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Poems to Fall in Love With

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In Poems to Fall in Love With Chris Riddell has selected and illustrated his very favourite classic and modern poems about love. This gorgeously illustrated collection celebrates love in all its guises, from silent admiration through passion to tearful resignation. These poems speak of the universal experiences of the heart and are brought to life with Chris's exquisite, in In Poems to Fall in Love With Chris Riddell has selected and illustrated his very favourite classic and modern poems about love. This gorgeously illustrated collection celebrates love in all its guises, from silent admiration through passion to tearful resignation. These poems speak of the universal experiences of the heart and are brought to life with Chris's exquisite, intricate artwork. This perfect gift features famous poems, old and new, and a few surprises. Classic verses sit alongside the modern to create the ultimate collection. Includes poems from Neil Gaiman, Nikita Gill, Carol Ann Duffy, E. E. Cummings, Shakespeare, Leonard Cohen, Derek Walcott, Hollie McNish, Kate Tempest, John Betjeman and Roger McGough and many more.


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In Poems to Fall in Love With Chris Riddell has selected and illustrated his very favourite classic and modern poems about love. This gorgeously illustrated collection celebrates love in all its guises, from silent admiration through passion to tearful resignation. These poems speak of the universal experiences of the heart and are brought to life with Chris's exquisite, in In Poems to Fall in Love With Chris Riddell has selected and illustrated his very favourite classic and modern poems about love. This gorgeously illustrated collection celebrates love in all its guises, from silent admiration through passion to tearful resignation. These poems speak of the universal experiences of the heart and are brought to life with Chris's exquisite, intricate artwork. This perfect gift features famous poems, old and new, and a few surprises. Classic verses sit alongside the modern to create the ultimate collection. Includes poems from Neil Gaiman, Nikita Gill, Carol Ann Duffy, E. E. Cummings, Shakespeare, Leonard Cohen, Derek Walcott, Hollie McNish, Kate Tempest, John Betjeman and Roger McGough and many more.

30 review for Poems to Fall in Love With

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kt

    Amazing! My mum got me this for Christmas because I've always had an interest in poetry but never really knew where to start and this was the perfect place to start!! There's such a range of poets in here, I marked my favourite ones with post it notes and will look into those poets work! I really loved this because their were old poetry and also modern poetry so like I said this is a fantastic place to start if you're wanting to explore poetry!!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Iva

    Beautiful and magical book to come back to very often! :) Longer review soon!

  3. 4 out of 5

    niri

    favourites: phoebe bridgers (duh), the orange (duh), the hera lindsay bird, postcards from a hedgehog!!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    My favourites are: A lost Language Love after Love The Orange Funeral Blues

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    One of the things I really like about these anthologies is how varied the poem selections are! I don't actually read all that much poetry in general, but I love seeing which poets/songwriters I particularly enjoy reading from, for example Wendy Cope and Nick Cave. Riddell's artwork is a bonus and his own poem was beautiful - on grief after his brother's passing, I believe (if I remember correctly from one Riddell's live drawing talks).Full RTC!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ain Ashura

    Beautiful. Some of my favourites: 64 Squares by Rachel Rooney Mad Girls Love Song by Sylvia Plath Wedding Thoughts: All I Know About Love by Neil Gaiman Dark Sonnet by Neil Gaiman Love After Love by Derek Walcott (one of my all time fave poems and I was pleasantly surprised to see it included in this collection) The Taste of a Biscuit by AF Harrold Funeral Blues by WH Auden Tomorrow When You Will Not Wake by Jan Dean

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    There are many lovely poems in this and I like Riddell's style (I adore his illustrations for Neil Gaiman's Sleeper and the Spindle short story, for example) but as a whole this left somewhat "eh" feeling. Not bad but not as fantastic as I expected it to be. Still, it would make a nice gift for somebody who wants to get into poetry because the styles are varied and all of the poems are quite short.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rosie

    It was such a comforting read. Like being hugged or sung to.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    2.5 stars

