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You Have Arrived at Your Destination

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Nature or nurture? Neither. Discover a bold new way to raise a child in this unsettling story of the near future by the New York Times bestselling author of A Gentleman in Moscow. When Sam’s wife first tells him about Vitek, a twenty-first-century fertility lab, he sees it as the natural next step in trying to help their future child get a “leg up” in a competitive world. But Nature or nurture? Neither. Discover a bold new way to raise a child in this unsettling story of the near future by the New York Times bestselling author of A Gentleman in Moscow. When Sam’s wife first tells him about Vitek, a twenty-first-century fertility lab, he sees it as the natural next step in trying to help their future child get a “leg up” in a competitive world. But the more Sam considers the lives that his child could lead, the more he begins to question his own relationships and the choices he has made in his life. Amor Towles’s You Have Arrived at Your Destination is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting.


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Nature or nurture? Neither. Discover a bold new way to raise a child in this unsettling story of the near future by the New York Times bestselling author of A Gentleman in Moscow. When Sam’s wife first tells him about Vitek, a twenty-first-century fertility lab, he sees it as the natural next step in trying to help their future child get a “leg up” in a competitive world. But Nature or nurture? Neither. Discover a bold new way to raise a child in this unsettling story of the near future by the New York Times bestselling author of A Gentleman in Moscow. When Sam’s wife first tells him about Vitek, a twenty-first-century fertility lab, he sees it as the natural next step in trying to help their future child get a “leg up” in a competitive world. But the more Sam considers the lives that his child could lead, the more he begins to question his own relationships and the choices he has made in his life. Amor Towles’s You Have Arrived at Your Destination is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from out-of-this-world authors. Each piece can be read or listened to in a single thought-provoking sitting.

30 review for You Have Arrived at Your Destination

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    This addition to the Forward collection was such an interesting idea. And it was one of the more compelling stories of the bunch, I think. It's essentially about genetic engineering, which is, of course, nothing new, but the way Towles tells this story was very exciting. And a little bit scary. Sam and his wife want to have a child, but being wealthy modern parents, they also want to give said child the best chance possible. To have a good life. To be happy. To be successful. That's what leads them to Vit This addition to the Forward collection was such an interesting idea. And it was one of the more compelling stories of the bunch, I think. It's essentially about genetic engineering, which is, of course, nothing new, but the way Towles tells this story was very exciting. And a little bit scary. Sam and his wife want to have a child, but being wealthy modern parents, they also want to give said child the best chance possible. To have a good life. To be happy. To be successful. That's what leads them to Vitek, a fertility lab that specializes in what they call "genetic nudging". Sam is presented with three "projections", each one showing a potential life for their unborn child. Which will Sam pick? What I really liked about this, though, is that Towles could have gone into all the old ethics of genetic engineering arguments-- is it right to play God? Is it right to design a baby? --but instead he takes a different route, which I found really interesting. It's kinda a spoiler, but (view spoiler)[I loved the idea that you can do absolutely everything within your power for your kids and still not get it right, and sometimes you can throw caution to the wind and gamble and win. (hide spoiler)] The true "message" of this one, if that's the right term, took a little thinking about. But I didn't mind that. I found myself pondering what it meant long after I finished. Thought-provoking with subtle power. Randomize by Andy Weir - ⭑☆☆☆☆ Ark by Veronica Roth - ⭑⭑⭑☆☆ Emergency Skin by N.K. Jemisin - ⭑⭑⭑⭑⭑ The Last Conversation by Paul Tremblay - ⭑⭑⭑⭑☆ Summer Frost by Blake Crouch - ⭑⭑⭑⭑☆

