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She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement

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From the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters who broke the news of Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment and abuse for the New York Times, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, the thrilling untold story of their investigation and its consequences for the #MeToo movement For many years, reporters had tried to get to the truth about Harvey Weinstein's treatment of women. Rumors of wrongdoing had lo From the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters who broke the news of Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment and abuse for the New York Times, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, the thrilling untold story of their investigation and its consequences for the #MeToo movement For many years, reporters had tried to get to the truth about Harvey Weinstein's treatment of women. Rumors of wrongdoing had long circulated. But in 2017, when Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey began their investigation into the prominent Hollywood producer for the New York Times, his name was still synonymous with power. During months of confidential interviews with top actresses, former Weinstein employees, and other sources, many disturbing and long-buried allegations were unearthed, and a web of onerous secret payouts and nondisclosure agreements was revealed. These shadowy settlements had long been used to hide sexual harassment and abuse, but with a breakthrough reporting technique Kantor and Twohey helped to expose it. But Weinstein had evaded scrutiny in the past, and he was not going down without a fight; he employed a team of high-profile lawyers, private investigators, and other allies to thwart the investigation. When Kantor and Twohey were finally able to convince some sources to go on the record, a dramatic final showdown between Weinstein and the New York Times was set in motion. Nothing could have prepared Kantor and Twohey for what followed the publication of their initial Weinstein story on October 5, 2017. Within days, a veritable Pandora's box of sexual harassment and abuse was opened. Women all over the world came forward with their own traumatic stories. Over the next twelve months, hundreds of men from every walk of life and industry were outed following allegations of wrongdoing. But did too much change--or not enough? Those questions hung in the air months later as Brett Kavanaugh was nominated to the Supreme Court, and Christine Blasey Ford came forward to testify that he had assaulted her decades earlier. Kantor and Twohey, who had unique access to Ford and her team, bring to light the odyssey that led her to come forward, the overwhelming forces that came to bear on her, and what happened after she shared her allegation with the world. In the tradition of great investigative journalism, She Said tells a thrilling story about the power of truth, with shocking new information from hidden sources. Kantor and Twohey describe not only the consequences of their reporting for the #MeToo movement, but the inspiring and affecting journeys of the women who spoke up--for the sake of other women, for future generations, and for themselves.


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From the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters who broke the news of Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment and abuse for the New York Times, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, the thrilling untold story of their investigation and its consequences for the #MeToo movement For many years, reporters had tried to get to the truth about Harvey Weinstein's treatment of women. Rumors of wrongdoing had lo From the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters who broke the news of Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment and abuse for the New York Times, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, the thrilling untold story of their investigation and its consequences for the #MeToo movement For many years, reporters had tried to get to the truth about Harvey Weinstein's treatment of women. Rumors of wrongdoing had long circulated. But in 2017, when Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey began their investigation into the prominent Hollywood producer for the New York Times, his name was still synonymous with power. During months of confidential interviews with top actresses, former Weinstein employees, and other sources, many disturbing and long-buried allegations were unearthed, and a web of onerous secret payouts and nondisclosure agreements was revealed. These shadowy settlements had long been used to hide sexual harassment and abuse, but with a breakthrough reporting technique Kantor and Twohey helped to expose it. But Weinstein had evaded scrutiny in the past, and he was not going down without a fight; he employed a team of high-profile lawyers, private investigators, and other allies to thwart the investigation. When Kantor and Twohey were finally able to convince some sources to go on the record, a dramatic final showdown between Weinstein and the New York Times was set in motion. Nothing could have prepared Kantor and Twohey for what followed the publication of their initial Weinstein story on October 5, 2017. Within days, a veritable Pandora's box of sexual harassment and abuse was opened. Women all over the world came forward with their own traumatic stories. Over the next twelve months, hundreds of men from every walk of life and industry were outed following allegations of wrongdoing. But did too much change--or not enough? Those questions hung in the air months later as Brett Kavanaugh was nominated to the Supreme Court, and Christine Blasey Ford came forward to testify that he had assaulted her decades earlier. Kantor and Twohey, who had unique access to Ford and her team, bring to light the odyssey that led her to come forward, the overwhelming forces that came to bear on her, and what happened after she shared her allegation with the world. In the tradition of great investigative journalism, She Said tells a thrilling story about the power of truth, with shocking new information from hidden sources. Kantor and Twohey describe not only the consequences of their reporting for the #MeToo movement, but the inspiring and affecting journeys of the women who spoke up--for the sake of other women, for future generations, and for themselves.

