Hot Best Seller

Migrating to Prison: America's Obsession With Locking Up Immigrants

Availability: Ready to download

A leading scholar’s powerful, in-depth look at the imprisonment of immigrants addressing the intersection of immigration and the criminal justice system For most of America’s history, we simply did not lock people up for migrating here. Yet over the last thirty years, the federal and state governments have increasingly tapped their powers to incarcerate people accused of A leading scholar’s powerful, in-depth look at the imprisonment of immigrants addressing the intersection of immigration and the criminal justice system For most of America’s history, we simply did not lock people up for migrating here. Yet over the last thirty years, the federal and state governments have increasingly tapped their powers to incarcerate people accused of violating immigration laws. As a result, almost 400,000 people annually now spend some time locked up pending the result of a civil or criminal immigration proceeding. In Migrating to Prison, leading scholar César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández takes a hard look at the immigration prison system’s origins, how it currently operates, and why. He tackles the emergence of immigration imprisonment in the mid-1980s, with enforcement resources deployed disproportionately against Latinos, and he looks at both the outsized presence of private prisons and how those on the political right continue, disingenuously, to link immigration imprisonment with national security risks and threats to the rule of law. Interspersed with powerful stories of people caught up in the immigration imprisonment industry, including children who have spent most of their lives in immigrant detention, Migrating to Prison is an urgent call for the abolition of immigration prisons and a radical reimagining of the United States: who belongs and on what criteria is that determination made?


Compare

A leading scholar’s powerful, in-depth look at the imprisonment of immigrants addressing the intersection of immigration and the criminal justice system For most of America’s history, we simply did not lock people up for migrating here. Yet over the last thirty years, the federal and state governments have increasingly tapped their powers to incarcerate people accused of A leading scholar’s powerful, in-depth look at the imprisonment of immigrants addressing the intersection of immigration and the criminal justice system For most of America’s history, we simply did not lock people up for migrating here. Yet over the last thirty years, the federal and state governments have increasingly tapped their powers to incarcerate people accused of violating immigration laws. As a result, almost 400,000 people annually now spend some time locked up pending the result of a civil or criminal immigration proceeding. In Migrating to Prison, leading scholar César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández takes a hard look at the immigration prison system’s origins, how it currently operates, and why. He tackles the emergence of immigration imprisonment in the mid-1980s, with enforcement resources deployed disproportionately against Latinos, and he looks at both the outsized presence of private prisons and how those on the political right continue, disingenuously, to link immigration imprisonment with national security risks and threats to the rule of law. Interspersed with powerful stories of people caught up in the immigration imprisonment industry, including children who have spent most of their lives in immigrant detention, Migrating to Prison is an urgent call for the abolition of immigration prisons and a radical reimagining of the United States: who belongs and on what criteria is that determination made?

30 review for Migrating to Prison: America's Obsession With Locking Up Immigrants

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro

    **NOTE: I received ARC of this book in ebook form via NetGalley in exchange for my honest and unbiased review. I did not receive compensation from the publisher for my review and so the opinions expressed within are of my own.** This is an extremely fascinating and infuriating read. This book really puts into perspective the issue of immigration and how the US deals with the situation in a language that people can understand. Reading through this book, the author reveals how and why immigration **NOTE: I received ARC of this book in ebook form via NetGalley in exchange for my honest and unbiased review. I did not receive compensation from the publisher for my review and so the opinions expressed within are of my own.** This is an extremely fascinating and infuriating read. This book really puts into perspective the issue of immigration and how the US deals with the situation in a language that people can understand. Reading through this book, the author reveals how and why immigration became such a complex hot button issue. The political, sociological, and even psychological ramification of an immigration system where we incarcerate immigrants who are escaping from peril are detailed in this book as well. The history that is in this book was very fascinating to read as well. It demonstrates the endless cycle with our obsession of detaining immigrants indefinitely without any due process or even care for these individuals. The author does explain that he does not have a solution on reforming our stances on immigration and rightly so because he is only one individual who would be tackling such a large issue like this. However, he does give hope that we can dismantle our current system and reform it to be more humane and empathetic to immigrants of all backgrounds.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Stevens

    This is a solid, accessible introduction to an important topic. News junkies will already know much of what is found here, as there has been much recent coverage of the topic. Even so there will be some new information for just about every reader. A key takeaway for me was how recent the whole idea of locking up unauthorized immigrants is.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate Sugarman

    Excellent

  4. 5 out of 5

    Colin Hogan

    Definitely worth the read. Though I don't agree with a few points in the book, it is a must read for Americans. Especially Americans who only hear what old white men say about immigration in our country.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marian P

    Migrating to Prison written by Cesar Garcia Hernandez demonstrates that the imprisoning of immigrants in the guise of “detainment” is a fairly new phenomenon. The process according to Garcia Hernandez was linked to the 1980s War on Drugs. The book is divided into three parts addressing the history of immigrants detainment, the contemporary system, and possible solutions. The strongest part of the book is the examination of the privatization of the prison system. The extent to which “Big Money” is Migrating to Prison written by Cesar Garcia Hernandez demonstrates that the imprisoning of immigrants in the guise of “detainment” is a fairly new phenomenon. The process according to Garcia Hernandez was linked to the 1980s War on Drugs. The book is divided into three parts addressing the history of immigrants detainment, the contemporary system, and possible solutions. The strongest part of the book is the examination of the privatization of the prison system. The extent to which “Big Money” is to be had by private corporations housing immigrants is startling. The book provides tremendous insight into various immigrant cases and the present state of immigrant prisons. Less effective was the historical background and the lack of analysis of the racialization of immigrants.For example, there are stark differences between the processing of Southern and Eastern Europeans at the turn of the 20th century and that of Chinese, Salvadorans, or Mexicans in the late 20th century. While each endured detailed, invasive physical examination and interrogation the latter immigrants were generally criminalized because of their racial status. And though discussion of asylum was broached a more thorough discussion of policy differences may have strengthened this book. I received this ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell K. Harris

