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Sea of Stars, Vol. 1: Lost in the Wild

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"LOST IN THE WILDS OF HEAVEN" Being a space-trucker sounds like a cool job, but the reality is can be boring as hell. So when recently-widowed GIL gets a long-haul gig across the universe, he figures it's safe enough to bring his young son KADYN along for the ride -- that is until their "big rig" gets bitten in half by a gigantic Space Leviathan! Now separated from his "LOST IN THE WILDS OF HEAVEN" Being a space-trucker sounds like a cool job, but the reality is can be boring as hell. So when recently-widowed GIL gets a long-haul gig across the universe, he figures it's safe enough to bring his young son KADYN along for the ride -- that is until their "big rig" gets bitten in half by a gigantic Space Leviathan! Now separated from his young son -- with a breached suit that's venting oxygen at an alarming rate -- Gil must defy the odds and stay alive long enough to rescue Kadyn. Meanwhile, Kadyn seems to be getting all the help he needs from a talking Space Mon-key riding a Space Dolphin...or maybe it's the strange powers he's suddenly manifest-ing?! From the writing duo of JASON AARON (SOUTHERN BASTARDS, Thor) and DENNIS HOPELESS (Cloak & Dagger, Vader: Dark Visions), with dazzling art by STEPHEN GREEN (Hellboy & the BPRD) and cosmic colors by Rico Renzi (SpiderGwen) comes a brand-new science fiction series, with all the scope and heart of the THE NEVEREND-ING STORY crossed with imaginative weirdness of Miyazaki -- an intense, galaxy-spanning adventure that's suitable for fans of all ages! COLLECTS SEA OF STARS 1-5


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"LOST IN THE WILDS OF HEAVEN" Being a space-trucker sounds like a cool job, but the reality is can be boring as hell. So when recently-widowed GIL gets a long-haul gig across the universe, he figures it's safe enough to bring his young son KADYN along for the ride -- that is until their "big rig" gets bitten in half by a gigantic Space Leviathan! Now separated from his "LOST IN THE WILDS OF HEAVEN" Being a space-trucker sounds like a cool job, but the reality is can be boring as hell. So when recently-widowed GIL gets a long-haul gig across the universe, he figures it's safe enough to bring his young son KADYN along for the ride -- that is until their "big rig" gets bitten in half by a gigantic Space Leviathan! Now separated from his young son -- with a breached suit that's venting oxygen at an alarming rate -- Gil must defy the odds and stay alive long enough to rescue Kadyn. Meanwhile, Kadyn seems to be getting all the help he needs from a talking Space Mon-key riding a Space Dolphin...or maybe it's the strange powers he's suddenly manifest-ing?! From the writing duo of JASON AARON (SOUTHERN BASTARDS, Thor) and DENNIS HOPELESS (Cloak & Dagger, Vader: Dark Visions), with dazzling art by STEPHEN GREEN (Hellboy & the BPRD) and cosmic colors by Rico Renzi (SpiderGwen) comes a brand-new science fiction series, with all the scope and heart of the THE NEVEREND-ING STORY crossed with imaginative weirdness of Miyazaki -- an intense, galaxy-spanning adventure that's suitable for fans of all ages! COLLECTS SEA OF STARS 1-5

