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Alien: Prototype

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Dead cargo! Venture, a direct rival to the Weyland-Yutani corporation, will accept any risk to crush the competition. Thus, when a corporate spy "acquires" a bizarre, leathery egg from a hijacked vessel, she takes it directly to the Venture testing facility on Jericho 3. Thou unaware of the danger it poses, the scientists there recognize their prize's immeasurable value. Ear Dead cargo! Venture, a direct rival to the Weyland-Yutani corporation, will accept any risk to crush the competition. Thus, when a corporate spy "acquires" a bizarre, leathery egg from a hijacked vessel, she takes it directly to the Venture testing facility on Jericho 3. Thou unaware of the danger it poses, the scientists there recognize their prize's immeasurable value. Early tests reveal little, however, and they come to an inevitable conclusion, they need a human test subject... Enter Zula Hendricks. A member of the Jericho 3 security staff, Colonial Marines veteran Zula Hendricks has been tasked with training personnel to deal with anything the treacherous planet can throw their way. Yet nothing can prepare them for the horror that appears - a creature more hideous than any Zula has encountered before. Unless stopped, it will kill every human being on the planet.


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Dead cargo! Venture, a direct rival to the Weyland-Yutani corporation, will accept any risk to crush the competition. Thus, when a corporate spy "acquires" a bizarre, leathery egg from a hijacked vessel, she takes it directly to the Venture testing facility on Jericho 3. Thou unaware of the danger it poses, the scientists there recognize their prize's immeasurable value. Ear Dead cargo! Venture, a direct rival to the Weyland-Yutani corporation, will accept any risk to crush the competition. Thus, when a corporate spy "acquires" a bizarre, leathery egg from a hijacked vessel, she takes it directly to the Venture testing facility on Jericho 3. Thou unaware of the danger it poses, the scientists there recognize their prize's immeasurable value. Early tests reveal little, however, and they come to an inevitable conclusion, they need a human test subject... Enter Zula Hendricks. A member of the Jericho 3 security staff, Colonial Marines veteran Zula Hendricks has been tasked with training personnel to deal with anything the treacherous planet can throw their way. Yet nothing can prepare them for the horror that appears - a creature more hideous than any Zula has encountered before. Unless stopped, it will kill every human being on the planet.

30 review for Alien: Prototype

  1. 4 out of 5

    John Lynch

    While I'm not the kind of guy who typically reads media tie-ins, as soon as I saw that this was written by Tim Waggoner I became intrigued. I'm a huge fan of the Alien movies, and seeing Waggoner as the scribe left me with hope that this would be a true to form sci-fi/horror blend. Those of you who may have similar reservations about this book need not fear, I had a blast reading it, and Waggoner managed to bring something completely new to the table. Alien: Prototype follows Zula Hendricks, Colo While I'm not the kind of guy who typically reads media tie-ins, as soon as I saw that this was written by Tim Waggoner I became intrigued. I'm a huge fan of the Alien movies, and seeing Waggoner as the scribe left me with hope that this would be a true to form sci-fi/horror blend. Those of you who may have similar reservations about this book need not fear, I had a blast reading it, and Waggoner managed to bring something completely new to the table. Alien: Prototype follows Zula Hendricks, Colonial Marine turned security trainer and Tamar Prather, corporate spy for Venture, a Weyland-Yutani competitor. When an ovomorph is brought to a Venture colony, the resident scientist decides they must study it with a human test subject, and it all goes downhill from there. I enjoyed following Hendricks, she was a strong female lead who's out for one thing, hunting Xenomorphs. Tamar Prather is all about working for herself and whoever will pay her the most. The other characters in this book were written decent enough and Waggoner shows that he knows his Alien stuff. Everything felt like it fit perfectly in the universe. Due to certain circumstances within the book, the Xenomorph here is deadlier than ever before. All I can say without spoiling anything is that it's called a Necromorph, and for good reason. Waggoner does an excellent job switching back and forth between perspectives here, and keeping the story interesting until we can get what we all want, Xenomorph action; There's plenty of that on display here and fans of the series won't be disappointed. All in all, I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this book. The Necromorph is just as deadly as advertised and brings something new and interesting to a very familiar world. There's enough blood and gore here to satisfy anyone who's into that, even if you aren't necessarily a fan of the franchise.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Darth Dragonetti

