, whether a particular entry will be the last. So, as I reached the heart-pounding, tension-filled end – and I do mean the last 20 pages of the book – my only consolation was in knowing that Rankin has written 8 more Rebus novels between 2002 and 2017. Rebus would live, but at what cost? As the "invoice" is being tallied, page by page, I thought the same thing that Morris Gerald Cafferty eventually quotes to Rebus: “Be Careful What You Wish For, Strawman.” Because the genie in the bottle may interpret your wishes far differently than you have expressed them. And you will have to live with the consequences of the genie’s actions as well as your own for the rest of your life. That's the cost.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Schwartz

    This book is definitely a winner. Classic John Rebus, and an excellent book in this wonderful series. This is book number 13 in the series, but it is also a good book for anyone to begin with if they want to sample this series. But I must warn those new dabblers, that this series is seriously addictive. Rebus is always in trouble with the higher-ups so it's not a surprise to find him sent to a retraining group to learn how to be a team player. And it's not a surprise to find out that he got This book is definitely a winner. Classic John Rebus, and an excellent book in this wonderful series. This is book number 13 in the series, but it is also a good book for anyone to begin with if they want to sample this series. But I must warn those new dabblers, that this series is seriously addictive. Rebus is always in trouble with the higher-ups so it's not a surprise to find him sent to a retraining group to learn how to be a team player. And it's not a surprise to find out that he got himself sent to this purgatory because of an act of anger which he inflicted on his superior officer. Rebus and five other edge of the fringe cops are living and training together. All of them have flouted authority for most of their careers, and for their sins, have been sent to the police college for some intermediary help to get them back into the mainstream. As a group they are asked to solve an unsolved cold case, and then that's when things get interesting for John Rebus. It's an old case of his that they're working on, and he has some secrets from the case that he doesn't want to get out. But the other five officers also have secrets of their own, and everyone is working to keep his own secrets buried so they will never see the light of day. Of course it doesn't stop there for John. Secrets to him are like an elixir that he must try to uncover, and he always finds himself in dangerous territory once he's on a case. And he has a habit of bringing Siobhan Clarke into the fray with him. I could go on, but I don't want to ruin all the fun for those who haven't read this book yet. And fun it is. This is a wonderful, galloping, page-turner of a book. I loved every minute of it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I have read other books in this series and really enjoyed them. This one for me was much less enjoyable than the others because it had so many characters that it was difficult to keep them all straight (it even had a 3 page list at the start of the book explaining who all the main characters were!). It also had more than one case that was being solved at a time in multiple police stations all with different staff. All this coupled with the fact that the book was so long (almost 450 pages) made I have read other books in this series and really enjoyed them. This one for me was much less enjoyable than the others because it had so many characters that it was difficult to keep them all straight (it even had a 3 page list at the start of the book explaining who all the main characters were!). It also had more than one case that was being solved at a time in multiple police stations all with different staff. All this coupled with the fact that the book was so long (almost 450 pages) made it a tedious read for me even though I usually enjoy the Rebus character and the Scottish setting. The central premise is that Rebus has been send back to a police training college to 'relearn' better habits as a disciplinary measure. It emerges that in fact he is undercover there attempting to unmask a group of bent cops that are also there for disciplinary reasons. They re-investigate an old case while at the same time his colleague Siobian is back at the station investigating a new case and still in touch with Rebus. The book details both investigations (which interact) and the relationships between all the police and civilian characters on both cases. Despite all this painstaking detail when the ending finally came I found it to be sudden and less believable than the rest of the book- it felt as if the author was as fed up as I was with all this detail and had suddenly decided to give up and just quickly end it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    #13 in Rankin's Rebus series sees DI John Rebus sent to a course for delinquent detectives. (After throwing a coffee cup at his superior Gill Templer that is). But all is not as it appears, Rebus has a certain job to do. The other "Resurrection Men" as these wayward coppers are called, are apparently not as they seem either. Solid entry in the always enjoyable Rankin novels. Although Rankin can't resist inserting several of his regulars into his stories (a certain Edinburgh crime boss for #13 in Rankin's Rebus series sees DI John Rebus sent to a course for delinquent detectives. (After throwing a coffee cup at his superior Gill Templer that is). But all is not as it appears, Rebus has a certain job to do. The other "Resurrection Men" as these wayward coppers are called, are apparently not as they seem either. Solid entry in the always enjoyable Rankin novels. Although Rankin can't resist inserting several of his regulars into his stories (a certain Edinburgh crime boss for example) he keeps things fresh by building up Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke. This is the strongest character development her character has received so far. Rebus on the other hand seems as self-destructive as ever. His love life with the museum curator Jean is also looking to be on shaky ground. Recommended to the fans. A newcomer to the series can certainly read this on its own, and perhaps decide to go back to the first novel and read them in order.

  24. 4 out of 5

    J.R.

