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The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company

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A grand vision defined: The CEO of Disney, one of Time's most influential people of 2019, shares the ideas and values he embraced to reinvent one of the most beloved companies in the world and inspire the people who bring the magic to life. Robert Iger became CEO of The Walt Disney Company in 2005, during a difficult time. Competition was more intense than ever and technology A grand vision defined: The CEO of Disney, one of Time's most influential people of 2019, shares the ideas and values he embraced to reinvent one of the most beloved companies in the world and inspire the people who bring the magic to life. Robert Iger became CEO of The Walt Disney Company in 2005, during a difficult time. Competition was more intense than ever and technology was changing faster than at any time in the company's history. His vision came down to three clear ideas: Recommit to the concept that quality matters, embrace technology instead of fighting it, and think bigger--think global--and turn Disney into a stronger brand in international markets. Twelve years later, Disney is the largest, most respected media company in the world, counting Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and 21st Century Fox among its properties. Its value is nearly five times what it was when Iger took over, and he is recognized as one of the most innovative and successful CEOs of our era. In The Ride of a Lifetime, Robert Iger shares the lessons he's learned while running Disney and leading its 200,000 employees, and he explores the principles that are necessary for true leadership, including: - Optimism. Even in the face of difficulty, an optimistic leader will find the path toward the best possible outcome and focus on that, rather than give in to pessimism and blaming. - Courage. Leaders have to be willing to take risks and place big bets. Fear of failure destroys creativity. - Decisiveness. All decisions, no matter how difficult, can be made on a timely basis. Indecisiveness is both wasteful and destructive to morale. - Fairness. Treat people decently, with empathy, and be accessible to them. This book is about the relentless curiosity that has driven Iger for forty-five years, since the day he started as the lowliest studio grunt at ABC. It's also about thoughtfulness and respect, and a decency-over-dollars approach that has become the bedrock of every project and partnership Iger pursues, from a deep friendship with Steve Jobs in his final years to an abiding love of the Star Wars mythology. "The ideas in this book strike me as universal" Iger writes. "Not just to the aspiring CEOs of the world, but to anyone wanting to feel less fearful, more confidently themselves, as they navigate their professional and even personal lives."


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A grand vision defined: The CEO of Disney, one of Time's most influential people of 2019, shares the ideas and values he embraced to reinvent one of the most beloved companies in the world and inspire the people who bring the magic to life. Robert Iger became CEO of The Walt Disney Company in 2005, during a difficult time. Competition was more intense than ever and technology A grand vision defined: The CEO of Disney, one of Time's most influential people of 2019, shares the ideas and values he embraced to reinvent one of the most beloved companies in the world and inspire the people who bring the magic to life. Robert Iger became CEO of The Walt Disney Company in 2005, during a difficult time. Competition was more intense than ever and technology was changing faster than at any time in the company's history. His vision came down to three clear ideas: Recommit to the concept that quality matters, embrace technology instead of fighting it, and think bigger--think global--and turn Disney into a stronger brand in international markets. Twelve years later, Disney is the largest, most respected media company in the world, counting Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm, and 21st Century Fox among its properties. Its value is nearly five times what it was when Iger took over, and he is recognized as one of the most innovative and successful CEOs of our era. In The Ride of a Lifetime, Robert Iger shares the lessons he's learned while running Disney and leading its 200,000 employees, and he explores the principles that are necessary for true leadership, including: - Optimism. Even in the face of difficulty, an optimistic leader will find the path toward the best possible outcome and focus on that, rather than give in to pessimism and blaming. - Courage. Leaders have to be willing to take risks and place big bets. Fear of failure destroys creativity. - Decisiveness. All decisions, no matter how difficult, can be made on a timely basis. Indecisiveness is both wasteful and destructive to morale. - Fairness. Treat people decently, with empathy, and be accessible to them. This book is about the relentless curiosity that has driven Iger for forty-five years, since the day he started as the lowliest studio grunt at ABC. It's also about thoughtfulness and respect, and a decency-over-dollars approach that has become the bedrock of every project and partnership Iger pursues, from a deep friendship with Steve Jobs in his final years to an abiding love of the Star Wars mythology. "The ideas in this book strike me as universal" Iger writes. "Not just to the aspiring CEOs of the world, but to anyone wanting to feel less fearful, more confidently themselves, as they navigate their professional and even personal lives."

