Hot Best Seller

Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery

Availability: Ready to download

You cannot discover lands already inhabited. Injustice has plagued American society for centuries. And we cannot move toward being a more just nation without understanding the root causes that have shaped our culture and institutions. In this prophetic blend of history, theology, and cultural commentary, Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah reveal the far-reaching, damaging You cannot discover lands already inhabited. Injustice has plagued American society for centuries. And we cannot move toward being a more just nation without understanding the root causes that have shaped our culture and institutions. In this prophetic blend of history, theology, and cultural commentary, Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah reveal the far-reaching, damaging effects of the "Doctrine of Discovery." In the fifteenth century, official church edicts gave Christian explorers the right to claim territories they "discovered." This was institutionalized as an implicit national framework that justifies American triumphalism, white supremacy, and ongoing injustices. The result is that the dominant culture idealizes a history of discovery, opportunity, expansion, and equality, while minority communities have been traumatized by colonization, slavery, segregation, and dehumanization. Healing begins when deeply entrenched beliefs are unsettled. Charles and Rah aim to recover a common memory and shared understanding of where we have been and where we are going. As other nations have instituted truth and reconciliation commissions, so do the authors call our nation and churches to a truth-telling that will expose past injustices and open the door to conciliation and true community.


Compare

You cannot discover lands already inhabited. Injustice has plagued American society for centuries. And we cannot move toward being a more just nation without understanding the root causes that have shaped our culture and institutions. In this prophetic blend of history, theology, and cultural commentary, Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah reveal the far-reaching, damaging You cannot discover lands already inhabited. Injustice has plagued American society for centuries. And we cannot move toward being a more just nation without understanding the root causes that have shaped our culture and institutions. In this prophetic blend of history, theology, and cultural commentary, Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah reveal the far-reaching, damaging effects of the "Doctrine of Discovery." In the fifteenth century, official church edicts gave Christian explorers the right to claim territories they "discovered." This was institutionalized as an implicit national framework that justifies American triumphalism, white supremacy, and ongoing injustices. The result is that the dominant culture idealizes a history of discovery, opportunity, expansion, and equality, while minority communities have been traumatized by colonization, slavery, segregation, and dehumanization. Healing begins when deeply entrenched beliefs are unsettled. Charles and Rah aim to recover a common memory and shared understanding of where we have been and where we are going. As other nations have instituted truth and reconciliation commissions, so do the authors call our nation and churches to a truth-telling that will expose past injustices and open the door to conciliation and true community.

30 review for Unsettling Truths: The Ongoing, Dehumanizing Legacy of the Doctrine of Discovery

  1. 5 out of 5

    Calvinist Batman

    This book has no chill and once you read why, you won't be chill either. SUMMARY This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and both how it's been used and how it gave permission for white supremacy to commit genocide, seen in the almost complete extermination and defrauding of America's indigenous peoples. For me, this was akin to reading Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America or The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in This book has no chill and once you read why, you won't be chill either. SUMMARY This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and both how it's been used and how it gave permission for white supremacy to commit genocide, seen in the almost complete extermination and defrauding of America's indigenous peoples. For me, this was akin to reading Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America or The Color of Compromise: The Truth about the American Church’s Complicity in Racism but for mainly indigenous peoples. It's rough and heartbreaking. THE GOOD Both authors write well and there is a treasure trove of quotes to pull from in this book. The passion bleeds through. It is easily one of the most gripping and unsettling books I've read this year (which says something). The chapter flaying Abraham Lincoln was one of the best. This is one of the few times I will endorse end-notes. Footnotes would have made this rougher reading. THE CHALLENGES None. CONCLUSION I've been trying to read from perspectives, issues, and stories that are outside my normal sphere. Books like this one show what we, especially as (Reformed) Christians miss when we don't listen and read. I don't know the answers or solutions to the problems posed, but we must glare and stare at our history, without wavering or flinching, without trying to re-write it. As a Christian, this book helped me love and feel sorrow for a forgotten people group that still resides in America. God help me be part of the solution. Five stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ethan