30 review for She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    I really am a fiction girl, but every once in a while a true story or biography will catch my attention. She Said, is written by the two women NYT reporters that helped to take Harvey Weinstein down and poured gasoline on the #Me Too movement. This is the inside story of all the witnesses, sexual assault survivors, and enablers of Weinstein. Since this was one of the biggest stories of the decade, I thought it was important enough to take the time to read. I want to mention the big stars first. I really am a fiction girl, but every once in a while a true story or biography will catch my attention. She Said, is written by the two women NYT reporters that helped to take Harvey Weinstein down and poured gasoline on the #Me Too movement. This is the inside story of all the witnesses, sexual assault survivors, and enablers of Weinstein. Since this was one of the biggest stories of the decade, I thought it was important enough to take the time to read. I want to mention the big stars first. I knew before reading this that Ashley Judd and Rose McGowan were a couple of badasses, but truthfully Judd is way more impressive than I ever realized. Also, I have to give a little shout out to Brad Pitt. Not many people ever confronted Harvey about his behavior but Brad went right after him and told him to never touch his girlfriend again. His girlfriend at the time was Gwyneth Paltrow. There are other actresses that Harvey abused but these three are the main ones the book centers on. I did hear a lot about the stars the Harvey assaulted and raped but I didn’t realize the extent of just normal every day employees that he terrorized. He assaulted women for close to 30 years. Heck it may even be longer, almost 30 years is just what they have information on. While hearing accounts of all the sexual harassment, assault, and rape was not easy on my stomach, what bothered me even more were all the people that enabled him. The people that helped silence the women and cared more about the Weinstein Company or what Harvey could do for their career, than cared about the women being attacked. And I have to say a big Fuck You to Lisa Bloom, Judas to women everywhere. When it came to reading the book I was hooked. The story draws you in and you don’t want to stop reading. I have a lot of respect for the two investigative journalists that worked on this piece for years before they went public. I can’t imagine taking that long to write one story, it’s pretty damn impressive. I do have to admit I didn’t care for a few of the last chapters. After the Harvey story is over, the book switches to an abbreviated account of how the Ford/Kavanaugh complaint and hearing went. While I did find out some information I did not know previously, the whole thing felt depressing to read. It’s not like slaying the giant Harvey, we all know how the Ford and Kavanugh story ends and I just would rather not be reminded to be honest. This is why my overall rating is a 4 instead of 5 stars. This was a good and often times gripping read. I personally thought this book was important for me to read and I feel like I have the whole story now. If you are interested in the fall of Weinstein, I don’t think you can find a better account than from the women who took him down.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sahitya

    I will not presume to be in any way capable of reviewing this brilliant book because it’s an extremely well written true account of the investigation and brings to light some systemic truths that we probably are well aware of, but haven’t seen discussed openly a lot. Instead, I think I’ll just share how I felt while reading it. I’ve only lived in the US for less than a decade now and while I have a seen a Hollywood movie or two since childhood, I’ve never been much knowledgeable about I will not presume to be in any way capable of reviewing this brilliant book because it’s an extremely well written true account of the investigation and brings to light some systemic truths that we probably are well aware of, but haven’t seen discussed openly a lot. Instead, I think I’ll just share how I felt while reading it. I’ve only lived in the US for less than a decade now and while I have a seen a Hollywood movie or two since childhood, I’ve never been much knowledgeable about the industry or its major players. So, when the Harvey Weinstein scandal broke out, all the names associated with it didn’t mean anything to me. The significance for me was mostly about the movement it created and the outpouring of stories we got to hear after that. It reinforced the fact that sexual harassment is rampant in the world, regardless of the industry or field you are in and what age you are. It’s all about power, and those who have it will exercise it in whatever way they can without fear of consequences because they know that the whole system is behind them. And while this book goes into a lot of detail about the investigation and the many women Kantor and Twohey spoke to, it also shows us the blatant disregard shown by so many other people towards these women and how all the sexual predation was just treated as matter of fact. My singular emotion while reading this book was anger. And helplessness. Maybe some hope too, but I won’t say it was a lot. The way that Weinstein used his power, bullying tactics and promises of helping their career to harass and assault and overpower so many young women is appalling to read about. I would never judge the women for not coming out and sharing their stories because it’s always them who had a lot to lose and they have their right to self-preservation. It’s the other people I find fault with - those around Weinstein who helped him cover up all the incidents by forcing the women with watertight settlements and NDAs, who thought his behavior was okay as long as it wasn’t a liability to the company, who decided that it must be the women coming onto him for a chance to go ahead in their careers, the high profile lawyers like David Boies, Gloria Allred and Lisa Bloom who feel completely justified in the way they defended Weinstein and shamed and blamed the women and the journalists covering the story. These are people even I have admired, watched documentaries about their work on marriage equality and women’s rights, and now to realize that powerful people always seem to support those in power - I just can’t describe the horror I’m feeling. If you’ve followed any of the twitter trends on the day of this book’s release, you must have seen the very enlightening (and loathsome) memo that Lisa Bloom wrote to Weinstein about how they can frame a narrative to victim blame and showcase him as an old man trying to understand the ever changing social mores. It really was an eye opener and I don’t think I will ever implicitly trust any “popular” activist again, especially lawyers. The last section of the book also goes into some detail about the Kavanaugh hearings and Dr. Ford’s testimony, particularly how she felt in the weeks leading up to the day and how her life has irrevocably changed since then. It just makes me furious that nothing fundamental has really has changed since the years after Anita Hill and women have to still weigh their safety and career prospects vs the possibility of telling their story and maybe getting some vindication and justice. And I’m currently feeling even more hopeless because between the few hours when I finished this book and I’m writing this review, the New York Times published excerpts from another book with corroborating evidence for other allegations against Kavanaugh. And it’s really exhausting to see that while Dr. Ford has to deal with death threats, this man will be on the Supreme Court for most of our lifetime. To conclude, I just wanna say thank you to all the women who came forward to tell their story, putting their livelihoods and privacy on the line, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey for their incessant desire to bring this story to light in its entirety while facing off the whole bully machine of Weinstein, and everyone else at NYT who made this possible. I highly recommend this book to everyone who wants to know more about this brilliant piece of investigative journalism and support women in their fight for equality and right to work without being harassed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elyse (retired from reviewing/semi hiatus) Walters