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Another creepy, futuristic, nail biter, mind bender, brain cell fryer and mouth gaper book from the Forward series! I think I’m about to hide under the curtains and act like a voicemail keep saying: “Sorry, the good reviewer you write comments cannot be reached at this moment. After this tone, please pray for her not to get more rejections from Netgalley and get extra credit from banks to buy more books online. Bippp!” You may see that without starting my nighttime Chardonnay and book Another creepy, futuristic, nail biter, mind bender, brain cell fryer and mouth gaper book from the Forward series! I think I’m about to hide under the curtains and act like a voicemail keep saying: “Sorry, the good reviewer you write comments cannot be reached at this moment. After this tone, please pray for her not to get more rejections from Netgalley and get extra credit from banks to buy more books online. Bippp!” You may see that without starting my nighttime Chardonnay and book appointments, I’m already hyper enough to read all those series but all those science fiction and mind numbing elements started to create side effects on my mind. (Some coordination problems occurred as I try to flip pages by putting my fingers inside my wine glass and trying to drink my kindle. Well, as I tried to drink it, I hit it hard to y mouth and I’m on my way to my dentist but don’t worry I’m okay and still reading the novellas!) Let’s talk about this terrifying story about the genetic engineering of our future children. ( Maybe it’s too near future like next year, who knows) So you can choose your future child’s gender, appearance and other qualities like choosing the topics for your pizza and then you may see their possible future. Isn’t it amazing? Not for me. I don’t have a child but if I had and the technology took control my entire life, I would happily flip the bird and turn my back to leave the place as like Sam did. ( Okay he wasn’t rude like me, he just went to the bar to get drunk! That part works for me but I prefer my own home and night time to get drunk!) This is intriguing, fast pacing, memorable page turner and I loved more than Emergency Skin and I excitingly start to add Amor Towles books to my tbr list which is higher than Mount Everest ( I think the astronauts will use my list as jumping point to fly to the moon!) So I had so much fun. What’s next? Of course Blake Crouch’s Summer Frost, what am I waiting for! Oh no! I had to take implant break! I hate my dentist but at least he has nitrous oxide a.k.a laughing gas! Yes, I’m definitely having so much fun!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angela M

    I’m not really a big fan of sci-fi so I doubt whether I’ll read all five of the novella/short stories in Amazon’s Forward Series, but I could not pass this one by since I am a big fan of Amor Towles.The story seems to take place in the future, but yet it doesn’t feel very far off from the present. It eerily paints a picture of the future implications of genetic engineering, designer fertility clinics that offer more than your choice of sex and eye color of your baby. It was pretty scary mainly b I’m not really a big fan of sci-fi so I doubt whether I’ll read all five of the novella/short stories in Amazon’s Forward Series, but I could not pass this one by since I am a big fan of Amor Towles.The story seems to take place in the future, but yet it doesn’t feel very far off from the present. It eerily paints a picture of the future implications of genetic engineering, designer fertility clinics that offer more than your choice of sex and eye color of your baby. It was pretty scary mainly because it felt realistic. Sam and Annie are planning to have a child and Annie has gone to the Vitek clinic while Sam is out of town to get the process started. Sam arrives at the clinic and sees three video presentations of what the life of a future son could be like. It’s a short story so I won’t go into details of these, but just say that Sam leaves the clinic upset at what he has seen and heard and goes to a bar where he gets drunk and meets a couple of people who help him shed some light on what has happened. It’s certainly thought provoking to consider the issue of the possibilities of science, the moral implications, but what I also found thought provoking was how Sam reflects on his own life, not just the future of a perspective son. It’s free to Prime members and that it included both the ebook and audiobook. I chose to read it rather than listen. Thanks to my Goodreads friend Paige for bringing this to my attention.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Holly B

    3.5 STARS Read in one sitting or rather.... road trip. It is less than 50 pages! I didn't want to start a new novel and I wasn't in the middle of another, so this was the perfect read for a day trip. Totally entertained me and made my trip more enjoyable (hate sitting in the car just being a passenger!) Part Sci-Fi , but also seemed like it could be something in the near future (SCARY) where parents choose what kind of child they want! Including gender and intell 3.5 STARS Read in one sitting or rather.... road trip. It is less than 50 pages! I didn't want to start a new novel and I wasn't in the middle of another, so this was the perfect read for a day trip. Totally entertained me and made my trip more enjoyable (hate sitting in the car just being a passenger!) Part Sci-Fi , but also seemed like it could be something in the near future (SCARY) where parents choose what kind of child they want! Including gender and intelligence. What could possibly go wrong? Want to see a future video of it before your child is born?? Genetic engineering... No thank you!! This is one of the 6 short stories in the Foward collection. I do plan to read more. It was free for me via prime on Amazon. Thought provoking for sure, but the end did seem rushed and it didn't completely work for me.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    Amor Towles proves he is the master of words, yet again. In this science fiction novella, he explores nature vs. nurture. By using foundational information, biographical histories, predictive behavior patterns, and patterned growth development, Vitek promotes a new type of genetic engineering that the main character, Sam, is confronted with. But, given the choice to alleviate one of the more unsubstantial characteristics, what would be sacrificed and how would that effect the child’s future? “We’re all born wifuture? Amor Towles proves he is the master of words, yet again. In this science fiction novella, he explores nature vs. nurture. By using foundational information, biographical histories, predictive behavior patterns, and patterned growth development, Vitek promotes a new type of genetic engineering that the main character, Sam, is confronted with. But, given the choice to alleviate one of the more unsubstantial characteristics, what would be sacrificed and how would that effect the child’s future? “We’re all born with certain strengths which, ideally, are fostered by our parents and positively reinforced through education and peer interaction. But our strengths don’t serve us well in every circumstance at every phase of our lives. As we grow and enter new contexts, our longer-term strengths can suddenly hamper our worldly progress, which in turn can create dissonance at home.” I sat at the edge of my seat totally enthralled. The audio book narrated by David Harbour (of the show Stranger Things) was completely immersive, and I highly recommend it. Not sure if I liked the ending, but it wasn't enough to take a star off. This is one of one of six novellas in the series Forward that is set in the future. The collection of short stories for Forward was curated by Blake Crouch, and includes stories by authors such as Andy Weir, Veronica Roth, and Paul Trembley. Amor Towles Tweet

