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Dune Trilogy: Dune/Dune Messiah/Children of Dune

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Herbert's evocative, epic tales are set on the desert planet Arrakis, the focus for a complex political and military struggle with galaxy-wide repercussions. Arrakis is the source of spice, a mind enhancing drug which makes interstellar travel possible; it is the most valuable substance in the galaxy. When Duke Atreides and his family take up court there, they fall into a Herbert's evocative, epic tales are set on the desert planet Arrakis, the focus for a complex political and military struggle with galaxy-wide repercussions. Arrakis is the source of spice, a mind enhancing drug which makes interstellar travel possible; it is the most valuable substance in the galaxy. When Duke Atreides and his family take up court there, they fall into a trap set by the Duke's bitter rival, Baron Harkonnen. The Duke is poisoned, but his wife and her son Paul escape to the vast and arid deserts of Arrakis, which have given the planet its nickname of Dune. Paul and his mother join the Fremen, the Arrakis natives, ho have learnt to live in this harsh and complex ecosystem. But learning to survive is not enough - Paul's destiny was mapped out long ago and his mother is committed to seeing it fulfilled.


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Herbert's evocative, epic tales are set on the desert planet Arrakis, the focus for a complex political and military struggle with galaxy-wide repercussions. Arrakis is the source of spice, a mind enhancing drug which makes interstellar travel possible; it is the most valuable substance in the galaxy. When Duke Atreides and his family take up court there, they fall into a Herbert's evocative, epic tales are set on the desert planet Arrakis, the focus for a complex political and military struggle with galaxy-wide repercussions. Arrakis is the source of spice, a mind enhancing drug which makes interstellar travel possible; it is the most valuable substance in the galaxy. When Duke Atreides and his family take up court there, they fall into a trap set by the Duke's bitter rival, Baron Harkonnen. The Duke is poisoned, but his wife and her son Paul escape to the vast and arid deserts of Arrakis, which have given the planet its nickname of Dune. Paul and his mother join the Fremen, the Arrakis natives, ho have learnt to live in this harsh and complex ecosystem. But learning to survive is not enough - Paul's destiny was mapped out long ago and his mother is committed to seeing it fulfilled.

30 review for Dune Trilogy: Dune/Dune Messiah/Children of Dune

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jan-Maat

    Frank Herbert's Dune was in part inspired by his experience working in a research centre in California studying desertification. The realisation of the interrelationship of environment, people and culture coming out of that experience is a key feature of the series. At the centre of the first novel is a desert planet, Arrakis, and the secret desire of its inhabitants to transform it's ecology. It is a great science-fiction novel about systems of power and the role of ecology, although admittedly del Frank Herbert's Dune was in part inspired by his experience working in a research centre in California studying desertification. The realisation of the interrelationship of environment, people and culture coming out of that experience is a key feature of the series. At the centre of the first novel is a desert planet, Arrakis, and the secret desire of its inhabitants to transform it's ecology. It is a great science-fiction novel about systems of power and the role of ecology, although admittedly delivered in an accept it or loath it writing style and with various weird ideas including: Feudalism in space, a stress on lineages in which nonetheless many of the women seem to be mystic-concubines, homosexuality is shorthand for depraved evil, and space Arabs with blue eyes. The sequels are not fascinating unlike the first novel. Full of enthusiasm after reading Dune I read Dune Messiah but it is one of those books that divides the fans from the readers I suppose. In Children of Dune we see the surface of Arrakis beginning to change as the plans to transform the ecology of the plant are being put into effect, and some of the social implications of those changes beginning to emerge, but the book is not as packed with ideas as Dune. For something similarly ambitious yet more consistent in its delivery (& I lost interest in this series as it ran on and on) I personally prefer Brian Aldiss' Helliconia Trilogy. The weigh of the ideas is really all placed in the first volume. The Feudal-Federalism of the Space-Empire, the breeding programme to create a Messiah figure who can guide humanity towards an unpredictable future, the land makes the people and the people make the land, the replacement of computers with specialised people. The subsequent books are really just the working through of the ideas set out there. It is all inevitable and the reading as a result is poorer. Dune perhaps epitomises science-fiction. The willingness to embrace big ideas and show them playing out on a broad canvas married to uneven writing and a a certain 'what-the Hell-ness' as the author lays out their pet sociological/anthropological opinions. The David Lynch film, I feel, captures the oddness of the reading experience quite well and perhaps sets about chopping at the text with a brutality which oddly appropriate. Alternatively it offers a combination of the latter books of the Old Testament with a sensitivity towards the influence of the environment upon man and of man upon the environment. At points this works on its own terms, at others it rather strangles itself with its own pretensions. You have to read it to believe it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Apatt