30 review for The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Katsanakis

    I really enjoyed how candid Iger chose to be here. Not a lot of sugarcoating at all. The narratives of the Pixar, Marvel, and Lucasfilm acquisitions were all fascinating.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Avneesh Mehta

    Part business lessons, part personal journey, and part the rise of today's dominant entertainment empire, this book is endlessly fascinating and consistently engaging. Chapters such as the acquisition of Pixar are written with the sort of nail-biting edge of your seat intensity that would make thrillers envious. Who knew board room meetings and phone calls could be so exciting? I think Bob Iger struck the perfect balance of personal and professional. A genuinely interesting and surprising person Part business lessons, part personal journey, and part the rise of today's dominant entertainment empire, this book is endlessly fascinating and consistently engaging. Chapters such as the acquisition of Pixar are written with the sort of nail-biting edge of your seat intensity that would make thrillers envious. Who knew board room meetings and phone calls could be so exciting? I think Bob Iger struck the perfect balance of personal and professional. A genuinely interesting and surprising personal touch was his relationship with Steve Jobs, I had no idea how close the two were. As someone's who's followed every move Disney has made for years and been in awe of Bob Iger's ability to navigate the evolving media landscape and make calculated acquisitions to position Disney at the top, this book was an invaluable inside/behind the scenes look at how so many defining deals went down. His personal journey chronicling his 45 year rise to the most powerful man in entertainment was also a marvel and came with some valuable insights, lessons and exciting "how will he make this happen" moments. I loved this book and only wish it were longer and even more detailed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ursula Johnson

    A Positive, Life Affirming, Uplifting Read This was a wonderful book about Robert Iger's amazing life, career and positive outlook. With so many CEOs who aren't always good people, good for their business or don't care for their employees, it is a breath of fresh air to hear from someone who is grounded in reality, treats people the way they should be treated, forward thinking and committed to quality and his customers. His insights to years at ABC are fascinating, horrifying, and give an in A Positive, Life Affirming, Uplifting Read This was a wonderful book about Robert Iger's amazing life, career and positive outlook. With so many CEOs who aren't always good people, good for their business or don't care for their employees, it is a breath of fresh air to hear from someone who is grounded in reality, treats people the way they should be treated, forward thinking and committed to quality and his customers. His insights to years at ABC are fascinating, horrifying, and give an insightful look at the evolution of a major network. His Disney career was frought with challenges, but he rose above them and remained the better man. His visionary view of knowing that the stale model Disney operated under needed to be upended. Many criticized his choices, decisions and views, but they were proved spectacularly wrong. I loved the stories about Steve Jobs, the acquisition of Pixar and how things turned around. My favorite parts of the book were about Marvel and Star Wars, since I am a huge fan of both. The tremendous success of Marvel films lies in the fact the films are made by fans for fans and are high quality with strong stories, wonderful characters and excellent production. He mentions Black Panther as one of his personal favorite projects, not believing naysayers that claimed films about women and blacks would not do well. The incredible success of both films proved him right. Despite some Star Wars fans misgivings, I am grateful that Disney bought Lucasfilm and gave us new Star Wars content. New films, books and shows are being created and I have already signed up for Disney +. As I write this, it was just announced that Marvel's Kevin Fiege will be working on a Star Wars film. I can't wait for that, it Wil be epic! Throughout the book, he shares his tips for successful business and management. A good portion is common sense, which is in short supply in many areas. I read this book using immersion reading while listening to the audio book. Mr. Iger reads two portions at the beginning and end of the book and is a wonderful narrator. The rest of the book is ably handled by Jim Frangione. A wonderful, positive life affirming, uplifting read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    I was really hoping for more insights into how Disney was run and his leadership style. Was a light version of both. Some cool stories about buying Pixar but would have preferred way more details.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jarrod

    I didn’t know who Bob Iger was until I heard an interview with Oprah recently. He came across as an authentic and genuine man with integrity. I loved his mild and calm demeanor and decided to buy the book. I thoroughly enjoyed it. He spends little time on his own life and rather focuses on his time at ABC and Disney. Whilst giving credit to many of his colleagues, the book shows that he is a man of integrity and is very well respected by his colleagues. I loved the summary of his wisd I didn’t know who Bob Iger was until I heard an interview with Oprah recently. He came across as an authentic and genuine man with integrity. I loved his mild and calm demeanor and decided to buy the book. I thoroughly enjoyed it. He spends little time on his own life and rather focuses on his time at ABC and Disney. Whilst giving credit to many of his colleagues, the book shows that he is a man of integrity and is very well respected by his colleagues. I loved the summary of his wisdom at the end. A quick read, certainly worth the money spent....and now I know who Bob Iger is!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dale Wyant

