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Wonderland: An Anthology

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From the greatest names in fantasy and horror comes an anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Join Alice as she is thrown into the whirlwind of Wonderland, in an anthology that bends the traditional notions of Lewis Carroll's classic novel. Contributors include the bestselling M.R. Carey, Genevieve Cogman, Catriona Ward, Rio Youers and L.L. McKinney. From the greatest names in fantasy and horror comes an anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Join Alice as she is thrown into the whirlwind of Wonderland, in an anthology that bends the traditional notions of Lewis Carroll's classic novel. Contributors include the bestselling M.R. Carey, Genevieve Cogman, Catriona Ward, Rio Youers and L.L. McKinney. Within these pages you'll find myriad approaches to Alice, from horror to historical. There's even a Wild West tale from Angela Slatter, poetry, and a story by Laura Mauro which presents us with a Japanese folklore-inspired Wonderland. Alison Littlewood, Cavan Scott and Catriona Ward make the more outlandish elements their own, while James Lovegrove instead draws on the supernatural. Cat Rambo takes us to a part of Wonderland we haven't seen before and Lilith Saintcrow gives the legend a science-fiction spin. The nightmarish reaches of the imagination are the breeding ground for M.R. Carey's visions, while Robert Shearman, George Mann, Rio Youers and Mark Chadbourn's tales have a deep-seated emotional core which will shock, surprise and tug on the heart-strings. So, it's time now to go down the rabbit hole, or through the looking-glass or... But no, wait. By picking up this book and starting to read it you're already there, can't you see?


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From the greatest names in fantasy and horror comes an anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Join Alice as she is thrown into the whirlwind of Wonderland, in an anthology that bends the traditional notions of Lewis Carroll's classic novel. Contributors include the bestselling M.R. Carey, Genevieve Cogman, Catriona Ward, Rio Youers and L.L. McKinney. From the greatest names in fantasy and horror comes an anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Join Alice as she is thrown into the whirlwind of Wonderland, in an anthology that bends the traditional notions of Lewis Carroll's classic novel. Contributors include the bestselling M.R. Carey, Genevieve Cogman, Catriona Ward, Rio Youers and L.L. McKinney. Within these pages you'll find myriad approaches to Alice, from horror to historical. There's even a Wild West tale from Angela Slatter, poetry, and a story by Laura Mauro which presents us with a Japanese folklore-inspired Wonderland. Alison Littlewood, Cavan Scott and Catriona Ward make the more outlandish elements their own, while James Lovegrove instead draws on the supernatural. Cat Rambo takes us to a part of Wonderland we haven't seen before and Lilith Saintcrow gives the legend a science-fiction spin. The nightmarish reaches of the imagination are the breeding ground for M.R. Carey's visions, while Robert Shearman, George Mann, Rio Youers and Mark Chadbourn's tales have a deep-seated emotional core which will shock, surprise and tug on the heart-strings. So, it's time now to go down the rabbit hole, or through the looking-glass or... But no, wait. By picking up this book and starting to read it you're already there, can't you see?

30 review for Wonderland: An Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    While I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve never been the biggest fan of the original source material, there’s something about the world of Wonderland that draws me in over and over again through retellings; I can never seem to get enough, so when I heard an entire anthology was being released of dark fantasy and horror stories themed around Alice and her adventures, I couldn’t get my hands on a copy soon enough! I’m so pleased to say that it was everything I hoped it would be. Many anthologies are ful While I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve never been the biggest fan of the original source material, there’s something about the world of Wonderland that draws me in over and over again through retellings; I can never seem to get enough, so when I heard an entire anthology was being released of dark fantasy and horror stories themed around Alice and her adventures, I couldn’t get my hands on a copy soon enough! I’m so pleased to say that it was everything I hoped it would be. Many anthologies are full of hit-and-miss pieces, but Wonderland is a genuinely solid collection of stories — I really don’t think the average Wonderland lover will be disappointed by hardly any of these tales. While I definitely have a few stand-out favorites, I haven’t broken down a full anthology review piece-by-piece in a long time (though long-time friends and followers will know it used to be one of my review trademarks!), and this seems like the perfect excuse to dive back into one of those long, thorough reviews! If you'd like to see my full review, check it out here on my blog! Otherwise, keep reading for my favorites (snipped from the full review): → The White Queen’s Pawn — Genevieve Cogman ★★★★★ Ahhh. This story was the moment when I knew this anthology was going to be an out-and-out success for me, because Cogman totally blew me away with how fun and fleshed-out this tiny little tale was. In this piece, a group tries to blackmail an elderly woman (who was an assassin in her younger years) into training new assassins, but there’s more to her story than they realize. I don’t know why, but I am a tremendous sucker for elderly women being badass protagonists, and this one didn’t let me down in the slightest. I would read an entire novel set in this world that Cogman’s created without hesitation. ——— → Good Dog, Alice! — Juliet Marillier ★★★★★ This one hurt my heart in the process. Little Dorothea is given a puppy for her birthday, and she names her Alice. The two go on adventures, but accidentally end up in another world, in which Dorothea’s given some unexpected help with a terrible situation she’s living through in the real world. While I’ll mention all of the trigger warnings and their respective stories below, I do want to specifically state that this story features implied child sexual abuse, and like I said… even though it isn’t graphic, it pained me a fair amount to read, but I promise it’s worth it. ——— → Vanished Summer Glory — Rio Youers ★★★★★ This is a really odd one that I’d be curious to see what other reviewers think of. It alternates between a “before” and “after” of a man going missing; the “before”s detail his descent into apparent madness, while the “after”s chronicle his poor wife’s musings over what might have happened to him and where she thinks it all went wrong. There are some really tragic details here and the whole thing is left open to your interpretations, but most of all, I liked the way Wonderland is woven in so that it’s hard to tell if it’s an actual place, or something this poor man has dreamed up in his grief. Thank you so much to Titan Books for providing me with a review copy in exchange for an honest review! Content warnings: Wonders Never Cease: cancer, depression; There Were No Birds to Fly: cannibalism; Dream Girl: body horror; Good Dog, Alice!: pedophilia, sexual assault, grooming; The Hunting of the Jabberwock: animal death; Smoke ’em if You Got ’em: implied rape and child abuse; Vanished Summer Glory: cancer; Eat Me, Drink Me: animal death; general anthology warnings: gore, gratuitous violence, murder, death. Diversity: Alice is black in both Dream Girl and What Makes a Monster. TL;DR: If you’re any sort of fan of Alice in Wonderland, whether it’s the original source material or retellings, this is right up your alley. With a solid mixture of dark fantasy and horror, there’s sure to be something to please everyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Umairah | Sereadipity

    Overall Rating: 3.75 stars Wonderland was a magical anthology full of short stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. All the stories managed to capture the wondrous yet morbid whimsy of Wonderland as they were full of imagination and followed no rules. It was a mixed bag- some were amazing and some not so much. Here's a brief summary of the stories and my thoughts on them: Alice in Armour by Jane Yolen- 3 stars: This was an amusing poem which I liked but it didn't greatly impress me. Wonders Never Cease by Robert She/>/>was/> Overall Rating: 3.75 stars Wonderland was a magical anthology full of short stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. All the stories managed to capture the wondrous yet morbid whimsy of Wonderland as they were full of imagination and followed no rules. It was a mixed bag- some were amazing and some not so much. Here's a brief summary of the stories and my thoughts on them: Alice in Armour by Jane Yolen- 3 stars: This was an amusing poem which I liked but it didn't greatly impress me. Wonders Never Cease by Robert Shearman- 2.5 stars: "Just because love dies, it doesn't mean you can't go on." This story was about life, love and death and even though I understood it was trying to convey a deep message I thought the writing was confused and just generally muddled and I didn't enjoy it. There Were No Birds to Fly by M.R. Carey- 5 stars: "If you follow the rules... you'll live a whole lot longer" This was so wonderfully creepy and mysterious and I did not see the ending coming. I liked how the narrator of the story was clearly hiding something and their intentions were gradually revealed. Also, it gave me very strong Birdbox vibes so if you liked that book/ movie you will probably like this. The White Queen's Pawn by Genevieve Cogman- 4 stars: The White Queen's Pawn was quite short and not much happened but it still had an impact. I loved how it slowly went from a seemingly normal situation to something scary and macabre! Dream Girl by Cavan Scott- 5 stars: This one started off in Wonderland, from the perspective of the Hatter, and ended on a very unexpected and refreshing plot twist. I loved it! Furthermore, I appreciated how the 'Alice character' didn't fit the visual stereotypes surrounding her. Good Dog, Alice! by Juliet Marillier- 4.5 stars: When a girl called Dorothea calls her dog 'Alice', she doesn't realise how useful her pet will become. This was another short story with an ending that came out of the blue but it was also quite satisfying. The Hunting of the Jabberwock by Jonathan Green- 4 stars: As the title suggests, this story was inspired by the 'Jabberwocky' poem and was about a young man trying to slay the Jabberwocky to earn his glory but comes to some unsettling realisations. I liked how the story included the whimsical nonsense language from the 'Jabberwocky' poem. About Time by George Mann- 3.5 stars: This story was about how our fears can affect our realities and the power of believing that something is real. It also had quite a sweet ending. Smoke 'em if You Got 'em by Angela Slatter- 3 stars: This one took Alice to the Wild West and while I liked the ideas behind it and the direct writing style it just didn't create much of an impact on me. Vanished Summer Glory by Rio Youers- 4 stars: Vanished Summer Glory was a poignant story about grief, loss and love and it was really touching and quite saddening to read. Black Kitty by Catriona Ward- 3 stars: It was quite weird and I still don't quite understand what on Earth went on in this one but I guess it gets credit for creativity! The Night Parade by Laura Mauro- 4.5 stars: This one was inspired by Japanese mythology which was intriguing and original. I also liked how the ending left me with so many theories and thoughts about all the implied things that could have caused the things that happened. What Makes a Monster by L.L. McKinney- 3 stars: What Makes a Monster was set in the author's A Blade so Black universe and it was about some rather cool monster hunters. At the start I thought I was going to enjoy this story very much but it didn't impress me as much as I thought it would although it was still good. The White Queen's Dictum by James Lovegrove- 4.5 stars: This one had a lovely hint of supernatural and while I saw the plot twist coming I enjoyed the dramatic irony of it. It was based on the idea that 'impossible things' can sometimes be more real than you first think. Temp Work by Lilith Saintcrow- 2.5 stars: Temp Work was heavily based on sci-fi but I didn't enjoy it because the plot didn't interest me. Eat Me, Drink Me by Alison Littlewood- 2 stars: An utterly weird and confusing story and my least favourite in the anthology. How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen by Cat Rambo- 3.5 stars: This story was extremely imaginative with a strong narrative voice and I was satisfied with the way it ended. I also liked how it explored previously uncharted territory in Wonderland. Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadbourn- 3 stars: It was quite touching and nostalgic tale and I liked how it included the history behind the original 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' book. Revolution in Wonder by Jane Yolen- 3.5 stars: Another humorous, clever poem which concluded the anthology nicely! Overall, this was a really interesting read and I liked reading all of the different takes on Wonderland. I'm not going to lie- I hate Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the animated Disney adaptation gave me nightmares as a child. However, this anthology makes me feel like giving the books (and the movies) another chance! Thank you to Titan Books for providing me with this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heather (The Sassy Book Geek)