    "Alien: Prototype" is a 2019 novel by Tim Waggoner. The book is part of the recent series of novels and comics that follow the exploits of Amanda Ripley and Zula Hendricks. In terms of chronology, "Prototype" falls after "Alien: Isolation" (in its myriad forms of media--videogame, novel, animated series) and "Aliens: Defiance" (comic series), but comes before "Aliens: Resistance" (comic series). You needn't necessarily have read what comes before "Prototype" to understand it, but it does help se "Alien: Prototype" is a 2019 novel by Tim Waggoner. The book is part of the recent series of novels and comics that follow the exploits of Amanda Ripley and Zula Hendricks. In terms of chronology, "Prototype" falls after "Alien: Isolation" (in its myriad forms of media--videogame, novel, animated series) and "Aliens: Defiance" (comic series), but comes before "Aliens: Resistance" (comic series). You needn't necessarily have read what comes before "Prototype" to understand it, but it does help set up the characters of Zula and Davis if you have some context as to their past exploits. A corporate spy steals a xenomorph egg; The spy works for Venture, a company that competes with Weyland-Yutani. The egg is taken to Jericho 3, a scientific research facility that also houses a space colonist training program. Surprise surprise! Things go wrong, a xenomorph gets loose in the facility, and it's up to Zula Hendricks and her team of Colonist Protection Force trainees to vanquish yet another of one of science fiction's most fearsome creatures. Just as you might expect, "Alien: Prototype" fits very neatly (too neatly?) into the formula that we've come to expect from Alien novels: Human discovers alien, underestimates threat, xenomorph gets loose, and gory pandemonium ensues. It's quite the entertaining formula, and Tim Waggoner puts an effective spin on it, but in the end it's exactly what you would expect. Waggoner does try to add some variables to the story that we haven't seen before, such as a xenomorph that caries a disease, and also adding a new corporation that competes with Weyland-Yutani. But in the end, these additions are just not enough to raise the plot of the novel above what Alien readers are already familiar with. "Alien: Prototype" is a well-written novel. The pacing and action are very tight, and it never feels as if the book drags. Mr. Waggoner doesn't waste space on unneeded filler, and the result is a lean, mean, read that--while predictable--is still an entertaining good time. I appreciated the author's obvious care in crafting the setting. He clearly put some thought in creating the physical layout of the facility, and also gave a new perspective on space colonization that we have not seen before. As someone who is in the military, I also found that some of the jargon used by Zula really is used in the military, and it's always nice to see that. There is less profanity in this novel than I have seen in other Alien novels, and that is fine by me. Like the plot, the characterization in "Prototype" is caricatured. There's a tough heroine who just wants to kill xenomorphs, an evil scientist, a greedy corporate hack, and the list goes on. The most well-rendered and compelling characters end up being androids. The author raises some interesting questions about androids and their behavior and cognitive abilities, and this content steals the show in terms of characterization. I wish the author had taken a more nuanced approach to corporate intrigue. Venture and Weyland-Yutani are treated just as you would expect--as faceless, greedy, ghouls who are after nothing but money. In his novel "Alien: Covenant: Origins," Alan Dean Foster gives one of the best story treatments of Weyland-Yutani that I've seen, and I wish other writers would pick up on that cue. For the record, I very much enjoyed "Alien: Prototype." It's absolutely an entertaining, well-written novel that deserves to be part of the Alien pantheon. However, looking to the future, Titan Publishing needs to give readers something new. The tried and true formula is starting to sag, and plot devices are becoming overly familiar. I thought Tim Lebbon's Rage War trilogy was a step in the right direction, and I would love to see more of that kind of fare going forward.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Only from audible. The narrator was barely acceptable IMO. She did this over enunciating thing that drives me crazy. But lots of xenomorph action from the start. Filled with idiot scientists and a mercenary who want to weaponize the xenomorph and or find out more about it to bring back to evil mega Corp Weylund Yutani. Chaos and death ensues in a delightfully dark and amusing manner.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Big Cat