    Iger is blatantly honest and sincere in this memoir. I read "Disney Wars," by James Stewart and was happy to get the next phase of the Disney story. Iger's list of how to succeed as a leader is a must read for any and all heads of companies or organizations.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Halordain

    The leadership components of this life story are enlightening and applicable. But what I picked up this book to learn was in-depth insight into managing the creative process, negotiating difficult personalities, and creating a unique creative culture at Disney and subsumed companies. Although the book told a coherent, clear storyline with interesting vignettes, it ultimately glossed over key moments in the general sense, rather than diving deep and mining their emotions. Some examples:

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    "True authority and true leadership come from knowing who you are and not pretending to be anything else. Robert Iger, Bob as everyone calls him, is the CEO of one of the largest corporations in the world. As the head of the Walt Disney Company, he has the unenviable task of honoring the legacy of the famed company's founder while keeping it relevant and profitable in modern times. The way in which entertainment is created and consumed is drastically different from dear old Walt's days. In his b "True authority and true leadership come from knowing who you are and not pretending to be anything else. Robert Iger, Bob as everyone calls him, is the CEO of one of the largest corporations in the world. As the head of the Walt Disney Company, he has the unenviable task of honoring the legacy of the famed company's founder while keeping it relevant and profitable in modern times. The way in which entertainment is created and consumed is drastically different from dear old Walt's days. In his book The Ride of a Lifetime, Iger writes about his journey from starting at the bottom of ABC to becoming the head of the Disney company at a time when it was in a state of turmoil. Iger presents his managerial advice through a chronological look back at his remarkable career. He started as a studio grunt at ABC nearly 45 years ago. His undying curiosity combined with a willful work ethic to help him start to climb the ranks of the company. Iger credits the mentorship of his bosses during that time for not only teaching him aspects of the business but showing him the qualities needed to be a leader. After cutting his teeth in the sports section of the network, bosses took a chance on him and thrust him into the role of head of prime time. Thrust into a role he really didn't know about, Iger learned to admit what he didn't know and be gracious to the people who could teach him. It seems that those early years really prepared Iger for taking on the job of running Disney. At the time he took over, Michael Eisner's tenure was coming to a tumultuous close. The company was floundering creatively and suffering financially because of it. Most alarming, Walt Disney Animation the once bright spot on which the company was grown, was completely out of touch with what made it special. Iger turned to an unlikely partnership with Steve Job's Pixar to reinvigorate the culture of creativity at the company. In an unprecedented move, Disney purchased Pixar and brought in their leadership to help rebuild Walt Disney Animation. This move not only breathed new life into the company, but foreshadowed the bold move of acquiring Marvel, Lucasfilm, and 20th Century Fox. In The Ride of a Lifetime, Bob Iger reflects back on his remarkable professional triumphs and challenges with refreshing candor that really draws you in. Yes, he runs one of the largest media conglomerates in the world, but he seems so genuine and down to earth in how he deals with his people. I especially related to the way he owns what he knows and doesn't know, never "bossing" the people who are more knowledgeable than he is. The book works as both a practical managerial thesis and a compelling memoir, the kind of read that will reveal different layers to different readers. I highly recommend it to those in leadership positions and casual Disney fans alike.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nacho Santos

    Ride of a lifetime by Robert Iger This is a different kind of review, since its more of a lesson oriented book I'll share with you what stood out to me from the book. (Consists of mostly direct quotes) Cherish waking up early. It is time for yourself before the rest of the world wakes up. (Learned from Roone) Do what you need to do to make it better. The relentless pursuit of perfection. It's a mindset more than a specific set of rules.It about creating an environment in wh Ride of a lifetime by Robert Iger This is a different kind of review, since its more of a lesson oriented book I'll share with you what stood out to me from the book. (Consists of mostly direct quotes) Cherish waking up early. It is time for yourself before the rest of the world wakes up. (Learned from Roone) Do what you need to do to make it better. The relentless pursuit of perfection. It's a mindset more than a specific set of rules.It about creating an environment in which you refuse to accept mediocrity. What he learned from Sushi documentary: Sushi Chef still trying to perfect his art at 80. Specific details that make the experience its best. Again embodying the relentless pursuit of perfection. Michael Ovitz saw things that people did not see and demanded it. See the details. Great is often a collection of very small things. If you approach people with respect and empathy, the seemingly impossible can become real From the Appendix A company’s reputation is the sum total of the actions of its people and the quality of its products. Demand integrity from your people and your products at all times. Sweating the details can show much you care. Great is often a collection of very small things. The downside of micromanagement can show that you don’t trust the people who work for you. Always be open to change. Be clear about your priorities, especially when toward your employees. Don't let them do the guesswork. -This is what we want to be, this is how we are going to get there