    Review Originally Posted On The Sassy Book Geek **** Huge thank you to Titan Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review as well as allowing me to participate in the blog tour! **** As soon as I read the description for this one I was pretty excited! I’m a big fan of retellings, especially Alice in Wonderland retellings, and horror. So an anthology of horror based Alice re-imaginings sounded fantastic! I was pleased with a good majority of the stories and I had a blast rea Review Originally Posted On The Sassy Book Geek **** Huge thank you to Titan Books for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review as well as allowing me to participate in the blog tour! **** As soon as I read the description for this one I was pretty excited! I’m a big fan of retellings, especially Alice in Wonderland retellings, and horror. So an anthology of horror based Alice re-imaginings sounded fantastic! I was pleased with a good majority of the stories and I had a blast reading this, horror and ‘Alice’ were definitely a great combination. I would definitely recommend this if you are a fan of Alice in Wonderland and horror! I will be reviewing and rating each story individually and any trigger warnings I have for this book will be placed with the story that the trigger is in, so you may skip those if you need to! Alice in Armor by Jane Yolen (Poem) – ★★★★ I’m not quite sure how to review a single poem but I enjoyed it. Yolen is a talented writer and of course I liked it because it’s ‘Alice’ themed. Wonders Never Cease by Robert Shearman – ★ Trigger Warnings: Character Passes from Cancer (Some bizarre happenings with babies but not graphic or violent in nature) Honestly, I don’t know why this story was put into the book first because it was my least favorite, it was just plain bad. For me, there wasn’t anything salvageable here and I spent the entire time reading it wondering “What the hell is this?”. There is no plot to speak of and the characters were like the author was slapping a name down on paper and just adding it here and there instead of having actual characters. It was bizarre and confusing. We were being told about a “character” called Alice and something about her just randomly having 20+ babies and her shoving them into a (rabbit?) hole in her garden and then keeping one eventually. Then we were told about her getting a typing job and marrying a man and right after divorcing him etc etc. Like, what the hell is going on here? It was all a random mess and I usually don’t like to toss the word “hate” around because usually there’s always SOMETHING good to say but this story was bad and I hated it. There Were No Birds To Fly by M.R. Carey – ★★★ Trigger Warnings: Gore & Violence This story has a dystopian/post-apocalyptic setting in which people’s worst nightmares come to life, stalk, and kill them. I thought this was an interesting concept especially with how it was executed. I also really liked how horrific and eerie the atmosphere was and the monsters themselves were terrifying and gruesome. However, I didn’t quite care enough about the characters because there was next to zero development at all. And when the plot is all about characters getting picked off it’s hard to get really invested when I feel I don’t know them. Also for some reason the main character whose POV the story is told from didn’t speak with quotations which made it hard to discern what they were saying or thinking. I did like the twist at the end even if it was a bit strange and a little confusing. I didn’t quite get what the ‘Alice’ twist was with this story either. The White Queen’s Pawn by Genevieve Cogman – ★★★ Trigger Warnings: Gore & Violence This story has a bit more of a vague plot, they bring in our “Alice” who used to do some assassination work and they wish her to teach new students. It is set in Britain and overall had a very sinister “Bond” feel to it. It also had some character development, finally! I loved the Alice character in this one too, what a badass. Also liked how the connection to “Alice in Wonderland” was a bit more clear here too, made it more fun. I’m always up for a Cheshire Cat appearance! And the horror element of the story was very present at the end and it was deliciously creepy. Dream Girl by Cavan Scott – ★★★★ Trigger Warnings: Gore & Violence I enjoyed that this story actually took place in a Wonderland setting and it was a darker version. Wonderland is falling apart and the ‘Dream Girl’ is responsible, a group of Wonderland characters are tasked with capturing her. I liked that there were some horror moments squeezed in and those bits were wonderfully creepy. Also the Alice character in this story is dark-skinned, fun tidbit! I especially enjoyed the sci-fi twist at the end, very unexpected and honestly makes me want a continuation of this story! Good Dog, Alice! by Juliet Marillier – ★★★★★ Trigger Warnings: Implied Child Molestation, Bit of Gore I hadn’t read anything by Marillier yet though I have heard tons of good things about her, so I was pretty excited for her story in this anthology. I am happy to say that I was not disappointed and this was actually one of my favorite stories. It’s about a young girl who lives with her Uncle in a large manor and receives a new puppy as a birthday gift. She discovers a small blue door that leads to another world and she must enter it in order to save her dog. I LOVED how this had a very “Narnia” feel to it though it was also very different. I felt very attached to the protagonist and her dog, Alice, by the end of the story and the world building was fantastic for such a short story. The “Alice” connections were subtle but very present. As mentioned in the trigger warning there is implied child molestation but I will say that justice is most definitely served and the ending was fantastic and satisfying, it’s also where the horror bits came in! The Hunting of the Jabberwock by Jonathan Green – ★★★★ Trigger Warnings: Gore & Violence This story tells the tale of a character named Nobody who is seeking out the Jabberwock to become a monster slayer and claim a reward. The “Alice” references here are very clear and I have to say I really enjoyed this one for the characters, plot, and writing. It’s got action and even a few twists, which for such a short story was definitely a nice surprise! The ending was one of those twists and while one was pretty satisfying the other was a little bleak but this is horror after all. Overall a creative and entertaining story! About Time by George Mann – ★★★★ Another fantastic story, I liked how this one was a little softer and the horror was toned down. It was a nice break! This is contemporary and is about a girl becoming a teenager and neglecting Wonderland and its inhabitants. However, she returns to find that Wonderland has been taken over by a monster and she must save it. I liked the more traditional Wonderland setting and characters and I would love to discuss the plot more but I don’t want to spoil it! I would have to say the ending was my absolute favorite part of the story and it was a very pleasant surprise, it was also a happy one! Smoke ’em if You Got ’em by Angela Slatter – ★★★★ Trigger Warnings: Gore, Violence, Mention of Suicide, Showing of Stillborns & Fetuses, Kidnapping, & Implied Rape and Child Rape (I felt that it was implied, personally) This was one of the heavier and darker stories that’s a Western about Alice hunting the Rabbit across America. I did like how intriguing the plot and characters were and the protagonist was definitely one to root for. I wish the world building was explained a little more because it was intriguing but left me wanting to know more. The ending left something to be desired because one chapter closed, so to speak, but the overall goal was not achieved. Overall though it was a creative tell and written well. Vanished Summer Glory by Rio Youers – ★★★ Trigger Warnings: Cancer Related Death This story was a bit strange and is about a man whose sister gets cancer and passes away, he then starts speaking with a “Mr. Rabbit” and then disappears. Like I said it was a bit strange and I’m not sure what was going on really and it was a little on the slow side. Not a whole lot happening. I will say that it was written beautifully though because it was very touching and emotional. Black Kitty by Catriona Ward – ★★★ Trigger Warnings: Death & Violence This was another story that was a bit odd but it’s about a pair of twins that live in a fantasy world and try and escape. The world building had some interesting aspects but overall I was a little disappointed with it because it isn’t expanded on much. There also didn’t seem to be a lot going on plot wise either, we were being TOLD what was happening but not much beyond that and it was hard to follow. I would say the best part of this one was the ending because that’s where the “Alice” related bits came into play and it was subtle but clever. Also cats! The Night Parade by Laura Mauro – ★★★★★ I loved this one, another favorite story in the collection! This is set in Japan and tells of a young woman who sees a small child alone and goes to help only to find herself entering another world via a hole in some bushes. The Wonderland connection with this story is very strong and I loved how creative it was. The supernatural Japanese creatures, yokai, are added into the mix and they were horrifying but added a lot of suspense to the story as our protagonist could not be caught by them. I think my favorite part was that the Cheshire Cat is added in as a shapeshifting yokai called a bakenenko (essentially a cat) and he was done very well from his mannerisms to his dialogue it was very Cheshire-esque but also unique on its own. I was a little confused by the ending because I didn’t “get” it but overall this was a fantastic story and I honestly wish I could read it as an entire novel! What Makes a Monster by L.L. McKinney – ★★★★ Trigger Warnings: Gore & Violence This story proves that you can do masterful world building in a short story! It’s about monsters called Nightmares that escape from Wonderland into the human world and only people from Wonderland and special humans can hunt them. This was written well and had great action scenes, I also came to love the characters as well. Also the main protagonist is black! The Nightmares themselves were also pretty terrifying which is always what I’m looking for in a horror story. I liked the very Victorian era London setting too and overall this was just a great addition to the collection and is another story I wouldn’t mind reading as a book! The White Queen’s Dictum by James Lovegrove – ★★★★ Trigger Warnings: Death & Mention of Suicide This was a very unique story about an internet paranormal investigator having a conversation with our POV character at a diner. I don’t want to spoil it so I won’t say much more than that! I loved how there were a bunch of “mini” ghost stories told in this one and the “Alice” link with the “six impossible things” that the investigator believes in. I did predict the ending after a bit but it was still a good twist. Temp Work by Lilith Saintcrow – ★★ Trigger Warnings: Violence This one was not really interesting to me, it was still told well though. It’s about a futuristic post apocalyptic world where Alice is…..sort of a spy I would say. She’s sneaky! It’s a plague apocalypse so that’s mentioned but overall not really discussed and I would have liked to have known a bit more about that. However, I can always get behind a plot where people take down people who abuse their power so there’s that! Eat Me, Drink Me by Alison Littlewood – ★★ Another story that wasn’t great for me, this one is about an Alice who is being forced to marry someone and runs off into a sort of “fever dream” almost. She believes she is hallucinating but goes down the rabbit hole and to tell you the truth I’m still not quite sure myself what was going on. It’s a very confusing story and not really that interesting either. How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen by Cat Rambo – ★★★ This is about a group of children that are sisters who run into Alice as she comes down into their Treacle mine. They follow her out on a journey and one of them becomes the “Treacle Queen”. This one was enjoyable enough to read but didn’t have a lot of depth, it was “meh”. Also as you can probably tell from the title the POV character doesn’t speak with perfect English and that became a little tiresome for me to read by the end. Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadbourn – ★★★ I’m not quite sure how to describe this story but it’s about an Alice who uses doors in another world to watch the happenings of another Alice in another world. I always love the inclusion of the Cheshire Cat so that’s a plus and I thought he was done well in this story. I also loved the mention and use of Peter Pan and Neverland with Wonderland. The ending was very emotional and touching and I have to admit I teared up a bit! Overall this story was the PERFECT ending to the collection. Revolution in Wonder by Jane Yolen (Poem) – ★★★★ Another poem I’m still not sure how to review but it’s well written and the Wonderland connection is there as well as the horror elements!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    An anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland already jumps straight to the top of my wish list but then you tell me it includes stories from authors like Juliet Marillier & L.L. McKinney and I just get even more excited about it! This book includes a collection of 17 short stories and 2 poems that were all inspired by Alice and her adventures and written by some very well known writers: Jane Yolen, Robert Shearman, M.R. Carey, Genevieve Cogman, Cavan Scott, Juliet Marillier, Jonathan Green, George Mann, Angela Slatter, Rio Youers, Catriona Ward, Laura Mauro, L.L. McKinney, James Lovegrove, Li An anthology of stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland already jumps straight to the top of my wish list but then you tell me it includes stories from authors like Juliet Marillier & L.L. McKinney and I just get even more excited about it! This book includes a collection of 17 short stories and 2 poems that were all inspired by Alice and her adventures and written by some very well known writers: Jane Yolen, Robert Shearman, M.R. Carey, Genevieve Cogman, Cavan Scott, Juliet Marillier, Jonathan Green, George Mann, Angela Slatter, Rio Youers, Catriona Ward, Laura Mauro, L.L. McKinney, James Lovegrove, Lilith Saintcrow, Alison Littlewood, Cat Rambo and Mark Chadbourn. All of these stories are linked to Alice in different ways, be it through a familiar character: Alice herself, the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter or perhaps even the Cheshire Cat; or a familiar place: falling down a rabbit hole or stepping through a looking glass maybe. Perhaps the link is just a throwaway phrase or a chance to visit a part of Wonderland that you've never explored before. I love how different each of the stories are, some are spooky, others are introspective but most of them are as weird as the tales they're based on. As with any anthology there were some stories I loved and a few that didn't resonate quite so well but overall I thought the quality of the stories was very high and a few particular highlights were The White Queen's Pawn by Genevieve Cogman, Dream Girl by Cavan Scott, Good Dog, Alice! by Juliet Marillier (my favourite of the collection), The Hunting of the Jabberwock by Jonathan Green and Smoke 'em if You Got 'em by Angela Slatter. This is the perfect collection for Alice in Wonderland fans, there really is something for everyone and it's a great book for dipping in and out of when you want something quick to read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    The Nerd Daily