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    It asks more questions than it answers and ends on a somewhat unresolved note, but from a literary point of view I think this story is head and shoulders above the others I’ve read so far in this FORWARD collection of SF novellas (4 down, 2 to go). It’s about genetic engineering gone too far, but it’s also about relationships and self-knowledge. Now excuse me while I go off and think about this some more. Full review to come.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elyse (retired from reviewing/semi hiatus) Walters

    Designer Babies-R-Us. Sam and Annie are debating on what type baby they want to have. They enjoyed ‘Gin & Tonic’s’, while enjoying the process of picking out their unborn baby. Cheers…Sam & Annie want a boy! They picked out the name Daniel. We look into the future at Daniels life and various ages. This very short story is well written - ( I read the short ebook version and listened to the Audiobook) > combined it didn’t take much time. The Audiobook added quality to the text...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mackey

    Of all of the novellas in the Forward Collection on Amazon, You Have Arrived at Your Destination was my favorite. Genetic engineering scares the hell out of me and to see it so vividly in print was downright terrifying. I absolutely loved the ending! The entire collection is interesting but if you only read one of the offerings, read this one.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Dawn

    This was a pretty decent short story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carol (Bookaria)

    This is my favorite story of the FORWARD collection! They have all been excellent, but this one had a touch of humor that I loved. The story is divided in three acts, and this part is relevant to the narrative. I am not going to go and describe each part because then we would get into spoilers and the story itself is so short I urge you to go read it. I loved the main character, I loved the supporting character and the reactions along the way. It was different than the others stories This is my favorite story of the FORWARD collection! They have all been excellent, but this one had a touch of humor that I loved. The story is divided in three acts, and this part is relevant to the narrative. I am not going to go and describe each part because then we would get into spoilers and the story itself is so short I urge you to go read it. I loved the main character, I loved the supporting character and the reactions along the way. It was different than the others stories in the sense that I found some scene hilarious. Overall, a great addition to this collection, go read them if you love science fiction. This story is part of Forward, a collection of six stories of the near and far future from six great authors. Get the collection here. Free for Prime and Kindle Unlimited members :)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Real Rating: 2.5* of five This is one of the Forward Collection, short stories...this one's 46pp...based on an idea by Blake Crouch to explore the nature of change, innovation, and society in fiction. I didn't feel this entry suited the brief. It's too gee-whiz about self-driving cars, a thing that's already entered its second decade of reality...it's entirely too wowee-toledo about the idea of in vitro genetic manipulation, something that's basically ready to roll as soon as a generation less s Real Rating: 2.5* of five This is one of the Forward Collection, short stories...this one's 46pp...based on an idea by Blake Crouch to explore the nature of change, innovation, and society in fiction. I didn't feel this entry suited the brief. It's too gee-whiz about self-driving cars, a thing that's already entered its second decade of reality...it's entirely too wowee-toledo about the idea of in vitro genetic manipulation, something that's basically ready to roll as soon as a generation less squeamish than our kids' is grows into power...and his lumpen over-the-bottom classist narrator/narrative frame was, frankly, eye-rollingly ridiculous. Man finds his balls in a dive bar? What is this, 1959? I have arrived at my conclusion: Towles and I will not be deepening our reader/writer acquaintance. This blah little mash-up of Babbitt and We Can Remember It for You Wholesale annoyed me from giddy-up to whoa. HT the gung-ho business lad/cliche generator, Nick the slow-to-anger wise old barkeep, and goddesses please forfend Sam the dull PoV placeholder...can't in good conscience call him a "main character"...were just not engaging or interesting or well-limned or even particularly readable. I tried the Moscow one. I even scudded through part of the Civility one. This far and no farther.

