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Sherlock Holmes & the Christmas Demon

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The new Sherlock Holmes novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin and Firefly - Big Damn Hero. It is 1890, and in the days before Christmas Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson are visited at Baker Street by a new client. Eve Allerthorpe - eldest daughter of a grand but somewhat eccentric Yorkshire-based dynasty - is greatly distressed, as she believ The new Sherlock Holmes novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin and Firefly - Big Damn Hero. It is 1890, and in the days before Christmas Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson are visited at Baker Street by a new client. Eve Allerthorpe - eldest daughter of a grand but somewhat eccentric Yorkshire-based dynasty - is greatly distressed, as she believes she is being haunted by a demonic Christmas spirit. Her late mother told her terrifying tales of the sinister Black Thurrick, and Eve is sure that she has seen the creature from her bedroom window. What is more, she has begun to receive mysterious parcels of birch twigs, the Black Thurrick's calling card... Eve stands to inherit a fortune if she is sound in mind, but it seems that something - or someone - is threatening her sanity. Holmes and Watson travel to the Allerthorpe family seat at Fellscar Keep to investigate, but soon discover that there is more to the case than at first appeared. There is another spirit haunting the family, and when a member of the household is found dead, the companions realise that no one is beyond suspicion.


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The new Sherlock Holmes novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin and Firefly - Big Damn Hero. It is 1890, and in the days before Christmas Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson are visited at Baker Street by a new client. Eve Allerthorpe - eldest daughter of a grand but somewhat eccentric Yorkshire-based dynasty - is greatly distressed, as she believ The new Sherlock Holmes novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin and Firefly - Big Damn Hero. It is 1890, and in the days before Christmas Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson are visited at Baker Street by a new client. Eve Allerthorpe - eldest daughter of a grand but somewhat eccentric Yorkshire-based dynasty - is greatly distressed, as she believes she is being haunted by a demonic Christmas spirit. Her late mother told her terrifying tales of the sinister Black Thurrick, and Eve is sure that she has seen the creature from her bedroom window. What is more, she has begun to receive mysterious parcels of birch twigs, the Black Thurrick's calling card... Eve stands to inherit a fortune if she is sound in mind, but it seems that something - or someone - is threatening her sanity. Holmes and Watson travel to the Allerthorpe family seat at Fellscar Keep to investigate, but soon discover that there is more to the case than at first appeared. There is another spirit haunting the family, and when a member of the household is found dead, the companions realise that no one is beyond suspicion.

30 review for Sherlock Holmes & the Christmas Demon

  1. 4 out of 5

    The Tattooed Book Geek (Drew).

    As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress... It is late December 1890, Eve’s Allerthorpe’s birthday is fast approaching and on Christmas eve she will turn twenty-one-years-old. On her birthday she will inherit a sizeable fortune left to her by her aunt…but only if she is found to be of sound mind. If, however, Eve is found to not be of sound mind then the inheritance will be divided and spread equally between other family members. Every year for As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress... It is late December 1890, Eve’s Allerthorpe’s birthday is fast approaching and on Christmas eve she will turn twenty-one-years-old. On her birthday she will inherit a sizeable fortune left to her by her aunt…but only if she is found to be of sound mind. If, however, Eve is found to not be of sound mind then the inheritance will be divided and spread equally between other family members. Every year for Christmas the Allerthorpe’s host a gathering with their extended family coming from far and wide to celebrate the festive season at their family home of Fellscar Keep, an isolated castle located in East Riding, Yorkshire. Fellscar Keep has a history and the local area is steeped in folklore, myth and local legend. One such local legend is that of the ‘Black Thurrick’ an evil entity, the dark to the light and an anti-father Christmas. The Black Thurrick replaces the benevolence and goodwill of Father Christmas with malevolence and ill will. The Black Thurrick removes the toys of those children who have been bad and exchanges them with bundles of birch twigs. And, if an offering isn’t left out for the Black Thurrick then, the Black Thurrick will steal the children of the household, take them back to its underground lair and eat them. When she was a child, alongside her younger brother, Eve’s mother used to regale the two children with tales of the Black Thurrick, a tale told to scare the children into being good and one that has been etched in Eve’s memory. Now, nearing Christmas and Eve’s birthday bundles of birch twigs are being left around Fellscar Keep. In the dark of the night, mysterious noises are being heard emanating from the east wing of the castle. And Eve, herself, by the glow of moonlight has glimpsed a figure resembling the countenance of the sinister Black Thurrick walking across the frozen lake late at night. With no-one else to turn to, Eve travels to London where she asks Holmes and Watson for aid, for their help in the hope that they will be able to uncover the truth behind the strange occurrences that are plaguing both her and Fellscar keep. To add to matters, while Holmes and Watson are at Fellscar Keep investigating the tale of the Black Thurrick things take on a more serious tone when one of the household is found dead under suspicious circumstances. The folklore is well incorporated and adds an ominous air to the story. Deep in winter Fellscar Keep is gripped by the coldness of the season with snow blanketing the area and the setting is very atmospheric. The gloomy, expansive and secluded Fellscar Keep, a castle on an island in the middle of a lake, joined to the land by a causeway, surrounded by a forest and miles away from the nearest village. There’s a vigour to the storytelling, a zeal to the writing and you can tell that Lovegrove has a genuine love for the iconic duo in his work. The mystery doesn’t disappoint, neither does the setting, the characters, the deductions, the twists or the denouement of the investigation. It is all cleverly plotted, honours and serves to pay homage to the characters of Holmes and Watson by once more bringing them to life in a gripping and highly entertaining mystery that captures the era perfectly and feels deeply reminiscent of a classic Holmes tale. I really liked the actual ending with Lovegrove ending things with some festive cheer done in a very Holmesesque way. It felt like a fitting end and leaves you with a smile upon your face. Simply, Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon was an absolute joy to read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Runalong