    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Carolyn Percy Featuring short stories from M.R. Carey, Mark Chadbourn, Genevieve Cogman, Jonathan Green, Alison Littlewood, James Lovegrove, L.L. McKinney, George Mann, Juliet Marillier, Laura Mauro, Cat Rambo, Lilith Saintcrow, Cavan Scott, Robert Shearman, Angela Slatter, Catriona Ward, Jane Yolen, and Rio Youers. Edited by Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane. You think you know Alice in Wonderland? Think again. The stories within the Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Carolyn Percy Featuring short stories from M.R. Carey, Mark Chadbourn, Genevieve Cogman, Jonathan Green, Alison Littlewood, James Lovegrove, L.L. McKinney, George Mann, Juliet Marillier, Laura Mauro, Cat Rambo, Lilith Saintcrow, Cavan Scott, Robert Shearman, Angela Slatter, Catriona Ward, Jane Yolen, and Rio Youers. Edited by Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane. You think you know Alice in Wonderland? Think again. The stories within these pages will take you on journey through all the different facets of Lewis Carroll’s famous creation, from the historical, the horrific, the contemporary to the spiritual. Get ready to fall down the rabbit hole – or step through the looking glass, whichever you prefer – and prepare to see Wonderland, and indeed Alice, as you’ve likely not seen them before. Originally published in 1865, Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (known first as Alice’s Adventures Under Ground) and his follow-up, Through the Looking-Glass, and what Alice Found There (published 1871), has been inspiring people for over 150 years. The first literary spin-offs began appearing as early as 1895 and have carried on to this day with titles such as Christina Henry’s The Chronicles of Alice. And of course the works inspired by it aren’t confined just to literature. Film adaptations started with the silent films of the early 1900s and have grown to include Disney’s beloved 1951 animated adaptation, Jan Svankmajer’s surrealist masterpiece, Alice (1988), and, most recently, Tim Burton’s interpretations. Alice-inspired media has even moved beyond film and literature, with American McGee’s brilliantly dark and twisted video games, Alice and its sequel Madness Returns, and many other references across the spectrum of pop-culture. Now Titan Books have released Wonderland, an anthology of 18 never before seen stories inspired by Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, brought together by award-winning writer and editors Paul Kane and Marie O’Regan, from some of the best names in fantasy and horror. We begin with Robert Shearman’s ‘Wonders Never Cease’, a story about change, beginning with the idea that “If Alice wouldn’t change, then something else would have to change in her place” before linking Alice’s journey to the journey we all share. ‘There Were No Birds to Fly’ by M.R. Carey portrays a sci-fi/horror tinged look at two of Wonderland’s more famous residents. ‘The White Queen’s Pawn’ by Genevieve Cogman adds elements of the spy genre before revealing a supernatural sting in the tail. Cavan Scott’s occasionally gory ‘Dream Girl’ sees Wonderland and its residents slowly disappearing. The Dream Girl is apparently to blame, but is everything as it seems? In Juliet Marillier’s tale, ‘Good Dog, Alice!’, Dorothea’s Great Uncle Bartholomew doesn’t want her to name her new dog Alice as, according to him, all those named Alice are prone to “all manner of wild escapades.” But, for Dorothea, Alice the dog’s curiosity may turn out to be a good thing. Jonathan Green’s ‘The Hunting of the Jabberwock’ sees a knight arrive to hunt the titular beast, only to uncover a nefarious scheme. In George Mann’s ‘About Time’, Lucy found Wonderland as a child and it became her haven. Now she’s a teenager however, she feels it’s time to put childish things behind her but soon finds that this is not as easy as it seems. In ‘Smoke ‘em if You Got ‘em’, Angela Slatter transports Alice to the Wild West. Rio Youers’ ‘Vanished Summer Glory’ is a poignant tale that looks at grief and its effect on the imagination. Catriona Ward’s ‘Black Kitty’ is a wonderfully peculiar, and surprisingly emotional, “tail” of a pair of twin sisters, a magic mirror and a certain cat. Laura Mauro’s ‘Night Parade’ takes influence from Japanese folklore. L.L. McKinney has already released a contemporary Alice retelling in the form of her debut novel A Blade So Black, and her story, ‘What Makes a Monster’, is set within this same world, bringing an even darker twist to mythology surrounding Jack the Ripper. In ‘The White Queen’s Dictum’ by James Lovegrove, two strangers meet in a motorway service station, one of whom is an investigator of the paranormal, only the paranormal may turn out to be closer than he thinks. ‘Temp Work’ by Lilith Saintcrow adds flavours of science-fiction – particularly cyberpunk – and corporate intrigue. ‘Eat Me, Drink Me’ by Alison Littlewood is an unnervingly woozy tale of a young woman about to be married, who thinks how much easier it would be to be her pet rabbit. ‘How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen’ by Cat Rambo has prose as poetically viscous as the treacle being mined. And ‘Six Impossible Things’ by Mark Chadbourn looks at the creation of imaginary worlds and the effects this can have on those who inspire them. The collection is bookended by Jane Yolen’s two poems, ‘Alice in Armour’ and ‘Revolution in Wonder’, acting as an opening and closing curtain. As with any short-story collection, particularly those where the stories are all written by different authors, there is a wide variety of genres and styles, and not all of them will have the same impact (though of course your mileage may vary as to which ones). But these are all written by solid names within the genre and the quality is consistently high. An interesting addition to the canon of Alice inspired literature as well as an appealing short story collection in its own right.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    This is an interesting collection of short stories and some poetry but unfortunately it just missed the mark for me. There was some really interesting stories in here. Some I really liked, one of my favourites being the first story, it was hilarious. However, there were no stories which I loved. Saying that, there were also no stories that I hated. They were all just pretty average. I found that as the book went on, the stories started to merge into each other. Which became confusing. Maybe it's This is an interesting collection of short stories and some poetry but unfortunately it just missed the mark for me. There was some really interesting stories in here. Some I really liked, one of my favourites being the first story, it was hilarious. However, there were no stories which I loved. Saying that, there were also no stories that I hated. They were all just pretty average. I found that as the book went on, the stories started to merge into each other. Which became confusing. Maybe it's best to read like one a day and not half the book in one sitting. I liked the idea of this, but as with all short story collections, there will be some I like and some I don't. Ratings for each story: 3,4,2,3,4,4,4,3,2,2,2,3,3,4,2,3,2,3,3 Overall average rating: 2.9 (rounded to 3) TW: cancer, abuse, car crash, suicide

