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The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics

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The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is an unprecedented collection of the greatest comics for children, artfully compiled by two of the best-known creators in publishing and the field of comics--Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly. This treasury created for young readers focuses on comic books, not strips, and contains humorous stories that range from The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is an unprecedented collection of the greatest comics for children, artfully compiled by two of the best-known creators in publishing and the field of comics--Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly. This treasury created for young readers focuses on comic books, not strips, and contains humorous stories that range from a single-page to eight or even twenty-two pages, each complete and self-contained. The comics have been culled from the Golden Age of comic books, roughly the 1940s through the early 1960s, and feature the best examples of works by such renowned artists and writers as Carl Barks, John Stanley, Sheldon Mayer, Walt Kelly, Basil Wolverton, and George Carlson, among many, many others. Organizing the book into five categories (Hey, Kids!; Funny Animals; Fantasyland; Story Time!; and Wacky & Weird), Spiegelman and Mouly use their expertise in the area of comics to frame each category with an introductory essay, and provide brief biographies of the artists. The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is essential reading for kids of all ages. . F&P level: T


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The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is an unprecedented collection of the greatest comics for children, artfully compiled by two of the best-known creators in publishing and the field of comics--Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly. This treasury created for young readers focuses on comic books, not strips, and contains humorous stories that range from The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is an unprecedented collection of the greatest comics for children, artfully compiled by two of the best-known creators in publishing and the field of comics--Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly. This treasury created for young readers focuses on comic books, not strips, and contains humorous stories that range from a single-page to eight or even twenty-two pages, each complete and self-contained. The comics have been culled from the Golden Age of comic books, roughly the 1940s through the early 1960s, and feature the best examples of works by such renowned artists and writers as Carl Barks, John Stanley, Sheldon Mayer, Walt Kelly, Basil Wolverton, and George Carlson, among many, many others. Organizing the book into five categories (Hey, Kids!; Funny Animals; Fantasyland; Story Time!; and Wacky & Weird), Spiegelman and Mouly use their expertise in the area of comics to frame each category with an introductory essay, and provide brief biographies of the artists. The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics is essential reading for kids of all ages. . F&P level: T

30 review for The TOON Treasury of Classic Children's Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    paula

    This hefty tome landed on my desk with a question: "Shelve with adult or in kids' graphic novels?" It's a question. First of all, the beast is 350 oversize pages long. It has an introduction AND a foreword. On the other hand, the Introduction is written by Jon Scieszka, and his first word of it is "Wow." Dennis the Menace and Little Lulu are in this book. So's Pogo, Uncle Wiggly, Donald Duck, and Gerald McBoing Boing. The comics are funny - funny in that slapstick name-call This hefty tome landed on my desk with a question: "Shelve with adult or in kids' graphic novels?" It's a question. First of all, the beast is 350 oversize pages long. It has an introduction AND a foreword. On the other hand, the Introduction is written by Jon Scieszka, and his first word of it is "Wow." Dennis the Menace and Little Lulu are in this book. So's Pogo, Uncle Wiggly, Donald Duck, and Gerald McBoing Boing. The comics are funny - funny in that slapstick name-calling kid-friendly way. I think that what most tempts us to slide this puppy in with the grownup books is its sumptuous production and classy design. Printed on ivory paper, the cartoons are reproduced in their original misregistered halftones, but I swear the page numbers and some of the interstitial text looks like letterpress. But this high-quality presentation is what Art Spiegelman and Francoise Mouly are known for. I swear that man took all the money he made from Maus and sunk it all into TOON books, their publishing company. While this book might be kind of too much for a kid to check out of the public library, it would make a really excellent gift - it would be the kind of book that would stay in a child's bedroom for six years, as he picked it up and put it down, browsed for something silly, or showed his favorites to his friends.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Wayne

    This volume is fantastic. Every story is great and every story is truly a classic. The book design is as good as it gets. I highly recommend this to parents. Normally old stories like these don't hold up too well, but this is the exception to that rule.It has Little Lulu - one of my alltime favorite comics, Carl Barks Ducks, Pogo, classic fairy tales and more. 300 pages of great stories. # 40.00 A real bargain coffee table book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I thought this book was very good. It has a lot of different stories that children can choose from along with mnay colorful pictures. The intended audience would be children in grades 2-8. I think it is a very entertaining book with many different stories for children to choose from. Moreover, I think both boys and girls would really enjoy reading this book and would be entertained for hours. It is from the Will Eisner award nominees for 2010.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    An amazing collection!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Abraham

