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Queerbaiting and Fandom: Teasing Fans through Homoerotic Possibilities

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In this first-ever comprehensive examination of queerbaiting, fan studies scholar Joseph Brennan and his contributors examine cases that shed light on the sometimes exploitative industry practice of teasing homoerotic possibilities that, while hinted at, never materialize in the program narratives. Through a nuanced approach that accounts for both the history of queer In this first-ever comprehensive examination of queerbaiting, fan studies scholar Joseph Brennan and his contributors examine cases that shed light on the sometimes exploitative industry practice of teasing homoerotic possibilities that, while hinted at, never materialize in the program narratives. Through a nuanced approach that accounts for both the history of queer representation and older fan traditions, these essayists examine the phenomenon of queerbaiting across popular TV, video games, children’s programs, and more. Contributors: Evangeline Aguas, Christoffer Bagger, Bridget Blodgett, Cassie Brummitt, Leyre Carcas, Jessica Carniel, Jennifer Duggan, Monique Franklin, Divya Garg, Danielle S. Girard, Mary Ingram-Waters, Hannah McCann, Michael McDermott, E. J. Nielsen, Emma Nordin, Holly Eva Katherine Randell-Moon, Emily E. Roach, Anastasia Salter, Elisabeth Schneider, Kieran Sellars, Isabela Silva, Guillaume Sirois, Clare Southerton


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In this first-ever comprehensive examination of queerbaiting, fan studies scholar Joseph Brennan and his contributors examine cases that shed light on the sometimes exploitative industry practice of teasing homoerotic possibilities that, while hinted at, never materialize in the program narratives. Through a nuanced approach that accounts for both the history of queer In this first-ever comprehensive examination of queerbaiting, fan studies scholar Joseph Brennan and his contributors examine cases that shed light on the sometimes exploitative industry practice of teasing homoerotic possibilities that, while hinted at, never materialize in the program narratives. Through a nuanced approach that accounts for both the history of queer representation and older fan traditions, these essayists examine the phenomenon of queerbaiting across popular TV, video games, children’s programs, and more. Contributors: Evangeline Aguas, Christoffer Bagger, Bridget Blodgett, Cassie Brummitt, Leyre Carcas, Jessica Carniel, Jennifer Duggan, Monique Franklin, Divya Garg, Danielle S. Girard, Mary Ingram-Waters, Hannah McCann, Michael McDermott, E. J. Nielsen, Emma Nordin, Holly Eva Katherine Randell-Moon, Emily E. Roach, Anastasia Salter, Elisabeth Schneider, Kieran Sellars, Isabela Silva, Guillaume Sirois, Clare Southerton

50 review for Queerbaiting and Fandom: Teasing Fans through Homoerotic Possibilities

  1. 5 out of 5

    amanda

    I knew I had to read this book as soon as I saw it on Netgalley. I’m a bisexual black woman active on social media sites like Twitter and I see and hear about queer baiting quite often. There are several shows that do this kind of thing and when you’re looking for representation of who you identity with as a person it can be frustrating if not downright insufferable to see these occurrences. I loved that this book went deep into this exact problem in society and discussed several recent instances I knew I had to read this book as soon as I saw it on Netgalley. I’m a bisexual black woman active on social media sites like Twitter and I see and hear about queer baiting quite often. There are several shows that do this kind of thing and when you’re looking for representation of who you identity with as a person it can be frustrating if not downright insufferable to see these occurrences. I loved that this book went deep into this exact problem in society and discussed several recent instances of it. Although we are growing and learning everyday as people it is important that we realize the harm that can come from these practices. This was a great, quick, and to the point read which highlighted these issues and hopefully as a society we can grow from it. Thanks very much to Netgalley and the publisher for my copy of this ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah

