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Anaïs Nin at the Grand Guignol

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Written as a lost volume from her celebrated diaries, ANAÏS NIN AT THE GRAND GUIGNOL follows the iconic feminist author into an erotic and twilit realm of dark fantasy and sexual obsession, a world of forbidden desire and deadly consequence from which she might never fully return. Paris, 1933. In the aftermath of her love triangle with novelist Henry Miller and his dancer Written as a lost volume from her celebrated diaries, ANAÏS NIN AT THE GRAND GUIGNOL follows the iconic feminist author into an erotic and twilit realm of dark fantasy and sexual obsession, a world of forbidden desire and deadly consequence from which she might never fully return. Paris, 1933. In the aftermath of her love triangle with novelist Henry Miller and his dancer wife June, thirty-year-old Anaïs Nin is left reeling. Stifled by her bourgeois marriage, she retreats into the midnight world of the Grand Guignol, the legendary theatre of horror and fear whose devoted patrons thrill at the macabre spectacles depicted on the black box stage. It is there that she falls under the spell of the actress Paula Maxa, known as The Most Murdered Woman of All Time, who awakens Anaïs to a secret realm of bewitchment and vice, of pleasure and pain. Only Maxa already belongs to Monsieur Guillard, the lustful night creature that haunts the dark streets of Pigalle. As the demon lover's insatiable hunger grows stronger by the hour, Anaïs finds herself trapped in a far more dangerous triangle, a cat-and-mouse game with Maxa's very soul as the ultimate prize.


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Written as a lost volume from her celebrated diaries, ANAÏS NIN AT THE GRAND GUIGNOL follows the iconic feminist author into an erotic and twilit realm of dark fantasy and sexual obsession, a world of forbidden desire and deadly consequence from which she might never fully return. Paris, 1933. In the aftermath of her love triangle with novelist Henry Miller and his dancer Written as a lost volume from her celebrated diaries, ANAÏS NIN AT THE GRAND GUIGNOL follows the iconic feminist author into an erotic and twilit realm of dark fantasy and sexual obsession, a world of forbidden desire and deadly consequence from which she might never fully return. Paris, 1933. In the aftermath of her love triangle with novelist Henry Miller and his dancer wife June, thirty-year-old Anaïs Nin is left reeling. Stifled by her bourgeois marriage, she retreats into the midnight world of the Grand Guignol, the legendary theatre of horror and fear whose devoted patrons thrill at the macabre spectacles depicted on the black box stage. It is there that she falls under the spell of the actress Paula Maxa, known as The Most Murdered Woman of All Time, who awakens Anaïs to a secret realm of bewitchment and vice, of pleasure and pain. Only Maxa already belongs to Monsieur Guillard, the lustful night creature that haunts the dark streets of Pigalle. As the demon lover's insatiable hunger grows stronger by the hour, Anaïs finds herself trapped in a far more dangerous triangle, a cat-and-mouse game with Maxa's very soul as the ultimate prize.

53 review for Anaïs Nin at the Grand Guignol

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    An enthralling, riotous, sexy, scary, and ingenious short novel/novella that reimagines Anais Nin's Paris with demons (human and supernatural).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gerhard

    Review to follow.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Thom (T.E.)

    Why aren't there more short novels like this? Levy has concocted a cosmic horror that fits itself carefully with literary heritage and intimate cultural history. There's little that needs to be said to introduce the piece--it's all in the title. Henry Miller's place in the proceedings may drop away too suddenly, and occasionally the "diary voice" of Nin doesn't stay constant for every single word--but so much here is very memorable. The light and dark of Paris; a house-and-garden party that turn Why aren't there more short novels like this? Levy has concocted a cosmic horror that fits itself carefully with literary heritage and intimate cultural history. There's little that needs to be said to introduce the piece--it's all in the title. Henry Miller's place in the proceedings may drop away too suddenly, and occasionally the "diary voice" of Nin doesn't stay constant for every single word--but so much here is very memorable. The light and dark of Paris; a house-and-garden party that turns into an incredibly potent and frightful version of a "meet-cute"; and a clubhouse turn from a vivid dream over to the rise of a handful of women seeking to overcome an evil that is chillingly confident of its inevitability--these and more are well-played but not overplayed. And isn't that the reader's fear with such as this--that it'll wallow and not maintain the discipline that its narrative demands? This left me wanting more, but I was thoroughly satisfied with the reading experience.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Denker

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Johnson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Angie

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lavi

  9. 5 out of 5

    Renee

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lethe Press

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lavi

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Rosen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Thebossinthewall

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dale

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Bird

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vaughn Entwistle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jordan West

  20. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Canning

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate Castellana

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Wilson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  24. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Lantz

  25. 5 out of 5

    Creolecat

  26. 5 out of 5

    Claire Kittridge

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marti

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shveta Thakrar

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Crane

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  31. 5 out of 5

    Em

  32. 4 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  33. 4 out of 5

    Robert Levy

  34. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

  35. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  36. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

  37. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Krasnoff

  38. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  39. 5 out of 5

    Ilana C. Myer

  40. 4 out of 5

    Nya Watkins

  41. 4 out of 5

    Maria Rambo

  42. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  43. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  44. 4 out of 5

    Allison Thurman

  45. 4 out of 5

    Susan Gualtier

  46. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Belle

  47. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

  48. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  49. 5 out of 5

    .sjb.

  50. 5 out of 5

    bepassersby

  51. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Kaufmann

  52. 5 out of 5

    Reading Reindeer

  53. 5 out of 5

    Nick Coleman

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