    As any jackass who's read a few graphic novels knows, comics have been through some rough times. Oh yes, there was a time not so long ago when the ancestors of today's librarians and school teachers thumbed their noses at comic art or else condemned the stuff as trash. But things have changed: the Comics Code Authority is long behind us and comics are no longer "underground." Many library shelves are now stuffed with graphic novels -- also known as picture books for the not quite so young. Many As any jackass who's read a few graphic novels knows, comics have been through some rough times. Oh yes, there was a time not so long ago when the ancestors of today's librarians and school teachers thumbed their noses at comic art or else condemned the stuff as trash. But things have changed: the Comics Code Authority is long behind us and comics are no longer "underground." Many library shelves are now stuffed with graphic novels -- also known as picture books for the not quite so young. Many librarians and teachers now promote the stuff as a way to keep kids reading past the stage of Curious George. On the other end of the spectrum, comic books, under the guise of graphic novels, have found their way into some rather high-brow, literary hands. I smile a bit each time I think of the number of New Yorker subscribers who have read at least one of these adult picture books. "My, how things have changed," I always think, as the smile grows broader and broader, though I always swiftly change my mind on account of awkward stares. Why, just lookey here: this collection of children's comics, each originally published some time between the thirties and the early sixties, was edited by Art "Pulitzer Prize-Winning" Spiegelman, and his long-time significant other Françoise Mouly, who is also the long-time art director of a certain aforementioned, hallowed 'zine (the apostrophe demonstrates that I am not being facetious or derogatory). Even the likes of "Uncle Scrooge" and "Little Lulu" are finally getting some praise from high places -- some very well-deserved praise, in fact. From the massive pile of poorly done art and writing, of blatant nationalism, racism and a few other unpleasant "-isms" the editors pulled some fine examples of storytelling. They are from people who have since become legends in their fields -- and also from people who have not. They are all wacky, colorful, and full of wonderfully colloquial dialogue. And they are all full of passion -- pure passion that was rarely motivated by money or fame. Only the crazy and/or terribly naive expected to nail their names to the Wall of History by way of comics writing and illustrating. But, in a few cases, that is exactly what happened. Today, all who enter the world of comics must take note, and pay respect, to those great names that came before them. I leave you with "Ode to the Disney Ducks" by Carl Barks, a touching poem on the author's classic Uncle Scrooge and Donald Duck creations, which he wrote about a year before he died. Keats is not pissing his pants (in fright, that is), but Barks clearly had passion. He surely died content, knowing that his life was not all for naught: Ducks are people, too. Ode to the Disney Ducks They ride tall ships to the far away, and see the long ago. They walk where fabled people trod, and Yetis trod the snow. They meet the folks who live on stars, and find them much like us, With food and love and happiness the things they most discuss. The world is full of clans and cults abuzz as angry bees, And Junior Woodchucks snapping jeers at Littlest Chickadees. The ducks show us that part of life is to forgive a slight. That black eyes given in revenge keep hatred burning bright. So when our walks in sun or shade pass graveyards filled by wars, It's nice to stop and read of ducks whose battles leave no scars. To read of ducks who parody our vain attempts at glory, They don't exist, but somehow leave us glad we bought their story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is an above-average collection of kids' comics, recommended with caveats. For those of you who missed reading comics as a child, you might enjoy this, but it's more likely you won't "get it". Either you got the comics bug, or you didn't. No real teenage / adult comics here (no superheroes other than Captain Marvel, no army comics, no western comics). However, that being said, there are some true classics in here: Uncle Scrooge going to Tra-La-La, a slapstick Donald Duck chasing t This is an above-average collection of kids' comics, recommended with caveats. For those of you who missed reading comics as a child, you might enjoy this, but it's more likely you won't "get it". Either you got the comics bug, or you didn't. No real teenage / adult comics here (no superheroes other than Captain Marvel, no army comics, no western comics). However, that being said, there are some true classics in here: Uncle Scrooge going to Tra-La-La, a slapstick Donald Duck chasing the nephews (both by Carl Barks), one of the better Fox & Crow episodes, an excellent Little Lulu and also a Tubby story. The rest of the entries are uneven. My favorite of those was "Intellectual Amos" --- a school lesson disguised as a comic. Disappointments: 1) the Pogo represented here is not the Pogo you may remember from "We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us", politically charged with lots of wordplay (e.g., the "adult-oriented" Pogo). This is Pogo from a simpler time. 2) Sugar and Spike ? One story would be fine, but two ? Perhaps I just don't get it, I know there are S&S fanatics. I'm not one. 3) Major omission: Where were the Harvey comics ? Their time frame was from the 30's to the early sixties, so they certainly qualified. Hot Stuff, Casper, Spooky, Little Dot, Wendy ?? Of course, they may be planning that for a second volume (we can hope).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    What a blast I had reading this thick volume of classic cartoons! Laughter really is the best medicine. I turned on my lamp and picked this up from my bedside table during a case of bad insomnia. All my cares seemed to vanish; I no longer even wanted to sleep. This book made me want to go back in time and purchase scads of dime comic books and live in that daffy, dazzling world. Since I finished, I've been researching some of the artists (late 1930-early 1960s) whose work appears in this book an What a blast I had reading this thick volume of classic cartoons! Laughter really is the best medicine. I turned on my lamp and picked this up from my bedside table during a case of bad insomnia. All my cares seemed to vanish; I no longer even wanted to sleep. This book made me want to go back in time and purchase scads of dime comic books and live in that daffy, dazzling world. Since I finished, I've been researching some of the artists (late 1930-early 1960s) whose work appears in this book and would love to see much more of their work. The design of this book is a visual treat, with full-color illustrated endpapers, archival images throughout, including on the title page and the introduction, and there is a 2-page spread introducing each chapter with an introductory paragraph and lots of cool vintage images. At the end of the book there is biographical information about each artist. I just have to share this testimonial blurb from inside the dust jacket: "I stayed up all night reading this wonderful book and was so enthralled, I didn't hear the burglars who broke into my home. Get your own copy and then, you, too, will have no furniture." --Lemony Snicket, A Series of Unfortunate Events.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    In the years before the publication in 1954 of “Seduction of the Innocent” by Frederic Wertham, a large number and great variety of comic books were published. Once the book began to have some influence, the comic book business nearly collapsed, parents and “authorities” were finding unsuitable messages in comics where before there was no hint of such content. Most of the comic excerpts in this collection were published before that fateful year and even with the passage of sixty years and makin In the years before the publication in 1954 of “Seduction of the Innocent” by Frederic Wertham, a large number and great variety of comic books were published. Once the book began to have some influence, the comic book business nearly collapsed, parents and “authorities” were finding unsuitable messages in comics where before there was no hint of such content. Most of the comic excerpts in this collection were published before that fateful year and even with the passage of sixty years and making allowances for a far less vulgar time, it is hard to see how anyone could have been disturbed by the messages in these comics. In nearly all cases the comics are so silly as to be laughable now. There are no dangerous messages pointing to a path of delinquency or any other detrimental behavior, anyone that somehow finds it is seeing the nonexistent. This book allows the reader to look back and see children’s literature from that era and all interpretations of the content must be evaluated within that historical context. It could also serve as a supplemental text for courses in children’s literature, for this is an excellent sampling of young children’s reading entertainment in the 1940’s. This review appears on Amazon