    Maybe I've done too many of the Alien books this year but this one felt pretty generic except for the xenomorph itself, this time it's a necromorph! Infected with a cellular necrosis disease. The xenomorph adapted it to its own biology and weaponized it, which also caused an internal conflict where it wanted to both infect and murder / impregnate everyone. Other than that you've got your strong heroine, shady corporation, and people willing to exploit and profit off of that leading to the xenomor Maybe I've done too many of the Alien books this year but this one felt pretty generic except for the xenomorph itself, this time it's a necromorph! Infected with a cellular necrosis disease. The xenomorph adapted it to its own biology and weaponized it, which also caused an internal conflict where it wanted to both infect and murder / impregnate everyone. Other than that you've got your strong heroine, shady corporation, and people willing to exploit and profit off of that leading to the xenomorph outbreak

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have really loved the Alien audiobooks and audio dramas of the last few years. This one just disappointed a little. First, I didn't realize that I needed to have read some of the Alien graphic novels before listening to this to find out about The Adventures of Amanda and Zula Killing Aliens. I could somewhat figure it out, although I am desperate to know what happened to Amanda, so I'll be tracking down the graphic novels for sure. Second, there was A LOT of set up in this book, and it didn't r I have really loved the Alien audiobooks and audio dramas of the last few years. This one just disappointed a little. First, I didn't realize that I needed to have read some of the Alien graphic novels before listening to this to find out about The Adventures of Amanda and Zula Killing Aliens. I could somewhat figure it out, although I am desperate to know what happened to Amanda, so I'll be tracking down the graphic novels for sure. Second, there was A LOT of set up in this book, and it didn't really pay off. In Alien: The Cold Forge, there was quite a lot of set up as well, but the payoff was worth it (holy moly Blue trying to escape the aliens was TENSE). To me, the scariest part of the aliens is when they are stalking people. It's the sustained suspense of people trying to avoid (or kill) the aliens when they could suddenly appear from anywhere and strike. There just wasn't a lot of that in Alien Prototype. For example, using the robot aliens from the training grounds to attack the Alien was kind of clever, but not worth the endless time we spent on the training grounds before that. Third, there's the Alien itself. It's more like Alien: Accidental Prototype since it wasn't intentional that it ended up crossed with a flesh-eating disease. I was intrigued by that setup, but it just didn't work for me. Like, aliens are already pretty darn deadly as they are. Adding in that this Alien can infect you with a flesh-eating disease that kills you in about 30 seconds just didn't make it scarier for me. It seems like lazy writing if you have to add in a flesh-eating disease to make the Alien scary or interesting. Kind of like the Jurassic Park/World nonsense that you have to keep building bigger and scarier dinosaurs rather than just making a good story. Okay, so you have this additional worry that the Alien can infect you from several feet away, but honestly if there is an Alien a few feet from you it's already REALLY worrying. The whole "dual drives" of the Alien thing also made the Alien seem a bit indecisive which meant it was actually a little less scary. And fourth, speaking of the "dual drives" thing, there was so much repetition. Did you know that the Alien is driven by its nature to kill and reproduce, but the flesh-eating diseases also drives it to infect people? Yes? Oh too bad because you will be beaten over the head with it. And did you know that as a synthetic, Bridget doesn't have to worry about either the flesh-eating disease or the Alien trying to impregnate her? Well you will never forget it because it will be mentioned again and again, sometimes within a few sentences. The bright spots? Zula and Tamar are badass ladies on opposite sides of the empathy coin. They both get the opportunity to show how badass, clever, and prepared they are. And if there is another theme to a good Alien story it's badass women kicking Alien butt. I think overall this book suffers from comparison to The Cold Forge and Isolation, which I think did the suspense and tension much better. As for the narration, I think Sarah Mollo-Christensen is okay. She narrated Isolation as well, and she does an okay job at differentiating voices. I suppose she does have a strange way of enunciating at times, but it didn't bother me. I've listened to Isolation a couple of times and both times enjoyed it a lot. Sadly, I'm returning Prototype.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    This was an absolute blast to read! It's got everything you'd expect in a book based on the Alien franchise, but done in such a way that it feels fresh and not just a rehash of the movies. I mean how can you go wrong with a Xenomorph that is infected with a disease that rots flesh allowing it to cough on humans to spread the disease? You can't go wrong, that's how. Throw in some synthetics, a disgraced Colonial Marine, and a planet that is going through a major storm and you have a fun mindless This was an absolute blast to read! It's got everything you'd expect in a book based on the Alien franchise, but done in such a way that it feels fresh and not just a rehash of the movies. I mean how can you go wrong with a Xenomorph that is infected with a disease that rots flesh allowing it to cough on humans to spread the disease? You can't go wrong, that's how. Throw in some synthetics, a disgraced Colonial Marine, and a planet that is going through a major storm and you have a fun mindless book that will keep you entertained. I could go through more of the plot, but I'd much rather just tell you it's not what you expect. No one is safe and the story goes into some interesting areas. We get a number of point of view scenes from the Xenomorph, which is pretty fun, especially when it is listening to its instincts as well as the instincts of the disease. This also leads me to the fact that there are some pretty violent scenes, there's no holding back in what the disease or the alien can do to soft squishy humans. If you've seen the movies, which I'm guessing you have, then you probably have an idea of the violence level, but there's something to reading about it that puts you more in the headspace. I think this might be part of a series, but I only read this one and was just fine, so you should be good. But, I am intrigued what the other ones are like after reading this. In the end, this is just a good fun story about a diseased alien trying to start a family while some evil humans stand in its way. If you are a fan of the Alien movies, than definitely check this out, and if you are not, then I don't know, the action is pretty non-stop, you might like that.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ursula Johnson