    To see more reviews check out MI Book Reviews. I got an ARC of this book. I have been hearing the term queerbaiting for a while, but no one ever explained it. I did a single google search which was enough for a definition to understand what others were saying. That was all of my knowledge of the subject before reading this book. Even then, this book made almost complete sense. The times it didn’t make sense was some of the authors used a lot of vocab words I didn’t know, which was exciting. I got To see more reviews check out MI Book Reviews. I got an ARC of this book. I have been hearing the term queerbaiting for a while, but no one ever explained it. I did a single google search which was enough for a definition to understand what others were saying. That was all of my knowledge of the subject before reading this book. Even then, this book made almost complete sense. The times it didn’t make sense was some of the authors used a lot of vocab words I didn’t know, which was exciting. I got to learn a lot of new words. It was also annoying. A lot of this book was accessible, it was so close to being a book that wasn’t academic to the point it alienated the people who wanted to read it. I’m mostly happy about new words, since it wasn’t every single piece, but a few paragraphs here or there. I knew all but two of the focuses of the pieces included. Despite not knowing Sherlock or Overwatch, I was able to follow the ideas. Enough details were given to keep me in the loop without bogging down the piece with overly fluffy back story. Supernatural had a lot more backstory to it, but it tended to stay in the realm of important information for the piece. I was impressed with how quickly the authors were able to describe a show that has been on the air for so long and make it easier to digest. There was a heavy focus on Supernatural and Sherlock, which makes sense considering how strong the evidence is for queerbaiting in those shows, but I wish there was more outside of those shows highlighted in longer pieces. Most of my favorite pieces were thought pieces. There was so much that got left out of the piece on Steven Universe for example. That could have easily been given the space of a chapter. Having the Steven Universe piece in particular piece did not allow the room for discussion of one character that is very obviously in love with another (there are multiple scenes where she displays jealousy over other relationships, admits to living her life for this other female character, and more). I would have loved to see how the author fit that into the puzzle. Then the books published around the series where one was even dedicated to trans and gender nonconforming youth. There were so many possibilities for the Steven Universe piece. I could have done with one less Sherlock or Supernatural piece to discuss a show that is incredibly queer in so many ways. So most of my issues with this book was focus on shows I don’t enjoy (though I do have language for one reason I don’t like one of the shows now) and being forced to learn new words. Not bad for an anthology. Clearly the issues are on me with this one. I loved how much the authors got me to care and just how many citations there were. The only real issue I had with the book was the piece on Jonas. There were multiple graphically sexual comments made that were cited, but didn’t seem to actually further the discussion or really serve any purpose. Without those sexual comments, the point would have been just as strong. There is a reason I stopped following media sites of gay cis men, the graphic and often violent sexual comments about everyone no matter the subject. I could have dealt without that in an academic piece that was not about graphic and/or violent sexual comments.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara Martins

    This collection of essays explores the theme of queerbaiting (enticing queer representation without delivering) in media. The text was overall comprehensible, but at times too academic, with entire sentences composed of unattainable words to the lay man. I could see it being valuable to people in social or media studies, and to a lesser extent to people like me, fans who are interested in diving deeper into these topics. Overall, I enjoyed the information presented and the way in which it was This collection of essays explores the theme of queerbaiting (enticing queer representation without delivering) in media. The text was overall comprehensible, but at times too academic, with entire sentences composed of unattainable words to the lay man. I could see it being valuable to people in social or media studies, and to a lesser extent to people like me, fans who are interested in diving deeper into these topics. Overall, I enjoyed the information presented and the way in which it was argued. However, as someone who was present in tumblr/fandom forums while the conversations of queerbaiting become more and more prevalent, not a lot was new information. But i did get a lot of new great information (e.g. assimilationist vs radical reading practices). Some topics (Nick Jonas, shipping of real people) and particularly their presentation as queerbaiting was slightly weird - i do see where the author(s) was coming from but it seemed " a reach", for lack of a better term. The equalization of queerbaiting relating to Wincest and then to Destiel seemed... off. There was some repetition with the same contextualization being made over and over, which is comprehensible since it is an anthology, but could've been edited better. upside: you can put this down and then pick it up whenever you wish. downside: you start skimming fast when you read it in one go. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with the ARC. PS. There's one essay arguing how the previous roles of the actors influence how their characters are read and the effects that has on the show/movie and consequent societal repercussions of it. The Sherlock movies and the role of Stephen Fry in them are mentioned. Within the referenced argument, they mention his role as Wilde, and his defense of LGBTQ rights,, but not the fact that he is a gay man?? and very out for many years?? anyways that seemed ridiculous to exclude from that narrative.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sakhile