  10. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    The last part made me have nightmares about my loved ones dying but apart from that very cute!!! Love that Phobe Bridgers

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andy Hickman

    How wonderful to have such a broad collection of old & new, quirky & classic, known & obscure poems about ‘love’. Gorgeous illustrations. A delightful introduction to heart-felt poems . “Love and Friendship” by Emily Brontë Love is like the wild rose-briar, Friendship like the holly-tree The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms But which will bloom most constantly? . Locks by Neil Gaiman: "We owe it to each other to tell stories .." . Postcards From The Hedgehog: by Harrold, A.F. "Dear Mum ... she was ac How wonderful to have such a broad collection of old & new, quirky & classic, known & obscure poems about ‘love’. Gorgeous illustrations. A delightful introduction to heart-felt poems . “Love and Friendship” by Emily Brontë Love is like the wild rose-briar, Friendship like the holly-tree The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms But which will bloom most constantly? . Locks by Neil Gaiman: "We owe it to each other to tell stories .." . Postcards From The Hedgehog: by Harrold, A.F. "Dear Mum ... she was actually a pine-cone." . La Belle Dame Sans Merci, by John Keats “I see a lily on thy brow..” . The Beautiful Librarians, by Sean O'Brien "The beautiful librarians are dead.." . The Indian Serenade by Percy Bysshe Shelley Classic and stylish! “.. My cheek is cold and white, alas! My heart beats loud and fast; Oh! press it to thine own again, Where it will break at last.” . I Carry Your Heart with Me by E.E. Cummings "i carry your heart with me(i carry it in)..." "...a sun will always sing is you...". . "Mad Girl's Love Song" by Sylvia Plath (1951) This is how I came to appreciate villanelle poetic form, consisting of five tercets and a quatrain and also follows a specific rhyme scheme using only two different sounds How intense is this? "I should have loved a thunderbird instead at least when spring comes they roar back again" . And how heart-wrenching is ”Remember”, “Funeral Blues” and “Tomorrow when you will not awake” ?? . Also: “Sisters Of Mercy”, by Leonard Cohen All the sisters of mercy, they are not departed or gone They were waiting for me when I thought that I just can't go on And they brought me their comfort and later they brought me this song Oh, I hope you run into them, you who've been travelling so long Yes, you who must leave everything that you cannot control It begins with your family, but soon it comes around to your soul Well, I've been where you're hanging, I think I can see how you're pinned When you're not feeling holy, your loneliness says that you've sinned Well, they lay down beside me, I made my confession to them They touched both my eyes and I touched the dew on their hem If your life is a leaf that the seasons tear off and condemn They will bind you with love that is graceful and green as a stem When I left they were sleeping, I hope you run into them soon Don't turn on the lights, you can read their address by the moon And you won't make me jealous if I hear that they sweetened your night We weren't lovers like that and besides, it would still be all right We weren't lovers like that and besides, it would still be all right . “SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY” … II …. One shade the more, one ray the less, had half impair'd the nameless grace which waves in every raven tress, or softly lightens o'er her face - where thoughts serenely sweet express how pure, how dear their dwelling - place. . . Into My Arms Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds I don't believe in an interventionist God But I know, darling, that you do But if I did I would kneel down and ask Him Not to intervene when it came to you Not to touch a hair on your head To leave you as you are And if He felt He had to direct you Then direct you into my arms Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms And I don't believe in the existence of angels But looking at you I wonder if that's true But if I did I would summon them together And ask them to watch over you To each burn a candle for you To make bright and clear your path And to walk, like Christ, in grace and love And guide you into my arms Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my arms, O Lord Into my… . . William Shakespeare Sonnet 116 Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove: O no; it is an ever-fixed mark, That looks on tempests, and is never shaken; It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken. Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved. . The Owl and the Pussy-Cat by Edward Lear ".. And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand, They danced by the light of the moon, The moon, The moon, They danced by the light of the moon." . The Good-Morrow by John Donne (died 1631) “.. "If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee...” “… My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears..” The wording here is a forerunner of Emily Brontë’s “He's more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.” - Wuthering Heights (1847) . Dark Sonnet By Neil Gaiman I don’t think that I’ve been in love as such although I liked a few folk pretty well Love must be vaster than my smiles or touch for brave men died and empires rose and fell for love, girls follow boys to foreign lands and men have followed women into hell In plays and poems someone understands there’s something makes us more than blood and bone And more than biological demands for me love’s like the wind unseen, unknown I see the trees