    Predictable, Gory & not Up to Earlier Original Books This book is the latest edition of the Alien series. The last book, was based on the Isolation game. Like the last book, it's somewhat of a letdown. Predictable, gory and fast moving, it's an entry that should've been more. Adding a new genetic equation in the evolution of the species, it just serves as an outlet to make the book similar to Alien Covenant on the gore quotient. What's lacking is corporate hijinks. I was hoping for a larger focus Predictable, Gory & not Up to Earlier Original Books This book is the latest edition of the Alien series. The last book, was based on the Isolation game. Like the last book, it's somewhat of a letdown. Predictable, gory and fast moving, it's an entry that should've been more. Adding a new genetic equation in the evolution of the species, it just serves as an outlet to make the book similar to Alien Covenant on the gore quotient. What's lacking is corporate hijinks. I was hoping for a larger focus on this. The earlier original story books did a fantastic job of incorporating corporate greed vs the need to capture an alien and the stories were solid, not needing shock value. If you haven't read them, Alien, Out of the Shadows and Alien Sea of Sorrows were much better books of suspense, great characters and solid stories. This book did have Zula and her synth friend Davis who were very likable, but parts of the story were not addressed. I read this book using immersion reading while listening to the audio book. The same narrator from the last book was used and her voice is too soft. Her male accents aren't great either. I'm sorry they couldn't get the wonderful Tom Taylorson who did the Alien Covenant books. Just a so-so entry.