30 review for Sea of Stars, Vol. 1: Lost in the Wild

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Finding Nemo in space. A space trucker and his son are separated across the vastness of space, yet through coincidence meet up again within five issues. Given the writers involved this was missing something. It kind of felt like a rushed first draft so they could get it out there to be optioned for a movie. Both Aaron and Hallum have written far better comics separately. The art lost me in places. I liked Rico Renzi's choice of color pallette but it sometimes obscured what was happening on the Finding Nemo in space. A space trucker and his son are separated across the vastness of space, yet through coincidence meet up again within five issues. Given the writers involved this was missing something. It kind of felt like a rushed first draft so they could get it out there to be optioned for a movie. Both Aaron and Hallum have written far better comics separately. The art lost me in places. I liked Rico Renzi's choice of color pallette but it sometimes obscured what was happening on the page. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Aaron is back to his indie work and takes a huge swing to give us a sci-fi coming of age, finding memo, story. Too bad it mostly strikes out. The story is almost exactly finding memo in terms of structure. Father and son are together, mother dies, father then loses son after being seperated from son. Son starts to become his own man, becoming stronger with the help of friends, all while his father searches for him through the hardships of survival. Well finding Memo is great James, what's the Aaron is back to his indie work and takes a huge swing to give us a sci-fi coming of age, finding memo, story. Too bad it mostly strikes out. The story is almost exactly finding memo in terms of structure. Father and son are together, mother dies, father then loses son after being seperated from son. Son starts to become his own man, becoming stronger with the help of friends, all while his father searches for him through the hardships of survival. Well finding Memo is great James, what's the issue? It doesn't have characters worth caring for. Both father and son are kind of boring. The son is least fun and his "powers" is pretty cool. But the rest? Blah. The father is typical "I need my son" but you never feel the gravity of the situation. I also didn't think the art worked all that well, besides a few cool designs, it was typical in space fare. Overall, a big old skip. Not horrible, but doubt I'll check out volume 2. A 2 out of 5.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 Total review score: 3.3

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    We open on a fabulous purple background, a psychedelic purple swirl of some distant galaxy. The caption: "Space...is so crapping boring." Good start. Promising writers, too Jason Aaron working with Dennis Hallum, and you can see why someone might want to drop the pen-name Hopeless, but doing it after you've already built quite a rep seems perverse. Alas, this series suffers from an endemic problem of Image books perhaps looking to hook inattentive Hollywood money quick, they start the story too We open on a fabulous purple background, a psychedelic purple swirl of some distant galaxy. The caption: "Space...is so crapping boring." Good start. Promising writers, too – Jason Aaron working with Dennis Hallum, and you can see why someone might want to drop the pen-name Hopeless, but doing it after you've already built quite a rep seems perverse. Alas, this series suffers from an endemic problem of Image books – perhaps looking to hook inattentive Hollywood money quick, they start the story too soon. Barely have we begun before we're into the action, upending a father-son space-trucking status quo we never got to know well enough to feel the disruption of its end. Impossibilities like a human kid breathing in space don't feel so impossible when we don't have a handle on the world as one where that doesn't happen, and other critters seem to be 'breathing space air' just fine. As for the dad who, despite everything, is still coming for his kid...that's just off-the-shelf motivation when we didn't spend long enough with the pair of them together to get any sense of their specific bond. Green's art and Renzi's colours are excellent, catching the broken-down tech and the cosmic strangeness both, but ultimately this can't escape the feeling of being an attempt to catch Saga's coat-tails, only replacing the romantic pairing at that story's heart with a parent-child one. Which, in any case, Saga already has too. (Edelweiss ARC)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    What in the star farts did I just read? A father and son get separated, the father looks for the son, who might be more special than he realizes. I think it boils down to that, but its also about space truckers, quippy space monkeys, flying dolphins, interstellar shamans and quarksharks. What in the star farts did I just read? A father and son get separated, the father looks for the son, who might be more special than he realizes. I think it boils down to that, but it’s also about space truckers, quippy space monkeys, flying dolphins, interstellar shamans and quarksharks.