    This was just a huge amount of fun and got the characters spot on - great mysteries too! Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Oliver Clarke

    Review coming soon on Sci Fi and Scary

  4. 4 out of 5

    Doreen

    I'm conceding defeat and I'm not even sure whom to. See, despite being an ardent mystery fan since a wee girl, I've been lukewarm at most to the Sherlock Holmes canon, and have had very little interest in reading the Sherlockiana that has spawned since. Not even Neil Gaiman's brilliant A Study In Emerald could draw me in, and I waved off my delight in G. S. Denning's Warlock Holmes series as being of a similar exception, given the overtly supernatural element common to both. Nancy Springer's Enola Holmes series an I'm conceding defeat and I'm not even sure whom to. See, despite being an ardent mystery fan since a wee girl, I've been lukewarm at most to the Sherlock Holmes canon, and have had very little interest in reading the Sherlockiana that has spawned since. Not even Neil Gaiman's brilliant A Study In Emerald could draw me in, and I waved off my delight in G. S. Denning's Warlock Holmes series as being of a similar exception, given the overtly supernatural element common to both. Nancy Springer's Enola Holmes series and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar & Anna Waterhouse's Mycroft & Sherlock books were also, I rationalized, exceptions since they focused on the deeds of Sherlock's siblings, and not on the tiresome detective and his sentimental companion themselves. Not even my appreciation for the most recent adaptations of Sherlock on the screen -- whether they be Guy Richie's movies, the Beeb's episodes or the excellent Elementary -- could sway me. So I'm not sure why I said yes when the magnificent Polly Grice over at Titan Books offered me a copy of James Lovegrove's Sherlock Holmes And The Christmas Demon. Perhaps it was because of all the other Titan-published Sherlock-adjacent books that I've thoroughly enjoyed. Perhaps it was because I absolutely adored what James Lovegrove did with his recent Firefly novels. Regardless, reader, I trusted the sources enough to finally say yes. There was always the chance, of course, that I'd find this novel tiresome in the same ways I find Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's works tedious. All the hallmarks of the original Sherlock stories are still present here in this gorgeously bound volume but Mr Lovegrove's deftness of touch makes it so that I don't find the relationship between the main characters irritating, and that I'm not wildly annoyed by the "exotic" touches to the story (just thinking of The Speckled Band still makes me incredibly grouchy.) While this wasn't a difficult mystery to solve -- tho some of the clues were quite ingenious -- it held together better for me than a lot of the original canon, and was so entertaining as to completely batter down my resistance to new material. Plus, I do love a Victorian Christmas! Perhaps I would have been grumpier if this book had come out after Halloween, as I'm always aggrieved at retailers ignoring Thanksgiving due to profit margins being better on the bracketing holidays, but with the weather turning and the supernatural bent to this Christmas tale, it felt like perfect timing. I can't imagine a cozier new book for fans of classic mysteries to curl up with as winter looms, and sincerely hope this book finds its way into many a mystery-lover's stocking as Yuletide approaches. It has certainly given me the gift of appreciation for new Sherlockiana, and for that I am thankful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    1890 - Eve Allerthorpe, the eldest daughter from a wealthy family stands to inherit a fortune when she turns 21 on Christmas eve. However there is a clause in the will that stipulates that Eve must be of sound mind to inherit. Eve arrives at 221B Baker street upset and on edge and explains to Sherlock Holmes that she is being haunted by Black Thurrick - a Crampus style demon from childhood stories. She claims to have seen him from her window, a dark face with glowing eyes, crossing the esta 1890 - Eve Allerthorpe, the eldest daughter from a wealthy family stands to inherit a fortune when she turns 21 on Christmas eve. However there is a clause in the will that stipulates that Eve must be of sound mind to inherit. Eve arrives at 221B Baker street upset and on edge and explains to Sherlock Holmes that she is being haunted by Black Thurrick - a Crampus style demon from childhood stories. She claims to have seen him from her window, a dark face with glowing eyes, crossing the estate with a sack on his back. Is she going insane? Holmes and Watson travel to Yorkshire to investigate. Is Eve really losing her grip on reality or are there darker forces at work? I've read all of the Sherlock Holmes books by James Lovegrove and they are all excellent. Thank you to Titan books for the ARC.