    A lot of people only read the first book, including people who seldom read sci-fi and people who only read just this one sci-fi book. The other two books are definitely worthwhile, especially the third volume (I have not read anything subsequent to the third book). If you are interested these are my reviews: 1. Dune 2. Dune Messiah 3. Children of Dune

  3. 4 out of 5

    Troy

    OK - let's cut through the BS. This is - quite simply - the most magnificent Sci-Fi epic ever written. The scope of Asimov's Foundation, the attention to detail and context of Tolkien's LotR, coupled with an unmatched visionary socio-ecological messianic narrative that is scarily relevant today. Anyone who likes Sci-Fi and who hasn't read this needs to get a copy. And read it. Now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Freya

    The 'Lord Of The Rings' of science fiction, I started reading my aunt's battered old copies while stuck in America in the spring and found it absolutely wonderful. Intensely gripping, I enjoyed it so much I went out and bought my own copy of the trilogy. Incredibly dense and rich with detail, these books are totally unputdownable, and the intrigue will keep you turning pages for hours. Loved them so much I named one of my cuddly toys Gurney Halleck :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Although this is the first half of the Dune series, personally I think books 1-4 constitute a proper story arc, But heck, I recommend the whole series, not just the first three books :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    This is such a magical book for me. I’m not even going to attempt to write an objective review. I simply don’t have the words. Yes, this rating is based on emotion and on how this book affected me and my reading evolution over the years. And, frankly, that’s the best way to gauge it, anyway. Long live the King!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    The Dune series by Frank, not the son, form one of the pillars of my dreams over the decades since I read the first book. Somehow the imagery plays out in my mind far better than the attempts made by Hollywood. Unfortunately, I donated my original set, with the original covers, when I moved a few years ago - the new books don't smell the same and don't have the familiar paper feel I grew accustomed to while reading them during finals week year after year. The blend of science-aversion, The Dune series by Frank, not the son, form one of the pillars of my dreams over the decades since I read the first book. Somehow the imagery plays out in my mind far better than the attempts made by Hollywood. Unfortunately, I donated my original set, with the original covers, when I moved a few years ago - the new books don't smell the same and don't have the familiar paper feel I grew accustomed to while reading them during finals week year after year. The blend of science-aversion, exploitation of the naive by systematic manipulation of religion and witchcraft, and the harsh realities of life in a barren and mineral depleted desert is astounding. I love these books!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shimon de Valencia

    The mythos the late Mr Herbert Has bequeathed to us either enraptures or bores the reader. I am of the former, this is mature, intellectual, dramatic science fiction that still resonates as a warning about power and its dangers. I seem to read rhis every few years and never tire, nor fail to gain a new insight. Simply put, glorious.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nooilforpacifists

    First book (loosely based on story of Mohammed) is second best SF ever written. Books two and three, inevitably, fall off.