are bending where it’s been I know that it leaves wreckage where it’s blown I really don’t know what I love you means I think it means don’t leave me here alone . The Song of Wandering Aengus by W.B. Yeats "I went out to the hazel wood, Because a fire was in my head, And cut and peeled a hazel wand, And hood a berry to a thread; And when white moths were on the wing, And moth-like stars were flickering out, I dropped the berry in a stream And caught a little silver trout." .. It had become a glimmering girl With apple blossom in her hair Who called me by my name and ran And faded through the brightening air.” .. .. “The courtship of the YONGHY-BONGHY-BO” by Edward Lear Quirky character indeed. YONGHY-BONGHY-BO I On the Coast of Coromandel Where the early pumpkins blow, In the middle of the woods Lived the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. Two old chairs, and half a candle,-- One old jug without a handle,-- These were all his worldly goods: In the middle of the woods, These were all the worldly goods, Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, Of the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. II Once, among the Bong-trees walking Where the early pumpkins blow, To a little heap of stones Came the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. There he heard a Lady talking, To some milk-white Hens of Dorking,-- ''Tis the lady Jingly Jones! 'On that little heap of stones 'Sits the Lady Jingly Jones!' Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. III 'Lady Jingly! Lady Jingly! 'Sitting where the pumpkins blow, 'Will you come and be my wife?' Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. 'I am tired of living singly,-- 'On this coast so wild and shingly,-- 'I'm a-weary of my life: 'If you'll come and be my wife, 'Quite serene would be my life!'-- Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. IV 'On this Coast of Coromandel, 'Shrimps and watercresses grow, 'Prawns are plentiful and cheap,' Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. 'You shall have my chairs and candle, 'And my jug without a handle!-- 'Gaze upon the rolling deep ('Fish is plentiful and cheap) 'As the sea, my love is deep!' Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. V Lady Jingly answered sadly, And her tears began to flow,-- 'Your proposal comes too late, 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò! 'I would be your wife most gladly!' (Here she twirled her fingers madly,) 'But in England I've a mate! 'Yes! you've asked me far too late, 'For in England I've a mate, 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò! 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò!' VI 'Mr. Jones — (his name is Handel,-- 'Handel Jones, Esquire, & Co.) 'Dorking fowls delights to send, 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò! 'Keep, oh! keep your chairs and candle, 'And your jug without a handle,-- 'I can merely be your friend! '-- Should my Jones more Dorkings send, 'I will give you three, my friend! 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò! 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò!' VII 'Though you’ve such a tiny body, 'And your head so large doth grow,-- 'Though your hat may blow away, 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò! 'Though you’re such a Hoddy Doddy-- 'Yet a wish that I could modi- 'fy the words I needs must say! 'Will you please to go away? 'That is all I have to say-- 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò! 'Mr. Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò!'. VIII Down the slippery slopes of Myrtle, Where the early pumpkins blow, To the calm and silent sea Fled the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. There, beyond the Bay of Gurtle, Lay a large and lively Turtle,-- 'You're the Cove,' he said, 'for me 'On your back beyond the sea, 'Turtle, you shall carry me!' Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, Said the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. IX Through the silent-roaring ocean Did the Turtle swiftly go; Holding fast upon his shell Rode the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. With a sad primæval motion Towards the sunset isles of Boshen Still the Turtle bore him well. Holding fast upon his shell, 'Lady Jingly Jones, farewell!' Sang the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, Sang the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. X From the Coast of Coromandel, Did that Lady never go; On that heap of stones she mourns For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. On that Coast of Coromandel, In his jug without a handle Still she weeps, and daily moans; On that little hep of stones To her Dorking Hens she moans, For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò, For the Yonghy-Bonghy-Bò. . The Sick Rose by William Blake Beautiful and sad grieving poem "O Rose, thou art sick! The invisible worm, That flies in the night, In the howling storm, Has found out thy bed Of crimson joy; And his dark secret love Does thy life destroy." .. "Remember" By Christina Rossetti Bold, determined, and deeply committed to the relationship(s) she cherishes. Remember me when I am gone away, Gone far away into the silent land; When you can no more hold me by the hand, Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay. Remember me when no more day by day You tell me of our future that you plann'd: Only remember me; you understand It will be late to counsel then or pray. Yet if you should forget me for a while And afterwards remember, do not grieve: For if the darkness and corruption leave A vestige of the thoughts that once I had, Better by far you should forget and smile Than that you should remember and be sad. …