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    After the last of the Cthulhu Casebooks, Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils, was published last year, I thought I’d got to the end of James’s entertaining cross-genre series. So, it was a lovely surprise to get this one arrive through the post – even though it’s a Christmas tale which has arrived before Halloween! It is 1890 and Sherlock and his friend John Watson are approached by Eve Allerthorpe, whose family seat at Fellscar Keep in Yorkshire appears to be haunted by a demonic spirit After the last of the Cthulhu Casebooks, Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils, was published last year, I thought I’d got to the end of James’s entertaining cross-genre series. So, it was a lovely surprise to get this one arrive through the post – even though it’s a Christmas tale which has arrived before Halloween! It is 1890 and Sherlock and his friend John Watson are approached by Eve Allerthorpe, whose family seat at Fellscar Keep in Yorkshire appears to be haunted by a demonic spirit – the sinister Black Thurrick, seen walking across the icy lake around the family home, and who leaves small parcels of birch tied together with twine as a sign that the recipient’s days are numbered. Understandably, this is driving Eve to distraction. She fears that it may be part of a plot to make her insane, for she stands to inherit a fortune on her 21st birthday in a few days, if she is sound in mind. Such a cry for help means that Holmes and Watson agree to visit Eve in her home. The duo’s visit to Yorkshire soon makes them realise that (of course!) the situation is more complicated than at first expected. As the Allerthorpe family gather at Fellscar Keep for their traditional family Christmas, it is clear that something odd is happening. When a member of the Allerthorpe household is found dead, which suggests that there may be more to this than initially thought… There’s something special about a Victorian Christmas, isn’t there? Thoughts of Charles Dickens, huge meals, men in top hats, gaslights and falling snow are (for me, anyway) as about as traditional Christmas as it gets. Dickens himself, of course, knew how to use these iconic ideas to good effect and James does well to incorporate the same images in this novel. We begin Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon with the chase of a Father Christmas through a crowded London department store, and end with a Christmas feast worthy of A Christmas Carol. In terms of time, Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon is set between the first and second of the Cthulhu Casebook stories, and as a result this one is perhaps more related to the Gothic ghost stories of Victorian/Edwardian England than Cthulhu. It does read nicely as a standalone, although Holmes and Watson do mention other cases along the way to put things into context. To me, Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon felt like a cross between a Dickensian mystery and an Agatha Christie crime novel, with a touch of Bronte’s Wuthering Heights for the harsh Northern setting and William Hope-Hodgson’s Carnacki the Ghost Finder for things that go bump in the night. It also helps that the setting is terrific as well. There’s lots of dashing around the snowy environment where most of the book is set, across lake ice and snow-white slopes and in a wonderfully Gothic castle. At the same time, to counterbalance this, there’s roaring fires and good food and drink mentioned in detail. James does well to balance the two by going all Agatha Christie in a grand setting of oak-lined libraries and drawing rooms and cigars and brandy after meals. On a genre note, there’s a nice nod to Philip Jose Farmer’s Wold Newton stories, which it would be wrong of me to spoil. The gathering of the Allerthorpe clan for Christmas does create a wide variety of potential murder suspects, which Holmes and Watson do well to deal with. The initially frosty reception from the inner circle of the household towards our detective duo is admirably portrayed, but the characterisation allows us to warm to some as the plot proceeds. The biggest plus in this novel, and indeed the series, is that the tone and style of writing makes this one seem like a Conan Doyle novel, albeit for a 21st century readership. The prose is right and Holmes’ and Watson’s actions are both realistic and appropriate. The explanation of the processes by which Holmes makes his deductions is a joy to read. All in all, like Lovegrove’s other Sherlock novels, Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon is a deceptively easy read that draws you in and, once started, I found difficult to put down. One last point – the cover and the format of the print edition is lovely. Removing the dustcover shows an embossed cover and spine that would make the book look good sitting nicely on any reader’s shelf. It’s not essential, but it does create the impression that this is a quality book the reader would like to keep. This is one that I can see me dipping into on a perennial basis. I’ve already added it to my pile of Christmassy reads for next year. “Yuletide is the time we commune with our friends and loved ones. It is the time when we banish demons, lay ghosts to rest, re-establish bonds with those who are dear to us, and reaffirm the good in the world.” So: may I be perhaps the first to wish you Merry Christmas?! This one is thoroughly recommended, to be read perhaps as the snow falls and the nights draw in. This is one you may keep coming back to.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Swords & Spectres