  7. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    I'm not usually great with anthologies because they're such a mixed bag! There were some great stories in this, some good, and some I didn't like. RTC

  8. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    The moment I discovered this anthology, I just had to have it. The more Wonderland I read, the more Wonderland I crave. It's a weird phenomenon. You'd expect that at some point I'd seen enough versions of Wonderland and met enough Cheshire Cat's, but nope. I want and need more. And just like with every story collection there were stories I liked better and stories that didn't really speak to me at all. The stories in this book are incredibly diverse and there's something in almost eve The moment I discovered this anthology, I just had to have it. The more Wonderland I read, the more Wonderland I crave. It's a weird phenomenon. You'd expect that at some point I'd seen enough versions of Wonderland and met enough Cheshire Cat's, but nope. I want and need more. And just like with every story collection there were stories I liked better and stories that didn't really speak to me at all. The stories in this book are incredibly diverse and there's something in almost every genre I can think of. I think it's very hard to find a person who likes all those stories equally. They are simply too different for that. I personally love the more Wonderland-centred stories. For me Wonderland has always been the true heart of the Alice story, the true wonder and miracle. It's a Land where everything is possible, where rules are broken and upside down, where your fantasy can go wild and then even wilder. So, the more twisted, not so logical and insane stories absolutely were my favourites. But, all stories were well written, had their own style and their own atmosphere. It's remarkable and amazingly impressive how one children's book can inspire so many different writers to write so many different, unique and original things.

  9. 4 out of 5

    S.E. Anderson

    From classic quests to speculative sci-fi, this collection reimagines the Alice in Wonderland world in such a contrarywise way. While I loved some stories more than others, that’s the curse of any anthology. It was entertaining and fun!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Runalong

    The best story anthologies take a theme and make you totally reappraise what it can do. I really dislike the original Alice tea but this collection does amazingly wonderful things with it https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty Stanley

    I think most people are somewhat familiar with the original stories. My first introduction to Alice, I’m fairly sure, was via the Disney animated film, and to be honest I’m not convinced if I’ve even fully read the original stories. I really must rectify that soon (would love a MinaLima to design an edition btw). The genre bending children’s fantasy, has definite horrific aspects and many a joke has been made about what Carroll was on when he wrote these tales. They are a true classic, and have I think most people are somewhat familiar with the original stories. My first introduction to Alice, I’m fairly sure, was via the Disney animated film, and to be honest I’m not convinced if I’ve even fully read the original stories. I really must rectify that soon (would love a MinaLima to design an edition btw). The genre bending children’s fantasy, has definite horrific aspects and many a joke has been made about what Carroll was on when he wrote these tales. They are a true classic, and have been a springboard for many a spin off or retelling both on film, and on the page. The majority of the works in this anthology are short stories although these are bookended by two poems by Jane Yolen. The second of which I preferred. Some of the tales may be better appreciated by people who are familiar with the originals but despite this most can stand alone. I was only familiar with 3 of the 20 names associated and so I had the pleasure of being introduced to other authors, some of whose other work I am now likely to seek out as a result. There is something for everyone in here, but as with most short story collections perhaps not everything will be for everyone. Stories that although are well written, don’t quite make that connection. There’s historical, contemporary and futuristic tales in fantasy, science fiction, horror, historical and more. Topics such as capitalism and child abuse are discovered. Not be shelved in the children’s section next to the original. And most of the characters from Hatter to Cheshire, The Jabberwock, and even the more obscure Walrus, appear in one form or another across these tales. For me there were many more hits than misses and I will mention a few of the hits next. First up is the author I was most familiar with - MR Carey with There were no birds to fly. The tonal similarity with his other works was apparent. That apocalyptic creepiness. Oddly this was the least recognisable in terms of its connection to the original, until the very end. Carey shows that being inspired by something can still lead to a highly original story. Next was Genevieve Cogman. I was aware of her and have her Invisible Library series waiting on my TBR. Her tale The White Queen’s Pawn had a wry and dark humour, and a be careful what you wish for moral. I definitely plan to bump her tales up the list. And the stand out for me was Cavan Scott’s Dream Girl. I won’t mention the genre as that is sort of a spoiler in itself but it was perfection. It reminded me of the Wizard of Oz/Wicked retelling and I would love to be able to read a longer work based on what this becomes at the end of the story. Thank you to Titan for the gifted review copy and to editors Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane for bringing this together. Do check out the rest of the blog tour stops to see which stories stood out to everyone else. Alice in Armor - poem - 4 stars Wonders Never Cease - 3 stars (abstract) There were no birds to fly - MR Carey - 4.5 creepy horror The White Queen’s Pawn - 5 stars Genevieve Cogman Dream Girl - 5 stars. Won’t tell you genre because it will spoil it Good Girl, Alice - 5 stars (doggo) The Hunting of the Jabberwock - 4.5 stars About Time - 4.5 stars Smoke ‘em if You Got ‘em - 4.5 stars Vanished Summer Glory - 5 stars Black Kitty - 4.5 stars The Night Parade - 5 stars (Asian influenced) What Makes a Monster - 5 stars. (Nightmare fuel. Jack the Ripper) The White Queen’s Dictum - 5 stars paranormal Temp Work - 4 stars Eat Me, Drink Me - 3 stars How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen - 3.5 stars Six Impossible Things - 3.5 stars Revolution in Wonder - poem - 4 stars

  12. 5 out of 5

    Museofnyxmares

    3.5/5 Stars *I was provided with a copy of this book by the publisher, in exchange for my honest opinion. I’m sure that the majority of us have read Alice in Wonderland at some point, or at least are familiar with the story. It has been a while though since I’ve read it, but it’s always been a story that fascinated me and I love the different interpretations of it in both book and film, so this anthology piqued my interest a lot. These stories were very original and were a 3.5/5 Stars *I was provided with a copy of this book by the publisher, in exchange for my honest opinion. I’m sure that the majority of us have read Alice in Wonderland at some point, or at least are familiar with the story. It has been a while though since I’ve read it, but it’s always been a story that fascinated me and I love the different interpretations of it in both book and film, so this anthology piqued my interest a lot. These stories were very original and were a very eclectic mix and it’s probably one of the most diverse anthologies I’ve read, most notably in the genres explored. As it’s such a mix of interpretations, writing styles and genres, everyone will probably respond to this anthology very differently from the next person. And as is probably expected, there were some stories that I enjoyed more than others. Every single contribution in this anthology is of course, inspired by Alice in Wonderland. However, with some of the stories it is a bit harder to pinpoint the connection to Wonderland and so with a couple of them, although I enjoyed the story in itself, it was a bit disappointing to not be able to see a clear connection with Alice. I didn’t expect them to be an exact copy, I’m actually glad that none of them were, but it would’ve been nice if the Alice influence was a bit clearer. Some had elements of the original story in them like going down the rabbit hole, the growing and shrinking and the slaying of the Jabberwocky. Whereas some just had characters with similar names to the original characters, with one being spelt Alise. Others didn’t have connections that I could pinpoint as easily and I didn’t mind when the story in itself was interesting enough, but some of the concepts were harder to grasp and I just couldn’t get into them as much. I wish I’d have taken my time with this, and stepped away after each story, because I feel like it would of allowed each story to fully make its mark on me, before I dived into another. Some of the stories have overlapped a bit in my memory because there are quite a few of them, and naturally, I remember the ones that I enjoyed more, compare to the ones I didn’t. There were quite a lot of stories that I did enjoy though and I found myself faced with one of the downsides to anthologies, where you read a good story and desperately want it to be a bit longer. For the most part, I felt that the author’s did a really good job with the length of their stories, they didn’t seem too long or too short, but when you’re enjoying something, you always want a bit more. There were actually also two poems in the book, one opened the anthology and another closed it, which was a quite nice use of structure. Both of the poems were done by the same author, but I really liked the last poem the best, it, paired with the last story, felt the perfect way to end the anthology. Both offerings seemed to jolt the reader back into the harsh realities of life, such as the fact that Alice couldn’t stay in Wonderland forever and in my opinion, the horrific truth of what would of happened to Wonderland had it been discovered by adults. The ones that I wasn’t too fond of, like I said, didn’t really feel connected to Wonderland or just didn’t pull me in enough. I feel like some of the stories were too abstract in their connection and general plot, that I couldn’t enjoy them as much as the others. I completely love how weird and wacky the world of Wonderland is, but some of the stories just didn’t make sense to me and I was confused the whole time. I felt like I couldn’t find something to hold on to in those stories and so when that happened, I was searching for the connection to Alice instead and then when I didn’t find it, I was at a loss. Therefore, I couldn’t appreciate them as their own story or through their connection to Wonderland. Lastly I want to just praise the ones that I loved. These tended to be the ones that had a more realistic approach to Wonderland, covered in magical realism. Magical realism tends to be a favourite of mine and so it doesn’t surprise me that these were my favourite type of stories. I’m not sure why, but I just found these more inventive than the others. There was one where Alice had come out of Wonderland, found the world a changed place and had to assimilate into everyday mundane life, it was sad but a really interesting read. There was another story that was a bit harder to swallow in terms of subject matter and looked at what Alice could of been escaping from by going to Wonderland. A lot of the stories had quite dark undertones, but one that was incredibly sweet was where Alice had to come to terms with the fact that the things from her childhood, such as Wonderland, were suffering due to her no longer paying attention to them and she made it her responsibility to fix it. One of my favourites and the last story, looked at Alice reflecting on her life and what happens to those who experienced so much magic as a child and the longing to go back instead of facing reality. It even incorporated Peter Pan, which I thought was a nice touch. Overall, this was a unique anthology filled with inventive stories that I’ve never seen before as interpretations of Wonderland. Although some were more to my liking than others, I was able to appreciate the amount of creativity displayed, I mean we saw an injection of Japanese folklore, Alice hunting Mr. Rabbit and even consideration of the controversy surrounding Carroll. I would definitely recommend this as I’m sure that there’s something for everyone in this wide range of stories.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I loved this one. I remember reading Alice Through the Looking Glass and Alice in Wonderland as a kid and how deeply twisted it felt to my young mind. I was disturbed and entranced by how it made me feel like reality had kaleidescoped around me. These stories recaptured some of that original experience for me.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Seregil of Rhiminee