  10. 4 out of 5

    James

    Dune is a masterful piece of writing, with a beautifully realised world - the politics, Arrakis itself, the people - all well thought out and plausible. I think what Herbert does well, is although the world and the people are alien, the reader can relate to them. I find too many sci-fi authors are so interested in creating exotic worlds and peoples that they forgo characters readers can relate to and as result, the stories miss that emotional hook. In my opinion, Dune is the strongest of the boo Dune is a masterful piece of writing, with a beautifully realised world - the politics, Arrakis itself, the people - all well thought out and plausible. I think what Herbert does well, is although the world and the people are alien, the reader can relate to them. I find too many sci-fi authors are so interested in creating exotic worlds and peoples that they forgo characters readers can relate to and as result, the stories miss that emotional hook. In my opinion, Dune is the strongest of the books, with Children of Dune second. Although I enjoy Dune Messiah, I can't help but shake the feeling that it is there to link Dune and Children of Dune together. I know it was written before Children but that is the feeling I get. I haven't braved the other books in the Dune series, I have heard they dip in quality and I don't want the original trilogy tarnished.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    This remains, for the time being, my favourite series. The story is intricate and well developed and perfectly balanced so that you do not lose sight of the other points of view in the book while focusing on a specific character's story. I found this book to be the well of clear water that I needed so badly in a rather dry existence. I remember having read the trilogy as well as the other books in under 2 weeks time, therefore this represents a personal epiphany and these books shall forever be This remains, for the time being, my favourite series. The story is intricate and well developed and perfectly balanced so that you do not lose sight of the other points of view in the book while focusing on a specific character's story. I found this book to be the well of clear water that I needed so badly in a rather dry existence. I remember having read the trilogy as well as the other books in under 2 weeks time, therefore this represents a personal epiphany and these books shall forever be the dearest and most valued memories of all that I have read. I highly recommend it for any SF fan (next to Asimov's Foundation).

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    The latter novels did not have the clarity of vision and meaning that the first does

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adon Coya

    A must read, not only by scifi fans, but also for its literature, its philosophy, ... - it's an ageless book for everyone.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Simon Kao

    Quite an epic ride.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Tintner

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My friend warned me: it goes down after the first book. But I couldnt help myself and ordered this trilogy the day after finishing Dune. I was not interested as much in the plot, which can dawdle on forever like so many once-great sci-fi series, but rather in how Frank Herbert continued exploring the big ideas of Dune: the Middle East/Dune parallels, Church-State, climate change, the competing myth creations of Paul vs the BG... Book II (Dune Messiah) is the fall of Paul and Book III My friend warned me: it goes down after the first book. But I couldnt help myself and ordered this trilogy the day after finishing Dune. I was not interested as much in the plot, which can dawdle on forever like so many once-great sci-fi series, but rather in how Frank Herbert continued exploring the big ideas of Dune: the Middle East/Dune parallels, Church-State, climate change, the competing myth creations of Paul vs the BG... Book II (Dune Messiah) is the fall of Paul and Book III (Children of Dune) focuses on the Atreides who were born on Dune (Paul's sister Alia, and Paul's twins). From a reading of other reviews, many people apparently lost interest at book II; however, I was drawn in by the new characters and intrigued by the big arc of Paul's willing self-destruction. The plot was not as compelling as Dune, but it also was not leaning on the the archetypal outline of the child-turned-hero myth. So as I began book II, I thought that my friend's judgment was off: while the trilogy was not equal parts greatness, it was building upon the masterpiece into something more. Book III got off to a promising start, with new characters (Farad'n, the grandson of the former Shaddah Emperor, and his entourage) and a more abstract focus on the dangers inherent in all of the "children of Dune" as a result of their having been born with a multiplicity of personalities and memories. Leto emerges as the protagonist, who is seeking a path that will correct the errors of his father. At this point, I was still hooked. "What does he see that Paul did not?" "How will this insight shift my understanding of the big issues?" But then, slowly, Leto's thoughts and philosophy became harder for me to follow. Is the Golden Path Leto's rule or Farad'n (who is described with plenty of gold imagery)? Is Leto prescient or has he avoided that temptation? By destroying the qanats, isnt Leto turning the planet back to dessert and thereby saving the worms, but if so, why will the worms die in 100 years? Harum?? It was this muddying of the big issues that left me dissatisfied, because if those had stayed coherent in my head (which may be the fault of my reading and not the writing), then I might not have found some of the plot twists so absurd (Leto becoming a worm) or the personality changes unconvincing (Paul to Preacher; Alia to Abomination). So I wont be reading any more Dune books, but I could see myself coming back to this series again and giving the third book another chance. I'd love to find that I had missed subtleties and that Herbert's grand vision was simply too all-encompassing for me to take in at first try.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