    Queerbaiting and Fandom is a collection of essays that explore queerbaiting in media. This was an interesting collection to read as queerbaiting has turned into a sort-of marketing technique in popular media. It explores the different ways in which viewers are promises representation or alluded to, representation but ultimately never getting it. Characters that sit just on the fence, friendships that allude to more but will always just be friendships. It's a cheap marketing technique but it Queerbaiting and Fandom is a collection of essays that explore queerbaiting in media. This was an interesting collection to read as queerbaiting has turned into a sort-of marketing technique in popular media. It explores the different ways in which viewers are promises representation or alluded to, representation but ultimately never getting it. Characters that sit just on the fence, friendships that allude to more but will always just be friendships. It's a cheap marketing technique but it works. Either in outrage or anticipation. Although I found most of these essays interesting some of them felt a little shallow to them such as equating taking shirtless pictures with queerbaiting. Not the same thing tbh. And skating the line between real people versus characters. I found it unsettling that "Larry Stylinson" was included as I don't believe they are queerbaiting. It's a fandom that ran away with the idea and ruined a friendship between two real people, not queerbaiting,

  5. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    ***I was granted an ARC of this via Netgalley from the publisher.*** Queerbaiting is a term that many outside of particular fandoms probably have not heard of but it is a term that is gaining more recognition from academics. In this book, Queerbaiting and Fandom edited by Joseph Brennan, the reader is provided with a number of essays and thought pieces on the subject. Queerbaiting, while still a term with fluid meaning, is generally when a promise of a homosexual relationship between to ***I was granted an ARC of this via Netgalley from the publisher.*** Queerbaiting is a term that many outside of particular fandoms probably have not heard of but it is a term that is gaining more recognition from academics. In this book, Queerbaiting and Fandom edited by Joseph Brennan, the reader is provided with a number of essays and thought pieces on the subject. Queerbaiting, while still a term with fluid meaning, is generally when a promise of a homosexual relationship between to characters in a entertainment medium is hinted at through subtext but is never actually fulfilled in a way that is unambiguous, allowing those in charge of the medium to laugh it off or say it isn't intentional. This is usually done to lure in a queer audience but not offend its heterosexual audience. The essays in this book explore the history of the term queerbaiting, its effects on the fandom, and also look at queerbaiting in anime, cartoons and even of real life celebrities. The authors of the essays do a good job in explaining queerbaiting's appeal to the entertainment industry and why fandoms are fed up with it and speaking out about it. The essays providing historical context to the term were the best in my opinion and also the in-depth looks of queerbaiting in the popular TV shows Sherlock and Supernatural and in the persona of Nick Jonas. Being one of the first books on the topic, I think that is has set a good standard following analyses on the subject of queerbaiting. Rating: 4 stars. Would recommend to a friend.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Julie Bozza