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael P.

    This is hardly a representative sample of children's comics, but some of the best. It is, perhaps, the best way to discover which children's comics you want to seek out for more reading. (I did it the wrong way, which is to randomly buy some. Do not make that mistake.) The standouts are Carl Barks Donald Duck stories, Sheldon Mayer's Scribbley pages and Sugar 'n Spike stories, everything by Walk Kelly, the one Captain Marvel story (only one?), and the great discovery is the Frankenste This is hardly a representative sample of children's comics, but some of the best. It is, perhaps, the best way to discover which children's comics you want to seek out for more reading. (I did it the wrong way, which is to randomly buy some. Do not make that mistake.) The standouts are Carl Barks Donald Duck stories, Sheldon Mayer's Scribbley pages and Sugar 'n Spike stories, everything by Walk Kelly, the one Captain Marvel story (only one?), and the great discovery is the Frankenstein story by Dick Briefer. The rest seem of variable quality to me, but that may be a matter of taste. The one exception I should point out are the Little Lulu stories. Lulu's charm has always eluded me. I realize that a plucky kid who does not let the world get her down has political and psychological appeal, but that was already realized in Little Orphan Annie and with more social complexity. The Lulu stories themselves are competently rendered, but I do not find anything above average in their execution. Possibly, I have a blind spot, but also, possibly, the empress has no clothes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    J.