    Audiobook...read by the two co-authors, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey and Rebecca Lowman. (known herself in the Audiobook world). This professional memoir reads like a true crime thriller... with outstanding top-notch-in-depth-investigating and reporting. How does an Hollywood ‘outsider’ get Angelina Jolie‘s phone number? Fascinating explosive details of the unfolding of the biggest sexual scandal in Hollywood. Isn’t it just a ‘little’ tempting to except $100,000 a month to keep quiet? The two New Y Audiobook...read by the two co-authors, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey and Rebecca Lowman. (known herself in the Audiobook world). This professional memoir reads like a true crime thriller... with outstanding top-notch-in-depth-investigating and reporting. How does an Hollywood ‘outsider’ get Angelina Jolie‘s phone number? Fascinating explosive details of the unfolding of the biggest sexual scandal in Hollywood. Isn’t it just a ‘little’ tempting to except $100,000 a month to keep quiet? The two New York award winning journalists, co-authors, Jodi Kantor, Megan Twohey, ruthlessly investigated decades of details uncovering sexual harassment and sexual abuse that helped break the Harvey Weinstein story. More than 80 women reported sexual abuse allegations. But... without these two journalists...secrets and silences would still be rampant. The reporting follows ‘whispers and secrets’ occurring over 30 years by a large number of interviews with actresses, past and present employees, talent agents, business executives, entertainment and PR companies. The focus is on the ‘structures-of-power’ that enabled Weinstein for decades. With emotional stories... listening to “She Said”, is gripping.... and reads like a novel. Actresses Ashley Judd and Rose McGowan came forward early with accusations that Weinstein promised to help advance their career’s in return for sexual favors. Massages for career advancement? Yuck! Weinstein used private investigators to cover up stories to keep women quiet. Gwyneth Paltrow and other famous actresses who worked in the film Industry, wanted to remain anonymous. Gwyneth was very concerned about being a prime focus. Nobody wanted to go first. One cannot finish this book without being incredibly thankful to Jodi and Megan... Their phenomenal work - will go down in history. I have no doubts that a movie will be made on this story - I just wonder who will star in it? Brilliant Book!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Kantor and Twohey are the two New York Times investigative reporters that broke the story about Harvey Weinstein’s habitual sexual harassment towards women. [More than 80 women have come forward to-date.] The two journalists had to wade through a flood of bullying tactics Weinstein used to keep these women’s stories silent for so long. Weinstein used his wealth to hire top-tier attorneys to craft airtight confidentiality agreements that his accusers had to sign in order to receive compensation. Kantor and Twohey are the two New York Times investigative reporters that broke the story about Harvey Weinstein’s habitual sexual harassment towards women. [More than 80 women have come forward to-date.] The two journalists had to wade through a flood of bullying tactics Weinstein used to keep these women’s stories silent for so long. Weinstein used his wealth to hire top-tier attorneys to craft airtight confidentiality agreements that his accusers had to sign in order to receive compensation. He also used media via The National Enquirer to either bury personal accounts or to discredit the victims; and used security firms like Black Cube to intimidate women accusers. More disheartening is how presumably feminist attorneys like Gloria Allred negotiated nondisclosure agreements for victims in order to enrich themselves with 40% of the payout—not just for Harvey’s victims, but for women abused by Fox News host Bill O’Reilly and Olympics gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar. And then there is Allred’s daughter, Lisa Bloom, who was retained by Weinstein. She developed a strategy of online campaigns to discredit accusers, painting them as liars, as well as other tactics. Kantor and Twohey also interviewed Christine Blasey Ford who accused now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh of assault, and follow her testimony before Congress. Ford comes across as totally naïve in regards to the political ramifications of her coming forward. She seems to have felt it was her duty as a citizen to inform Senator Feinstein, but really did not want to testify. Recommend this compelling account of stellar investigative reporting.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tessa