  6. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    Damn it, I thought this was a completed series. It ends in a cliffhanger with no new issues in sight. This is why I don't read new stuff. I hate the wait. Otherwise, it's a great story about a father and son who get separated in the hostile environment that is space. The love of a father for his son proves to be no less strong than a mother's. I suspect feminists won't like this. There is also an Aztec-like tribe whose gods require sacrifice to be appeased and use magical artefacts of great Damn it, I thought this was a completed series. It ends in a cliffhanger with no new issues in sight. This is why I don't read new stuff. I hate the wait. Otherwise, it's a great story about a father and son who get separated in the hostile environment that is space. The love of a father for his son proves to be no less strong than a mother's. I suspect feminists won't like this. There is also an Aztec-like tribe whose gods require sacrifice to be appeased and use magical artefacts of great power. The story takes place in a universe that isn't the desolate landscape we know space to be. It's populated by creatures large and small that can survive without oxygen and can navigate space as a fish does water. Space trucker Gil Syarx is separated from his son Kadyn when his spaceship is cut in two by a space Leviathan. Gil is swallowed up by the creature as Kadyn flees. In reality Gil survives as well and goes looking for Kadyn who seems to have developed the ability to survive in space with no space suit. (view spoiler)[With life support systems at critical levels, Gil makes for a close-by derelict ship. Thankfully, it has enough power left to reactivate. An encounter with Kyle the protector bot makes the ship fly through hyperspace by accident. After he crashlands, he must survive an attack from Zzastek hunters. He fights fiercely until the signal to his son's suit is lost. With no hope to find Kadyn, Gil is captured and taken to the Zzastek capital. Kadyn enjoys his new-found abilities and tries to forget his past. He is found by Dalla the Despised, an exiled Zzastek who reveals that the boy has the power of the sun god Quasarro, likely from touching an artefact his father was transporting. In the hopes of being accepted back into the fold, Dalla invites him to return to her tribe. He accepts, though he is unaware that Dalla doesn't have his best interests at heart - she wants to retrieve the artefact even if it kills the boy. Gil regains hope when he sees proof of his son's presence. The tribe's shaman intends to sacrifice Kadyn to retreive the artefact that merged with him and save the tribe from the devil god that intends to destroy them. Thankfully, Dalla opposes this at the last second. It's revealed that the shaman wanted the power for himself and that he worships the devil god who has just arrived at the camp. (hide spoiler)]

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    An interesting idea - a father and his son separated by the immense expanse of space. Could be real nailbiting stuff, showing the father's desperate attempts to reach his son, or his son increasingly getting more and more afraid, while danger is closing in on him. There's some of that in the dad's story, I suppose, although the plot seems mostly dependent on coincidence. The kid behaves like only a comic book kid would, so we basically get Space Jungle Book (which sounds cooler than what we get An interesting idea - a father and his son separated by the immense expanse of space. Could be real nailbiting stuff, showing the father's desperate attempts to reach his son, or his son increasingly getting more and more afraid, while danger is closing in on him. There's some of that in the dad's story, I suppose, although the plot seems mostly dependent on coincidence. The kid behaves like only a comic book kid would, so we basically get Space Jungle Book (which sounds cooler than what we get here). When we get to issue 5, it feels like we should've had that as issue 2 or 3. 2.5 stars (Read as five single issues)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Oh no, they did NOT end it like that! Sea of Stars follows a dad, Gil, and his young son, Kaydn. Gil is a space trucker who has Kaydn on board for his latest mission, following the death of Kadyn's mother. The ship is attacked by a giant monster, and Kaydn gets a mystical set of powers after a chance encounter with a staff as the ship is breaking up. The two are separated, and Kadyn finds he can swim through space, he doesn't require oxygen, and he's super strong! Suddenly, the boring-ness of Oh no, they did NOT end it like that! Sea of Stars follows a dad, Gil, and his young son, Kaydn. Gil is a space trucker who has Kaydn on board for his latest mission, following the death of Kadyn's mother. The ship is attacked by a giant monster, and Kaydn gets a mystical set of powers after a chance encounter with a staff as the ship is breaking up. The two are separated, and Kadyn finds he can swim through space, he doesn't require oxygen, and he's super strong! Suddenly, the boring-ness of space is gone, and all he wants to do is play. Contrasting his story is that of Gil, who is set adrift, finds a derelict ship with a murder-y cop bot named Kyle, and crash lands on a planet infested with baddies. Volume one has a serious cliff hanger that will leave you really wishing that wasn't the last page. Kaydn is the perfect little Nemo type, enamored with his new found surroundings and powers. His story is a perfect juxtaposition to the tribulations Gil goes through to find his son. Kyle's sense of justice is hilarious, and his comments on Gil's journey create a great duo of hope and pessimism. The artwork of Stephen Green and the dazzling colors of Rico Renzi really bring to life this visual cornucopia of creatures and planets. This is a great story by two comic book greats, beautifully illustrated. Sara's rating: 9/10 Suitability level: grades 8-12 This review was made possible through an advanced reader copy from the publisher through Edelweiss.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Father and son are separated, and must find their way back to each other. Sounds familiar? Yeah, it is. But this one's in space! Sea Of Stars has a lot of good ideas. It also has a lot going on at once, and doesn't seem to want to tell you about half of it, which makes it difficult to care. There's a lot of underlying mythology that would put some stuff in context, but unlike say, Monstress, where you can work it out if you try hard enough, Sea Of Stars feels more deliberately obtuse, like it's Father and son are separated, and must find their way back to each other. Sounds familiar? Yeah, it is. But this one's in space! Sea Of Stars has a lot of good ideas. It also has a lot going on at once, and doesn't seem to want to tell you about half of it, which makes it difficult to care. There's a lot of underlying mythology that would put some stuff in context, but unlike say, Monstress, where you can work it out if you try hard enough, Sea Of Stars feels more deliberately obtuse, like it's just not telling you things for convenience of plot. The two disparate plotlines are also a bit skewed - the father's story is infinitely more compelling than the son's, especially since the son spends most of his fucking about and it's the space-animals he meets along the way that force his plot forward. Stephen Green's art is nice, but a little hazy in places, like it's not quite finished, and he leaves it up to Spider-Gwen colourist Rico Renzi to fill in the blanks, with varying degrees of success. Not a bad start, and I'll stick around, but definitely some teething problems.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Gorgeous art, but the story felt too rushed. This is a rare case where I would have liked more exposition, rather than being thrown into the present with only a couple of pages before the first big obstacle. Loved the critters, the worldbuilding just felt a little slapdash. I received a free digital review copy from Image Comics.