  10. 5 out of 5

    Allyson

    Incredible man, incredible career. I listened to the audible of this book, and highly enjoyed it. In fact, I was sad when the booked ended and have since spent time finding podcast interviews he has done (i.e., Oprah's SuperSoul conversations). This is book is focused on his career and weaves in life lessons throughout the book. I felt everything was highly applicable to a wide swath of people and provided many lessons in leadership. Felt very relatable. Would highly recommend to anyone, for bus Incredible man, incredible career. I listened to the audible of this book, and highly enjoyed it. In fact, I was sad when the booked ended and have since spent time finding podcast interviews he has done (i.e., Oprah's SuperSoul conversations). This is book is focused on his career and weaves in life lessons throughout the book. I felt everything was highly applicable to a wide swath of people and provided many lessons in leadership. Felt very relatable. Would highly recommend to anyone, for business or for fun.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben Mattson

    This book was very engaging and will be especially compelling for a few types of people. 1) People who are interested in Disney should read this book. It provides fascinating history and insight into the decisions the company has made over the last 15 years, as well as a look into the lives of Bob and others who made the company what it is today. 2) People who want to be great leaders should read this book. Bob Iger is undoubtedly an exceptional leader and he skillfully integrates his lessoned l This book was very engaging and will be especially compelling for a few types of people. 1) People who are interested in Disney should read this book. It provides fascinating history and insight into the decisions the company has made over the last 15 years, as well as a look into the lives of Bob and others who made the company what it is today. 2) People who want to be great leaders should read this book. Bob Iger is undoubtedly an exceptional leader and he skillfully integrates his lessoned learned into an interesting and engaging tale of his history 3) People who are interested in a compelling story about the shifting of the behemoths of the entertainment industry should read this book. Bob Iger has been a major player in, or at least a spectator for, many fascinating events in the entertainment industry throughout his long career. This book gives you a look into the inner workings of the industry from a film executive standpoint. I would thoroughly recommend this book. It is compellingly written and an engaging read. It is brief but thorough, and packed with interesting stories, valuable lessons, and an exclusive perspective on an industry titan who, until now, has been a bit of a mystery. You should read it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dale Duncan

    I worked at the same company as the author, Capital Cities/ABC. He was a star then, in sports working for Roone Arledge, and quickly rose through the ranks under Chairman Tom Murphy and President Dan Burke. He not only survived our acquisition by Disney (I did not), but emerged to eventually succeed Michael Eisner, as Head Mouse. This book about his experience and thoughts on leadership can serve as valuable guidance to anyone seeking a career in corporate America. His focus on self-awareness, b I worked at the same company as the author, Capital Cities/ABC. He was a star then, in sports working for Roone Arledge, and quickly rose through the ranks under Chairman Tom Murphy and President Dan Burke. He not only survived our acquisition by Disney (I did not), but emerged to eventually succeed Michael Eisner, as Head Mouse. This book about his experience and thoughts on leadership can serve as valuable guidance to anyone seeking a career in corporate America. His focus on self-awareness, basic strategy, negotiation and bedrock values provides a roadmap to success. It’s a quick read. The stories behind the headlines are compelling.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Einaras

    One of the best business books I’ve read. Real page turner. Arguably the best leadership book in recent years.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mediaman