    I have slightly mixed feelings about “She Said,” not due to the subject matter or message, but just with the way the book is formatted. The Weinstein investigation section, which takes up the bulk of the book, is thrilling, an account of investigative journalism at its finest. Secret meetings with sources, computer systems meant to keep developing stories accessible to only a handful of writers and editors, the delicate phrasing needed to get a source to talk or to go on record, the difficult ch I have slightly mixed feelings about “She Said,” not due to the subject matter or message, but just with the way the book is formatted. The Weinstein investigation section, which takes up the bulk of the book, is thrilling, an account of investigative journalism at its finest. Secret meetings with sources, computer systems meant to keep developing stories accessible to only a handful of writers and editors, the delicate phrasing needed to get a source to talk or to go on record, the difficult choice of when to publish the story - I love that stuff, and this book is full of it. I love reading about the disturbing and bizarre details that come out about Weinstein and the level of his corruption. And the tense moments of verbal sparring and legal threats as the Times prepares to publish - so gripping. My issue is with the latter part of the book which centers on Christine Blasey Ford and the Kavanaugh accusation and hearing. A fascinating story in its own right, and I did sort of enjoy reading behind the scenes as Ford decided what to do and prepared to testify. But I didn’t understand it’s place in the book. Yes, it was a dramatic culmination of the #MeToo movement that would not have taken place without the women coming forward in the wake of the Weinstein news and the research and reporting on Weinstein and other offenders. But where the first part of the book is a meticulously detailed account of how the Weinstein story came to be, the Ford section is much more about her personal deliberations on whether to come forward and what happened surrounding that. I didn’t see how the authors of “She Said” were involved in that story aside from being allowed to sit in on the preparations for Ford’s testimony. They were even given a tip about Ford, from her own lawyer, but Ford declined to contact them to discuss the story. In fact she mostly spoke to another reporter at a different publication. I wanted to continue reading about journalism and the uncovering of these accounts of abuse by powerful men. Rather than exclusively focusing on the Ford story, I believe that the book would have been stronger if it followed a variety of the post-Weinstein revelations more closely instead of just briefly touching on them. Also, what happened to Weinstein himself and the company? The book does not really speak to that. At the end the journalists describe a sort of retreat/mass interview of several of the women who were instrumental in the #MeToo movement. At this meeting, the women, including Ford shared how coming forward publicly changed their lives. I think I would have enjoyed the book more if it cut to this meeting sooner after the Weinstein story broke (which is the dramatic climax of the book even though it happens relatively early in the book). The Ford/Kavanaugh stuff is interesting and I am glad I read about it. It just felt like the authors were trying to jam two different stories together into one book and I didn’t quite get the reasoning behind that. To me it felt like a distraction from the Weinstein reporting, which I found much more interesting. It also downplayed the importance of the #MeToo movement - feeling like a huge anticlimax and letdown after the thrill of the Weinstein story breaking and the beginning of the movement. Despite my complaint this really was an excellent book and well worth reading. The best part was reading about all of the female reporters, editors, lawyers, sources, and survivors (and secondarily, male allies). They were all so intelligent and clever, all operating in fields historically dominated by men, excelling and bringing light to something that our society has tried to stuff down for so long. In a time when I’ve never felt less proud to be an American, where I’m daily so discouraged by politics and current events, this book was actually a glimmer of hope and a reminder that while some things have gone downhill, other causes have found greater success than ever and give some hope to the future.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Malia

    This was a truly gripping book about the origins of the Me Too movement and in particular, the way a small team of dedicated journalists uncovered the Harvey Weinstein abuse scandal. Of course, much of this has already been in the media, but the behind-the-scenes look at how the story came together, the work and time and emotional tribulations that went into it make it an absolutely worthwhile read. Recommended! Find more reviews and bookish fun at http://www.princessandpen.com

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

    Highly recommend

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marion

    Excellent. I read it in one sitting. Ultimately it was unbelievable, all too real, enraging, and hopeful. Highly recommended for those who have been following the #metoo movement.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura Mcgee

    I could NOT put this book down. It’s absolutely fascinating, reading about the investigation that finally led to Harvey Weinstein being held accountable. The authors (the same heroines who did the reporting for The NY Times story on Weinstein) manage to explain their story in incredible, page turning detail, but they then move into the larger issue of the #metoo era, and finally, to Brett Kavanaugh. I highly recommend everyone read this book, it has certainly given me a good deal to think about.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Simon Pressinger

    Just days before the Times published the October 2017 article that would change the world, Harvey Weinstein was reported lying to a magazine saying he knew nothing about the allegations (he’d known for months and was deeply involved). He also said something ironically very true: that this story would make a great movie. It would. It really is like an All the President’s Men for the 21st Century. It’s amazing how the story pans out, what unbelievable things come to the surface, the rel Just days before the Times published the October 2017 article that would change the world, Harvey Weinstein was reported lying to a magazine saying he knew nothing about the allegations (he’d known for months and was deeply involved). He also said something ironically very true: that this story would make a great movie. It would. It really is like an All the President’s Men for the 21st Century. It’s amazing how the story pans out, what unbelievable things come to the surface, the relentless journalistic grind to get to the truth. The bulk of the book looks at all the work leading up to the Weinstein revelations, then changes tack to recover the full story behind Christine Blasey Ford’s accusation against Brett Kavanaugh — who, by the way, is now facing fresh accusations for sexual assault. It’s a testament to bravery to follow Ford as she wrestles with the life-changing decision to speak up against a nominee for the Supreme Court, especially at the thought of attracting the ire of the Republicans, incels and general mysognists, not to mention the narcissist-in-chief himself. The whole book is just an absolute marvel of what it means to do journalism. The concluding chapter really brought everything together with a powerful final message from a gathering of twelve women, mainly high-profile victims who featured throughout the cases, including the two authors, to listen to one another’s stories and how they felt about speaking out and how important and transformative it was for them. I’d recommend reading this book very much. It feels very current and it makes you wonder where things will go from here, now that more and more women are in the public eye speaking truth to power, and holding those responsible to account.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura Tremaine