  11. 4 out of 5

    RG

    2.5*. Massive fan of Aarons but this was missing something

  12. 4 out of 5

    Art

    I thought this book was okay. I was a little disappointed in some of the elements of this book (talking in space? multiple species of creatures who live in zero-gee vacuum, but can also survive in atmosphere?) I think that is what made me tag it as a book for kids, maybe even tweens. As an adult reader, it did not grab me, even though I can see how younger readers might latch onto some of this. I might have to read the next volume, however, because of the enormous cliff-hanger att he end... is I thought this book was okay. I was a little disappointed in some of the elements of this book (talking in space? multiple species of creatures who live in zero-gee vacuum, but can also survive in atmosphere?) I think that is what made me tag it as a book for kids, maybe even tweens. As an adult reader, it did not grab me, even though I can see how younger readers might latch onto some of this. I might have to read the next volume, however, because of the enormous cliff-hanger att he end... is that a spoiler?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Harry Jahnke

    A space trucker gets separated from his space boy by a giant space kraken and now has to go across space to find him...in space. A cute story but it feels pretty insubstantial. The concept of this dad trekking across space to find his boy is a good one but he almost instantly finds him. So I guess it wasn't that hard after all. A solid meh.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Reasonably enjoyable comic, with a space pirate/trucker separated from his young son, who has somehow absorbed some superpowers. Its ribald approach to universe building, with some quite peculiar situations, characters and ecologies, still didn't quite make me a fan, but it was alright while it lasted. Three and a half stars for the inventiveness.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    Cheerfully Inane, With Some Snappy and Deadpan Moments Dad and son are separated after a space monster smashes their space ship. Dad struggles to survive. Son gains superduper powers from touching a weird artifact and finds he can survive and swim around space with impunity. Son hooks up with a space monkey and a space dolphin. (Don't ask.) Dad floats into an abandoned freighter manned only by a prissy defense droid, Kyle, who becomes Dad's tormentor/companion. Son has adventures and Dad searches Cheerfully Inane, With Some Snappy and Deadpan Moments Dad and son are separated after a space monster smashes their space ship. Dad struggles to survive. Son gains superduper powers from touching a weird artifact and finds he can survive and swim around space with impunity. Son hooks up with a space monkey and a space dolphin. (Don't ask.) Dad floats into an abandoned freighter manned only by a prissy defense droid, Kyle, who becomes Dad's tormentor/companion. Son has adventures and Dad searches for son. Some aliens think son is their returned God, and that "plot" is where the book ends and a cliffhanger hangs. The kid is pretty young and sort of a goof, so he isn't much of a character. Monkey and Dolphin feel protective toward him and they are both very funny in a deadpan fashion, except when they are funny in a space slapstick way. Kyle is as dry as dust and Dad's reluctant companion, and flips between acid humor and dithering. Dad is resigned to having a very bad day indeed, and is a fine foil for Kyle. We basically just rollick around in deep space, adventuring and kvetching. I guess you could build up a serious approach to the story, but I liked it as a goof, and that seemed to be a fine way to approach the project. The art is big and colorful and switches between carrying the basic action and flipping over to psychedelic. Sometimes it's hard to follow the action, but how clearly, exactly, do you need to see a Space Monkey as long as you can follow the dialogue? So, I got on board with this as soon as Space Monkey, Dolphin, and Kyle showed up, and I had fun reading it. That works. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Villain E