  8. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Bunce

    Originally published October 25, 2019, at BORG.com. Alien: Prototype review--Tim Waggoner upgrades your Xenomorph and Synth fix in new novel Review by C.J. Bunce If only the movies since Aliens had been this good. Wrapping up the year's celebration of the 40th anniversary of Ridley Scott's sci-fi horror classic Alien, coming next week from author Tim Waggoner is the next novel of the Alien universe, Alien: Prototype. I've read most of the Alien tie-in novels, and this novel is right on the heels of Originally published October 25, 2019, at BORG.com. Alien: Prototype review--Tim Waggoner upgrades your Xenomorph and Synth fix in new novel Review by C.J. Bunce If only the movies since Aliens had been this good. Wrapping up the year's celebration of the 40th anniversary of Ridley Scott's sci-fi horror classic Alien, coming next week from author Tim Waggoner is the next novel of the Alien universe, Alien: Prototype. I've read most of the Alien tie-in novels, and this novel is right on the heels of the best of them, Tim Lebbon's Alien: Out of the Shadows. Three tough-as-nails female characters drive this story. Readers first meet Tamar Prather, a master of corporate espionage and all-around resourceful spy. Tamar self-driven and self-serving, and she breaks into Weyland-Yutani to steal a stasis pod housing a valuable trade secret, with a buyer at an opposing corporation ready and waiting. Several hundred colonists live in the testing facility on the planet Jericho-3, and they're about to meet a threat even worse than your typical Xenomorph encounter. To protect them is Zula Hendricks (first introduced in the Aliens: Defiance comic series), a member of the security staff who has been training her squad for just this kind of alien encounter. Hendricks knows first-hand what works and what doesn't in combat, having lost her last platoon from her own bad judgment. Working for the new corporation is a new take on the franchise's synthetics, an upgraded cyborg named Brigette, and Hendricks' synth friend Davis, now assisting her but no longer in your typical synth bipedal form. Despite Alien: Prototype′s requisite, nasty, sci-fi monster--and this time readers will meet an entirely new version of the Xenomorph even more difficult to defeat than her predecessors--the real villains of the Alien-verse continue to be the corporate wonks who refuse to heed the warnings of those who have encountered the Xenomorphs in previous clashes. But for the first time it's not Weyland-Yutani that is behind the decision-making leading to the next disaster. Some Frankensteinian efforts combined with that colonial marines action from Aliens, All You Need is Kill/Edge of Tomorrow, and Starship Troopers, and more of what makes Alien... Alien: those weasely, dastardly, bastardly Burke/Paul Reiser types that ultimately teach us not to fool with mother nature--it all spells good sci-fi reading. Waggoner knows his universe and its rules, what makes a soldier a colonial marine, and a synth a synth. The action makes for a quick, fun read. For all fans of the Alien-verse, Alien: Prototype arrives in paperback in bookstores next week.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    At the time I bought Tim Waggoner’s Alien: Prototype (set in the universe of the Alien and Aliens movies), it wasn’t at all obvious on Amazon that this was a follow-on to a specific other book (I believe it’s Alien: Isolation). So I was a little confused by a bunch of alluded-to background on the main character, Zula Hendricks, who apparently used to fight aliens with Amanda Ripley (Ellen’s daughter, I believe). However, once the story picks up you won’t feel left behind. As usual, corporate scie At the time I bought Tim Waggoner’s Alien: Prototype (set in the universe of the Alien and Aliens movies), it wasn’t at all obvious on Amazon that this was a follow-on to a specific other book (I believe it’s Alien: Isolation). So I was a little confused by a bunch of alluded-to background on the main character, Zula Hendricks, who apparently used to fight aliens with Amanda Ripley (Ellen’s daughter, I believe). However, once the story picks up you won’t feel left behind. As usual, corporate scientists are totally psychopathic and care about discovery at the cost of whatever human lives might be necessary. I guess I’m used to that with Weyland-Yutani, and it makes sense that they have a consistent corporate culture, but I would have liked to see a little variation in dealing with a rival corporation. On the other hand, that element is sort of part of the structure of Alien tales, so maybe it would be a bit weird if it weren’t present. I really like the character of spy Tamar, because she’s charismatic and it’s hard not to like her, but she’s utterly and completely self-serving. Zula is also great. She’s tough but has her own issues, and she does a great job dealing with needing her trainees’ help against the Necromorph but also trying to keep them alive. The advent of the Necromorph itself is fantastic. I love seeing the ways in which the Xenomorph’s adaptation to its host’s DNA changes the Xenomorph. This is a really interesting variation on that, and it introduces some irregularities into the Necromorph’s behavior. As usual there are a couple of synthetics in the mix, obvious from the start. Zula’s friend Davis is currently lacking a body, so he’s acting much as an AI in a computer, only much more human. He’s trying to stay under the radar while still helping Zula out by making things happen within the station computer system. Brigette is another synthetic who works for Dr. Gagnon; there’s some question as to how much free will she has, as she seems to disapprove of his methods but carries them out anyway. I’m enjoying reading Alien novels this week. I’d almost forgotten how much I love that franchise. Original review posted on my blog: http://www.errantdreams.com/2020/01/r...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shadow