    To the uninitiated the Dune universe and its characters, plots and intrigues might seem inaccessible. And perhaps that is fair comment. The continuously shifting allegiances, uncovering of secrets and see-sawing fulcrum of power can be intimidating. Accompanied by Herbert's rather staid prose, Dune is not recommended as a primer for the novice or the curious, however, those willing to persist will be rewarded many-fold. That is not to say that Dune is difficult to read - it isn't. Dune is the re To the uninitiated the Dune universe and its characters, plots and intrigues might seem inaccessible. And perhaps that is fair comment. The continuously shifting allegiances, uncovering of secrets and see-sawing fulcrum of power can be intimidating. Accompanied by Herbert's rather staid prose, Dune is not recommended as a primer for the novice or the curious, however, those willing to persist will be rewarded many-fold. That is not to say that Dune is difficult to read - it isn't. Dune is the reason why Sci-fi exists. It is the most magnificent theatre of the fantastic, the grandiose and the epic, whilst still retaining it's integrity. Sci-fi is also a potent vehicle for social commentary. Not bound by the constraints of other forms of fiction, Sci-fi has a virtual blank canvas upon which to paint its social allegory, allowing it unprecedented scope and accuracy. Frank Herbert makes full use of these faculties and delivers a typically honest interrogation of both temporal and existential issues such as imperialism, globalisation (universalisation?), organised religion, free will vs predestination, and fundamentalism, amongst others. Not only that but Herbert pioneered planetary ecology in creating an ecosystem for Arrakis, an ecosystem that undergoes some drastic transformations during the course of the book, with remarkable accuracy have reported many ecologists. But most incredibly of all, Herbert somehow created an allegory that pre-dated its subject by almost three decades, an allegory that is still as pertinent now as it was 20 years ago. Without giving too much away, the world of Dune (trilogy) and everything that takes place in it can be viewed as a direct analogy for Western, specifically US, involvement in the Middle East from Gulf War I hence, with particular reference to the conquest for oil (melange/spice). The Fremen culture is closely modelled on Arab culture, even speaking practically pure Arabic. But what freaks me out, and many Arab readers, is that some of the Arabic words and concepts employed by Herbert in Dune did not become part of mainstream Arabic culture until the 21st century (the first book was published in 1965)! Obviously I am a big fan - Dune was the book that eventually tilted me towards the Sci-fi windmill - but I believe this book deserves recognition as a great work of fiction, not just Science Fiction.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    With this latest addition to the so-called Gollancz "Black Library", another classic has been immortalised. If you're looking for a lovely copy to keep, or for a gift, this one has much to like. The black faux-leather has writing imprinted in gold, and it is a nice looking copy. The print type however seems to be of old stock, and a little worn in terms of type - none of that precise digital typography here! In term of the content, there's nothing too exciting. There are the three boo With this latest addition to the so-called Gollancz "Black Library", another classic has been immortalised. If you're looking for a lovely copy to keep, or for a gift, this one has much to like. The black faux-leather has writing imprinted in gold, and it is a nice looking copy. The print type however seems to be of old stock, and a little worn in terms of type - none of that precise digital typography here! In term of the content, there's nothing too exciting. There are the three books of the original trilogy, of course (Dune, Dune Messiah and Children of Dune) with the Glossary and the maps as found in the original copies of Dune. There's enough been said in other reviews about the content, so I'll say little here other than Dune is great, the others are more demanding (although, admittedly, not as demanding as the so-called "Second Trilogy", published a decade or so later than these novels.) However, it is the basic text - there's no added introduction or gilt edges (as in the 1987 Easton Press edition of Dune), there's none of the lovely John Schoenherr artwork (recommended by Frank Herbert himself) that was added to the 1999 edition of the Dune Gollancz hardback. It is about half the price of the Folio Press edition of Dune, though, and here you get the other two books as well. But it gives you what you're expecting - a lovely edition of the basic books to keep, and a worthy addition to the Black Library.