    I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Growing up … well, when I was about 16, I remember pretending to be sick so I could stay off school and plow my way through the Complete Sherlock Holmes collection that I’d come across. That book (a few shorts aside) was the best book I’d ever picked up and it was one of my saddest days as a reader when I finished it. So, when I got an e-mail advertising Sherlock Holmes and The Christmas Demon from Tit I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Growing up … well, when I was about 16, I remember pretending to be sick so I could stay off school and plow my way through the Complete Sherlock Holmes collection that I’d come across. That book (a few shorts aside) was the best book I’d ever picked up and it was one of my saddest days as a reader when I finished it. So, when I got an e-mail advertising Sherlock Holmes and The Christmas Demon from Titan Books it was impossible to refuse. I’ll also say that I had a bit of a mixed set of feelings about reading a Christmas novel in October, but it actually felt really good and now I’m well into the Christmas spirit. Sadly it will be a much different Christmas due to living in the modern age rather than Holmes’ time, but beggars can’t be choosers. My main concern (never having read a book by this author, much less one set in the world of my favourite consulting detective) was that it wouldn’t be any good. I imagined someone trying too hard to fill the shoes left by the death of Sir Arthur. At the very least, I assumed it would be nowhere near as good as the work by Anthony Horowitz. Thankfully, it over-performed and knocked me for six. The long and the short of the previous paragraph ‘thought it might not hit a homerun, but it went and hit two.’ The writing itself is just different enough from Conan-Doyle’s writing to not make it feel like Lovegrove is trying too hard to be the great man, but brilliant enough that it fits the characters perfectly and tells a wonderful story from start to finish (even if a couple of the deductions were a bit too shoe-horned in, but then Conan-Doyle had a habit of that as well, so I suppose it fits perfectly.) The general plot is that a young woman from a wealthy Yorkshire family comes to London at her wit’s end, claiming to be haunted by a demonic Christmas being known as ‘The Black Thurrick’. She implores Holmes and Watson to come and prove her to be of sound mind for, if she is not of sound mind, she goes without her inheritance. Holmes, spying an easy case because any sane man knows that supernatural creatures are a thing of fairy tales to scare small children, readily agrees. The overall plot is one that the reader needs to keep a vigilant eye on (much like with any Holmes plot by any good Holmes author). The plot fractures into several different paths and the shrewdest investigator might find themselves at a loss as to how to keep all the threads tied. The book provided me with hours of evening enjoyment and sucked me right into the cold, inhospitable Yorkshire countryside come 19th century Christmas and I loved every second of it. The characters, for the most part were well-fleshed out and believable. Some of them felt a bit over-exaggerated at times but it didn’t make the book feel bad in any way, shape or form. In fact, they felt over the top in the same way some of Conan-Doyle’s were. I would highly recommend this as not only Christmas read, but a read for any time of the year if you want a good Holmes and Watson tale. And that cover. Beautiful? Elegant? Both describe it well. All I can say is that it’s the kind of cover that makes me happy I own the physical copy rather than a kindle version. I hear the same author also has a Homes and Watson series set around the Cthulhu mythos and am very intrigued by that. I will have to get my hands on those books as I seriously need more Holmes and Watson in my life after the tale of The Christmas Demon.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bethxdd