    Originally published at Risingshadow. Let me start this review by saying that Wonderland: An Anthology of Works Inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is an immersive, fascinating and thrillingly unsettling anthology that celebrates the bizarre and wondrous nature of Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass". I was wholly satisfied with this anthology and enjoyed reading each of the stories. If you've ever been fascinated by the original Alice novels and l Originally published at Risingshadow. Let me start this review by saying that Wonderland: An Anthology of Works Inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland is an immersive, fascinating and thrillingly unsettling anthology that celebrates the bizarre and wondrous nature of Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass". I was wholly satisfied with this anthology and enjoyed reading each of the stories. If you've ever been fascinated by the original Alice novels and love them, this anthology is mandatory reading material to you, because its contents will entertain and surprise you in equal measure. If this happens to be your first introduction to Wonderland, you couldn't have chosen a better companion to guide you there, because you're in for a magical treat when you begin to read the stories. The editors, Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane, have done an excellent job at gathering compelling stories from fantasy and horror authors. The editors and the authors seem to have been fully committed to this anthology, because the stories are as mind-boggling and strange as Wonderland itself. The stories gathered here highlight what Lewis Carroll has created in a splendid way. They also invite readers to explore Wonderland in all of its glory and strangeness. This anthology is proof of the fact that there's much to explore in Wonderland and there are many tales to tell, for Wonderland is filled with strange things that tease and tickle our imagination. Some of these things are magical and wondrous while others are dark and terrifying. This anthology also demonstrates that talented authors have the ability to make Wonderland their own by using their skills to add sparkling originality to what Lewis Carroll has created. This is evident in many of the stories. What makes this anthology great is that it has something for everybody, because the stories range all the way from fantasy to horror and have elements of history and science fiction woven into them. As a fan of all things dark and weird, I was impressed by these stories and found myself enjoying them. (It's possible that certain stories may not be to everybody's liking due to their strange and demanding nature, but that's just one of the reasons why this anthology is good.) This anthology consists of the following stories: - Alice in Armor by Jane Yolen - Wonders Never Cease by Robert Shearman - There Were No Birds to Fly by M.R. Carey - The White Queen's Pawn by Genevieve Cogman - Dream Girl by Cavan Scott - Good Dog, Alice! by Juliet Marillier - The Hunting of the Jabberwock by Jonathan Green - Smoke 'em if You Got 'em by Angela Slatter - About Time by George Mann - Vanished Summer Glory by Rio Youers - Black Kitty by Catriona Ward - The Night Parade by Laura Mauro - What Makes a Monster by L.L. McKinney - The White Queen's Dictum by James Lovegrove - Temp Work by Lilith Saintcrow - Eat Me, Drink Me by Alison Littlewood - How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen by Cat Rambo - Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadbourn - Revolution in Wonder by Jane Yolen Storytelling-wise each of the above mentioned stories is a small gem. Some of the stories are clearly stronger than others, but all of them are good and worth reading. Many of these stories tell about Alice, or perhaps I should say that they tell of alternate Alices, because the authors have created their own unique versions of Alice that are quite different from each other. I can guarantee that you'll be surprised by what the authors have in store for the reader in this regard. The prose in all of these stories is excellent and evocative. I was positively surprised that the authors have managed to capture the magic, wonder and whimsiness of Wonderland with their writing and have done their best to write immersive and memorable stories. Here's a bit more information about the stories and my thoughts about them: Alice in Armor by Jane Yolen: - A beautifully written poem that tells of how Alice plummets down the rabbit hole into Wonderland and prepares herself for battle. Wonders Never Cease by Robert Shearman: - This is a slightly unsettling story about how Alice returns from Wonderland and finds out that the world has changed quite a lot. She gets a job and marries Dom whom she doesn't love. When she has babies, she thinks of them as defective and pushes all of them, except for one, down the rabbit hole. - I was taken by this story, because the author's vision of Alice is satisfyingly different and twisted. The Alice in this story is not the sweet Alice we've come to know from the stories, but a more mature (and stranger) version of her. - This strange story is steeped in modern weird fiction and has a few elements that can be regarded as bizarro fiction elements. As a big fan of weird fiction, I enjoyed this story very much and found it excellent. - This story has an emotional impact on the reader, because the author's way of writing about Alice and her daughter, Trish, is surprisingly touching and harrowing. There Were No Birds to Fly by M.R. Carey: - In this eerie story, aliens get into people's heads and make their worst nightmares come to life. - This story has an interesting dystopian setting, because the world has changed and the characters talk about what they miss. - If I'm not mistaken, this story is inspired by the poem "The Walrus and the Carpenter", which appears in "Through the Looking-Glass". - This is an excellent and satisfyingly weird story, because it's multi-layered and different from the other stories. The White Queen's Pawn by Genevieve Cogman: - This brilliant story tells of how Lady Hargreaves is approached by Mr Walters who knows about her secret past as a talented assassin. Mr Walters wants Lady Hargreaves to train new assassins. - I enjoyed reading about the conversation between Lady Hargreaves and Mr Walters, because it's perfectly written and has good tension. - I loved the ending, because the author has come up with a perfect way to end the story. Dream Girl by Cavan Scott: - In this fascinating story, Wonderland and its residents are mysteriously disappearing and the disappearances are believed to be connected to the arrival of the Dream Girl, a blonde-haired human who has been running around the Wonderland. - This story is an interesting and thrilling blend of fantasy, horror and science fiction. - The ending is simply brilliant, because it's distinctly different and will surprise the reader with science fiction elements. Good Dog, Alice! by Juliet Marillier: - A story about a girl who lives with her uncle Bart. The girl receives a dog as a birthday present and decides to call her Alice. One day, the girl has to travel through a blue door in order to save her dog. - This story has dark and unsettling undertones, because the author implies at child molestation and tells of the girl's fears, because the perpetrator has frightened her and has made it clear that she can't hide from him. - The ending is excellent and fits the story, because justice is served. The Hunting of the Jabberwock by Jonathan Green: - A story about a youth called Nobody who is looking for the monster Jabberwock. Nobody wants to kill Jabberwock. - It was fun to read about Nobody and his quest to slay the Jabberwock. - This is one of the best and most entertaining fantasy stories I've read this year, because the story is gripping and the ending has a nice twist to it. About Time by George Mann: - A story about Lucy who returns to Wonderland as a teenager and finds out that a monster has arrived there and has declared himself the King of Wonderland. - I was impressed by the emotional impact the author delivered with this story, because there's something sorrowful and touching beneath the story's surface that will captivate the reader. - This is an excellent and well written story. Smoke 'em if You Got 'em by Angela Slatter: - This is another brilliant story, because it's a Wild West story about Alice and how she hunts the Rabbit. - Because Angela Slatter has been on my must-read list ever since I read "The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings" (the second collection of stories in the author's "The Sourdough Cycle"), I was eager to read this story. I'm happy to say that this is one of the best fantasy stories I've ever read, because the author has created her own intriguing vision of Alice who has been affected by the time she spent in Wonderland. - This story is so strong and captivating that it will stay with the reader. Vanished Summer Glory by Rio Youers: - In this strange and beautifully written story, Charles - who is a psychiatrist - sees a white rabbit and talks to him after his sister has passed away. - I enjoyed this story a lot, because it's wholly different from the other stories. The story is told from two points of view in an excellent way. - This is an excellent story that will be of special interest to readers who love strange and well written stories. Black Kitty by Catriona Ward: - A strange and well written story about a pair of twins, Snowdrop and Kitty, who are thinking of escaping their world. - I liked this story and found it interesting, because it's a satisfyingly original take on Wonderland stories. - I'm not going to spoil the story for readers, but I can say that the ending is interesting and revealing. The Night Parade by Laura Mauro: - In this story, a young woman, Airi, tries to help a small child and finds a hole in the bushes that leads her to another place. - This is a wonderfully different kind of a story, because it is set in Japan and features elements of Japanese folklore. - Fans of Alice stories will easily notice that the Cheshire Cat is featured as a bakeneko in this story. - I enjoyed this story very much and found it utterly compelling. What Makes a Monster by L.L. McKinney: - This is a story about Nightmares that escape from Wonderland. Dreamwalkers, who are born of humanity and have been trained by Guardians born of Wonderland, can hunt these beasts and stop them from wreaking havoc in the mortal plane. - I was thrilled to read this story, because I enjoyed what the author had created. This story is one of the best examples of creative storytelling in this anthology. - The ending has an interesting reference to Jack the Ripper. The White Queen's Dictum by James Lovegrove: - This is a strange tale about an internet journalist who investigates paranormal phenomena and has an online channel where he streams his videos. The man believes in impossible things and hauntings are his specialty. - I found this story captivating, because it's modern and original. - The ending is excellent. Temp Work by Lilith Saintcrow: - This cyberpunk story takes place in a futuristic and post-apocalytic world where Alise works as a kind of a spy. - This story features an intriguing digiplague. - There's something about this story that slightly reminds me of Danie Ware's Ecko series. Eat Me, Drink Me by Alison Littlewood: - A story about Alice who is getting married and dreams of how much easier it would be to be her white pet rabbit. - This is a weird little tale that has a dream-like feel to it. - I was taken by this story, because it's not your normal kind of a story and needs a bit of concentration on the reader's part to fully understand it. How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen by Cat Rambo: - In this story, Alice is thrown into the treacle mines by the White Queen and the Red Queen. Alice befriends the miners and helps them. - This story was a bit of a surprise to me, because I didn't expect to find anything like it in this anthology. I found myself enjoying it and was pleased with the ending. - It's great that the story is told from the point of view of a treacle miner and the text has grammatical errors, because it makes everything feel fresh. Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadbourn: - In this story, Alice finds herself in a strange place and doesn't know how she arrived there. The Cheshire Cat tells her that she is there to play a game and has to find Vasteous Shield. She looks through doors and sees different things. - I enjoyed this story, because it gradually grew into something deeper and more meaningful. - This story has an excellent and touching ending that will surely impress everybody. Revolution in Wonder by Jane Yolen: -Just like the first poem, this is a beautifully written poem. It serves as an excellent closing curtain to this anthology. One of the things that impressed me about these stories is how insightful and thought-provoking some of them are and how they make the reader think about what is going on. Although these stories entertainment, they have a surprising amount of depth. I strongly recommend this anthology to readers who want to read something fresh and unsettling, because the stories are intriguing and fascinatingly original. Please, don't hesitate to take a literary plunge into Wonderland, for you'll be rewarded with marvellous stories that will take you by surprise.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gemma