    I very much enjoyed this, though at times (due to the nature of the subject) it was a tad painful to read. Being the first academic book to consider queerbaiting in depth, care was taken to discuss the relevant terminology, its definitions and its history. Academic essays are interspersed with shorter, slightly more casual Thought Pieces each considering a particular example or genre. Queerbaiting is definitely a concern at present, and it has been for some years. However, I very much hope that I very much enjoyed this, though at times (due to the nature of the subject) it was a tad painful to read. Being the first academic book to consider queerbaiting in depth, care was taken to discuss the relevant terminology, its definitions and its history. Academic essays are interspersed with shorter, slightly more casual Thought Pieces each considering a particular example or genre. Queerbaiting is definitely a concern at present, and it has been for some years. However, I very much hope that it's the result of a transition that will be of relatively short duration. I think the show "Xena: Warrior Princess" (1995-2001) is a good marker of "before". As discussed in Holly Eva Katherine Randell-Moon's Thought Piece in this book, the cast and creatives made the Xena/Gabrielle relationship as queer as they could, given the refusal of The Powers That Be (TPTB) to allow anything explicitly queer. I strongly feel that "Good Omens" (2019) is a terrific indication of "after" or at least the way forward. I assume it was produced too late to be considered in this book, but I vividly remember watching it for the first time and suddenly realising, "This is actually queer, not queerbaiting." The show includes queerness in sexuality, romance and gender identity, particularly in but not limited to the two main characters, Crowley and Aziraphale. As soon as I realised that I was in such safe hands, I relaxed, and was so much better able to enjoy watching the rest of the show play out. In between "Xena" and "Good Omens", there are a number of shows which tease the viewers and fans with queer subtext, or promises of queer characters, but never follow through with actual queer content. And the fans are no longer willing to give the producers a pass, as was done in the past with "Xena", because times are changing, our culture is evolving, and queer characters are far more welcome (or at least allowable) now. There is a cautionary tale told by Leyre Carcas in the Thought Piece "Heterobaiting" on the show "Black Sails" (2014-17). As you would guess from the piece's title, "Black Sails" turned the whole notion of queerbaiting on its head. They teased us with the supportive, sexual, secretive relationship between the pirate Flint and the widow Miranda - before surprising us with a 2nd season episode that explicitly presented us with Flint's "true love", Miranda's husband Thomas. While many welcomed this, there was a harsh backlash, and it is reported that the inclusion of Thomas in future storylines was curtailed. I can only hope that TPTB decide to batten down the hatches and weather such backlashs in the future. Meanwhile, the three shows that come in for the most criticism in this book are "Supernatural" (2005-?), Sherlock (2010-17?), and the "Harry Potter" universe (1997-?). My own fandom, BBC Merlin (2008-12), earns itself a few dishonourable mentions. Some of this is not comfortable reading; for example, the "Sherlock" showrunners and the fans who ardently insist on The Johnlock Conspiracy all seem to have their moments of behaving badly. And it hurts to see the beyond-fan-friendly actor Misha Collins ("Supernatural") quoted in the top and tail of the book's Introduction as an example of getting it wrong in his remarks. But no matter my discomfort, I couldn't really disagree with the main arguments presented. While the main examples of queerbaiting came from TV shows and films, there was also discussion of finding it in celebrity culture, children's TV, Real Person Slash fan fiction, Japanese popular culture, talk show practices (i.e. the "fan art segment"), superhero comics and their alternate universes, video games, and the Eurovision Song Contest. So while some of this was dealt with fairly briefly in the Thought Pieces, I was pleased to feel that the notion of queerbaiting had been thoroughly aired! Reality TV shows weren't considered - and it's interesting to me that some reality shows are ahead of the curve. For example, Australia's renovation show "The Block" (2003-?) included a gay couple in their first and their most recent seasons - and probably in some seasons in between, as well, though I haven't watched them all. Surely such "non-fictional" examples help pave the way for change in fictional shows. And maybe it would have been nice for this book to include a few examples of TV shows and such which got it right, or are on the right path...? Or is such an approach not suitable in an academic tome? I did very much appreciate Monique Franklin's essay "Queerbaiting, Queer Readings, and Heteronormative Viewing Practices". Franklin makes a good case for not throwing the baby out with the bathwater, as it were. There is value in keeping and enjoying queer subtext for its own sake, as well as increasing actual, visible queer representation. I might be showing my age, but I'm happy with queer subtext, as long as the text remains open and doesn't close off the queer possibilities that can be found there. One of the joys of the first season of "Merlin" was that the text was very open. We were free to ship anyone with anyone, without any contradiction from the text. It was only later that the creators began to pin down certain relationships. Though of course it cannot be denied that proper queer representation is vitally important, and "Merlin" is such a wasted opportunity in that regard, given that it so beautifully set up both the Merlin/Arthur and Guinevere/Lancelot relationships before insisting on canonical Arthur/Guinevere. TPTB could have taken it that way if they chose... Ah, well! Here's to hoping that the need for considering queerbaiting is short-lived. Let's have queer subtext and queer text and just the whole queer shebang! It's time. ### A copy of this book was kindly provided to me by the publisher via NetGalley.

  7. 5 out of 5

    🌈⭐️RoseOfRainbows⭐️🌈💕

    Very enlightening and takes some getting used to, but honestly a really solid, educational read. I really liked it. 5/5 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Mckinney