    Fairly unique "leadership book" written while a CEO is in office where Disney chief Iger discusses a bit of his younger years, has a strong middle section where he throws many industry leaders under the bus, then wastes the last third of the book with vague details about acquiring other major companies. Overall very worth reading, but once he acquires Pixar the rest of it is pretty dull, including his claim to have thought about running for president in 2020 (as a Democrat). The title is also a Fairly unique "leadership book" written while a CEO is in office where Disney chief Iger discusses a bit of his younger years, has a strong middle section where he throws many industry leaders under the bus, then wastes the last third of the book with vague details about acquiring other major companies. Overall very worth reading, but once he acquires Pixar the rest of it is pretty dull, including his claim to have thought about running for president in 2020 (as a Democrat). The title is also a subtle follow-up to the great Brandon Tartikoff's The Last Great Ride, which had much more in it about the inner workings of a broadcast company. Iger comes across as a nice guy but this book is edited carefully by his "team," that seems to lean heavily on his Chief Communication Officer/PR person who is always worried about Iger looking good. His childhood stories are minimal, just enough to make you feel a bit sorry for him while admiring his parents. His early years with ABC greats like Roone Arledge are interesting although not extremely detailed. It isn't until he gets into the Michael Eisner years that things come alive and Iger doesn't hold back on the negatives that many Hollywood executives brought to the table. Most refreshing was his relationship with Steve Jobs and the story of how Iger salvaged the Disney relationship with Pixar. Some surprising revelations are made in the middle of the book, I only wish there were more in the more recent years. Instead the last third is pretty dull and repetitive, with Iger trying to acquire Marvel and Star Wars. He reveals very little and then fails to address head-on some of the issues his company had with sexual accusations against Harvey Weinstein and John Lasseter. What's also missing is any sense that Iger caused any real problems or that he isn't the great leader he claims to be. Outside perspectives should have been included. While much of what he says sounds good, in reality he has tens of thousands of Disney employees not making a living wage while his stockholders make millions. To self-proclaim this a "leadership book" is a bit misleading. Few people will get the chance to make the kind of major multi-billion dollar decisions Iger has been involved with. His principles are fine but he needed more stories to illustrate them for the common worker. The book is too short, needs more than just a broad overview of his big deals, and in the end seems like it was released to be timed to promote the start of the Disney+ service. Maybe he should have waited until after his retirement to tell even more inside stories and not worry about cranking out a somewhat fantasy tale of the magical CEO whose company lives happily ever after.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sergio Diaz

    Practically I read this book in a couple days, the back stage of the company that many admired, more that just a history of success, is and history of a human been with all the feelings to involve working in a environment with a lot of different personalities from Steve Jobs to Roy Disney, and how to mange those different personalities and egos, I love this book and I admire more the work of Bob

  16. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    Thanks to Penguin Random House for sending me this goodreads giveaway. Robert Iger comes across as an honest, hard working, even likable man. He states this book is not a memoir instead lessons he's learned. However given this story every chance, I was not able to finish and give an honest rating. There were too many sentences beginning with "I" and it became a challenge to count how many appeared in each paragraph defeating the purpose of reading. Sorry.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    Highly highly recommend this book, a hugely inspirational journey of his path to Disney CEO and a compelling overview of key decisions he had to make esp around acquisitions. Really heartening to see what can happen when people put the customers and product first and stay true to a mission

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    “Life’s an adventure,” she said. “If you don’t choose the adventurous path, then you’re not really living.” Rating: 5/5 I’VE WORKED FOR the same company for forty-five years: twenty-two of them at ABC, another twenty-three at Disney, after Disney acquired ABC in 1995. For the past fourteen years, I’ve had the enviable task of being the sixth CEO to run the company since Walt founded it in 1923. There have been difficult, even tragic, days. But for me this has also been, to steal/>

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Keithly

    As a big fan of Disney, Pixar, Marvel, and Star Wars, this book naturally called to me. Robert Iger writes a book that is part memoir, but really, it is a view from the top on how Disney acquired all of those companies plus Fox to become the entertainment giant that it is today. Along the way, Iger has plenty to offer about running the company, but it is really a book on being on CEO, looking to the future, and how to be a leader, and less a book about Disney World. In fact, there is really very As a big fan of Disney, Pixar, Marvel, and Star Wars, this book naturally called to me. Robert Iger writes a book that is part memoir, but really, it is a view from the top on how Disney acquired all of those companies plus Fox to become the entertainment giant that it is today. Along the way, Iger has plenty to offer about running the company, but it is really a book on being on CEO, looking to the future, and how to be a leader, and less a book about Disney World. In fact, there is really very little discussion of the theme parks at all. Iger lays out all his lessons of leadership at the beginning of the book, and then as he progresses through his tenure at Disney, each of those lessons comes to life. While it is an interesting study in leadership, I think many Disney fans will find it to be a fascinating look at how he dealt with the likes of Steve Jobs and George Lucas as he continued to make acquisitions and grow the business. Another fascinating section of the book is Iger's discussion of the soon to launch Disney+ service. It comes under a chapter entitled "Innovate or Die." Iger sees that the future of media is in the direct to consumer model. So, he has directed Disney towards achieving that model even if it means short term loss. It is a bold move, but it is hard to say he is wrong.