    The past few years have seen many contributions from people of color regarding their experience in America in light of its heritage of white supremacy, especially as it relates to the Christian faith; this work is an important contribution to that end, featuring the perspective of a Native American regarding the "doctrine of discovery" and its implications in Western civilization ever since. The author brings to the fore the principle which undergirded the colonization of America: the "doctrine The past few years have seen many contributions from people of color regarding their experience in America in light of its heritage of white supremacy, especially as it relates to the Christian faith; this work is an important contribution to that end, featuring the perspective of a Native American regarding the "doctrine of discovery" and its implications in Western civilization ever since. The author brings to the fore the principle which undergirded the colonization of America: the "doctrine of discovery," enshrined in papal bulls granting the Portuguese and Spanish dominion over any lands they would "discover," even though the lands they discovered already had Native populations within it. It was presumed that the Europeans "discovering" these lands were superior in belief and nature to those who would be "discovered," and from this principle would come the ungodly, dehumanizing, and genocidal treatment of the Native Americans at the hands of Europeans from the 16th century into the 20th. The author describes how the "doctrine of discovery" became enshrined in American legal precedent in the Johnson vs. M'Intosh Supreme Court decision in 1823, and has remained live and active to the present, used in a justification of denying a Native claim to land in New York in 2005. The author speaks of the transgressions of the nation: the forced deportation of Natives from their lands to places out West; the dire conditions of the reservations; the massacres at Sand Creek and Wounded Knee; the boarding schools and the desire to "get the Indian out of the man". He likewise views "Western" civilization through critical lenses: its white supremacy, its "Christendom" and Christianity's compromise with empire, its dysfunctional theology of domination and conquest, its colonialism, its claims to exceptionalism, and the ugly side of its heroes, especially Abraham Lincoln. He also speaks of trauma and its effects. He yearns for conciliation in truth. It's a challenging read for the white American, but a very necessary one. Many will be offended at the way in which the author approaches many of the subjects, but the reader ought to step out of his or her perspective and consider how it would all look to Native Americans whose legitimacy in the land was denied for nearly 400 years, and to thus be open to the prospect that he is not wrong, and has a clearer view to an ugliness we would rather not see. The author's desire for truth in conciliation is good, wise, and appropriate. That conciliation would, no doubt, lead to a restoration of some land to the Natives. But it is hard to square the posture of the author to be working for an America "for everyone" with wide-ranging thoroughgoing land claims that would come at the expense of plenty of others who are here in America. The means by which land was taken from Native Americans was, without an argument, unjust and wrong. Then again, for generations before Europeans came (and even afterward!), Natives would dispossess other Natives through war. Based on genetics and records it would seem that human history is one long series of migrations (or invasions): in many instances, the newcomers genetically assimilated into the local populations, with either the newcomers or the locals assimilating culturally into the other; yet in many other instances, the newcomers wiped out the local populations and replaced them on the land. For that matter, the Bible itself testifies to the same piece of land being possessed, at different times, by different peoples. So what do you do with land claims and land ownership? I do not think it is an easy question with an easy answer, and worthy of more meditation. Regardless, invaluable and important reading. Highly recommended. **galley received as part of early review program

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy Greco

    Rah and Charles explore US history, church history, sociology, and Scripture in an effort to help us understand the origin of our current racial, economic, and religious upheaval. The co-authors illustrate how the church has historically supported the state in the state's quest to expand human kingdoms and human power at the expense of human life and human flourishing. Here's a quote from chapter four: "Christendom is the prostitution of the church to the empire that created a church culture of Rah and Charles explore US history, church history, sociology, and Scripture in an effort to help us understand the origin of our current racial, economic, and religious upheaval. The co-authors illustrate how the church has historically supported the state in the state's quest to expand human kingdoms and human power at the expense of human life and human flourishing. Here's a quote from chapter four: "Christendom is the prostitution of the church to the empire that created a church culture of seeking power rather than relationships.Jesus laid down his life, but the empire must save its life. Jesus emptied himself, but the empire must protect and expand itself. There is a fundamental conflict between the goal of the earthly empire and the direction of the kingdom of God. Greatness in the world and greatness in the kingdom of God stand in opposition." This book is profound and powerful. (And FYI: as a Caucasian, it's not an easy read. It is essential.)