    This is such an important book. I almost didn’t get this one, because I followed the Harvey Weinstein story and the unfolding #MeToo movement pretty closely, and thought it would be a rehash if those things. But my friend Yasmin mentioned that we should support these books and this journalism with our dollars, even if we didn’t read every word. I agreed, and ultimately ended up listening to the audio book and I’m so glad I did. Because I didn’t know (or remember) exactly how this story went down This is such an important book. I almost didn’t get this one, because I followed the Harvey Weinstein story and the unfolding #MeToo movement pretty closely, and thought it would be a rehash if those things. But my friend Yasmin mentioned that we should support these books and this journalism with our dollars, even if we didn’t read every word. I agreed, and ultimately ended up listening to the audio book and I’m so glad I did. Because I didn’t know (or remember) exactly how this story went down, and reading it from the journalists’ perspective as they tracked down sources and confirmed these stories was really interesting.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Krutika Puranik

    She Said - #bookrecommendation ~ Very rarely I stumble upon a book that's as powerful as this one. You watch the celebrities on the red carpet with their magnificent gowns and flawless smiles but what we don't know is the ugly truth that lurks just behind their appearances. Harvey Weinstein founded Miramax production house which soon became known for debuting stunning actors. For years, Weinstein ruled the world of Hollywood by using his powers to make women submit to his needs. He thr She Said - #bookrecommendation ~ Very rarely I stumble upon a book that's as powerful as this one. You watch the celebrities on the red carpet with their magnificent gowns and flawless smiles but what we don't know is the ugly truth that lurks just behind their appearances. Harvey Weinstein founded Miramax production house which soon became known for debuting stunning actors. For years, Weinstein ruled the world of Hollywood by using his powers to make women submit to his needs. He threatened his employees to ruin their careers if they didn't succumb to his wishes. ~ I did read about Weinstein when the allegations lurked out but what I wasn't aware of was the number of women who were harrassed sexually and mentally by this so-called famous producer. She Said is a thorough investigation carried out by two Pulitzer- prize winning reporters, Megan and Jodi from 2016 stretching out to 2019. Right from the very first page, I knew without a doubt that this would eventually become very close to my heart. The women who have been interviewed and went on record includes few famous actors like Ashley Judd, Gwyneth Paltrow, Rose McGowan and many others who were tortured by Weinstein during their career with him. Weinstein inviting women to his suite under the pretence of offering them roles but later stripping down and asking them for sex was horrifying. He later privately forced the women to enter into a NDA sealing it off with chunks of money. ~ I remember feeling angry and frustrated as I read through this book at an alarming speed. The women who came out to the public were ridiculed thoroughly by the media and by those who were accused. This book not only focuses on Weinstein but also brings into light the actions of Trump and Brett Kavanaugh. This book encloses a detailed investigation carried out by two brilliant reporters flanked by an army of editors. It's empowering to see how strong these women were to speak out in public about what happened to them. They dragged Weinstein down and stopped him from subjecting other women to the same treatment. ~ This read is intense, powerful and extremely informative. I highly recommend it. ~ Rating - 5/5. @bloomsburyindia

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

    Nothing I like better than a good investigative reporting story, especially about a topic I follow fairly closely. I tore through this. The writing was very good, both in clarity and structure. A must read for anyone interested in Me Too or journalism. WaPo called it "an instant classic of investigative journalism" and they are not wrong. Content warnings for discussions of sexual assault and harassment

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miss Marple

    This was a thoroughly fascinating read. Maybe it's because I'm a journalist myself, but I find that the steps towards breaking a story are often as interesting or even more than the story itself. People usually read the finished product, and can't even imagine how much work and effort comes before, especially in such a sensitive and revealing matter as the years of sexual harassment committed by Harvey Weinstein. Most of what is told here about Harvey Weinstein himself is well known b This was a thoroughly fascinating read. Maybe it's because I'm a journalist myself, but I find that the steps towards breaking a story are often as interesting or even more than the story itself. People usually read the finished product, and can't even imagine how much work and effort comes before, especially in such a sensitive and revealing matter as the years of sexual harassment committed by Harvey Weinstein. Most of what is told here about Harvey Weinstein himself is well known by now, as his methods of exploiting, abusing and harassing women have been well documented in the past two years. What's more revealing about this book are the workings of the people around him, the ones that tried to cover up for him and the ones that ended up helping his true nature come to light. Especially shocking to me was the portrayal of Lisa Bloom, who has made a name for herself as an advocate for victims and here you can see how unethical and ruthless she is behind that persona. Her mother, Gloria Allred, who I've always admired as a fighter for women's rights, doesn't come across that much better. The work that Kantor and Twohey did to uncover Weinstein's abuses is remarkable, and a true lesson in ethical investigative journalism. I feel like I learned more from this book than in years in university and I truly admire the way these women go about their job and their role in society, trying to give everyone a fair chance, respecting their sources and their privacy, fact checking everything to a fault. If all journalism was like this! However, it must be said that the second half in this book is not as well achieved as the first. Once the focus moves away from Weinstein to Brett Kavanaugh, a lot of the story falls a little flat. Not because Kavanaugh's alleged crimes themselves, but because most of the breaking of that story wasn't something done by the authors, so their telling of it feels more like a removed witness account and also a long winded explanation of why the NY Times didn't report that story in the way people expected them to (the explanation, by the way, makes sense to me, at least in the context of the book). That part left way too many questions that seem impossible to answer. It was a nice touch to finish with a joint interview of some of the women who came forward with their stories in the course of the investigation. They are all wonderfully brave, and deserved a space to be heard.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Neville Longbottom