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    The theme of 'The One' that is so overly used in fantasy is applied to Herbert's highly original sci-fi setting. A few of the environmental themes still have resonance in today's world, together with the struggle over resources. I noted some parallels between the fate of Duke Leto and that of George RR Martin's Ned Stark. Some plot developments were a tad convenient whilst others were interesting.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Trevivian

    This is definitely one of those sets-of-books that they should remake the films for! Frank Herbert injects so much detail into a complex emotional story line you can't help but be sucked in by it all. The ending is sort of sad, but then I haven't read the additional #4 or above yet! I'm a purist...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donna Riley-lein

    Dune is a planet of limits and possibilities. It is a place waiting for the people bred for its promise. But it goes wrong. Or right. It depends on your perspective. Perspective, like the sands of Dune change with the wind. Dune is a treatise on power, ecology and hubris. It is one of the books any science fiction fan should read at least once.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Pearl

    A brilliant examination of human politicks and potential. Also an exploration of the dichotomy of destiny and free will as Paul struggles to stem the inevitable tide of events that will rip human society apart. One of the best books ever written.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    First one 5 stars. Second book 3 stars. 3 book 2 stars.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    These were really fun. As soon as I finished one I grabbed the next. I was sorry to see them end. Unlike most incredibly detailed books it didn't take me long to "get into" the story.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ru Chung

    Amazing exploration of society and the norms that have been established. Heavy read in the lane of Asimov foundation or Butler in the wildseed series. I'd say one of the greatest books ever written.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lee Penney

    Breaking down each book: Dune - 4* I was aware of Dune from the movie, which is one of my favourites (it’s well worth a watch, because the design team was clearly on something strong). I knew it was based on a book and I’d been meaning to read it for a while. I actually have the first three books in an omnibus edition. One thing that struck me is how closely the movie sticks to the plot of the novel, lifting lines and entire scenes directly from the bo Breaking down each book: Dune - 4* I was aware of Dune from the movie, which is one of my favourites (it’s well worth a watch, because the design team was clearly on something strong). I knew it was based on a book and I’d been meaning to read it for a while. I actually have the first three books in an omnibus edition. One thing that struck me is how closely the movie sticks to the plot of the novel, lifting lines and entire scenes directly from the book — not something that happens very often. Where it differs, I’d actually say the movie does a better job. Controversial, I know. I say that because, while the book provides a bit more depth to certain elements, it seems shy of the action. Herbert loves inventing new terms, sects and religious elements, but any action passes in a few paragraphs or happens entirely off-screen. Other than that, it’s brilliantly inventive, with scenes that I couldn’t pull myself away from sprinkled throughout. I did find it hard to read without comparing it to the movie. The next next two should give me a different view. They’re apparently re-making the movie for release in 2019, but having read it, I think it would have made a good TV series with as much murder and double-dealing as Game of Thrones. --- Dune Messiah 3* This is a short entry compared to the others in the trilogy. It also involves a lot more navel-gazing than the first. Gone are the battles, the fighting and the grand visions. They’re replaced with plots, intrigue and battles of conscience. Having created an empire, set a galaxy-wide jihad in motion and been deified by his people, the new emperor must deal with his own inner demons. There are no easy choices, but it seems to be less about the plots from without and more about the roads he must walk and the decisions he has to live with. As such, it’s a deep read, but lacks something in the dynamism. Pleasant enough but doesn’t have the grandeur of the first. --- Children of Dune 3* I picked up the miniseries that stars James McAvoy on DVD a while back and was suitably lost in the story, and the low production value. I was hoping this would help make sense of it. This was the final part of the three-book collection I had. As the name suggests, it follows the children of Paul Maud’dib as they grow into adolescence on Dune, raised away from the cities as Fremen in a sietch (cave complex). There’s some very good parts, some interesting action, some gripping moments as the pair, who look like children but have the memories of all of their ancestors, dish out philosophy and wisdom. Not all of it made sense though. And then there’s the ending. It’s a mess. Aside from being unbelievably abrupt, it just doesn’t fit with the rest of the story. The narrative, up to that point, is more convoluted and nuanced than anything in Game of Thrones, annoyingly so at times, but the ending feels like the author was trying to get it under a certain word count and realised he was running out. Maybe a second read would help, but not likely I’ll give it that chance.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Liliana