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.R. Forasteros

    This is an important, powerful book that traces the Church's quest for power from Constantine through the Doctrine of Discovery to the founding of the USA to today. An exhaustive illustration of how the American Church has been unable and unwilling to surrender its attachment to White Supremacist ideology. And running throughout, there's a hope that if the American church will listen to the voices we've pushed aside, it's not too late.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adam Shields

    This is going to be on my best books I have read this year list, but I am not going to write about it more until I read it again.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David

    This review is for a Launch Team Edition. The forthcoming publishing date is November 5, 2019. This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and the Christian Church. It explores how this doctrine has oppressed nations and people of color. It presents a history that has not been put forth in the textbooks and is very well documented. The authors have created a much needed look at the Church's role in the Doctrine of Discovery. It is a book that I believe Church's should read, discuss and take This review is for a Launch Team Edition. The forthcoming publishing date is November 5, 2019. This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and the Christian Church. It explores how this doctrine has oppressed nations and people of color. It presents a history that has not been put forth in the textbooks and is very well documented. The authors have created a much needed look at the Church's role in the Doctrine of Discovery. It is a book that I believe Church's should read, discuss and take action on as assistants as determined by the leaderships of people of color. This was a book I did not want to put down and brought forth lament, tears, and the desire to make a difference. I highly recommend it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joel Wentz

    I devoured this in one sitting. The use of the word "unsettling" in the title is very apt. Even as someone who has read and studied quite a bit on the history of race, and especially racial dynamics in American history, I was still challenged and provoked by many of the discussions in Charles' and Rah's new book. The authors go right for the jugular in this historical summary, making a bold case that the "Doctrine of Discovery" provided a racially-structured, white-supremacist foundation for I devoured this in one sitting. The use of the word "unsettling" in the title is very apt. Even as someone who has read and studied quite a bit on the history of race, and especially racial dynamics in American history, I was still challenged and provoked by many of the discussions in Charles' and Rah's new book. The authors go right for the jugular in this historical summary, making a bold case that the "Doctrine of Discovery" provided a racially-structured, white-supremacist foundation for everything that America would become. The impacts of this doctrine are traced through the Puritans, the founding documents, the treatment of Native peoples in the 19th century, and onward into our day. Personally, I wonder if a few of the historical assertions are overstated. I think there is a more nuanced way to understand the rise of Christendom during and after Constantine, for example. However, the reason this book gets a confident 5-stars from me, is not because I uncritically agree with every argument, but rather because of the powerful way the book made me wrestle with historical and theological ideas. There is surely *something* to the narrative that the authors have laid out, even if one quibbles with specifics, and we ignore their argument to our peril. Personally, the chapters challenging the historical narrative around Lincoln, the discussion of how America has really never needed to deal with "losing" a war, and especially the concept of historical trauma, were all paradigm-shifters for me. The idea that (most) white folks in America are suffering from collective trauma regarding the historical atrocities we benefit from today was a powerful argument, and from my perspective, provides much healthier explanatory power than the popular idea of "white fragility." I'm deeply grateful that this book exists, and will certainly be returning to it in the future.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    This isn't my first introduction to the Doctrine of Discovery and its ongoing aftereffects, but I'm still unsettled. History is heavy, and the authors don't pull their punches. (Nor should they.) Moving forward, I'm going to be recommending this as a good place for folks to start. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Whiting

    I am definitely still processing this book, but I would highly recommend it. Charles and Rah provide a powerful commentary on the issues of American exceptionality, the doctrine of discovery, and current and historical racial issues in the US. It is convicting, challenging, and enlightening.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    This will not be an easy book (idea-wise, not language-wise...it's written very accessibly) for many people to read (especially Evangelicals, but Christians more broadly, regardless of political persuasion), but I'm going to go ahead and say that you 100% need to read it. Centering it primarily around the dehumanization and genocide of Native Americans in the US (but looking at other histories of racism as well), Mark Charles tells the story of the Doctrine of Discovery, and how it's infected This will not be an easy book (idea-wise, not language-wise...it's written very accessibly) for many people to read (especially Evangelicals, but Christians more broadly, regardless of political persuasion), but I'm going to go ahead and say that you 100% need to read it. Centering it primarily around the dehumanization and genocide of Native Americans in the US (but looking at other histories of racism as well), Mark Charles tells the story of the Doctrine of Discovery, and how it's infected the American church's view of itself and view of its role in the world. Short version: "Christendom" has replaced "following Christ" in this country, and he traces how we can see this evolution starting with Constantine, through the Enlightenment, to the founding of the US and the writing of the Constitution, to Lincoln, all the way up to the present and the white nationalism that is, quite frankly, alive and well in the US. This book does not conclude with solutions or anything that will make the white people in the room feel better about themselves, but you can tell he's writing this from a place of deep love for Christ and His Church, and a deep sadness over the compromised integrity of the American Church's witness in the world. As a sociologist I really appreciated his inclusion of C. Wright Mills and Berger and Luckmann (because how often do they get a shout-out in evangelical publications??), and I have some "inside baseball" questions about his section on white people having perpetrator-induced trauma (I don't think he's wrong, but I don't think trauma's the only motivation for white people not wanting to face history). Overall though, highly recommending this-- not because it's enjoyable, but because it's honest. **I received a complimentary copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review**