    So it’s mid-October, the spooky season and here I am reading a Christmas story! I am fond of Halloween but I am definitely more of a Christmas lover and this was the perfect story to get me into the festive mood. I loved everything about this enthralling tale – from the much loved crime-solving duo, to the setting, the cast of characters, the sinister Black Thurrick and the haunting of Mrs. Allerthorpe – it’s one that I’ll surely be reaching for again and again. I was fascinated by th So it’s mid-October, the spooky season and here I am reading a Christmas story! I am fond of Halloween but I am definitely more of a Christmas lover and this was the perfect story to get me into the festive mood. I loved everything about this enthralling tale – from the much loved crime-solving duo, to the setting, the cast of characters, the sinister Black Thurrick and the haunting of Mrs. Allerthorpe – it’s one that I’ll surely be reaching for again and again. I was fascinated by the Black Thurrick and was eagerly eating up Eve’s stories about him. The Black Thurrick is a terrifying tale told to Eve and her brother, Erasmus, at bedtime in a bid to get them to behave. To me, the Black Thurrick was pretty similar to the Grinch; described as evil, a hunched figure carrying a sack slung over its shoulder that punishes children who have behaved badly during the course of the year. The Black Thurrick is said to steal infants from their home, hence the sack. He replaces presents with clusters of birch twigs so when Eve starts discovering them placed around her family’s home, she calls upon Sherlock Holmes and John Watson to find out who is behind this sinister act. I really enjoyed the vast cast of characters and how the whole extended Allerthorpe family came to visit. It made the story very entertaining at times and added in some great festive scenes. My favourite relationship was the one Eve had with her brother. I loved how close they were – it reminded me of my relationship with my own brother and even though we see each often less often now, we are still really close and have fortunately always got on with one another, even growing up. It was very touching too see how much they cared for each other. James Lovegrove did a fantastic job with Sherlock and John – as he usually does. In some stories, I feel like John doesn’t contribute much to the story and often ends up being in the way but with The Christmas Demon he was right in the thick of it. He was always there when Sherlock needed him and he was there for characters he barely knew, namely Eve, by comforting her when she was panicking about the Black Thurrick and caring for other members of the household if they were taken ill. I loved this side of John and found a lot of his scenes to be very touching. Sherlock, of course, was his usual self and completely focused on solving the case. I loved all the interactions between Sherlock and John. A particular favourite of mine was when they are investigating the east wing which is where the ghost of Mrs. Allerthorpe supposedly resides. John voices the possibility that the residents genuinely did experience something uncanny and ends up being scolded by Sherlock for believing in the supernatural. I thought that scene was hilarious and there’s a few like it when John wonders if the Black Thurrick is not simply a scary story told to children at bedtime, but actually a real living creature. I loved how John was much more open to the possibility of supernatural entities but is constantly shot down by Sherlock who is ultimately fearless and entirely certain that the residents are being terrorised by one of their own. I was expecting The Christmas Demon to be good but I didn’t expect it to capture my attention so quickly. It was an intriguing and gripping story, filled with so many twists and turns that it rapidly evolved from simply being about one creature terrorising an innocent family, to becoming so much more. I loved seeing Sherlock gradually piece things together and explaining how he reached these conclusions. I thought the ending was very heart-warming and I can’t wait to see what James comes up with next! This is a fantastic story and one fans of the originals are sure to love. *I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