    I was kindly gifted a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for review. Anthologies can be little bit hit or miss for me. Either I really enjoy most of the stories or the majority end up being a bit too lyrical and metaphorical for me and end up going over my head. This collection was a little bit of a both, I really enjoyed some stories but others I just didn't really gel with. As you can probably tell from the title of this anthology it is a collection of stories inspired by Alice in I was kindly gifted a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for review. Anthologies can be little bit hit or miss for me. Either I really enjoy most of the stories or the majority end up being a bit too lyrical and metaphorical for me and end up going over my head. This collection was a little bit of a both, I really enjoyed some stories but others I just didn't really gel with. As you can probably tell from the title of this anthology it is a collection of stories inspired by Alice in Wonderland. There are a large variety of stories in here, some from fairly well known authors, that range from direct retellings or continuations of the original to stories with a tenuous link such as a characters name. This started off really promising, I really enjoyed most of the stories in the first half. However, there were a few in the second half that I didn't really gel with which was a shame. Some of my favourite stories included... There Were No Birds to Fly by M.R. Carey - I really enjoy M.R. Carey's writing style, its atmospheric and a little bit creepy and I liked that this story took its inspiration from a less familiar part of the story. Dream Girl by Cavan Scott - This one I particularly enjoyed. I loved the sci-fi twist at the end. Good Dog, Alice! - This one was just super fun. What Makes a Monster by L.L McKinney - I've previously read A Blade so Black and actually quite enjoyed it and this story was based in the same world as that book. I enjoyed getting back into that world again. Overall, if your an Alice in Wonderland fan though I would recommend this one as there are some really interesting takes on the tale.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Harris

    I'm grateful to Titan Books for a free advance copy of Wonderland to consider for review and for inviting me to take part in the book's blogtour. I love themed anthologies. It's always interesting to see what a diverse group of top-grade authors make of a meaty subject, what similarities and differences there are between their take on it, and how the editor juxtaposes things. Recently there seems to have been a resurgence of anthologies playing with classic stories - understandably be I'm grateful to Titan Books for a free advance copy of Wonderland to consider for review and for inviting me to take part in the book's blogtour. I love themed anthologies. It's always interesting to see what a diverse group of top-grade authors make of a meaty subject, what similarities and differences there are between their take on it, and how the editor juxtaposes things. Recently there seems to have been a resurgence of anthologies playing with classic stories - understandably because, really, with something like Alice, there is always something new to say, not least because times change, we change, and our approach to these stories must also change. This anthology is bookended by poems from prolific author and poet Jane Yolen. Alice in Armor muses on an Alice taking her own life into her hands and arming herself against injury. The implications of this are made clearer in Yolen's closing poem, Revolution in Wonder. It's fitting that Yolen both opens and closes the book, echoing the range of approaches followed by the stories in between (especially given her contributions elsewhere to this whole area of reinterpreting and reimagining those classic tales we all have as part of the furniture of our minds. Overall this collection has teeming variety. There are stories inspired by Wonderland, using its look and feel, as it were, stories which expand upon aspects of the original books, prequels, sequels, real-world stories where a "Wonderland" aspect might be taken as objective reality or equally, may reflect a state of mind or be a metaphor for the distance from childhood. There are transpositions of Alice to varied settings - the Wild West, a dystopia future, urban Japan - and all manner of other reimagining (including some which touch on uncomfortable aspects of Dodgson - Lewis carroll - and his circle. They are all strong stories and it would be invidious to try to rate each one, but I particularly enjoyed Genevieve Cogman'' The White Queen's Pawn, Good Dog, Alice by Juliet Marillier, About Time by George Mann, LL McKinney's story What Makes a Monster and Alison Littlewood's Eat Me, Drink Me. In Wonders Never Cease, the first story proper, Robert Shearman picks up where Alice itself ends, imagining her leaving Wonderland and rejoining a very prosaic Earth of roundabouts, typing and switchboards. Or has she left? The story is effectively timeless, weaving together Wonderland weirdness with moments in an ordinary life, while keeping the sense of being in a dream which Carroll's novels depend upon. There Were No Birds To Fly by MR Carey presents a Wonderland-tinged, but post-Apocalyptic, Brighton. Deadly aliens walk among us, and a small party is fleeing - but to where? And why? 'If you follow the rules' the Narrator (who wears an apron, and carries a set of carpenter's tools) is told at the start, 'you'll live a whole lot longer.' And there do seem to be rules in this story, but they are frustratingly hard to grasp. A grim, allusive take that seems to inhabit the spirit of Wonderland while being rooted in a real place. Genevieve Cogman presents a different Alice in The White Queen's Pawn, set in the 1930s where dreams of dozing by the river and drinking resizing potions are long gone and the nasty realities of the later decade take the foreground - with, however, the order 'Off with her head!' still ringing. A neat reversal involving a looking glass is a nice commentary on the politics of those, and perhaps these, times. Cavan Scott's Dream Girl plunges into what seems to be a world of classic horror - a dark and bloodstained Wonderland with its own secrets where the March Hare's madness has taken a sinister turn. Alice is missing - if she is found will she be able to restore order or will she just bring ruin? There is a clever conceit to this story which I didn't spot coming, but it's one that casts a shadow at the end of the story. I wasn't sure whether the was a Happy Ever After here. In Good Dog, Alice by Juliet Marillier the protagonist is Dorothea, not Alice, but there is a small doorway, there is a magical food that can resize the eater and there are - in the background - Oxford dons. Here Wonderland (if that's what it is) is both a refuge and a source of strength, with the real hours outside, in our world. A neat and haunting story, one of my favourites in this book. Jonathan Green's The Hunting of the Jabberwock gives us the true story of this famous quest - in which things turn out to be both less, and more, heroic than the legend which has been handed down. Drawing on the possibilities for the Hunt as a self-contained episode Green creates what could almost be a Dungeons & Dragons module, complete with an eager young Squire, a battered, world-weary knight and an unfriendly Hermit. Liberally spattered with gyres and gimbles, more raths and fearsome Jubb Jubb birds, this story is fun and entertaining. In About Time, George Mann gives a thoughtful interpretation of Alice in a wider context, dwelling on childhood and adulthood and the responsibilities each has to the other. Here, as in several other stories, Wonderland serves several purposes, including being a refuge, a comfort and a mirror (of course!) to "real life". Another of my favourites. I previously knew Angela Slatter for her Verity Fassbinder series of urban fantasy sets in Brisbane (excellent - read them!) so it's good to see her do something every different in Smoke 'em if You Got 'em which is... how to describe it? A kind of Alice "Western" complete with six-shooters, a sheriff and a saloon. An excellent, rounded story in itself giving its Alice plenty of action and agency and, perhaps, a peep into a wider world we might see more of? I can hope. Rio Youers's Vanished Summer Glory takes a more sentimental vein, being one of those stories that looks back on a (sort of) past Wonderland, or Wonderland experience, making no judgement on objective reality (I had thoughts) but definitely using the whole concept to convey vanished youth, innocence and childhood joy. As a native of Cheshire I was pleased to see the Daresbury setting. Black Kitty by Catriona Ward might be, perhaps, a prequel to the Alice stories? It very cleverly weaves elements from the Alice mythos into a deeper, scarier world but - and I think this is unusual in this sort of story - gives its Wonderland participants real hopes and fears, which are perfectly rational in their (irrational) world. Laura Mauro's The Night Parade takes us to Osaka, to a humid night where Airi, unable to sleep, lights a moody cigarette and observes the city from her tiny balcony. That might seem as unlikely a jumping off point for a Wonderland story but it really isn't - as Mauro shows, everything joins up. Another of my favourites, both for its distinctive atmosphere and for its resourceful central character. LL McKinney has form in reimagining Wonderland, her A Blade so Black using it as the basis for an urban fantasy set in modern Atlanta, so What Makes a Monster already has a whole world to draw on - one she uses with relish in this story of London, gaslight and fog which also serves as something of a prequel for ABSB. James Lovegrove's The White Queen's Dictum is perhaps more tangentially Wonderland-ish - the title refers to the idea of believing "six impossible things before Breakfast" but with that nod we're into rather a different kind of story - still an effective and twisty one, though. In Temp Work, Lilith Saintcrow gives us a grim, corporate-ruled and environmentally degraded future. Not a Wonderland, you'd think, and temping maid Alise, required to dress pleasingly for someone else's fantasy, is just making it from one day to another, staving off hunger and getting by. Its not though only her bosses who have have strategies and plans. Alison Littlewood's Eat Me, Drink Me, like a number of other stories here, picks up on the atmosphere and trapping of the original stories and deftly turns them round to reflect on its Alice's situation and dilemmas. A claustrophobic, harrowing and tense story, another favourite in this collection. Cat Rambo's story How I Comes to be the Treacle Queen is a slightly different take, written in - at first - a slightly difficult language but it's an intriguing and passionate story that quickly grew on me. It is really Wonderland from below. Excellent. The final story in the book, Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadbourn complements Vanished Summer Glory in meditating on "real life" (whatever that is) but doing with both a more direct take on the Alice books (looking at the people who inspired then, including some darker aspects concerning Carroll) and a less direct one: it involves an Alice, exploring something very like a canonical Wonderland... but not exactly like. Fittingly, the story raises many questions, bringing the anthology towards its end in a very open way, before Yolen's closing poem of high revolt rounds things off. A super anthology showcasing a range of authors doing splendid stuff. Great fun.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jthbooks

    I don’t think this book was for me, but I did enjoy some stories! Well 3 of them!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bunny21