  11. 4 out of 5

    Breanna Randall

    I really appreciated the content and the perspectives in this book. The most illuminating chapters for me were, by far, the ones toward the end of the book, where the authors unpack the complex legacy of Abraham Lincoln. This is history that we all need to be reading and engaging with. For the content, I'd give this book four stars. The delivery and writing style were not as strong as I wished they would be for a subject this important. The writing felt stilted/wooden at times, which is perhaps I really appreciated the content and the perspectives in this book. The most illuminating chapters for me were, by far, the ones toward the end of the book, where the authors unpack the complex legacy of Abraham Lincoln. This is history that we all need to be reading and engaging with. For the content, I'd give this book four stars. The delivery and writing style were not as strong as I wished they would be for a subject this important. The writing felt stilted/wooden at times, which is perhaps due to the fact that it was coauthored. I would absolutely recommend this book to folks who are passionate about this subject, because I think that people who really want to listen will stick it out. But I would not necessarily give this book to someone who is skeptical/unsympathetic toward the concerns of Native American peoples. I think the delivery would not be compelling enough for them. (I would, however, urge anyone to pick up this book and read the last chapters on Lincoln. Those chapters were compelling, well-presented, and a good challenge to those who have not considered the legacy of men such as Lincoln.) (thanks to Netgalley and IVP for this ARC)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Ayau

    A great read for anti-racism, decolonization work in a Christian context. The writing was a bit bulky in places but delved into some fascinating history, tracing colonization (both as a structural manifestation of white dysfunction/supremacy and as an internalized worldview) back to the conversion of Rome by Emperor Constantine. By merging two separate entities—the early Christian church and the Roman Empire—a new theocratic entity emerged: Christendom. Militarism as a means of securing and A great read for anti-racism, decolonization work in a Christian context. The writing was a bit bulky in places but delved into some fascinating history, tracing colonization (both as a structural manifestation of white dysfunction/supremacy and as an internalized worldview) back to the conversion of Rome by Emperor Constantine. By merging two separate entities—the early Christian church and the Roman Empire—a new theocratic entity emerged: Christendom. Militarism as a means of securing and protecting Empire usurped the staunchly nonviolent doctrine of Christ-followers, and the “holy war” advanced Roman occupation under the guise of Christian expansion. Rah and Charles unpack some of the historical origins of ideologies like just war and manifest destiny to explain how colonization became a mindset deeply embedded into the DNA of the Christian church. They often talk about this process of embedding as a disease, which was a compelling way to think about it. I appreciated the radical historical deconstruction that the authors facilitate here. Of course this leads us through the invasion of North America/Turtle Island, genocide, the Indian wars, etc. etc. Admittedly I had to rush through the end of the book because I had to return it...so I wish I could have spent more time with their last few chapters, which focus more on the readers (especially white readers) seeking to amend relations between the Church and Indigenous peoples. Overall though, got me to consider some new things and learn a lot of history in the process!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    I hope to write a longer review later but in the interim. This book ought to be required reading for all students of US history and all students of church history. Additionally, the final two chapters, need to be incorporated in any conversation about racial conciliation in the US. NOTE ON THE PUBLISHER: This book was published by InterVarsity press. As a rule I work to avoid purchasing books from that publisher due to their stance on LGBT employees (you can check it out here I hope to write a longer review later but in the interim. This book ought to be required reading for all students of US history and all students of church history. Additionally, the final two chapters, need to be incorporated in any conversation about racial conciliation in the US. NOTE ON THE PUBLISHER: This book was published by InterVarsity press. As a rule I work to avoid purchasing books from that publisher due to their stance on LGBT employees (you can check it out here https://religionnews.com/2016/10/14/i... ) In this case I chose to purchase the book because I am familiar with the lead author (Mark Charles) and I support the work he does with Native American, Indiginous, and minority rights within the US and the Church. If anyone is interested in the content of text but is—very understandably—unwilling to support the publisher you can find most (but not quite all) of the salient content in this talk by the lead author: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRRDu...