    After hearing so many times that Dune was the masterpiece of Science Fiction literature, and seeing a new edition in the store where before I had seen none, I decided to pick this up. This took me some months to read, specially because it is very dense and in other editions just the first book is 900-ish pages. But it was absolutely worth it, entrancing and mind-blowing! Herbert succeeds at juxtaposing so many different elements: ecology, religion, consciousness, feudalism, space travel... gawsh After hearing so many times that Dune was the masterpiece of Science Fiction literature, and seeing a new edition in the store where before I had seen none, I decided to pick this up. This took me some months to read, specially because it is very dense and in other editions just the first book is 900-ish pages. But it was absolutely worth it, entrancing and mind-blowing! Herbert succeeds at juxtaposing so many different elements: ecology, religion, consciousness, feudalism, space travel... gawsh, I could go on! He delivers lessons on all of these, and I couldn't help but save so many quotes. The fact that he has as the epicentre of the story an entheogen is... just amazing. Hardly anyone writes about that because they either have no experience in psychoactive substances, or they are too afraid of the negative connotations it might carry. But not Herbert. He would be the kind of person I'd love to have a chat with. The fabric he's woven with these books is just incredible. It is a mainly character-driven plot, with the three books in this trilogy focusing on the Atreides family on Dune. Conversations leave you in suspense because there are so many hidden motivations, giving you an exaggerated perspective on human nature. That being said, I sometimes had a hard time to follow Herbert's writing and dialogues. I suspect that is partly why this trilogy took me so long to complete, I need to be really focused and in the mood to dive into such a complex world. Also, my order of preference is: (1) Dune; (2) Dune Messiah and (3) Children of Dune. There were some plot decisions in the last book that just left me baffled, and I was wondering why the characters would decide to act that way. Dune just had a hold on me from start to finish, and I was finding it hard to put it down, already thinking of the fun I would have in rereading it. Dune Messiah just focused so much more on Paul's struggles in his new found role, I felt much closer to him, and the whole book just had a poetic justice undertone that I really liked. Even though there were some low points, I can't help giving this trilogy a 5* rating! Simply because I think everyone should delve into this world, let themselves be absorbed by it. It makes you question your reality, your choices, your relationships and the impact you have on the world, or the impact the world has on you. I cannot recommend it enough, and believe me, I can't shut up about it. I will definitely continue with the the sequels!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ian King

    Wow! What an adventure! This is a brilliant read and a well laid out story, set on the desert planet 'Dune'. A place where the universe is battling to control the 'Spice' found on this wretched land. This is a story of corruption, control and universal domination between various races who will betray one another at the drop of the hat. Whoever pays the highest price get's the greatest army, or so they think. Baron Harkonnen thinks he has the new planet administrator, 'The Duke of Atreides', Wow! What an adventure! This is a brilliant read and a well laid out story, set on the desert planet 'Dune'. A place where the universe is battling to control the 'Spice' found on this wretched land. This is a story of corruption, control and universal domination between various races who will betray one another at the drop of the hat. Whoever pays the highest price get's the greatest army, or so they think. Baron Harkonnen thinks he has the new planet administrator, 'The Duke of Atreides', wrapped around his fat finger and so he does, but the Baron had not accounted for The Dukes prophesied son Paul. Paul is a long awaited production of the 'Bene-Jeseret' experiment, which has been in development for many generations. A Bene-Jeseret is born and raised through a selection process of the highest order and of the best training known. Once Paul Atreides comes of age, he is put through the terrible 'Jongebar' test which could cost him his life and he survives with unprecedented results. A brutal plot is afoot to take absolute control of 'The Spice' and The Atreides family line is destroyed, only Paul and his mother survive and go into hiding and become allied with the planets local natives. They will rise again, a most powerful army that sets the universe on its edge. It's a long trilogy and sometimes hard to follow, but certainly worth your time. I listened to the audiobook version of this (over 22 hours) and was a little disappointed with this, as the characters voices and narration changed constantly. This is the only reason I've given it a 4 star. I found that the main narrator sometimes played the individual characters, which is fine, but other times there were other people doing those same characters so there was no real consistency to the audio flow. I found this distracting because I was expecting a particular character voice to be heard and it would have been even more enjoyable if the production company got this one right. They should have stuck to either the single narrator, or the different character voices playing their parts throughout... one, or the other but definitely not both.