    When I noticed this new set of short stories inspired by Alice in Wonderland I immediately begged a copy to read. I’m such an Alice fan that recently, when someone came into my home for the first time, they asked if it was my favourite book. I’m not sure I’d fully realised that I’d acquired a tea set, a dodo, a Mad March Hare, and a 5ft white rabbit with working pocket watch that stands in the hall! I have a lot of the literature inspired by Alice and fell in love all over again watching the rec When I noticed this new set of short stories inspired by Alice in Wonderland I immediately begged a copy to read. I’m such an Alice fan that recently, when someone came into my home for the first time, they asked if it was my favourite book. I’m not sure I’d fully realised that I’d acquired a tea set, a dodo, a Mad March Hare, and a 5ft white rabbit with working pocket watch that stands in the hall! I have a lot of the literature inspired by Alice and fell in love all over again watching the recent Royal Ballet production of the story. Being a therapist means I have a fascination with the psychological aspects of the story. The ‘eat me/ drink me’ section can be read as an interpretation of puberty and the need to be noticed on one hand, but the urge to disappear on the other. The Red Queen as a metaphor for the stifling confines of Victorian middle-class womanhood, and her cries to chop off heads can be seen as a curtailing of Alice’s adventure and freedom. The White Rabbit is a picture of anxiety and The Mad Hatter and friends may be mad, or may be portraying madness to be free and avoid the court and all its rules. It is always the characters that draw me in most, just as they did when I was a child. I’m a sucker for anthropomorphic characters -as my collection of textile sculptures shows - so my imagination ran riot when I first read the novel, full of waistcoated rabbits, monocled dodoes and hares in top hats. I actually own a hare in a top hat. I’m a hopeless case! Lewis Carrol wrote a book so beloved that it has inspired writers, artists, photographers and filmmakers and the recent explosion of Alice merchandise means we see it everywhere we go. I was interested to see how writers such as M.R. Carey and Catriona Ward had done with the story. Some stories pick up the psychological elements I find intriguing such as Alison Littlewood’s ‘Eat Me, Drink Me’ where a woman who is getting married has doubts and imagines how much easier it would be to become her pet rabbit. This reminded me of Tim Burton’s film version which opens at a garden party where Alice’s engagement is to be announced. Tiring of being primped and made ‘acceptable’ to the restrictive society gathered in the garden, Alice follows the white rabbit into a maze where she escapes into Wonderland. This underlying theme of the what is acceptable female behaviour is echoed elsewhere in the anthology; in Juliet Marillier’s story ‘Good Dog, Alice’ Dorothea’s grandad warns her against calling the dog Alice because creatures with that name can be prone to ‘wild escapades’ and in George Mann’s ‘About Time’ a girl called Lucy has visited Wonderland as a child, but now she’s a grown woman shouldn’t such childish pursuits be set aside? The underlying creepiness and horror of Wonderland inspires other stories within the collection. I remember being horrified by the scene with the Duchess, the pig and the meat cleaver when I was young and I find Tweedledum and Tweedledee slightly disturbing, because although comic, they remind me of the ghostly twin girls in Stephen King’s The Shining. L.L. McKinney’s story is set in a world already created by her novel ‘A Blade So Black’ and brings an Alice twist to the crimes of Jack the Ripper in a story entitled ‘What Makes A Monster.’ ‘There Were No Birds To Fly’ is M.R. Carey’s take on some of Wonderland’s residents by placing them in the horror genre whereas Cavan Scott represents some of the gorier elements of the tale with some residents slowly disappearing. Carroll’s book pairs well with the fantasy/supernatural genre and I feel these stories are quite successful. The whole anthology is bookended with two Alice poems by Jane Yolan. There is something for everyone here and while not every story grabbed my imagination, there were certainly enough to keep me interested. Every anthology I’ve read feels uneven because I don’t connect with every genre and writer, and I’m sure the favourite stories here would be different reader by reader. What the anthology tells me as a whole, is that Lewis Carroll’s story is a living entity, ripe for adaptation and inspiring to every new generation and reader. The story is so rich that it really does lend itself to most genres, with this anthology alone ranging across sci-fi, horror, fantasy, cyber-punk and crime fiction. It can also be transported to any location - here it is relocated to the present day, takes in the folklore of Japan and the Wild West. For me, it’s still the psychological aspects that resonate, where Wonderland is a metaphor for freedom, escape, madness and the difficulties of growing up or saying goodbye. Rio Youer’s story ‘Vanished Summer Glory’ explores bereavement and what grief does to the imagination. I’m sure I will dip in and out of this book from time to time, but for now I’m going to make a cup of tea in my ‘Drink Me’ mug, plump up my flamingo cushions and put up my white rabbit slippers. Maybe I’ll have a snooze, or an adventure....

  19. 5 out of 5

    Doreen

    First of all, Titan Books just has the best speculative fiction short story anthologies. Between this and the recent Wastelands 3: The New Apocalypse alone, I feel entirely spoiled with exposure to some of the best minds working in fantastic fiction today. Wonderland collects 20 brand new short works (18 stories, plus two poems from Jane Yolen) inspired by Lewis Carroll's classics, that run the gamut from luminous to terrifying, with every shade of wonder in between. Whether looking at Wonderland from a h First of all, Titan Books just has the best speculative fiction short story anthologies. Between this and the recent Wastelands 3: The New Apocalypse alone, I feel entirely spoiled with exposure to some of the best minds working in fantastic fiction today. Wonderland collects 20 brand new short works (18 stories, plus two poems from Jane Yolen) inspired by Lewis Carroll's classics, that run the gamut from luminous to terrifying, with every shade of wonder in between. Whether looking at Wonderland from a historical perspective or diving into its text as presented by Mr Carroll himself or re-setting the proceedings in different times and places, these 20 inventive gems carve out new space in our collective psyches for Wonderland to inhabit. Personal disclosure time: my first starring role as an actress was in my primary school's adaptation of Alice In Wonderland. I was cast as the White Rabbit but wound up having that supporting role enlarged -- given more lines, given more time on-stage, given more motivations and things to do -- to reflect my talent, which happened a lot during my too-brief stage career. It was a bit like how Johnny Depp's Mad Hatter became so much more important in the Tim Burton film than in any other adaptation, tho I likely got better reviews for my performance than he did (seriously, a national paper said I stole every scene I was in. I'm still not sure what they were doing at my school play, but I imagine it was a slow week in the human interest pages.) Anyway, this formative experience goes a long way towards explaining why I'm so fond of this setting and of any adaptations thereof. That said, it's perhaps surprising that my favorites of the collection were probably the least traditional, going all out with a sci-fi bent, as M. R. Carey's There Were No Birds To Fly and Cavan Scott's Dream Girl did. The period pieces definitely gave them a run for their money, tho. I loved Genevieve Cogman's The White Queen's Pawn, as well as Juliet Marillier's Good Dog, Alice!, both set in a post-Victorian Britain somewhat askew from the one we inhabited. I also adored the more far-flung adaptations, particularly Angela Slatter's Smoke 'Em If You Got 'Em and L. L. McKinney's What Makes A Monster, the latter so much so that I've requested her full-length novel, A Blade So Black (set in the same universe as the short story,) from my local library. The hallmark of a good short story collection, after all, isn't just to satisfy, but also to whet the readers' appetite for more of the writers' works. Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane have done an amazing job curating this anthology. Over at The Frumious Consortium, we've been given the chance to interview them about it, so look out for that in the coming weeks! In the meantime, feel free to hop over to any of the other sites featured on the Wonderland book tour, beautifully illustrated in the graphic at the link just above.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Austine (NovelKnight)

    Check out the original review and more on NovelKnight! This book was provided by the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. I always struggle to review anthologies, especially ones so varied as Wonderland was. This collection of short fiction covers every facet of the world of Wonderland that I could think of as well as many that I'd never expect. As a collection, I found Wonderland to mirror the myriad of possibilities one might expect from work inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. I'm a huge Wonderland fan andby Alice'sfound toas was.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Frank Nemecek

    I've always like it when modern authors are able to put their own unique spin on classic characters. This is why I was excited when Wonderland hit bookstores a couple of weeks ago. This book is an anthology of works that were inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, edited by Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane. There is a total of 19 short stories in this 363-page book. Each one offering their own very unique down the rabbit hole or through the looking glass. O'Regan and Kane did a very I've always like it when modern authors are able to put their own unique spin on classic characters. This is why I was excited when Wonderland hit bookstores a couple of weeks ago. This book is an anthology of works that were inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, edited by Marie O'Regan and Paul Kane. There is a total of 19 short stories in this 363-page book. Each one offering their own very unique down the rabbit hole or through the looking glass. O'Regan and Kane did a very good job, in my opinion, of keeping enough of Lewis Carroll's imagination to keep the characters and scenses recognizable while still allowing the various writers to introduce their own interpretation. Theses 19 adventures through one's imagination range from horror to historical. While the original novel from 1865 was largely intended for children, this anthology is written with adult readers in mind. On the back cover, for example, there is promise that the authors will take readers from the nightmarish reaches of their imagination and beyond with tales that will shock, surprise, and tug at one's heartstrings. The one criticism that I have of this collection is that, in my opinion, it draws a bit too much from the nightmarish horror genre and doesn't quite keep enough of the original child-like innocence of Carroll's 19th century creation. However, since this book does come out rather close to Halloween, i suppose that one should overlook this fact. Even if one has never read Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, the basic story is so widely engrained in Western culture that I believe anyone could enjoy the collection that O'Regan and Kane put together regardless of whether or not one has reader the original work. This, of course, is one more thing that I like about these stories - they draw on a mythos that is widely understood yet instill within it each other's particular take on it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    SJH (A Dream of Books)