  14. 5 out of 5

    David

    The following is the review I posted on Goodreads: This review is for a Launch Team Edition. The forthcoming publishing date is November 5, 2019. This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and the Christian Church. It explores how this doctrine has oppressed nations and people of color. It presents a history that has not been put forth in the textbooks and is very well documented. The authors have created a much needed look at the Church's role in the Doctrine of Discovery. It is a book that I The following is the review I posted on Goodreads: This review is for a Launch Team Edition. The forthcoming publishing date is November 5, 2019. This book is about the Doctrine of Discovery and the Christian Church. It explores how this doctrine has oppressed nations and people of color. It presents a history that has not been put forth in the textbooks and is very well documented. The authors have created a much needed look at the Church's role in the Doctrine of Discovery. It is a book that I believe Church's should read, discuss and take action on as assistants as determined by the leaderships of people of color. This was a book I did not want to put down and brought forth lament, tears, and the desire to make a difference. I highly recommend it!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matthew R Hazzard

    An insightful read, I especially appreciated how the book points out where progressives have failed indigenous and minority communities and promotes the myth of American exceptionalism. As the book says, “This is not just a Republican problem.” While the book spends considerable time discussing the appropriation of biblical texts to equate the US with the City on a Hill and The Promised land, I wish the authors had explored Lincoln’s use of biblical language and especially the words of Jesus An insightful read, I especially appreciated how the book points out where progressives have failed indigenous and minority communities and promotes the myth of American exceptionalism. As the book says, “This is not just a Republican problem.” While the book spends considerable time discussing the appropriation of biblical texts to equate the US with the City on a Hill and The Promised land, I wish the authors had explored Lincoln’s use of biblical language and especially the words of Jesus (ex. “A house divided against itself...”) in the chapter “Lincoln and the Narrative of White Messiahship.” Overall an approachable book that deals with hard truths. An important reminder that Jesus is at odds with Empire despite centuries of the church actively working to convince itself otherwise.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jonah Kunisch

    This caused me to think about race relations in many ways I hadn't yet. I'll still be processing for a while all the ways that the United States needs to heal from its sins, as stated in this book. However, there is not an objective stance attempted, so it makes for bad history. There is not a fair assessment of what it means to be God's people, or an honest look at the God-ordained genocides of the Old Testament, so it makes for bad theology. It is a passionate cry for justice, a scathing This caused me to think about race relations in many ways I hadn't yet. I'll still be processing for a while all the ways that the United States needs to heal from its sins, as stated in this book. However, there is not an objective stance attempted, so it makes for bad history. There is not a fair assessment of what it means to be God's people, or an honest look at the God-ordained genocides of the Old Testament, so it makes for bad theology. It is a passionate cry for justice, a scathing denunciation of all 'whiteness,' a look at US history through the eyes of a highly-educated Native descendant; an honest and fair assessment of these topics, it is not.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian Christensen

    Very true on the 'unsettling' part - but authors Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah point out the some of the hidden history of the United States that as a follower of Christ I would have a difficult time supporting. But there is the distinction between Christianity and Christendom - in one (Christianity) we become servants - like Christ -and see the Imagio Dei in all of humanity - no matter their beliefs or ethnicity. In the other we make others servants based on bad theology. We take old testament Very true on the 'unsettling' part - but authors Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah point out the some of the hidden history of the United States that as a follower of Christ I would have a difficult time supporting. But there is the distinction between Christianity and Christendom - in one (Christianity) we become servants - like Christ -and see the Imagio Dei in all of humanity - no matter their beliefs or ethnicity. In the other we make others servants based on bad theology. We take old testament promises to only Israel and apply it to any country and throw away much of the NT teachings of Christ as not being 'practical'.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Beth Jensen

    “This text offers the hope that healing can occur when unsettling truths are confronted. For centuries we have kept hidden the stories of oppressed people in our society. We have embraced the stories of success and exceptionalism rather than engaging the narrative of suffering and oppression. This obsession with the self-elevation of the American church and American society reflects an absence of truth telling. And the absence of truth has resulted in the presence of injustice.” -Charles and Rah