  20. 5 out of 5

    John

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There are numerous business lessons scattered throughout the book and a nice summary of Iger’s lessons in “lessons to life by” towards the end. Iger’s passion and intensity can be felt throughout the book and this guy is a real go-getter (he gets up at 4:30am each day to workout!). I was also amazed by his high level of empathy as a leader and how he has dealt with numerous difficult situations over the years. This is a good quick read/listen and I enjoyed it - if I were to pick at the book, you There are numerous business lessons scattered throughout the book and a nice summary of Iger’s lessons in “lessons to life by” towards the end. Iger’s passion and intensity can be felt throughout the book and this guy is a real go-getter (he gets up at 4:30am each day to workout!). I was also amazed by his high level of empathy as a leader and how he has dealt with numerous difficult situations over the years. This is a good quick read/listen and I enjoyed it - if I were to pick at the book, you do have to wonder if this novel is a bit of a PR move to set up Iger for something greater down the line (i.e. President of U.S.). Nonetheless, this is a great business read and should be a good holiday gift for the 2019 season. If I were to take one lesson/story from the book: Don’t be the greatest trombone-oil manufacturer in the world / i.e. don’t spend time on low ROI projects, focus on what matters. Here are some of my other favorite quotes and stories from the book: 1. And I tend to approach bad news as a problem that can be worked through and solved, something I have control over rather than something happening to me. Iger has the ultimate internal locus of control - he seems to feel that hard work and passion will win the day - this is a great mindset to have. 2. The Relentless Pursuit of Perfection. This doesn’t mean perfectionism at all costs, but it does mean a refusal to accept mediocrity or make excuses for something being “good enough.” If you believe that something can be made better, put in the effort to do it. If you’re in the business of making things, be in the business of making things great. When I talk about this particular quality of leadership, I refer to it as “the relentless pursuit of perfection.” In practice that means a lot of things, and it’s hard to define. It’s a mindset, really, more than a specific set of rules. A common theme throughout this book - the pursuit of excellence. 3. Their business strategy was fairly simple. They were hyper vigilant about controlling costs, and they believed in a decentralized corporate structure. Meaning: They didn’t think every key decision should be made by the two of them or by a small group of strategists in corporate headquarters. Tom Murphy and Dan Burke had a great influence on not only Iger’s direction in life, but also his management style. Their emphasis on a decentralized corporate structure was something Iger ultimately tried to emulate at Disney when he become CEO. 4. I never start out negatively, and unless we’re in the late stages of a production, I never start small. I’ve found that often people will focus on little details as a way of masking a lack of any clear, coherent, big thoughts. If you start petty, you seem petty. And if the big picture is a mess, then the small things don’t matter anyway, and you shouldn’t spend time focusing on them. Great feedback lessons here. 5. Dan handed me a note that read: “Avoid getting into the business of manufacturing trombone oil. You may become the greatest trombone-oil manufacturer in the world, but in the end, the world only consumes a few quarts of trombone oil a year!” He was telling me not to invest in projects that would sap the resources of my company and me and not give much back. It was such a positive way to impart that wisdom, though, and I still have that piece of paper in my desk, occasionally pulling it out when I talk to Disney executives about what projects to pursue and where to put their energy. Love this story and this may end up being my #1 story from the entire book - don’t get into small side-projects that consume lots of time. 6. Michael’s biggest stroke of genius, though, might have been his recognition that Disney was sitting on tremendously valuable assets that they hadn’t yet leveraged. One was the popularity of the parks. If they raised ticket prices even slightly, they would raise revenue significantly, without any noticeable impact on the number of visitors. The value of DIS’s IP - probably a nice parallel to today and the upcoming streaming wars which are just beginning. 7. Michael had plenty of valid reasons to be pessimistic, but as a leader you can’t communicate that pessimism to the people around you. It’s ruinous to morale. It saps energy and inspiration. Decisions get made from a protective, defensive posture. Optimism sets a different machine in motion. Especially in difficult moments, the people you lead need to feel confident in your ability to focus on what matters, and not to operate from a place of defensiveness and self-preservation. This isn’t about saying things are good when they’re not, and it’s not about conveying some innate faith that “things will work out.” It’s about believing you and the people around you can steer toward the best outcome, and not communicating the feeling that all is lost if things don’t break your way. The tone you set as a leader has an enormous effect on the people around you. No one wants to follow a pessimist. Another great leadership nugget - no one likes to follow a pessimistic leader! Be an optimist. 8. Priorities are the few things that you’re going to spend a lot of time and a lot of capital on. Not only do you undermine their significance by having too many, but nobody is going to remember them all. “You’re going to seem unfocused,” he said. “You only get three. I can’t tell you what those three should be. We don’t have to figure that out today. You never have to tell me what they are if you don’t want to. But you only get three.” Good story for when Iger was interviewing to be the next CEO of Disney - he kept his priorities to just 3 (or was coached for this) and has labored at these points for years. 9. PEOPLE SOMETIMES SHY AWAY from taking big swings because they assess the odds and build a case against trying something before they even take the first step. One of the things I’ve always instinctively felt—and something that was greatly reinforced working for people like Roone and Michael—is that long shots aren’t usually as long as they seem. Roone and Michael both believed in their own power and in the ability of their organizations to make things happen—that with enough energy and thoughtfulness and commitment, even the boldest ideas could be executed. I tried to adopt that mindset in my ensuing conversations with Steve. Great story as it relates to going after Pixar and a great life lessons too. Take big shots in life, you never know and the odds are better than you think. 10. I entered the boardroom on a mission. I even took a moment before I walked into the room to look again at Theodore Roosevelt’s “The Man in the Arena” speech, which has long been an inspiration: “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. Always a great speech to remember and this helped Iger when he spoke to the board before proposing the Pixar acquisition.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Li Li