    4.5 - In October of 2017, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey at The New York Times were the first to break the story about Harvey Weinstein’s harassment of women and his trail of secret settlements to keep the women silent. This book follows how they investigated the story, found sources and convinced them to go on the record, and what lengths Weinstein went to in order to try and stop the story. Later on the book pivots away from the Weinstein story to more broadly cover the #MeToo movement, especially in 4.5 - In October of 2017, Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey at The New York Times were the first to break the story about Harvey Weinstein’s harassment of women and his trail of secret settlements to keep the women silent. This book follows how they investigated the story, found sources and convinced them to go on the record, and what lengths Weinstein went to in order to try and stop the story. Later on the book pivots away from the Weinstein story to more broadly cover the #MeToo movement, especially in the case of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford coming forward against Brett Kavanaugh. This book is at its strongest when it is covering Jodi and Megan’s personal experiences investigating and reporting on Weinstein. It was extremely compelling to see how they went about tracking down sources and how they were able to uncover the information they needed. It’s also super interesting to read this alongside Ronan Farrow’s book Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators to see different sides of reporting on Weinstein. Jodi and Megan were completely supported by The New York Times and the editors didn’t capitulate to Weinstein whereas Ronan Farrow was ordered to stop reporting by NBC. When the book switches gears to cover Dr. Ford, I think it loses a little bit of steam. It was still illuminating to see more insights into what led Dr. Ford to come forward and her experiences. But because this wasn’t a story that was investigated and broken by Jodi and Megan, it didn’t have quite the same impact in the book. Everything does get brought back together in the end when Jodi and Megan bring Dr. Ford and sources for their stories like Weinstein, together for a group interview. I found that section to be very moving, to see all these women come together and share their experiences. Overall I think this is a really compelling book. It’s a tiny bit jarring when the focus shifts away from their reporting on Weinstein to cover Dr. Ford and the broader #MeToo movement. But ultimately, all of the information in the book is fully worth reading, even if some segments are stronger than others.

  16. 5 out of 5

    HR-ML

    NY Times journalists Jodi & Megan (hereafter J+M) spent 3 years investigating movie producer Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment, alleged rape and threats against actresses and employees. HW & his younger brother Bob managed Miramax (award- winning film studio) & Weinstein C0. J+M tracked HW's exploits to 1990 and even further backward. The authors tracked 8-12 women who were pd off & forced to sign a nondisclosure agreement (NDA). The authors concluded the NDA made money f NY Times journalists Jodi & Megan (hereafter J+M) spent 3 years investigating movie producer Harvey Weinstein's sexual harassment, alleged rape and threats against actresses and employees. HW & his younger brother Bob managed Miramax (award- winning film studio) & Weinstein C0. J+M tracked HW's exploits to 1990 and even further backward. The authors tracked 8-12 women who were pd off & forced to sign a nondisclosure agreement (NDA). The authors concluded the NDA made money for the victim & her atty but did not make HW's negative/ illegal behavior toward women go away. IMO Bob perpetuated HW's illegal behavior through Bob's inaction. The authors also explored scientist Christine Blasey Ford's accusation against federal judge/ Supreme Ct nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Reportedly he intended to rape her when they both were teens at a party, which offered too much alcohol and no adults. IMO Dr.Ford's attys were not entirely honest with her about their stategy & how the Senate Judiciary Committee (SJC) would treat her. Anita Hill testified against SCOTUS nominee Clarence Thomas 27 yrs prior. In the inter- vening yrs the SJC seemed to have no set protocol on witnessess, evidence or timeframes. Shame on the SJC, which contained many former state & federal prosecutors! The authors also discussed women pressured for sex by supervisors in lower paying jobs. Some of these women were fired, black-balled in the industry or became homeless.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    From page one, "She Said" was one of the most riveting books I've read all year. The ex-journalist in me was in awe of the hundreds (thousands?) of hours Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey invested in breaking open the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal. These women are 21st-century heroes who helped inspire a generation of women and men to no longer be afraid to speak up. Thank you, Jodi and Megan, for your remarkable reporting and for (in the second half of your book) giving us a behind-the- From page one, "She Said" was one of the most riveting books I've read all year. The ex-journalist in me was in awe of the hundreds (thousands?) of hours Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey invested in breaking open the Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment scandal. These women are 21st-century heroes who helped inspire a generation of women and men to no longer be afraid to speak up. Thank you, Jodi and Megan, for your remarkable reporting and for (in the second half of your book) giving us a behind-the-scenes look into the before and after of Christine Blasey Ford's brave testimony before Congress. What a reckoning these past few years has been, but as you so eloquently wrote to your daughters in your acknowledgments: "May you know respect and dignity always, in the workplace and beyond." Here's to this being our daughters' reality—a reality made possible in part by your tireless work that helped spark a worldwide movement.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    I liked this a lot, but it's not the whole story. I found myself wondering when I'd hear about Salma Hayak, Mira Sorvino, etc. - and I never did, because this is the New York Times investigation-It's what Kantor and Twohey actually learned, uncovered, and reported on in the early stages of the Weinstein investigation - which is as it should be. They give a step by step account - at times minute-by-minute - so the text is as compelling as the real-world storyline.  I found the Christine Blasey Fo I liked this a lot, but it's not the whole story. I found myself wondering when I'd hear about Salma Hayak, Mira Sorvino, etc. - and I never did, because this is the New York Times investigation-It's what Kantor and Twohey actually learned, uncovered, and reported on in the early stages of the Weinstein investigation - which is as it should be. They give a step by step account - at times minute-by-minute - so the text is as compelling as the real-world storyline.  I found the Christine Blasey Ford material fascinating despite the fact that perhaps it didn't belong in this book. Likewise the strange epilogue - it was surreal to picture all the "characters" sitting around talking during a sort of weekend retreat - Blasey Ford and the McDonald's worker interacting with Ashley Judd and Gwyneth Paltrow! 