    Is it just me or are there a lot of space magic comics out now? I can't tell if it's because of the popularity of Saga or if it's because of the popularity of Saga AND the fact that Saga is on hiatus. Sea of Stars is pretty good. Very, very soft on any actual science. A space trucker and his son are attacked by a giant space creature which destroys their ship. They get separated and the boy gets magic powers which allow him to survive in space. They both get tangled up with a cult interested in Is it just me or are there a lot of space magic comics out now? I can't tell if it's because of the popularity of Saga or if it's because of the popularity of Saga AND the fact that Saga is on hiatus. Sea of Stars is pretty good. Very, very soft on any actual science. A space trucker and his son are attacked by a giant space creature which destroys their ship. They get separated and the boy gets magic powers which allow him to survive in space. They both get tangled up with a cult interested in the space magic. I like the designs of the aliens, which are mostly based on animals. Another space magic comic which shall remain nameless went the lazy Star Trek route of humans with different skin colors (meaning blue and green, etc) rather than designing alien aliens. Here there's a lot of sea-creature-like aliens that can swim in space, which fits with the title. I'll be honest: Jason Aaron can be hit or miss for me. He's a great writer when he wants to be, but sometimes, especially his superhero stuff, he seems like he's just goofing around. But this was solid. The story is fun. The art is good. I enjoyed it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Maksym Karpovets

    It was fun to read something else from Jason Aaron who is associated with brutal and violent stories (yeah, I'm a huge fan of "Scalped" and "Southern Bastards"). This is a story about the disconnection between a father and a son in the deep space, which reminds a deep and psychedelic ocean with weird creatures. The father struggles with the plant-monsters, cosmic savages, and his own fears, while his son is making fun with the flying fish and talking monkey. But they want to be together instead It was fun to read something else from Jason Aaron who is associated with brutal and violent stories (yeah, I'm a huge fan of "Scalped" and "Southern Bastards"). This is a story about the disconnection between a father and a son in the deep space, which reminds a deep and psychedelic ocean with weird creatures. The father struggles with the plant-monsters, cosmic savages, and his own fears, while his son is making fun with the flying fish and talking monkey. But they want to be together instead of everything, thus the cosmic journey becomes the obvious parable of family reunion. Actually, this is the central theme for Aaron, but here he uses a completely different form and tone. It also reminds me a little Remender's "Black Science", but if the latter is a big cosmic novel, then Aaron's version is a short story. I haven't found the story smart and innovative enough (although the colours are really great!), but if you want to read something light, bright, and open-hearted, you wouldn't be wrong with "Sea of Stars".

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Sea of Stars volume 1 introduces and follows two characters, a boy on a wild ride of discovery innocently ignorant of the dangers around him, and his good-hearted father desperately trying reach him before the universe consumes his son. Like two expertly designer roller coasters, the characters stories plunge from great height to a destructive collision with the ground only to twist and lift away at the last second. The contrast in perspective of the protagonists drives the twin narratives; the Sea of Stars volume 1 introduces and follows two characters, a boy on a wild ride of discovery innocently ignorant of the dangers around him, and his good-hearted father desperately trying reach him before the universe consumes his son. Like two expertly designer roller coasters, the characters’ stories plunge from great height to a destructive collision with the ground only to twist and lift away at the last second. The contrast in perspective of the protagonists drives the twin narratives; the son’s youth sees every wonderful surprise free of any anxiety while the father is gripped with fear of the possible outcomes and dogged determination to prevent them. This sector of deep space is populated with fabulous creatures, both sinister and whimsical. The art encompasses both the grit and beauty of this imagined cosmos with a wild palette of color. Together they push this story closer to cosmic fantasy than science fiction.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dubzor