  9. 5 out of 5

    A. Luna

    I often find myself wanting to curl up with a good book. Now that fall is slowly unfurling its child, though quite slowly in Puerto Rico, I couldn’t have asked for a more appropriate book to read in the damp weather than James Lovegrove’s Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon. This story is masterful in the way it manages to conserve the authenticity of the original Sherlock Holmes novels while still giving it somewhat of a modern flair. Lovegrove’s version of Sherlock Holmes is reminisce I often find myself wanting to curl up with a good book. Now that fall is slowly unfurling its child, though quite slowly in Puerto Rico, I couldn’t have asked for a more appropriate book to read in the damp weather than James Lovegrove’s Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon. This story is masterful in the way it manages to conserve the authenticity of the original Sherlock Holmes novels while still giving it somewhat of a modern flair. Lovegrove’s version of Sherlock Holmes is reminiscent of today’s charming and cocky counterpart. Like the one featured on Sherlock, he lacks social cues, creates social faux pas more than once, but all in all, is truly a sweetheart around those he cares about. Dr. Watson is the same hard but compassionate man with a genuine interest in helping others. In this instance of Sherlock Holmes, we’re placed right in the middle of a jolly London getting ready for Christmas. After apprehending a red-handed—and red-suited—thieving Father Nicholas, Sherlock and Watson meet a twenty-year-old woman named Eve Allethorpe. She feels that she’s on the verge of lunacy, which is not all too rare for her eccentric family. As a child, her mother would tell her tales of the Black Thurrick, a hunchbacked creature that would come after rotten children after leaving bundles of birch sticks at their homes. Now that bunches of birch twigs have started to appear around the Allerthorpe castle, she fears that her childhood monster has come back to haunt her. She decides to task Sherlock and Dr. Watson to help her solve the mystery before it’s too late. Is there really a monster hunting her? Is she bordering delusion? Either she loses her mind, or someone loses their life. The case manages to capture enough of Sherlock’s interest. Soon enough, the dynamic duo is on the hunt! Honestly, I’ve always absolutely loved the original Sherlock Holmes Series. I haven’t read all of the novels but the ones that I’ve finished, they’re absolutely fantastic. Sherlock Holmes and the Christmas Demon does a good job of emulating Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s style, and Lovegrove makes sure to use a “Sunday” vocabulary which adds to the late 19th-century ambiance. It doesn’t feel time-displaced and adds to the authenticity of the story. As for the plot, it’s just convoluted enough to be entertaining while still making sense. I couldn’t pick up on any plot holes, which is always good. I genuinely couldn’t put it down. The slow burn is clearly evident: the mystery’s end is finished at an agonizingly slow pace. It makes you even more jittery, like wanting to scratch at an itch but you don’t even know where it is. The plot doesn’t give up on itself quickly which in turn makes you want to gobble up the book. I think I ended up reading 200 pages in one day! The characters are really dynamic so you get a pretty picture of them, even though there are more than five. Small details about each character are cleverly weaved within the plot itself, which makes for a pleasant, continual build-up of each character. This isn’t an easy task, but Lovegrove manages it well. The way in which the author writes also paints vivid pictures of the castle, the landscape, the fear, and the winter chill. Plus, you don’t even suspect the resolution to the mystery until the very end! If you’re a fan of the brusque detective novel and a lover of slow burns, this book is for you. You’d do good to sit down with a cup of coffee, hot chocolate or tea and start to read it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Museofnyxmares

    *I was provided with a copy of this book by the publisher, in exchange for my honest opinion. As I'd hoped, this was a humorous, lively and enjoyable read. I haven't really delved too much into Sherlock Holmes books and films, but I've seen enough to know that he's a very interesting and entertaining character, who I can't help but find fascinating. I was so pleased with the characterisation of Holmes in this, and would probably say that it's the strongest aspect of the novel, it was *I was provided with a copy of this book by the publisher, in exchange for my honest opinion. As I'd hoped, this was a humorous, lively and enjoyable read. I haven't really delved too much into Sherlock Holmes books and films, but I've seen enough to know that he's a very interesting and entertaining character, who I can't help but find fascinating. I was so pleased with the characterisation of Holmes in this, and would probably say that it's the strongest aspect of the novel, it was honestly just perfect. Lovegrove beautifully captured the unimaginably intelligent, quick thinking, bold and brilliant enigma that we know and love Holmes to be. 🎋 The novel is told from Doctor Watson's perspective and it was both helpful and amusing. Watson almost represented the reader throughout this, as Holmes was always a thousand steps ahead and when Watson played catch-up regarding Holmes' actions, courtesy of a helpful explanation or two, so then could the reader. It was great to see the dynamics between Watson and Holmes, as they couldn't be more different, with Watson being more sympathetic and naive, and Holmes being so shrewd and forthright. It was always funny to see Watson scold Holmes for his lack of tact. 🎋 There were lots of different twists and turns in this, with almost all of the reveals being a surprise. It's a fairly easy read, but you will find yourself eager to get to the bottom of everything, as there were many layers to this christmassy mystery. It was entertaining to try and guess what's what alongside Watson, thinking yourself clever, only to be reminded that Holmes' brain is always superior. My favourite aspects of the novel was probably Holmes and the writing, the writing was just so personable and had such charm to it, that gave the story a nice pace and kept the reader engaged. I would definitely recommend this to the avid Sherlock Holmes fan and also those who are simply intrigued by this famed detective.

  11. 4 out of 5

    B Meadows

    Review Coming Soon.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Ewing

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hebridean Reader

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Burns

  19. 5 out of 5

    brian armstrong

  20. 4 out of 5

    Autumn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Zroka

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Read

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pawprints

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Conlon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nick Moraitis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Devon Ashby

  29. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Tyler

  30. 4 out of 5

    carl sireno

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