    This was quite a good collection, with some things I hadn't been exposed to before. Particularly good: Sheldon Mayer's "Sugar and Spike" and the autobiographical "Scribbly" Walt Kelly's "Pogo" of course. (And when is this strip going to get a fancypants edition?) Carl Barks "Duckburg" stories, which I had heard were good to excellent and hadn't had a chance to read. They were. George Carlson's "Pie-Face Prince" story was hilarious with the puns. Dave Berg's "Tweedle Twin This was quite a good collection, with some things I hadn't been exposed to before. Particularly good: Sheldon Mayer's "Sugar and Spike" and the autobiographical "Scribbly" Walt Kelly's "Pogo" of course. (And when is this strip going to get a fancypants edition?) Carl Barks "Duckburg" stories, which I had heard were good to excellent and hadn't had a chance to read. They were. George Carlson's "Pie-Face Prince" story was hilarious with the puns. Dave Berg's "Tweedle Twins" Harvey Kurtzman's "Hey, Look!" Jack Cole's "Burp the Twerp" was bizarre and philosophical. Basil Wolverton's "Powerhouse Pepper" and "Foolish Faces."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tosh

    This is sort of a weird trip to my childhood via this book. I would give this five stars, if it wasn't for my memories - which is not bad, but memories are sometimes sad. And for some reason going through these old comic books for children (roughly my generation) was like biting into that cookie that started the memories. Beautifully designed and correctly priced for the consumer ($40), it is a memory lane of sorts. And the odd thing is that these comics don't really deal with the era This is sort of a weird trip to my childhood via this book. I would give this five stars, if it wasn't for my memories - which is not bad, but memories are sometimes sad. And for some reason going through these old comic books for children (roughly my generation) was like biting into that cookie that started the memories. Beautifully designed and correctly priced for the consumer ($40), it is a memory lane of sorts. And the odd thing is that these comics don't really deal with the era of the 40's, 50's and 60's. It is sort of step away from whatever was happening and just stayed in this weird neutral land, where everything was beautiful and surreal.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karl Kindt

    Is this really the best of the comics that existed for kids pre-1970? Sad. Either the editors (and I suspect this is true) picked their own favorites, heavily flavored with nostalgia, with little regard for choosing the best or these really are the best of forty years of kids' comics. Or perhaps a bit of both are true at the same time? All of the art is first-rate, but I really wonder if this is the best of the era as far as the story-telling. I am highly suspect because I have read all of Carl Is this really the best of the comics that existed for kids pre-1970? Sad. Either the editors (and I suspect this is true) picked their own favorites, heavily flavored with nostalgia, with little regard for choosing the best or these really are the best of forty years of kids' comics. Or perhaps a bit of both are true at the same time? All of the art is first-rate, but I really wonder if this is the best of the era as far as the story-telling. I am highly suspect because I have read all of Carl Bark's stuff, and what they picked is good, but it is certainly not his best work. Perhaps they were limited by what they could reprint due to licensing or availability of quality original art?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Nearly all of these comics were published before I was born, but they have a timeless quality to them. I read them aloud to Nick over several days, and we both had a great time. Nick would probably give this 5 stars. Which is great, because it's a collection of comics for young children. These are funny comics, mostly, with some mild scares and thrills mixed in. They should be interesting to a wide age range. I hope that Nick'll be reading them to himself soon. He can already enjoy looking at th Nearly all of these comics were published before I was born, but they have a timeless quality to them. I read them aloud to Nick over several days, and we both had a great time. Nick would probably give this 5 stars. Which is great, because it's a collection of comics for young children. These are funny comics, mostly, with some mild scares and thrills mixed in. They should be interesting to a wide age range. I hope that Nick'll be reading them to himself soon. He can already enjoy looking at the pictures since, as good comics should, they tell a lot of the story. Really, I'd recommend this for anyone from little kids through adult lovers of graphic novels.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Tame