    Overall I really enjoyed this novel. It's easy to read, predictable but fun, and somewhat shallow. I've not read any other book in this franchise, but I did play Alien: Isolation, and I didn't find to storyline to be confusing. This story is populated with a large, diverse cast of people - mostly women [explained in the book that women have a "more efficient" body and are thus better suited in some ways to life in space], lots of racial diversity, and a transgender character [who was introduced Overall I really enjoyed this novel. It's easy to read, predictable but fun, and somewhat shallow. I've not read any other book in this franchise, but I did play Alien: Isolation, and I didn't find to storyline to be confusing. This story is populated with a large, diverse cast of people - mostly women [explained in the book that women have a "more efficient" body and are thus better suited in some ways to life in space], lots of racial diversity, and a transgender character [who was introduced in an awkward manner]. I would have loved if the characters had more depth: many of them felt fairly one dimensional. That said, there were several great characters that I found myself rooting for. But my favorite character was a synth. Some interesting ideas were brought up about the emotional capacity of artificial intelligence that the story didn't dive into. I also felt that the book set up some compelling stuff with Zula's [the protagonist's] mental state - and possible PTSD - that didn't influence her thoughts or actions later on in the book. The action scenes were great and tense. The villains - an evil, unhinged scientist and a few others - were all delightfully hate-able. The pacing was perfect and I found myself reading long after I intended to stop. Although it had some issues, this book was a lot of fun.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Marshall Davis

    This is the first book I've read in the Alien franchise, not counting the novelization of the original film. I picked it up on a whim and I am pleasantly surpised at how it good it is. Much of the plot is familiar to anyone who has seen any of the films or, I can only assume, any of the novels. However, this book builds off familiar tropes and weaves new elements into what could have been a highly derivative work. The author provided solid characterizations to avoid the major players coming acro This is the first book I've read in the Alien franchise, not counting the novelization of the original film. I picked it up on a whim and I am pleasantly surpised at how it good it is. Much of the plot is familiar to anyone who has seen any of the films or, I can only assume, any of the novels. However, this book builds off familiar tropes and weaves new elements into what could have been a highly derivative work. The author provided solid characterizations to avoid the major players coming across as two-dimensional. The reader has to care about who is going up against the Xenomorph or whatever dangers exist. A couple of the human villains are a bit too familiar to fans of the franchise in how their goals and lack of morals or good sense are explained. They exist to facilitate the Alien's birth and that's about it. But the story has heroes and at least one morally ambiguous character to carry the narrative. It's not entirely perfect but I feel it deserves 5 stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Stone

    Audible has been rocking my sci-fi nerd world with its series of Alien audiobooks during the past few years.  The latest dark adventure by Tim Waggoner, entitled ‘Prototype,’ had me looking over my shoulder far more than usual during my morning walks.  This sumptuous nightmare was another study in the psychology of how greed tempers fear, and I had a marvelous time guessing which emotion would drive its characters into the monster’s jaws.  I particularly enjoyed this version of the xenomorph its Audible has been rocking my sci-fi nerd world with its series of Alien audiobooks during the past few years.  The latest dark adventure by Tim Waggoner, entitled ‘Prototype,’ had me looking over my shoulder far more than usual during my morning walks.  This sumptuous nightmare was another study in the psychology of how greed tempers fear, and I had a marvelous time guessing which emotion would drive its characters into the monster’s jaws.  I particularly enjoyed this version of the xenomorph itself, dubbed here a necromorph because of its insidious hunting method.  In the Alien franchise, each iteration of the beast always presents unique mutations imparted by its host, and this bad puppy was no disappointment. *begins to cough from puppy breath*

  13. 4 out of 5

    Laura Steinert

    I have read none of the other books in this "series" or the related books by other authors. I was interested in the glimpses inside the mind of the Alien, and was happy with the "explanation" of why the Alien looks different in each movie. I was a bit annoyed at first at how the chapters skipped from person to person, seemingly unconnected except on the same planet. However, because they were well-rounded and interesting characters, I kept reading. I was glad I did! Lots of action; pretty vivid I have read none of the other books in this "series" or the related books by other authors. I was interested in the glimpses inside the mind of the Alien, and was happy with the "explanation" of why the Alien looks different in each movie. I was a bit annoyed at first at how the chapters skipped from person to person, seemingly unconnected except on the same planet. However, because they were well-rounded and interesting characters, I kept reading. I was glad I did! Lots of action; pretty vivid descriptions of the colony, the new diseases, and the thought processes involved in the different approaches in how to deal with a deadly creature. Between 5 and 6 hours reading time, and entertainment time well spent.