  12. 5 out of 5

    DeAnn

    3.5 thought-provoking stars This was a quick read as it is a short story, perfect for the airport! I read "A Gentleman in Moscow" by this author and loved it. I also had a chance to hear the author speak, so I was excited to see this new choice out by this author. This is a futuristic tale, reminded me a bit of Ray Bradbury, about the future of genetic choices and babies. It was chilling and gave me some food for thought about how much science has gotten involved in this in 3.5 thought-provoking stars This was a quick read as it is a short story, perfect for the airport! I read "A Gentleman in Moscow" by this author and loved it. I also had a chance to hear the author speak, so I was excited to see this new choice out by this author. This is a futuristic tale, reminded me a bit of Ray Bradbury, about the future of genetic choices and babies. It was chilling and gave me some food for thought about how much science has gotten involved in this industry. How far would you go?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hamad

    This Review ✍ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 ★ This was a little bit tough to get into but I really liked the idea behind it! ★ Maybe because I am a doctor and I am interested in genetic engineering although what it imagined can be a little too far fetched! But this may be the story that made me think most and it provides ethical and philosophical problems that are worth pondering! ★ I did not know the author before reading this one, but I may check his other works because I really liked th This Review ✍️ Blog 📖 Twitter 🐦 Instagram 📷 ★ This was a little bit tough to get into but I really liked the idea behind it! ★ Maybe because I am a doctor and I am interested in genetic engineering although what it imagined can be a little too far fetched! But this may be the story that made me think most and it provides ethical and philosophical problems that are worth pondering! ★ I did not know the author before reading this one, but I may check his other works because I really liked this one. The ending was a bit shaky though! You can get more books from Book Depository

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Quann

    Amor Towles' A Gentleman in Moscow is my favourite novel of 2019 so far, and this short story has a lot of the same charm. The lead character's tour through the potential futures of his offspring are garnished with substantive characters and genuinely great humour. I didn't quite know what to expect of Towles operating in a sci-fi setting, but he handles himself extremely well here and myself and my road trip companion both agreed that this was an absolute winner. If I had to come down on this or th Amor Towles' A Gentleman in Moscow is my favourite novel of 2019 so far, and this short story has a lot of the same charm. The lead character's tour through the potential futures of his offspring are garnished with substantive characters and genuinely great humour. I didn't quite know what to expect of Towles operating in a sci-fi setting, but he handles himself extremely well here and myself and my road trip companion both agreed that this was an absolute winner. If I had to come down on this or the Jemisin story as my favourite, I'd have a pretty tough time. Definitely worth a read or listen (David Harbour's narration is stellar!).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    .This short story, part of the Amazon Forward collection, was a total mess. I had a hard time believing that it was written by Amor Towles, author of A Gentleman in Moscow, one of my all time favorites. I couldn't stand the main character and the plot made no sense. Sam and his wife, Annie, are having a hard time conceiving a baby,so they turn to this brand new fertility clinic, Vitech. That is supposed to be the main premise of this story. However, soon the story goes completely off the rails and descends in .This short story, part of the Amazon Forward collection, was a total mess. I had a hard time believing that it was written by Amor Towles, author of A Gentleman in Moscow, one of my all time favorites. I couldn't stand the main character and the plot made no sense. Sam and his wife, Annie, are having a hard time conceiving a baby,so they turn to this brand new fertility clinic, Vitech. That is supposed to be the main premise of this story. However, soon the story goes completely off the rails and descends into la la land. I really don't have anything more to say about this without spoiling it for other readers who may actually understand and like You Have Arrived at Your Destination.

  16. 4 out of 5

    WendyB

    Just alright. Not sure I completely understood the purpose of the story or the ending.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    I liked this near future short story about boutique parentage. Picking the qualities you think you want in a child. Creative and fascinating. I must read more Amor Towles. 4.5 Stars Listened to this on Audible. Excellent narration.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I have arrived at the end of this story. Wut? Ok, rewind, what kind of ending was that? I am confused and a little unsatisfied with it. Too open and abrupt for my taste. However, I liked the story as such. Pretty creepy, actually. Getting shown three potential versions of your yet-to-conceive child and how he will do in life. How do you choose, aka which of those future is the most worthy? What in life do you value the most? What means happiness, where is the value in life? Does it ma I have arrived at the end of this story. Wut? Ok, rewind, what kind of ending was that? I am confused and a little unsatisfied with it. Too open and abrupt for my taste. However, I liked the story as such. Pretty creepy, actually. Getting shown three potential versions of your yet-to-conceive child and how he will do in life. How do you choose, aka which of those future is the most worthy? What in life do you value the most? What means happiness, where is the value in life? Does it matter how you get there? Plus there was some inventive additional head-screwing in the aftermath. Devious. The audio narration by David Harbour of the show Stranger Things was solid. PS: The bio of Amos Towles is very reminiscent of his main protagonist in this story.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sonja Arlow