  19. 4 out of 5

    peter

    A strong and essential dose of truth-telling starting with Constantine, running through Columbus and the founding and settling of the US, leading up to the present day. There are many "aha" moments, but of particular note for me were two insights: the deconstruction of the Abraham Lincoln mythology and the thought-provoking (and generous) suggestion of the existence of "traumatized whiteness". While the topic is not new (although probably new to most white evangelicals), this book provides a A strong and essential dose of truth-telling starting with Constantine, running through Columbus and the founding and settling of the US, leading up to the present day. There are many "aha" moments, but of particular note for me were two insights: the deconstruction of the Abraham Lincoln mythology and the thought-provoking (and generous) suggestion of the existence of "traumatized whiteness". While the topic is not new (although probably new to most white evangelicals), this book provides a powerful and challenging summary of our failure to face our past.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Larry Thiel

    Fair assessment of the impact of the Doctrine of Discovery on the West. Deeply troubling accounts whether this is one's first reckoning with the history or for those who have heard the stories numerous times. There are a couple of questionable interpretations of the historical data, (I agree with Mark Noll on this), but a necessary read for every American whether they consider themselves woke (which the authors critique) or not. My sense is that every reader will and should be sobered by this Fair assessment of the impact of the Doctrine of Discovery on the West. Deeply troubling accounts whether this is one's first reckoning with the history or for those who have heard the stories numerous times. There are a couple of questionable interpretations of the historical data, (I agree with Mark Noll on this), but a necessary read for every American whether they consider themselves woke (which the authors critique) or not. My sense is that every reader will and should be sobered by this work.

  21. 4 out of 5

    William Horne

    This book is the type of scholarship we desperately need in the West and the American Church. I believe this book is a must read by all and should be required readings for church leaders in particular. Excellent, eye-opening research and important dialogue on the depth of white supremacy in America and some solution we must listen to if we want any healing in our churches and communities. Thank you Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah for your excellent and much needed work.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Jones

    I feel like I’ve been waiting to come across a book like this for a while now. Not only a book that confronts the injustices caused by the doctrine of discovery, but written from an indigenous AND biblical perspective. While the authors are passionate about seeking justice and reconciliation, they never lose sight of extending grace and coming from a place of love (which does NOT include walking on eggshells with our white brothers and sisters). I can’t recommend this book enough.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexiana Fry

    It’s important to understand what is so deeply ingrained throughout history in order to weed the problem out at the root. This book was incredibly helpful to see even these insidious thoughts in my own theology, and to come to terms with the sins of this nation and White evangelicalism.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Steve Hirby

    Powerful and challenging. A prophetic voice calling Christendom to confession, repentance, and lamentation. Offers a vision of a path forward in which the church does not lead but participates humbly.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    The first half was heavy on Church doctrine and theology which was a little difficult to follow. The second half provides ideas for reconciliation and demonstrates how Scripture was used for political gain to justify the Doctrine of Discovery.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Louis Prontnicki

    "For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God."

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Kindelin

    Mark Charles and Soong -Chan Rah have written a truly remarkable work. This book is clear, convicting and a unique contribution. Beyond the highlighting of facts and history (which when wrestled with are truly unsettling), Charles speaks of a trauma lens in which to view our racialized history. He is the first person I have heard apply that to the white experience, and I believe it is a helpful paradigm in terms of the way forward. This is not an easy read, but so necessary. I would recommend it Mark Charles and Soong -Chan Rah have written a truly remarkable work. This book is clear, convicting and a unique contribution. Beyond the highlighting of facts and history (which when wrestled with are truly unsettling), Charles speaks of a trauma lens in which to view our racialized history. He is the first person I have heard apply that to the white experience, and I believe it is a helpful paradigm in terms of the way forward. This is not an easy read, but so necessary. I would recommend it highly.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    This book frames the most important conversation the United States of America needs to have, in my opinion. As a Christian man, and Christian leader, I am especially grateful that this book is written by two godly, biblically literate, wise Christian men who elucidate and then challenge head-on the hypocrisy of ways that those who profess to follow the teaching of Jesus, i.e. The Church, have tragically been the most complicit in creating systems that have sinned so greatly against, frankly, This book frames the most important conversation the United States of America needs to have, in my opinion. As a Christian man, and Christian leader, I am especially grateful that this book is written by two godly, biblically literate, wise Christian men who elucidate and then challenge head-on the hypocrisy of ways that those who profess to follow the teaching of Jesus, i.e. The Church, have tragically been the most complicit in creating systems that have sinned so greatly against, frankly, anyone who is not a caucasian male. Thank you Mark Charles and Soong-Chan Rah for your prophetic, biblical and just message.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Phil Wiseman

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Cooper

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.