  14. 4 out of 5

    R.A. Coulbeck

    Another excellent Alien novel! The tricky thing with Alien, is to keep it fresh. Too easily the stories could become repetitive. Thankfully, this story mixes things up with some truly inspired twists. Just when you thought a Xenomorph couldn't get more deadly! It also brings back some characters from the Alien 'expanded universe' so to speak. Not ones I'm that familiar with either, so it's prompted me to hunt down more stories they are in. Overall a really good book for any fans of the Alien univer Another excellent Alien novel! The tricky thing with Alien, is to keep it fresh. Too easily the stories could become repetitive. Thankfully, this story mixes things up with some truly inspired twists. Just when you thought a Xenomorph couldn't get more deadly! It also brings back some characters from the Alien 'expanded universe' so to speak. Not ones I'm that familiar with either, so it's prompted me to hunt down more stories they are in. Overall a really good book for any fans of the Alien universe.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    An interesting Alien tale, it took a little liberty with the aliens lifecycle but otherwise was ok. There's enough action to keep things going, the link to Amanda Ripley was tenuous at best but the main story has enough of a twist to make it not the same as all the other Alien stories. Not required reading by any means but if you're a big Alien fan then you'll enjoy this enough to be worthwhile.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bill Riggs

    In a lonely outpost on Jericho 3 scientists looking to exploit the value of a seized alien egg allow a human test subject to become impregnated. Unbeknownst to them their test subject had been suffering from cellular necrosis- now the newly emerged xenomorph has integrated the disease into its on DNA. The new necromorph is on a mission to spread disease and death to every remaining human in the colony.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Larry Mortensen

    Good story A new twist on the alien franchise adding an even deadlier component to an already indestructible creature. I honestly liked this story better than the first novel in the series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Adam O'Grady

    A strong scifi/horror/action entrant in the Alien series focusing on the accidental creation of a hybrid Xenomorph. Some heavy tropes in the characters but also some good and diverse representation with a nice intense build-up.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Keith

    Really enjoyed this, I'm a big fan of the Zula Hendricks and Amanda Ripley comic arc (and the Isolation game) so seeing Zula getting a novel was great. Really fast-paced exciting stuff, and probably the most I've enjoyed an Alien novel in recent years.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John R. Dailey Jr.

    THEM ALIENS IS MORE BAD, THEY ARE.. Hello, this story was okay. I liked the new twist with the alien. It just didn't keep me glued to the story. A lot of people died in very unusual ways. Thanks.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bill Brinkley

    It was an interesting story and had several please twists. I recommend this book for Alien fans.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Delaney

    An entertaining but by the numbers Alien book. I really enjoyed Zula's interactions with her trainees.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Craig Andrews

    A cracking read. Alien books are hard to write without going over the top or rehashing Alien & Aliens. Whilst this book did indeed do that it did it well. Recommended. A cracking read. Alien books are hard to write without going over the top or rehashing Alien & Aliens. Whilst this book did indeed do that it did it well. Recommended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ienjoyhorror

    Would make an amazing Alien movie, with elements from Aliens, if Ridley Scott could realize that he's making an Alien movie, not a blade runner movie about androids.

  25. 4 out of 5

    JJ Steyn

    It's a pretty average "squad of soldiers hunts an Alien" Alien book. It's worth a read if that's what you're looking for, but otherwise you're better off going for something like Aliens Cold Forge or the new Aliens Phalanx. Not terrible, but nothing groundbreaking either.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Edward Taylor

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lee

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Grozan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Casey Ray

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cherise

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