    3.5 great stars Within the span of only 47 pages Amor Towles created a fully realized story. An impressive feat! A Gentleman in Moscow unfolded in a slow beautiful way, not pacing that can work in a short story but the author is clearly more versatile than I thought. I can’t really say much about the story without giving away the plot but i 3.5 great stars Within the span of only 47 pages Amor Towles created a fully realized story. An impressive feat! A Gentleman in Moscow unfolded in a slow beautiful way, not pacing that can work in a short story but the author is clearly more versatile than I thought. I can’t really say much about the story without giving away the plot but it was a speculative look at the future of genetic engineering. I particularly liked the ending. This story forms part of the latest Amazon Originals collection called the Forward Collection, the brainchild of Blake Crouch and what a stellar cast of Authors he gathered. Andy Weir, Veronica Roth, and a few others I don’t know (yet). Like the Disorder collection (that also had amazing authors) this feels like a clever marketing campaign by Amazon to get new users for the Kindle Unlimited service, not that I am complaining. I really like seeing well known authors come up with inventive short stories. Recommended even for readers who do NOT like si-fi

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cheeky Cher

    4.5 stars - Incredible. I really loved it. Incredibly thought-provoking and fascinating concept. I have now read 5 of the 6 short stories in this collection and so far this one is far, far in the lead for being the best. Which, that’s not surprising given how wonderful his novel, A Gentleman in Moscow was. The narration of the audiobook was done by the actor that plays Jim Hopper on Stranger Things - great choice for the story. ------------------------------------------- Favorite Quote: Our lives are i/>Favorite 4.5 stars - Incredible. I really loved it. Incredibly thought-provoking and fascinating concept. I have now read 5 of the 6 short stories in this collection and so far this one is far, far in the lead for being the best. Which, that’s not surprising given how wonderful his novel, A Gentleman in Moscow was. The narration of the audiobook was done by the actor that plays Jim Hopper on Stranger Things - great choice for the story. ------------------------------------------- Favorite Quote: Our lives are intricate and multifaceted. But they also tend to have a larger arc that takes us from a position of youthful self-assurance through a period of setbacks, leading to a third phase in which, if we’re lucky, we’ve confronted our limitations and become deeper people ready to lead richer lives. First Sentence: It had been years since Sam had been this far out on the expressway.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    “The three of them sat there in silence, not looking at each other so much as at the middle of the table—at that small plastic container in which there was and wasn’t their future.” Life choices, genetic engineering, the military industrial complex, infidelity... this short story had too much and not enough.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    3.75* Wasn’t sure what score to give to this short story. On one hand, this is a very thought-provoking story, but on the other I found the end a little bit rushed and naive. Still, totally worth reading it. Towles here takes the idea of nature vs nurture to a completely different level. Not only can you chose your child’s sex, make sure he/she has no horrendous illnesses, but decide on which kind of character traits and thus life experiences he/she will have! With all this 3.75* Wasn’t sure what score to give to this short story. On one hand, this is a very thought-provoking story, but on the other I found the end a little bit rushed and naive. Still, totally worth reading it. Towles here takes the idea of nature vs nurture to a completely different level. Not only can you chose your child’s sex, make sure he/she has no horrendous illnesses, but decide on which kind of character traits and thus life experiences he/she will have! With all this focus on ‘could’, what about the issue of ‘should’? The choices offered here to this dad-to-be are shocking, and ultimately say less about the potential child and more about the parents and their life choices. I think the story was strong enough with just with this, and with the male lead processing all shown and re-analysing his life. It didn’t need the added subtle threat at the end, which then lead to the weak-ish ending. Otherwise, the narrative was great and compelling, and David Harbour’s (Hopper in Stranger Things) performance totally matched this.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks)