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rupal Dalal

    Written in a riveting, fact-based manner - I couldn’t put it down. A must-read for anyone who is a woman or knows a woman.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Di Richardson

    Listened too the audio version of this book. I recently listened to a NYT podcast that discussed some mor shocking elements of this book, but it is still a lot to unpack. Written by the two reporters that spent months substantiating the rumors that finally took down Harvey Weinstein I don’t think I was really surprised by the number of women that were assaulted and abused, and utterly terrified of HW...he thing that gets me is how many other people knew about it, particularly the lawyers, and th Listened too the audio version of this book. I recently listened to a NYT podcast that discussed some mor shocking elements of this book, but it is still a lot to unpack. Written by the two reporters that spent months substantiating the rumors that finally took down Harvey Weinstein I don’t think I was really surprised by the number of women that were assaulted and abused, and utterly terrified of HW...he thing that gets me is how many other people knew about it, particularly the lawyers, and the extent they took to protect a man that was clearly disturbed. The book ends with a couple of chapters on the Blakey Ford testimony against then Supreme Court nominee Kavanaugh. The differences in the witnesses and how they came forward is pretty interesting. But it really comes together in the epilogue, where the authors bring several of the women together to discuss cases, the impact of both coming forward and staying silent, and the impacts on society. I think we all know that our silence only allows these types of things to keep happening, but we have to fin a way to be more supportive of those that do have the strength to come forward,

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book was unputdownable. As a former reporter, I love books that show the behind the scenes of a big news story and how it happened and this traced how two tenacious reporters broke the Harvey Weinstein story. As they were writing the book, the Christine Blasley Ford story came out. Thank goodness there are still reporters out there who won't stop until they get the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Renata Stuhlberger

    Some of the content within this book came out to me as really shocking: having read about the Weinstein's story from a far away perspective in the news, I did not have a notion of the absurd things that this man had done over more than 30 years. As a journalistic triller, this book makes the Weinstein breakout story increadibly great. The fact that it mentions so many Hollywood starts adds some additional gossip spark into it. While reading the book, I could not help to share some of Some of the content within this book came out to me as really shocking: having read about the Weinstein's story from a far away perspective in the news, I did not have a notion of the absurd things that this man had done over more than 30 years. As a journalistic triller, this book makes the Weinstein breakout story increadibly great. The fact that it mentions so many Hollywood starts adds some additional gossip spark into it. While reading the book, I could not help to share some of the unbelievable stories with friends, and even cried a few times when reading about the progress the journalists made. All in, this book makes me closer to believe in real journalism.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    TRULY A MUST READ. Bravo to these reporters and their tenacity, continuing to track down this story and working diligently with victims to bring justice. They are modern day heroes. Having read the Times articles and listened to the podcasts, I thought I knew a lot about this story but this book goes in depth into all of the behind the scenes reporting. The last chapter alone makes this book worth reading. One of the best this year.

  24. 5 out of 5

    vanessa

    This is a really fascinating look at top-notch journalism. The book first deals with the Harvey Weinstein revelations and then guides us through the repercussions (other high profile men accused) culminating with the Christine Blasey Ford/Brett Kavanaugh hearings. It’s eye-opening to see how Kantor and Twohey talked to sources, how they kept information private until it was time to reveal, and how they worked with editors, lawyers, and investigators at the Times. Of course, Harvey Weinstein is t This is a really fascinating look at top-notch journalism. The book first deals with the Harvey Weinstein revelations and then guides us through the repercussions (other high profile men accused) culminating with the Christine Blasey Ford/Brett Kavanaugh hearings. It’s eye-opening to see how Kantor and Twohey talked to sources, how they kept information private until it was time to reveal, and how they worked with editors, lawyers, and investigators at the Times. Of course, Harvey Weinstein is the big bad - the authors explain how his case is more settled when compared to the one, maybe two credible accusations against Kavanaugh amidst a backlash of #MeToo. The writing is gripping, the journalists are tenacious and smart, and the outcomes are aggravating and sobering.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa K