    As someone who reads and writes her share of fan fiction, I'm well aware of the powers of subtext and the palaces that fans can build upon their unsubstantial sands. However, I hadn't heard the term queer baiting which emerged in the 2010s and is used to describe "an industry tactic where 'those officially associated with a media text court viewers interested in LGBT narratives... without the text ever definitely confirming the nonheterosexuality of the relevant characters'" (6). In Queer As someone who reads and writes her share of fan fiction, I'm well aware of the powers of subtext and the palaces that fans can build upon their unsubstantial sands. However, I hadn't heard the term queer baiting which emerged in the 2010s and is used to describe "an industry tactic where 'those officially associated with a media text court viewers interested in LGBT narratives... without the text ever definitely confirming the nonheterosexuality of the relevant characters'" (6). In Queer Baiting and Fandom editor Joseph Brennan and contributors investigate this exploitative practice, distinguish it from both homoeroticism and subtext, and engage with the queer activism undertaken by fans. The most valuable material for scholars can be found in the opening chapters, which investigate how the LGBT community has traditionally been marketed to, the frustration faced when authors/creators insist on a single meaning for a text, and the way queer baiting refuses to entirely reject queer readings in order to gain an audience. The tactics described in these chapters demonstrate how media creators keep (questionably) queer content palatable to so-called “mainstream” audiences, how imposing certain readings may be the only way for an audience to experience LGBT content, and how a transnational context may limit queer possibilities. For example, queerbaiting may allow studios to “get credit for having a queer character, without putting the studio or the film at risk” with markets that prohibit queer content (71). Most striking is the comment that queerbaiting expects “an LGBTQ audience to be satisfied with the bare minimum” of onscreen representation (29). The politics of representation, marginalization, and stereotypes are discussed at length. Chapters in the book are dedicated to a wide range of subjects including the way that the creators of Supernatural welcome queer content as long as they can joke it away, “the Dumbledore controversy” that offers “blink-and-you’ll-miss-it” fragments rather than much-needed representation, heterobaiting in Black Sails, Law and Order SVU, Sherlock, Xena: Warrior Princess and Supergirl. Later chapters turn to the “real world” queer baiting engaged in by celebrities and queer baiting in video games. As with all collections, the usefulness of each chapter will depend on the reader or scholar’s particular interests. However, this is an excellent start to a much-needed conversation, and one hopes other anthologies and monographs will follow its lead.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Littlebookterror

    I'm not gonna lie, I struggled a bit when I started it. I only ever read papers about biology, and sparingly, so I had trouble with the language at first. This is of course in part because I am no native speaker but I also don't think this rather dry style is for everybody. So it's not the easiest thing to read but that's not what I expected considering the subject matter. As a fan of many tv shows and other media and a queer person myself, queerbaiting is nothing new to me. I've read my fair I'm not gonna lie, I struggled a bit when I started it. I only ever read papers about biology, and sparingly, so I had trouble with the language at first. This is of course in part because I am no native speaker but I also don't think this rather dry style is for everybody. So it's not the easiest thing to read but that's not what I expected considering the subject matter. As a fan of many tv shows and other media and a queer person myself, queerbaiting is nothing new to me. I've read my fair share of posts and articles online but never any actual data or studies. This book filled this gap in my knowledge very well. It examines many points arguing for both sides, shows the effects it has on society and explains how producers are abusing such methods for money. One detriment was definitely that every new essay redefines queerbaiting and the more you get into, the more repetitive it gets. I'd wished they's simply cut those parts out since they offered nothing new. It just feels very nice to be validated and for "proper" scholars to tell you that you haven't been imagining this and this is not something to be ignored or forgotten like so many other problems. I received an advanced reading copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    サヘリー

    I'd requested this book ages ago, and was highly gratified to see both the email of acceptance from NetGalley as well as the book drop into my NetGalley "Start Reading" section. Imagine my surprise when I saw BBC Merlin touched upon in it------KIDDING LMAO I fully expected the show to make an appearance in the introduction itself (it's why I desperately wanted this book) and I was NOT disappointed. BBC Merlin (and Sherlock, but I digress) is the main reason that I was so very, very keen to read I'd requested this book ages ago, and was highly gratified to see both the email of acceptance from NetGalley as well as the book drop into my NetGalley "Start Reading" section. Imagine my surprise when I saw BBC Merlin touched upon in it------KIDDING LMAO I fully expected the show to make an appearance in the introduction itself (it's why I desperately wanted this book) and I was NOT disappointed. BBC Merlin (and Sherlock, but I digress) is the main reason that I was so very, very keen to read this set of essays. When I say not disappointed -- I mean it. I was NOT DISAPPOINTED. I have always struggled with academic English so this reading was no different (made me feel utterly stupid by the end, but what else is new). However, it is so very gratifying to see academic papers on a subject that has been long discussed in fandom spaces. I am still struggling to decipher some sentences but I don't mind, really. These essays were enlightening and thought-provoking and I do hope that one day I'll be able to articulate myself on the level of the authors in this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    emily [coffeeandwashitape]