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The quote on the back describes this an a "Miyazaki inspired" story but that is not an apt descriptor at all. It feels more like the old pulp Sci first novels the likes of ERBurroughs. There's some attempt at world building but it's clear that's not what Aaron was going for. More Science Fantasy than Science Fiction. This would be fine, if the main protagonist wasn't so infuriatingly unlikeable. Imagine if Chihiro from SPIRITED AWAY never grew as apt character and was an obnoxious little shit the The quote on the back describes this an a "Miyazaki inspired" story but that is not an apt descriptor at all. It feels more like the old pulp Sci first novels the likes of ERBurroughs. There's some attempt at world building but it's clear that's not what Aaron was going for. More Science Fantasy than Science Fiction. This would be fine, if the main protagonist wasn't so infuriatingly unlikeable. Imagine if Chihiro from SPIRITED AWAY never grew as apt character and was an obnoxious little shit the entire movie. The composition of the panels aren't great either. Events feel tepid and boring despite their fanciful nature. Worse yet, characters can turn on a dime, going from antagonist to protagonist for no realing reason other than to make them a recurring character. Some of the character designs are nice, and there's a few bits of neat pulpy fun, but ultimately it's not worth the price of admission. Borrow it from your library but I wouldn't run to add this to your pull list.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Jason Aaron really knows how to make something good out of some concepts. The relationship between Kadyn and his dad is really touching. It's not ideal and it's a very hard thing to get around. But that's parenting for you. The second half certainly feels like a rush though. You go from how space is both mesmerizing (thanks to the artwork) and dangerous to a nation of Aztec stand-ins. It's not a lot but Dalla can certainly seem a little likable when she comes across and bonds with Kadyn. As for Jason Aaron really knows how to make something good out of some concepts. The relationship between Kadyn and his dad is really touching. It's not ideal and it's a very hard thing to get around. But that's parenting for you. The second half certainly feels like a rush though. You go from how space is both mesmerizing (thanks to the artwork) and dangerous to a nation of Aztec stand-ins. It's not a lot but Dalla can certainly seem a little likable when she comes across and bonds with Kadyn. As for the twist with that shaman, I can't help that Jason can get a little preachy about his misotheism. The ending for that matter just leaves things on a cliffhanger that might not even get a resolution. I just hope that if this does continue, this Star Nation gets a little more development.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    When Gil, a recently widowed long haul space trucker, brings his son, Kadyn, along on a delivery, he figures it will be a chance for them to reconnect. That is, until a giant space creature severs their ship in half sending Gil and Kadyn tumbling into docs in different directions. Now Gil is determined to find Kadyn, regardless of the cost. Kadyn, on the other hand, saw his father get killed and figures hes on his own. So he befriends a space monkey and a galactic whale and decides to swim When Gil, a recently widowed long haul space “trucker,” brings his son, Kadyn, along on a delivery, he figures it will be a chance for them to reconnect. That is, until a giant space creature severs their ship in half sending Gil and Kadyn tumbling into docs in different directions. Now Gil is determined to find Kadyn, regardless of the cost. Kadyn, on the other hand, saw his father get killed and figures he’s on his own. So he befriends a space monkey and a galactic whale and decides to swim across the universe he suddenly discovers he’s one with. It’s a weird story. That’s the best I can say about it. Weird and a little confusing and things happen a little too fast for my taste. I doubt I’ll keep going.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alex Tiethoff (the Unedited Book Review)

    Excellent! Part Jungle Book, part space opera, and part Bear Grylls, Sea of Stars is a new book from Jason Aaron and Dennis Hallum. In issue 1, a space trucker father and his son become separated in a cosmic incident. The Dad is on a harrowing mission to find his son, but Kadyn has discovered that in the accident he has gained some mysterious powers. While the boy comes to thoroughly enjoy the space play that his powers enable, his newfound companions are baffled at what he can do--and especially Excellent! Part Jungle Book, part space opera, and part Bear Grylls, Sea of Stars is a new book from Jason Aaron and Dennis Hallum. In issue 1, a space trucker father and his son become separated in a cosmic incident. The Dad is on a harrowing mission to find his son, but Kadyn has discovered that in the accident he has gained some mysterious powers. While the boy comes to thoroughly enjoy the space play that his powers enable, his newfound companions are baffled at what he can do--and especially what he can survive. This book was endearing and intriguing. Plus it was beautiful. Stephen Green and Rico Renzi amplify the storytelling in all the right ways. It was cartoonish yet just gritty enough, fitting featuring an estranged boy and his badass dad.