  28. 5 out of 5

    James

    Since this was three books in one omnibus, I'll try to review each book... Dune was very detail oriented and much richer than the other books. What was happening was straightforward, leading to a lot of the outcomes being exactly what the reader would expect even if they hadn't seen the movie. (That being said, a lot of points of the movie aren't understood if you haven't read the book. But I prefer to keep the two separated.) Dune Messiah was pretty enjoyable, though it wa Since this was three books in one omnibus, I'll try to review each book... Dune was very detail oriented and much richer than the other books. What was happening was straightforward, leading to a lot of the outcomes being exactly what the reader would expect even if they hadn't seen the movie. (That being said, a lot of points of the movie aren't understood if you haven't read the book. But I prefer to keep the two separated.) Dune Messiah was pretty enjoyable, though it was a bit harder to follow due to the fact that there was at least one part where it seemed like the publisher forgot a page. But it did help set up for the next book very well. Children of Dune on the other hand took a lot of the original characters and turned them on their heads. Many of the plot points from the first two books were effectively thrown out for the sake of the story and I can't really say that it was as enjoyable as the story line preceding it. Hence why I only rated this book as three stars rather than four.

  29. 5 out of 5

    *Jasmin B*

    The thing about Dune is that the story revolves around a desert planet that's filled with big deserts with big and nasty worms, so it's naturally to this day still badly accepted by the society that prefers Star Wars and Star Trek kind of movies. But that doesn't mean it's bad, in fact, in my humble opinion, Dune Trilogy is one of the best science fiction Trilogies ever written besides Alien and Isaac Asimov's Foundation. It pretty much brings everything every science fiction buff wants to read The thing about Dune is that the story revolves around a desert planet that's filled with big deserts with big and nasty worms, so it's naturally to this day still badly accepted by the society that prefers Star Wars and Star Trek kind of movies. But that doesn't mean it's bad, in fact, in my humble opinion, Dune Trilogy is one of the best science fiction Trilogies ever written besides Alien and Isaac Asimov's Foundation. It pretty much brings everything every science fiction buff wants to read about inside of a science fiction novel, and it offers a truly great storyline and a well-crafted fictional Hero, one that shall most definitely keep your interest into the novel, and keep you wanting and searching for a whole lot more. Luckily for you, there is more of the Dune world on the bookshelves inside of a book store, but I suggest you read this Trilogy first, because it's amazing, characters inside it are amazing, and the storyline isn't just truly great but also truly spectacular.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam Mitchell

    So so so often (99%) any on screen adaptation grievously disappoints the book! Now I was introduced to Dune first by way of the Miniseries in the early 2000's and I loved it and proceeded to watch Children of Dune (miniseries) and the 1984 movie! After digesting all of these I finally brought the books, and well- the screen adaptations are pale in comparison to the sheer vastness of the detail and soul that Mr Herbert instills into these Epics! Yes I call them Epics, with few equals! His imagina So so so often (99%) any on screen adaptation grievously disappoints the book! Now I was introduced to Dune first by way of the Miniseries in the early 2000's and I loved it and proceeded to watch Children of Dune (miniseries) and the 1984 movie! After digesting all of these I finally brought the books, and well- the screen adaptations are pale in comparison to the sheer vastness of the detail and soul that Mr Herbert instills into these Epics! Yes I call them Epics, with few equals! His imagination creates these intricate alien landscapes and cultures that despite their alienness are relatable and a plot that draws you in!

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