    Read on Kindle Unlimited! A short story about genetic engineering- a very interesting topic that I first came across in secondary school. I liked how the short novella was divided into three parts, it broke up the pacing well. Again, most of the scientific elements were well-explained. The one thing that let the reading experience down for me was that I couldn't connect well to the characters, especially towards the ending part.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    A very short audio book, one of six especially curated science fiction novellas simply because the chooser felt Amor Towles's A Gentleman in Moscow was the best novel he's ever read. A chilling examination of what designer offspring could mean.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Um...? Did I miss something? I didn't get the purpose of the story, the ending left me confused. It didn't make sense. I did like listening to David Harbour reading the audio!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anissa

    This tale of the path not taken of a man that's sparked by his consult at a fertility clinic was just okay for me. The writing was fine but the story trajectory, especially after the main character leaves Vitek (the fertility clinic) leapt headlong into the navel-gazing chasm and by story's end, I was just glad it was done. All things being equal, I'd have rather re-watched Gattaca.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    Interesting This short book is part of the "Forward Collection" curated by Blake Crouch. it is not something I would have expected from Amor Towles--nothing like anything else that he has written, but it is an interesting experiment in writing which I enjoyed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Obsidian

    Well not too much to say about this one except the third act one of the characters went on about actually weighed down this book a lot. I loved the concept (able to use an algorithm to choose what path an unborn child will possibly lead) but after the character of Sam lives the corporation the book just got messy. "You Have Arrived at Your final Destination" follows Sam whose wife Annie has talked him into having a child via a corporation called Vitek which does "genetic nudging." Vitek can supp Well not too much to say about this one except the third act one of the characters went on about actually weighed down this book a lot. I loved the concept (able to use an algorithm to choose what path an unborn child will possibly lead) but after the character of Sam lives the corporation the book just got messy. "You Have Arrived at Your final Destination" follows Sam whose wife Annie has talked him into having a child via a corporation called Vitek which does "genetic nudging." Vitek can supposedly use enough "science" to lead a couple to determine what type of life a child they will have one day, will experience. Sam starts off skeptical, and then dismayed when he sees what type of life his child could have and what does that mean in the end for free will. Sam I liked a lot initially. He was rightfully skeptical when he gets to Vitek. When he is told his wife has already selected three projections of their child's life for Sam to view, he wonders how she came to a decision so quickly. When he is shown the three projections I had to wonder at why Sam reacted the way he did. And we quickly find out about his past and his father and start asking questions of what parts of those experiences made Sam and what parts were pre-determined? The story talks a lot about his wife Annie, but we never get to "see" her or get her thoughts on things. Based on the ending of the book, one wonders if she was trying to get Sam to some realizations cause those three projections she selected say a lot about her. I thought the other character in the novel we stay with the most is Sam's "projection" child and we have that character being the driving force for the choice that Sam makes in the end. The writing I thought was really good. This reminds me a a bit of Gattaca, but on drugs a bit due to how the genetic nudging works with them able to "view" their child's life. The flow though once we get to "act three" didn't really work. Also one of the character's saying everyone's life goes around three acts like a movie just bugged me. The setting of this book seems to be in the not to distant future, though with a lot of things that sounded familiar to me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    ✨Skye✨

    This was one of my favourites in the Forward collection, mostly because of the really cool concept! I'd love to see a full length book with this idea-choosing a child based on what their life would be. Imagine the ethical dilemma and themes! I liked the writing style in this story, and enjoyed reading it overall. I will say it could have ended on a stronger note, as I still had some questions and didn't fully understand the main character's reasoning for what he did. This one maybe just nee This was one of my favourites in the Forward collection, mostly because of the really cool concept! I'd love to see a full length book with this idea-choosing a child based on what their life would be. Imagine the ethical dilemma and themes! I liked the writing style in this story, and enjoyed reading it overall. I will say it could have ended on a stronger note, as I still had some questions and didn't fully understand the main character's reasoning for what he did. This one maybe just needed to be a little longer to have really wowed me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gabi

    The most layered of the collection so far (read 4/6). Prenatal genetic engineering always gives me the creeps, so the topic already was right on spot for me. Amor Towles tackled the consequences with a clear sight and let his protagonist wander through his personal hell in the aftermath of a video representation of possible life choices for his future son at a company for in vitro fertilization. I love that the end is completely open. The reader has to find their own solution to the w The most layered of the collection so far (read 4/6). Prenatal genetic engineering always gives me the creeps, so the topic already was right on spot for me. Amor Towles tackled the consequences with a clear sight and let his protagonist wander through his personal hell in the aftermath of a video representation of possible life choices for his future son at a company for in vitro fertilization. I love that the end is completely open. The reader has to find their own solution to the whats and whys.

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