    A powerful book well written - succinct but not dry at all. Bob presented some most important leadership lessons in the must humble way. Highly recommend to anyone who wants to live a life with no disappoints and regrets. Sometimes, even though you’re “in charge”, you need to be aware that in the moment you might have nothing to add, and so you don’t wade in. You trust your people to do their jobs and focus your energies on some other pressing issue. Do what you need to do to make it A powerful book well written - succinct but not dry at all. Bob presented some most important leadership lessons in the must humble way. Highly recommend to anyone who wants to live a life with no disappoints and regrets. Sometimes, even though you’re “in charge”, you need to be aware that in the moment you might have nothing to add, and so you don’t wade in. You trust your people to do their jobs and focus your energies on some other pressing issue. Do what you need to do to make it better. When I talk about this particular quality of leadership, I refer to it as ‘the relentless pursuit of perfection”. It’s a mindset as I internalized it, it is not about perfectionism at all cost. Instead, it’s about creating an environment in which you refuse to accept mediocrity. You instinctively push back against the urge to say “good enough” is good enough. Shokunin (工匠) - the endless pursuit of perfection for some greater good. This is what it looks like to take immense personal pride in the work you create, and to have both the instinct toward perfection and the work ethic to follow through on that instinct. Documentary: Jiro Dreams of Sushi I was determined to work hard and learn as much as I could learn. I didn’t have a clear idea of what “success” meant, no specific vision of being wealthy or powerful, but I was determined not to live a life of disappointment. Whatever shape my life took, I told myself, there wasn’t a chance in the world that I was going to toil in frustration and lack of fulfillment I don’t carry much pain with me from those early years, other than the pain that my dad didn’t live a happier life, and that my mother suffered, too, as a result. I wish he could have felt prouder of himself. In your work, in your life, you will be more respected and trusted by the people around you if you honestly own up to your mistakes. It is impossible not to make them; but it is possible to acknowledge them, learn from them, and set an example that it is Okay to get things wrong sometimes. What’s not Okay is to undermine others by lying about something or covering your own ass first. Be decent to people, treat everyone with fairness and empathy. Life is an adventure, if you don’t choose the adventurous path, you are not living. You have a job. They are expecting you to turn this business around. Your inexperience can’t be an excuse for failure. So what do you do in a situation like that? The first rule is not to fake anything. YOu have to be humble, and you can’t pretend to be someone you are not or to know something you don’t. You’re also in a position of leadership, though, so you can’t let humility prevent you from leading. It’s a fine line. You have to ask the questions you need to ask, admit without apology that you don’t understand, and do the work to learn what you need to learn as quickly as you can. There’s nothing less confidence inspiring than a person faking a knowledge they do not possess. True authority and true leadership come from knowing who you are and not pretending to be anything else. The task was to not let my ego get the best of me. Rather than trying too hard to impress whoever was across the table, I needed to resist the urge to pretend I knew what I was doing and ask a lot of questions. I didn’t have a big personality or any obvious swagger. I barely knew anyone in town. I could be insecure about that, or I could let my relative blandness be a kind of mystery that worked to my advantage while I absorbed as much as I could. There are important lessons about structure and pacing and clarity that I’d absorbed without even knowing it. I never start out negatively, and unless we’re in the late stages of a production, I never start small. I’ve found that often people will focus on the little details as a way of masking a lack of any clear, coherent, big thoughts. If you start petty, you seem petty. And if the big picture is a mess, then the small things don’t matter anyway, and you shouldn’t spend time focusing on them. I make a point of directing praise and attention to my coworkers. WHen I am the one attending a meeting with a group outside of my team, I make sure to connect and speak with every person at the table. It’s a small gesture, but I remember how it felt to be the overlooked sidekick, and anything that reminds you that you are not the center of the universe is a good thing. Managing your own time and respecting other’s time is one of the most vital things to do as a manager. Those moments when you find yourself hoping that something will work without being able to convincingly explain to yourself how it will work - that’s when a little bell should go off, and you should walk yourself through some clarifying questions. WHat’s the problem I need to solve? Does this solution make sense? If I am feeling some doubt, why? Am I doing this for sound reasons or am I motivated by something personal? Second in line - It’s important to know how to find the balance - do the job you have well; be patient; look for opportunities to pitch in and expand and grow; and make yourself one of the people, through attitude and energy and focus, that your bosses feel they have to turn to when an opportunity arises. Conversely, if you are a boss, these are the people to nurture - not the ones who are clamoring for promotions and complaining about not being utilized enough but the ones who are proving themselves to be indispensable day in and day out. A company’s culture is shaped by a lot of things, but this is one of the most important - you have to convey your priorities clearly and repeatedly. In my experience, it’s what separates great managers from the rest. The biggest task before me is to continue to make the best case I can make for myself and ignore all of the distractions that I couldn’t control. As much as this process was a test of my idea, it was also a test of my temperament, and I couldn’t let the negativity being expressed by people who knew little about me affect the way I felt about myself. “A few solid pros are more powerful than dozens of cons.” Steve Jobs said. Steve was great at weighing all sides of an issue and not allowing negatives to drown out positives, particularly for things he wanted to accomplish. It was a powerful quality of his.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vivek Srivastava