    I loved the first 75% which was all the Weinstein reporting, surprisingly didn’t care much for the Kavanaugh at the end

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Well researched. Thought provoking. Eye opening. I may need a little more time to digest but the clearest thing I am taking away from the book is the BRAVERY of the women who came forward and faced the backlash.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    “If the story was not shared, nothing would change.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This book was riveting and fascinating. I followed the Weinstein story from day one and the Kavanaugh allegations as well and still I did not know the bulk of the story. The way that the Times reporters approached the women and coaxed all the players to tell their stories was amazing. The nastiness of Weinstein and his "feminist" lawyers was also just stunning.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sage

    She Said is one of the most powerful books I have ever read. As a former journalism major, I LOVE books like these - I am fascinated by investigative reporting, and this is no exception. Specifically with the Weinstein case, and the rise of #MeToo, I remember being horrified yet enthralled by everything I read. How thrilled I was that *finally* powerful men and other people (but not all men — yet...) were being held to account for their shitty, unacceptable behavior. This book was absolutely inc She Said is one of the most powerful books I have ever read. As a former journalism major, I LOVE books like these - I am fascinated by investigative reporting, and this is no exception. Specifically with the Weinstein case, and the rise of #MeToo, I remember being horrified yet enthralled by everything I read. How thrilled I was that *finally* powerful men and other people (but not all men — yet...) were being held to account for their shitty, unacceptable behavior. This book was absolutely incredible, and I tore through it on my subway commutes, wishing I could read through work because I just had to know what happened next. I’m also honestly just so impressed that Jodi and Megan could distill three years of vigilant reporting, writing, parenting, sleepless nights, and stress into 250-odd pages. That’s amazing to me (and I would have read even more!) I loved hearing about their editor, Rebecca Corbett, and how instrumental she was to shaping and guiding the Weinstein investigations and pieces (and parts of the book!) and I wish she featured a bit more in the book — the more badass women, the better! Her work habits reminded me of RBG, how she would stay at the Times late into the night/early in the morning, take a 45 minute nap at her desk and then wake up and get back to work. I’m not sure which is my favorite part of the book, but I was particularly struck by the chapters about Christine Blasey Ford and the Kavanaugh hearings. Her courage, poise and determination is incredible and I have nothing but the utmost respect for her. One of my absolute favorite parts of the book, however, was at the very end, called The Gathering, where 12 of the women gathered at Gwyneth Paltrow’s house for a cathartic, surprising, emotional group interview with Jodi and Megan. I was struck (and not at all surprised) by how each woman seemed to counsel and support the others. I loved that so much. One of the parts that stuck with me was when activist and actor Ashley Judd was telling Christine Blasey Ford how she doesn’t read any media/comments about herself, and hasn’t for the last 20 years (she went off the grid when the initial Weinstein story broke). “If an alcoholic can stay away from a drink one day at a time, I can stay away from the comment section one day at a time. I’m participating in my own self-harm when I expose myself to that material.” (Page 258) Lastly, Gwyneth Paltrow quoted an analogy that Tim McGraw once told her: “they only tackle you when you have the ball” (Page 258). This is a striking, incredible, moving, stunning book and everyone should read it. 10000/10. Easily in the top 5 books I’ve read in 2019. Grateful to my bestie for snagging me a copy 🥰

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Woodside

    I've always been a film junkie. Every film nerd has been familiar with Harvey Weinstein long before the sexual misconduct allegations made headlines. I never liked the guy. He was always a reputed piece of work. While there were the "casting couch" rumors but I kinda took it with a grain of salt since it's such a cliche in regards to powerful figures in show business. He was highly intrusive and would frequently meddle with the editing process by shortening films dramatically to cater to the low I've always been a film junkie. Every film nerd has been familiar with Harvey Weinstein long before the sexual misconduct allegations made headlines. I never liked the guy. He was always a reputed piece of work. While there were the "casting couch" rumors but I kinda took it with a grain of salt since it's such a cliche in regards to powerful figures in show business. He was highly intrusive and would frequently meddle with the editing process by shortening films dramatically to cater to the lowest common denominator that made a lot of filmmakers and writers unhappy ("All the Pretty Horses" is a pretty big example) hence why he was given the moniker; "Harvey Scissorhands." He harassed Sydney Pollack on his deathbed & Anthony Minghella's recently widowed wife while "The Reader" was getting made. He was known for his aggressive Oscar campaigns for the films that he produced (let's face it... it seems awfully fishy that "Shakespeare in Love" beat the obviously superior "Saving Private Ryan" for Best Picture). Of course, he was a bully with a short fuse. So, yeah... he was always a dick bag . When he started making headlines 2 years back, I thought; "Good God, as if I couldn't hate this tub of lard even more than I did before." Well, anyway... this book is one of the reasons why I've become such a nut for investigative journalism. It's compelling, strongly researched and very fair. It's a behind-the-scenes account of the Weinstein investigation, the Brett Kavanaugh hearing and the inspirations and repercussions of the #MeToo movement. The final chapter was the book's highlight. Also, Gloria Allred is a hypocritical piece of shit who is no champion of women's rights.

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