    The content of this book was truly great. Comprised of 7 essays and multiple "thought pieces", it really covers all topics and areas of queerbaiting in media, from Supernatural, Sherlock, Nick Jonas, Harry Potter, Adventure Time, Xena, etc. It was massively helpful in explaining the problems, and putting words to what so many of us have been trying to vocalize all along. The only thing disappointing here is that this is the first book on queerbaiting, I can only hope this inspires more like it The content of this book was truly great. Comprised of 7 essays and multiple "thought pieces", it really covers all topics and areas of queerbaiting in media, from Supernatural, Sherlock, Nick Jonas, Harry Potter, Adventure Time, Xena, etc. It was massively helpful in explaining the problems, and putting words to what so many of us have been trying to vocalize all along. The only thing disappointing here is that this is the first book on queerbaiting, I can only hope this inspires more like it because we need it. This was a really great read despite it taking longer to read than an average non-fiction because of the writing style.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Harri

    This book, comprised of articles and shorter 'think pieces' is a fascinating read for anyone, LGBTQ or not, who wants to learn more about the phenomenom of queerbaiting. The text is academic, but it is simple enough for someone not an academic within that particular field to understand it, and the reference list is extensive if you're interested in wider reading. I thought the book overall gave a relatively unbiased look at the topic of queerbaiting, the issues within the media industry today, and This book, comprised of articles and shorter 'think pieces' is a fascinating read for anyone, LGBTQ or not, who wants to learn more about the phenomenom of queerbaiting. The text is academic, but it is simple enough for someone not an academic within that particular field to understand it, and the reference list is extensive if you're interested in wider reading. I thought the book overall gave a relatively unbiased look at the topic of queerbaiting, the issues within the media industry today, and the difference between queerbaiting and homoerotic subtext that can be 'read queerly'. I found the Sherlock and Supernatural discussions particularly interesting, as a queer fan but not a Johnlock or Destiel shipper. It gave me insight into something I previously hadn't understood, and had therefore avoided. There are detailed analysises of particular scenes and fan reactions, as well as discussion around the intention of the producers. Other fandoms discussed included Harry Potter, Xena, and the topic of real person slash and celebrity queerbaiting. Well worth a read, even if you only dip into the chapters you have a particular interest in.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    I received an ARC via Netgalley. This is a really though-provoking collection of essay and thought pieces on 'queerbaiting' and queer reading practices highlighting a variety of recent media. Most of the pieces are quite academic, particularly at the start of the book and if the reader doesn't have a media/cultural studies background I think it could be a challenging read in the more theoretical parts. This collection actually really changed my position on queerbaiting and sparked discussions in I received an ARC via Netgalley. This is a really though-provoking collection of essay and thought pieces on 'queerbaiting' and queer reading practices highlighting a variety of recent media. Most of the pieces are quite academic, particularly at the start of the book and if the reader doesn't have a media/cultural studies background I think it could be a challenging read in the more theoretical parts. This collection actually really changed my position on queerbaiting and sparked discussions in my household about the value of LGBTQ representation, identity politics, the death and resurrection of the author and assimilationist vs radical reading practices, so I got a lot from it but then I'm also a fandom nerd with academic experience in fandom studies so your mileage might vary. I especially enjoyed Emma Nordin and Monique Franklin's essays, and loved that a piece on Black Sails' 'straightbaiting' was included which I'd love to read a whole book on.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Effy

    This book is book important and interesting. The format of the book is 7 longer essays interspersed with shorter "thought pieces". Each essay or thought piece explores a different aspect of what queerbaiting is or where it has been argued to have been employed. There are a wide variety of topics covered in this book including Sherlock Holmes, Nick Jonas, and the Eurovision Song Contest. The book did take me a little while to read as it is written in an academic style but it is well worth the This book is book important and interesting. The format of the book is 7 longer essays interspersed with shorter "thought pieces". Each essay or thought piece explores a different aspect of what queerbaiting is or where it has been argued to have been employed. There are a wide variety of topics covered in this book including Sherlock Holmes, Nick Jonas, and the Eurovision Song Contest. The book did take me a little while to read as it is written in an academic style but it is well worth the effort and I would strongly recommend others read it too. Thank you to Netgalley for providing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    The topic of queerbaiting has come up repeatedly in various fandoms I've been part of. At various times, I've been more or less understanding about the issue. I expected to be irritated by this book, but the explorations made the issue clearer for me. Some of the topics were less interesting because I'm not part of those fandoms, but the chapters on Supernatural and Sherlock were especially engaging. I liked that the "thought pieces" were presented to give additional views on each topic. The topic of queerbaiting has come up repeatedly in various fandoms I've been part of. At various times, I've been more or less understanding about the issue. I expected to be irritated by this book, but the explorations made the issue clearer for me. Some of the topics were less interesting because I'm not part of those fandoms, but the chapters on Supernatural and Sherlock were especially engaging. I liked that the "thought pieces" were presented to give additional views on each topic. Overall, this was a balanced and nuanced look at this sometimes contraversial topic.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lyra Hale