  23. 5 out of 5

    SuperSillySerra

    Fun for the whole family! A man and his son are on a space trucking mission, bringing ancient artifacts to a new museum when all of a sudden a space whale attacks their ship. The two become separated, and something magical starts to happen... Its finally nice to see Jason Arron do something other than Thor. I really liked the characters in this story; a young, happy go-lucky, innocent boy and a father out to do anything to save him. The coloring for this is amazing! It even does a cool mix Fun for the whole family! A man and his son are on a space trucking mission, bringing ancient artifacts to a new museum when all of a sudden a space whale attacks their ship. The two become separated, and something magical starts to happen... Its finally nice to see Jason Arron do something other than Thor. I really liked the characters in this story; a young, happy go-lucky, innocent boy and a father out to do anything to save him. The coloring for this is amazing! It even does a cool mix media layers over closes up, its wild. excited to see where this book ,goes. I can see some annoyed with how slow of a burn it is though.

  24. 4 out of 5

    -RadioactiveBookworm-

    Another almost guaranteed amazing read, Sea of Stars is a beautiful and haunting series following a young boy named Kadyn as he survives in space. His dad is looking for him, trying to stay positive, and it's all he can do to keep up his motivation. Full of vibrant colours and strange creatures, this book sucked me in from the very beginning and I can't wait to see what happens in the next volume. Check out my full review here! https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Y.S. Stephen

    WHY I LOVE THE BOOK Sea of Stars: Lost in the Wild Heavens is a pure adventure tale. It has diverse alien characters who are relatable, funny, and believable. From tribal politics to survival to emotional troubles, this book has all the makings of a quirky worldbuilding combined with intelligent writing that is the hallmark of stories like the StarWars. DISLIKES The colour scheme is a bit too dark in some areas. WHO IS IT FOR Fantasy lovers and sci-fi fans might want to check this out.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Science fiction comic series - unusual but only quite good Kadyn and his father are travelling in space when they end up separated with Kadyn exhibiting unusual abilities. A whole plot unravels with new characters / creatures playing a part in Kadyns journey. The story moves along reasonably well but the artwork leaves a lot to be desired, especially as its over-coloured which is a shame. It lacks clarity at times. Disappointing series which will be continued. Science fiction comic series - unusual but only quite good Kadyn and his father are travelling in space when they end up separated with Kadyn exhibiting unusual abilities. A whole plot unravels with new characters / creatures playing a part in Kadyn’s journey. The story moves along reasonably well but the artwork leaves a lot to be desired, especially as it’s over-coloured which is a shame. It lacks clarity at times. Disappointing series which will be continued.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A father. A son. And a whole lot of space between them. This collects the first five issues of Sea of Stars. Which is quite an intense story (father and son trying to reunite) thats told in a bright, funny, sarcastic way. The story and art do a good job of telling and showing the story. The colouring is amazing “A father. A son. And a whole lot of space between them.” This collects the first five issues of Sea of Stars. Which is quite an intense story (father and son trying to reunite) that’s told in a bright, funny, sarcastic way. The story and art do a good job of telling and showing the story. The colouring is amazing

  28. 4 out of 5

    Henrik Ståhlberg

    When I first laid my eyes on this comic, I was drawn by the art and vibrant colours as much as my curiosity towards a new SF comic. Sadly, I found the story trite, weirdly paced and the boy Kadyn extremely annoying. I guess that the blend of space opera, magic and space whales just ain't my cup of tea...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tony Nance

    An interesting premise: cosmic accident, Father and Son separated, Son becomes "magic". However, it felt a bit weighed down by a barely-explained back-story and the feeling that you were dropped into the middle of the story with NO explanation for the cultures, creatures or circumstances. Still, it WAS entertaining and the art work is beautiful!! I'd recommend it!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Buzz Park

    Just Okay. Art was decent but this was kind of a Finding Nemo story (as other reviewers have said) but the ending was obscure. The art in the last couple pages didn't really clarify the storyline. Probably won't continue the series.

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