    'Wonderland' is an anthology of short stories inspired by 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. I didn't need to know anything else about this book to know that I desperately wanted to read it. Although I'm not always a huge fan of short stories and I will always prefer to read a full-length novel, they were fun to dip in and out of and interesting to see the authors' takes on the original Alice. The anthology blends together stories which fit into a myriad collection of genres, from horror to fan 'Wonderland' is an anthology of short stories inspired by 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland'. I didn't need to know anything else about this book to know that I desperately wanted to read it. Although I'm not always a huge fan of short stories and I will always prefer to read a full-length novel, they were fun to dip in and out of and interesting to see the authors' takes on the original Alice. The anthology blends together stories which fit into a myriad collection of genres, from horror to fantasy to historical. Some were much better than others but I always find with short stories that although you don't always connect with every single one, there's usually something for everyone. There are some really great writers included in 'Wonderland' such as M.R. Carey, Mark Chadbourn, Genevieve Cogman, Jane Yolen, Juliet Marillier, Lilith Saintcrow, James Lovegrove and Catriona Ward. Each have given their own unique take on a different aspect of the classic novel. My favourites were: 1. Wonders Never Cease by Robert Sherman An intriguing take on how the Alice story never really ends. There's always a different Alice with a different ending, some happy, some sad. 2. Good Dog, Alice! by Juliet Marillier I really loved this story. A blue door reveals a magical world that may provide a solution to Dorothea's problem. This one crept up on my slowly because initially you think it's going to be a sweet story about childhood with birthdays and puppies but then it morphs into something much darker and twisted. 3. About Time by George Mann Lucy thinks that she is past childish pursuits, such as her adventures in Wonderland but when she visits to say goodbye, she finds an unexpected visitor. I thought this story was a brilliant twist on the age old terror of the monster hiding under the bed. The ending really made me smile. 4. The White Queen's Pawn by Genevieve Cogman This is probably one of the shortest stories in the anthology but there is such a creepy feeling to it that it really got under my skin and I couldn't stop thinking about it afterwards.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kate (Looking Glass Reads)

    Wonderland: An Anthology, edited by Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane is an anthology of stories all inspired by Lewis Carroll’s beloved tale Alice in Wonderland. This is a brand new anthology released September 17, 2019 now available for purchase. The book is comprised of a total of nineteen short stories and poems. Authors include Juliet Marillier, Jane Yolen, George Mann, Cat Rambo, and many more. Each story is, of course, different. Though each tale is inspired by the same work, the same literary Wonderland: An Anthology, edited by Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane is an anthology of stories all inspired by Lewis Carroll’s beloved tale Alice in Wonderland. This is a brand new anthology released September 17, 2019 now available for purchase. The book is comprised of a total of nineteen short stories and poems. Authors include Juliet Marillier, Jane Yolen, George Mann, Cat Rambo, and many more. Each story is, of course, different. Though each tale is inspired by the same work, the same literary universe, the stories being told belong to a myriad of genres and feature a huge variety of familiar characters. Genres span everything from more traditional fantasy to post-apocalyptic to science fiction and more. Each story was a surprise and delight. The Alice element is very apparent in some tales, with Alice herself making frequent appearances and mentions. Other stories make their inspiration apparent in other, more subtle ways. These were some of my absolute favorites of the anthology, such as “There Were No Birds to Fly” by M.R. Carey. So many of the tales had a very Alice style of prose. Magic, whimsy, and wonder seep through the pages. Each tale was a delight to read. And there are several authors whose other work I am now out searching for. As with all anthologies, I enjoyed some stories more than others. Overall, though, I greatly enjoyed my time with this collection. Wonderland: An Anthology edited by Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane is phenomenal collection of short fiction inspired by Alice in Wonderland. It is perfect for fans of the original series and anyone who loves magic, the unknown, and the surreal. Pick up a copy. You won’t be disappointed. I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This review and others originally found at Looking Glass Reads.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jo Barton

    I remember listening to the story of Alice in Wonderland when I was a little girl but I only really understood the dark and brooding nature of the story when I read it as an adult. I think it was one of the first classics I downloaded onto my kindle, when e-copies were still an innovative idea. There's something strangely compelling about Alice's Adventure in Wonderland and no matter when you read the story it still has that strangely dystopian edge which is quite, quite, chilling. In I remember listening to the story of Alice in Wonderland when I was a little girl but I only really understood the dark and brooding nature of the story when I read it as an adult. I think it was one of the first classics I downloaded onto my kindle, when e-copies were still an innovative idea. There's something strangely compelling about Alice's Adventure in Wonderland and no matter when you read the story it still has that strangely dystopian edge which is quite, quite, chilling. In this anthology of stories, the idea of Wonderland is explored in detail. The stories, all written by authors at the top of their particular genre, allow a wider interpretation of the story in fantastical fiction which range from poetry, to prose, and back again. The nineteen interpretations all have Wonderland as their theme but the tales are all very different, some are inspired by history, others by poetry, as in the Jabberwocky, another by the wild, wild west and there's even a story inspired by Japanese folklore. I've really enjoyed dipping into and out of this book, picking a story here and there and finding something which sparks my imagination in all of them. I have a couple of favourites, Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadburn, and Good Dog, Alice by Juliet Marillier, but, of course, all the others have something special to offer. Wonderland is a clever anthology which doesn't seek to rewrite, what is after all, an absolute classic, but which rather gives us an absolute feast of clever stories which reinterpret Wonderland in all of its fantastical glory.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    TITLE: Wonderland: An Anthology of Works Inspired By Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland AUTHOR(s): Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane editors GENRE: Fantasy PAGES: 365 Alice Liddell lives! Well, in the Book Wonderland: An Anthology of Works Inspired by Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Alice has come to life several times in many different incarnations and each one made me look at this character in a different way each time. It is not just Alice in t TITLE: Wonderland: An Anthology of Works Inspired By Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland AUTHOR(s): Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane editors GENRE: Fantasy PAGES: 365 Alice Liddell lives! Well, in the Book Wonderland: An Anthology of Works Inspired by Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Alice has come to life several times in many different incarnations and each one made me look at this character in a different way each time. It is not just Alice in these adventures, all of the usual suspects appear and there was even something to think about regarding the Queen of Hearts (you will just have to buy the book and read the story to see what I am talking about). The list of authors that contributed to this anthology is a veritable who’s who in the fantasy genre. The best part of an anthology where different authors have contributed is I became aware of other authors to check out, and I now have several leads for something different in my reading repertoire. This anthology is perfect for fans of the original work by Lewis Carroll, as well as fans of the movies. If you are not familiar with either of these, read this book and you will want to be! 5 very enthusiastic bookmarks out of 5!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Most of these stories seem to have been written by authors who don't actually like Alice, or Lewis Carroll/Charles Dodgson, or both. Many of the authors have tried and convicted Dodgson of being a pedophile with no proof and little evidence. Some of them don’t seem to realize that Alice Liddell and Alice in Wonderland are not actually the same person, and that they can’t “protect” Alice in Wonderland from her own creator. I don’t know, I was expecting more celebration of Alice in Wonderland and Most of these stories seem to have been written by authors who don't actually like Alice, or Lewis Carroll/Charles Dodgson, or both. Many of the authors have tried and convicted Dodgson of being a pedophile with no proof and little evidence. Some of them don’t seem to realize that Alice Liddell and Alice in Wonderland are not actually the same person, and that they can’t “protect” Alice in Wonderland from her own creator. I don’t know, I was expecting more celebration of Alice in Wonderland and less outraged rewriting of Alice Liddell’s story. I only really liked two of the nineteen stories – The White Queen’s Pawn by Genevieve Cogman and Good Dog, Alice! By Juliet Marillier. I patently disliked five of them, and the other 12 fell somewhere in the middle. Recommended for short story readers who don't actually like Alice. Not recommended for Alice lovers. I read an advance reader copy of Wonderland: An Anthology.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Georgia_books

    This is a collection of short stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland which obviously appealed to me straight away. Unfortunately I didn't love it, nor did I dislike it so to say. Being a mix of short stories and poetry there were bound to be stories I liked and some I didn't, honestly I DID end up disliking more than I enjoyed. They were really quite odd which don't get me wrong, isn't a bad thing, but some were just too odd and I struggled to understand them or get my h This is a collection of short stories inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland which obviously appealed to me straight away. Unfortunately I didn't love it, nor did I dislike it so to say. Being a mix of short stories and poetry there were bound to be stories I liked and some I didn't, honestly I DID end up disliking more than I enjoyed. They were really quite odd which don't get me wrong, isn't a bad thing, but some were just too odd and I struggled to understand them or get my head around them. I did however particularly enjoy a couple of stories, including: Wonders never cease, Dream girl, Good dog, Alice! And Eat me, drink me. I liked the fact that some were humerus, some were creepy and some were just odd in a way that I actually quite enjoyed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty ~ Paper Hearts Ink

    A fantastic collection of short stories and poems perfect for Alice fans but you certainly don’t need to have read Alice in Wonderland to enjoy this anthology. Some of the tales are dark and creepy, others horrifying yet touching. A whimsical take of the macabre, the stories cover many genres from fantasy to historical. I enjoyed rediscovering Wonderland through an assortment of lenses. Thanks to the publisher, Titan Books, for gifting me with a copy of the book in exchange f/>Thanks A fantastic collection of short stories and poems perfect for Alice fans but you certainly don’t need to have read Alice in Wonderland to enjoy this anthology. Some of the tales are dark and creepy, others horrifying yet touching. A whimsical take of the macabre, the stories cover many genres from fantasy to historical. I enjoyed rediscovering Wonderland through an assortment of lenses. Thanks to the publisher, Titan Books, for gifting me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lucy

    I love fairytales so I was excited to fall down the rabbit hole into this collection. This is a anthology of short stories that take inspiration from Alice in Wonderland. I have to say this was a strange collection and there were some I really liked and there were others that I just couldn't connect with.

  30. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Wonderland: An Anthology travels in so many different directions. Whether it's a story that fixates on the wondrous portals in the form of rabbit holes, or the mysterious creatures that populate Wonderland. If you like any of the authors, this anthology is a sure bet. You may recognize the contributors from books of their own featuring zombies, survival stories, and fantasy worlds (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Wonderland: An Anthology travels in so many different directions. Whether it's a story that fixates on the wondrous portals in the form of rabbit holes, or the mysterious creatures that populate Wonderland. If you like any of the authors, this anthology is a sure bet. You may recognize the contributors from books of their own featuring zombies, survival stories, and fantasy worlds. This anthology makes you recall your first experiences with Alice and Wonderland. full review; https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

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