    Excellent book! There are some lovely stories in here. Some of the stories and characters were familiar to me, but not all. I'd never even heard of Intellectual Amos before. It's a shame that reprints of this work aren't more common. Yes, Walt Kelly, Carl Barks, Harvey Kurtzman, and even John Stanley are well I represented in readily available reprints. But where are the reprint collections for Jack Cole, George Carlson, or Sheldon Mayer? It's a serious lack on the part of currently available bo Excellent book! There are some lovely stories in here. Some of the stories and characters were familiar to me, but not all. I'd never even heard of Intellectual Amos before. It's a shame that reprints of this work aren't more common. Yes, Walt Kelly, Carl Barks, Harvey Kurtzman, and even John Stanley are well I represented in readily available reprints. But where are the reprint collections for Jack Cole, George Carlson, or Sheldon Mayer? It's a serious lack on the part of currently available books. Let's hope this volume is just the beginning.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jay Daze

    A wonderful collection of classic children's comics. My favourties were Little Lulu ('Five Little Babies' is positively a Jacobean revenge play), Intellectual Amos (shrunk down in an ant hill), and Carl Barks' Uncle Scrooge in "Tralla La" (move over Karl Marx). Still can't overcome my aversion for 'Dennis the Menance' probably because I was exposed to the watered-down, sappy version when I grew up. This is what children's literature should be subversive, imaginative and fun-fun-fun!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Celina

    this book has diffrent section of storys but what i see in all theese comics is that theese comics are very funny and cute it really atracts me . the photos of this book are very adorable it has babys that look so silly . in my opinon this book is awesome because it also has alot of baby colors and thats because theres babys in the book included and i think anyone will just take this book by looking at the pictures . a person who injoys babys will read this . trust me

  17. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    For anyone who remember the "classic" comics, this is a must for you! These comics focus on the juvenile in all of us. From Uncle Scrooge, Little Lulu, and many I'd never heard before, readers will be able to immerse themselves into humor that is so innocent yet classic. The book is a large book, so the comics are of great size and the quality of the original drawings are kept. Just a great book to sit down on a rainy day and have a good chuckle. A great book for anyone's library collection.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A bit expensive at $40, but my goodness, this is a must own, a curated sampler plate of golden age comics directly aimed at children with work by Barks, Jack Cole, Sheldon Mayer, Kurtzman, Wolverton, Stanley, etc, in addition to many others you've never heard of, like Andre LeBlanc. Hopefully, just like Art Out of Time, TOON will trigger more reprints from some of its rediscovered artists.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

    The age could be from grade 3 and up. This book could be for a boy or a girl and even for adults. The comics are very funny and fun to read. The children relate to the book and get a lot of reading done along the way. The book can bring back past memories for adults when they were younger. Eisner 2010 award winner

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I've rarely seen anything by Walt Kelly that wasn't "Pogo" (who is represented as well), or Harvey Kurtzman that wasn't in Mad or some other strange mag, but here we are. Nice range of titles and you can read the entire adventure, not suffer through a couple pages and leave you hanging. Although I would have liked some explanation the strips I wasn't familiar with.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Moss Drake

    A good mix of comics, although it's hard to edit approx. 30 years of kids' comics down to one volume. Spiegelmn & Mouly make a good selection. I'm glad to see the artists are given proper credit, since they weren't always credited when the comics were first published.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Francisco Becerra

    A wonderful assortment of classic toons and strips, selected by the master hand of Art Spiegelman. I had a blast of a time reading this classics and remembering good childhood days. Highly recommended, a source of inspiration!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emily Shaw

    I had to read this for my Comics & Graphic Novels college course, and it was enjoyable for what it was, but is not something I would pick up on my own. If you're a fan of classic comics though, I'd recommend it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eric Orchard

    One of the best comic anthologies I've read. amazing work, frantic, fun and really weird at times. I didn't love every single story but there isn't a boring story here.Love seeing the history of kids comics. So glad they didn't recolour this.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    This is an amazing collection of kids-oriented comics long unseen and forgotten by current collectors and readers of superhero fare. Wonderful Little Lulu, Pogo, fairy tales, and Uncle Scrooge tales that I'm sure to be sharing with my little one ASAP.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Adamirs0

    This is the thickest comic book I ever read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    a fun trip back into childhood with a lot of old favorites and a lot of new ones I never read or don't remember. Now the decision is whether to give the book to Isaac or Solly.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shay Dawn

    This is super cute, toons of comics, from Donald Duck to Gerald Mc. Boing-Boing.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joann

    Lots of old school comics, from the 1930's - 1960's....lots I had never seen.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

    Seriously, this is one of the best comics collections I've ever read. I hope they publish more collections!

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