  12. 5 out of 5

    LittlePiscesReading

    It's a bit of a jumbled collection. I love quite a few of the poems. The Orange by Wendy Cope is beautiful and devastating and I felt nothing when I heard it. The narrators were too flat and too fast and rather announcement-voice-over-the-tannoy-esque. It made the poems boring. And there's no getting over that Romeo + Juliet did iambic pentameter better than these narrators.

  13. 5 out of 5

    ScriptaManent

    I'm a bit confused. I think I liked at least 1/3 of the poems, which is already a lot coming from me, I suppose. The illustrations are very pretty though and there are definitely some texts that marked me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    Beautiful poems, not a dud amongst them. Great to fall asleep to or to listen to in a quiet moment. Expertly read. Target audience is YA but really great for people of any age. Only an hour long so it was good to listen to a few times and one I'll borrow again as the mood takes me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    A really approachable collection of wonderful poems that touch on some of the many aspects of love, enhanced by the beautiful, striking and sometimes really funny illustrations by Chris Riddell.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rebekka Hindbo

    It's always difficult to rate poems but some I really liked and some where just okay, so therefore a rating of "I liked it".

  17. 4 out of 5

    Poocy Mills

    Beautifully illustrated and curated

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    It's not something i really like, it's poetry in combination with art. I love the art, but i don't like that here isn't a disclaimer about how old they are. If you skip te little part in the front, you will have the so called "same problem" as i had. I had this problem: i didn't know that it was 'old' and i mean that most of these poems (view spoiler)[were/are verry old (hide spoiler)] But i did order the other book Poems to Live Your Life By so, i can't wait until i have that one, because i actua It's not something i really like, it's poetry in combination with art. I love the art, but i don't like that here isn't a disclaimer about how old they are. If you skip te little part in the front, you will have the so called "same problem" as i had. I had this problem: i didn't know that it was 'old' and i mean that most of these poems (view spoiler)[were/are verry old (hide spoiler)] But i did order the other book Poems to Live Your Life By so, i can't wait until i have that one, because i actualy wan't to 'read it' and see the drawings!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    Lovely selection with gorgeous illustrations; some classic choices and some more unusual so there is a pleasantly varied selection.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ceyda Akalın