    The books treats a very complicated subject in a overly simplistic way. The author rarely presents evidence for his assertion, but instead composes a historical narrative to arrive at his point. That narrative, while interesting, is clearly only a partial picture. For example, Cesar spends several chapters discussing how our we arrived at our current obsession with incarceration, which he attributes entirely to racism and venal interests. However, he never even mentions the 80's crime wave. Many The books treats a very complicated subject in a overly simplistic way. The author rarely presents evidence for his assertion, but instead composes a historical narrative to arrive at his point. That narrative, while interesting, is clearly only a partial picture. For example, Cesar spends several chapters discussing how our we arrived at our current obsession with incarceration, which he attributes entirely to racism and venal interests. However, he never even mentions the 80's crime wave. Many similar incomplete and motivated depictions of history result in a book that is little more than a pom-pom shake for the authors desired message. Despite the clearly truncated and unfair citation of history, this book does contain many gems. Cesar effectively points out that civil detainment and criminal imprisonment are indistinguishable. I came to this book looking for a unique perspective from an author with deep experience in this field. That deep perspective should have lead to a complex treatment of a complex topic. What we got was a deeply ideological narrative that simplifies the issues to point where it can only be called a polemic. Overall, worth ignoring. Look for works that cite facts and examine issues rather than one-sided ideological storytelling.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Burke

    Truly an excellent book. I think every America needs to read this because if you invest in a 401k or a 403b you most likely are making money off the misery of others. Also, the opportunities your familiy members had when they migrated to this country are most likely very different than what is currently happening today. This book reviews the history of our country and the racist ways we have set up the immigration system into a detention/prison industrial complex. And in many ways, that still Truly an excellent book. I think every America needs to read this because if you invest in a 401k or a 403b you most likely are making money off the misery of others. Also, the opportunities your familiy members had when they migrated to this country are most likely very different than what is currently happening today. This book reviews the history of our country and the racist ways we have set up the immigration system into a detention/prison industrial complex. And in many ways, that still function much the same way they did over 170 years ago. I am motivated to work to destroy the dentention system we currently have for so many reasons and this book gave me even more ways to do just that!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hector

    3.5 stars. Informative, but I wouldn’t necessarily call it compelling. I appreciate that García Hernández recognized that the problems with immigration detention are not isolated to the last three years of executive policy and that many factors have contributed to this inhumane practice. I also liked that the author gave examples of the many forms immigration takes and the reminder that immigrants are not super humans — they have the same wants, needs, and faults as any other group of people.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle N

    An important read for everyone. This book teaches the uninformed about the immigration dilemma we are facing right now. It is dire and we need a solution fast. No one migrating to a country should be forced into a prison, just as this book makes the point of saying. I recommend this book highly.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I won a copy of this book. A very timely read for this moment in our history. It doesn't matter which side of the fence you're on, this book gives one the back story of the USA's immigration system from its early years to present day. Get a copy for all your favorite relatives this holiday season!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daisy Dooley

    Migrating to Prison was a really fascinating account of the history of America's immigration policy, and quite an eye-opener. Whilst the immigration policy of the U.S. has become a way to 'punish, stigmatize and marginalize - all for political and financial gain, it has throughout its history, veered between a somewhat laissez faire approach, with the pendulum now firmly swinging in the punitive direction. It was in 1896 that Supreme Court Judges declared that immigration imprisonment was Migrating to Prison was a really fascinating account of the history of America's immigration policy, and quite an eye-opener. Whilst the immigration policy of the U.S. has become a way to 'punish, stigmatize and marginalize - all for political and financial gain, it has throughout its history, veered between a somewhat laissez faire approach, with the pendulum now firmly swinging in the punitive direction. It was in 1896 that Supreme Court Judges declared that immigration imprisonment was constitutionally permissible in the 1896 Wong Wing v U.S case. Early detention centres in Ellis Island and Angel Island were unsanitary and degrading holding centres. Following WWII when there was a shortage of labour, migration was actually encouraged with initiatives like the Bracero Program which encouraged generations of Mexicans to move northwards. However this was a time-limited initiative and since the civil unrest of the 1960's and 1970's, immigration laws have become increasingly militant and unfairly biased along race and class lines. With mass hysteria about terrorism, legislation has become increasingly restrictive, including imprisoning women and children fleeing gangs, or abuse. With the rise of private prisons, immigration policies are generating revenues that exploit slave labour and boost economies by providing jobs for hundreds. Treating people as criminals simply because they have fled a country to find safety, seems like a wholly cynical and degrading policy. Surely each case should be treated on its merits? There has to be a better way forward and this book examines in detail past, present and possible future ways of dealing with migration. Fascinating, extensively researched and an important read for anyone interested in politics in the present climate.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Danita L

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gus

  14. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  16. 4 out of 5

    Monette Cortez

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christine

  18. 4 out of 5

    Michael Baum

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Lunz Trujillo

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

  21. 5 out of 5

    Briar

  22. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  23. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Law

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peter Z.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maia

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lenore H Hare

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matty

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Kelly

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.