    This the 13th in the addictive John Rebus series featuring the addicted cop who has become a favorite read for many. The book won an Edgar as best mystery in 2004 and I can’t really say why I hadn’t read it before this. When he’s not boozing or smoking, Rebus is generally up to his neck in trouble. This novel is no exception. It begins with the detective throwing a tea mug at his supervisor, which gets him sent to Tulliallan, the Scottish police college, for retraining. We soon discover he has This the 13th in the addictive John Rebus series featuring the addicted cop who has become a favorite read for many. The book won an Edgar as best mystery in 2004 and I can’t really say why I hadn’t read it before this. When he’s not boozing or smoking, Rebus is generally up to his neck in trouble. This novel is no exception. It begins with the detective throwing a tea mug at his supervisor, which gets him sent to Tulliallan, the Scottish police college, for retraining. We soon discover he has been ‘planted’ among other miscreants to investigate a group of other cops who are suspected of more serious misdeeds. Meanwhile, Rebus’ acolyte, the recently promoted Detective Sergeant Siobhan Clarke is continuing investigation of the brutal murder of an art dealer. As they confer, by phone and in person, they discover their cases are linked, a situation which puts them both in danger. This is a convoluted tale which requires close attention. Highly enjoyable and recommended.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Luffy

    When nearing the end of this book, I didn't realize that there would be a series of very short, action packed chapters. I'm beginning to find out that Ian Rankin tries to flavor his formula differently. The author likes to discuss about pubs, the weather, cigarettes, music (there's a mention of some movie but only once). If Rebus hadn't been a DI, he would have been amazed at all the action taking place in his life. Since he solves cases for a living, such events don't seem out of place. Goes When nearing the end of this book, I didn't realize that there would be a series of very short, action packed chapters. I'm beginning to find out that Ian Rankin tries to flavor his formula differently. The author likes to discuss about pubs, the weather, cigarettes, music (there's a mention of some movie but only once). If Rebus hadn't been a DI, he would have been amazed at all the action taking place in his life. Since he solves cases for a living, such events don't seem out of place. Goes with the territory. I've never seen an author quite like Rankin for making a mystery desultory, and its solving, mundane. The story of corrupt cops was a nice departure, the recurrent mob boss was present as usual. I just didn't get to know who wrote messages for DS Clarke. I also found the platonic romance of Jean and Rebus cute. Altogether a very satisfactory read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julia Herdman

    I have to confess I am an Inspector Rebus fan. Rebus is always in trouble one way or another and in this novel he is he is sent to the Scottish Police College for 'retraining' - in other words, he's in the Last Chance Saloon. As usual, Ian Rankin masterfully weaves different elements of the two cases in this novel, the murder of an Edinburgh art dealer and an old, unsolved case with highly rewarding results. The characters are engaging and real and in this story Rebus is asked to act as a I have to confess I am an Inspector Rebus fan. Rebus is always in trouble one way or another and in this novel he is he is sent to the Scottish Police College for 'retraining' - in other words, he's in the Last Chance Saloon. As usual, Ian Rankin masterfully weaves different elements of the two cases in this novel, the murder of an Edinburgh art dealer and an old, unsolved case with highly rewarding results. The characters are engaging and real and in this story Rebus is asked to act as a go-between for gangster 'Big Ger' Cafferty and the newly promoted DS Siobhan Clarke works the case of the murdered art dealer. If you love Rebus like me then you will enjoy this. If you’ve never tried a detective novel this would be a good one to start with.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anne Fenn

    Rebus is sent on a course for polis with problems - maybe corruption, brutality, insurrection, he is with 4 other men for testing times to improve their behaviour. For Rebus, it's actually a set up. A long and involved story of past crimes, work relationship troubles, villains old and new finds Rebus in a fix, getting into very dangerous territory on all fronts. Jean is still his love interest . He's living in Arden St, driving the Saab, drinking and smoking too much, all as usual. Gill Templar Rebus is sent on a course for polis with problems - maybe corruption, brutality, insurrection, he is with 4 other men for testing times to improve their behaviour. For Rebus, it's actually a set up. A long and involved story of past crimes, work relationship troubles, villains old and new finds Rebus in a fix, getting into very dangerous territory on all fronts. Jean is still his love interest . He's living in Arden St, driving the Saab, drinking and smoking too much, all as usual. Gill Templar is his boss. He shows more desperation, seems to really go off the rails. Siobhan has a new underling, David Hynds. She is more independent, a leader herself now after promotion to DS.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Marsh

    Resurrection Men is an interesting book. The plot is cleverly contrived and presents Rebus in an unusual situation. This story does not dissapoint, the expected range of on going story lines exist with favourite characters developing further. For me the plots become more fascinating with each book. Can't wait to start reading the next one.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Way too complicated. The novel staggers from place to place like Rebus after a long night at the Ox. A rare example of the TV adaptation being better. That said it's Ian Rankin, which means it's still a hell of a lot better than most.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shabbeer Hassan

    A rather good novel in the Rebus stable winning the Edgar in 2004 and one can see why! Rebus with his inner demons alive and hurting, a clumsy dinosaur in an over-bureaucratic and corrupt police system, with an unusual relationship with Morris Cafferty, the biggest mobster in Edinburgh, and yet not corrupt. And here we see all the past choices and actions both personal and professional, joining forces to put him in a corner, a no-win situation. A worthy read! My Rating -4/5

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