    I listened to the audiobook for this one and thought both the narrators did a very good job. I didn’t dislike this book and ultimately I think my rating comes down to my taste in poetry being very different to that of Chris Riddell. That’s not to say that there weren’t some real gems in this collection, but otherwise it was only okay in my opinion.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Although I liked his first poetry collection more, there were still some really good ones in here! And the illustrations were breath-taking. A really fun book to read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I was given this volume of poetry, selected by Riddell, for Christmas. Having its companion volume, "Poems to Live Your Life By," I knew that this one would be just as beautiful. Riddell is my favourite contemporary illustrator and, although I have many of the poems within this collection in various other collections, the addition of Riddell's illustrations meant that I was eager to delight in this. As expected, the book is beautiful. The covers are gorgeously decorated. The poems are nicely set I was given this volume of poetry, selected by Riddell, for Christmas. Having its companion volume, "Poems to Live Your Life By," I knew that this one would be just as beautiful. Riddell is my favourite contemporary illustrator and, although I have many of the poems within this collection in various other collections, the addition of Riddell's illustrations meant that I was eager to delight in this. As expected, the book is beautiful. The covers are gorgeously decorated. The poems are nicely set against the poetry, meaning that the illustrations add to the words, rather than distracting away from them. As a gift, either for yourself or a loved one, this should be treasured.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lilly

    “Doubt thou the stars are fire, Doubt that the sun doth move, Doubt truth to be a liar, But never doubt I love.” - William Shakespeare

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    A spectacular range of poems and definitely worth picking up and appreciating.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    This isn't my first Riddell poem collection, so I had to get it when I saw it among Waterstones special and signed editions. The illustrations in this are absolutely stunning. I sometimes stopped on the pages for minutes just to admire how beautiful they are. The sections made sense to me. Yes, they're poems about different kinds of love but the sections were carefully selected. The poems: there was so much variation, meaning there was at least one poem for everyone. From modern to classic poets This isn't my first Riddell poem collection, so I had to get it when I saw it among Waterstones special and signed editions. The illustrations in this are absolutely stunning. I sometimes stopped on the pages for minutes just to admire how beautiful they are. The sections made sense to me. Yes, they're poems about different kinds of love but the sections were carefully selected. The poems: there was so much variation, meaning there was at least one poem for everyone. From modern to classic poets, from famous names to people you might never have heard of, from rhyming schemes to almost prosaic texts. I used too many post-its to go back to poems I particularly enjoyed. The last section wasn't easy to finish the day after my grandfather had passed away but it also made me feel better about everything. Overall, it's a collection that I quite enjoyed, and one which I'd also consider as the perfect gift for someone just starting out in poetry.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eva Mandy

    Astonishing. Chris Riddell's art is just beautiful. Some of the chosen poems (and therefore illustrations) were unusual, which made the reading much more interesting.

  27. 4 out of 5

    maria

    like in almost every collection i read, this has poems i loved, ones i liked, ones that were just fine and others that went completly over my head, that being said it was a nice and entretaining read thanks to the beautiful ilustrations. some of my favourite ones were: -postcards from the hedgehog, A. F. Harrold -wormwood, Margot Armbruster -i carry your heart with me, E. E. Cummings -'doubt thou the stars are fire' from Hamlet, William Shakespeare -firework, Kate Tempest -like otters, Hollie McNish -we like in almost every collection i read, this has poems i loved, ones i liked, ones that were just fine and others that went completly over my head, that being said it was a nice and entretaining read thanks to the beautiful ilustrations. some of my favourite ones were: -postcards from the hedgehog, A. F. Harrold -wormwood, Margot Armbruster -i carry your heart with me, E. E. Cummings -'doubt thou the stars are fire' from Hamlet, William Shakespeare -firework, Kate Tempest -like otters, Hollie McNish -wedding thoughts: all i know about love, Neil Gaiman -love after love, Derek Walcott -the taste of a biscuit, A. F. Harrold

  28. 4 out of 5

    Teri B

    I got hold of this book as audiobook from the local library. So I cannot say anything about the illustrations. The poems are fabulously read, the selection spans centuries and represent female and male poets possibly quite evenly. Very enjoyable.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erin Lee

    This is a gorgeously illustrated book and Riddell chose a nice, diverse range of poems to include - lots of old favourites alongside more modern poems. I enjoyed that the selection was broken into themes on love.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kara Kozla

    I really enjoyed this book. The poems, chosen by Chris Riddell, fit the sections he had quite well. His drawings were simply amazing and fit the poems beautifully. The last section made me feel a bit melancholy, but they were beautiful in their own way.

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