    Was ok with the concept of the book and the content in it until I hit certain chapters who identified the smallest actions as queer baiting instead of actual legit random ass things. I do believe that companies are taking advantage of queer viewers because we make bank, but some of this content seems really focused on perspectives I do not understand but am willing to learn more about. Unfortunately it's not with this book. Especially because it dived into Wincest, which I never thought I would Was ok with the concept of the book and the content in it until I hit certain chapters who identified the smallest actions as queer baiting instead of actual legit random ass things. I do believe that companies are taking advantage of queer viewers because we make bank, but some of this content seems really focused on perspectives I do not understand but am willing to learn more about. Unfortunately it's not with this book. Especially because it dived into Wincest, which I never thought I would read in a serious collection of essays.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    An excellent academic look at something that has been discussed by various levels of people through out. While any collection of essays about a particular topic will be a bit repetitive as each essay has to define the topic for themselves especially with a collection where people may not read it all the way through. I thought the authors picked up on some certain areas that do need further reflection and study and is certainly a good read for anyone interested in culture or media.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    The first book of its kind and it doesn't let you down. Extremely comprehensive and thought-provoking. Different perspectives all clearly detailed covering a range of examples from now and across time.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I received an ARC of this book thanks to Net Galley and publisher University of Iowa Press in exchange for an honest review. This book was everything I could have wanted and more. I was extremely excited when I got an ARC of this as the subject matter is right up my street and I was really intrigued to learn more about it in general. Part of me was concerned though because I have requested similar books before and been disappointed by how dry they are. Thankfully this was not the case with this I received an ARC of this book thanks to Net Galley and publisher University of Iowa Press in exchange for an honest review. This book was everything I could have wanted and more. I was extremely excited when I got an ARC of this as the subject matter is right up my street and I was really intrigued to learn more about it in general. Part of me was concerned though because I have requested similar books before and been disappointed by how dry they are. Thankfully this was not the case with this book. Queerbaiting and Fandom is an incredibly comprehensive, insightful and all-round entertaining read. It is a collection of academic essays so be aware that it is written in that style rather than written for the purposes of entertaining the general public. However, I was very impressed by how readable and easy to follow all of the essays were. The essays themselves cover a wide range of fandoms and topic areas, some of which I wasn't expecting and ended up being a pleasant surprise. The obvious offenders are here-Supernatural, Sherlock and Harry Potter all have chapters to themselves. But there are also essays about Nick Jonas deliberately marketing himself to gay fans, the One Direction fandom shipping real-life celebrities and the Eurovision song contest encouraging queer flirting with its hosts. These were all surprising to me and I found them the most insightful essays in terms of introducing me to new knowledge and making me think about things I hadn't considered before. The only minor niggle I had was a completely understandable one. Every essay must take the time to define queerbaiting and other terms that it refers to, but this was very repetitive when reading the whole collection. The first two chapters were dedicated to defining the term anyway so I feel that the essays could have been edited to remove the definitions for the purposes of this collection, especially since every author used the term in the same way. Overall, I really recommend this book for anyone interested in the topic. I genuinely wish it was more widely available as I found it very entertaining and I have several friends I know would love to read it. If you can get your hands on a copy, then definitely take the opportunity to do so. I feel this is a book I will revisit several times in the future again. Overall Rating: 5/5

  20. 4 out of 5

    Saar

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emma Nordin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ks.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dana (Devour books with Dana)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kaleigh

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  28. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mark Ward

  31. 5 out of 5

    Em (Diversify Your Shelf)

  32. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  33. 4 out of 5

    Beth G.

  34. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Brown

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sadie

  36. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  37. 4 out of 5

    Lars

  38. 5 out of 5

    h

  39. 4 out of 5

    Ayca

  40. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

  41. 4 out of 5

    Mel

  42. 4 out of 5

    Amy Woods

  43. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

  44. 4 out of 5

    Dru

  45. 4 out of 5

    Carry

  46. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo Teixeira

  47. 5 out of 5

    Alie

  48. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  49. 4 out of 5

    Shane

  50. 5 out of 5

    Robyn

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