    A fluent read and wonderfully articulated by Rob. From humble beginnings to top of the ladder in one of the most famed company is the story of this book, telling us about important management and leadership lessons. The book focuses on learning, taking care of employees and customers (more importantly showing humane side), negotiation considerations and integrity. Key points from summary in the last chapter are: 1. Innovate or die 2. Pursuit of perfection is a mindset 3. Take resp A fluent read and wonderfully articulated by Rob. From humble beginnings to top of the ladder in one of the most famed company is the story of this book, telling us about important management and leadership lessons. The book focuses on learning, taking care of employees and customers (more importantly showing humane side), negotiation considerations and integrity. Key points from summary in the last chapter are: 1. Innovate or die 2. Pursuit of perfection is a mindset 3. Take responsibility of failure 4. Be decent to people 5. Excellence and fairness don't need to mutually exclusive 6. True integrity is knowing yourself and your own clear sense of right and wrong 7. Value ability more than experience 8. Ask questions 9. Managing creativity is art not science 10.Don't start negatively and don't start small 11. If you want innovation you need to grant permission to fail 12. Don't be in business of playing it safe 13. Don't let ambition get ahead of opportunity 14. Prioritize what to pursue and where to put energy 15. Dysfunctional top is catastrophe for company 16. Listen to people's problem and help them find solutions 17. Develop others to step into your shoes 18. A company's reputation is dependent on its people's integrity and quality of its product 19.Leaders should be wary of pessimism and should ensure it doesn't percolate down 20. Optimism emerges from faith in yourself and in the people who work for you 21. With enough thoughtfulness and commitment, the boldest ideas can be executed 22. Communicate priorities clearly and repeatedly to ensure direction for people 23. Technological advancement will eventually make older business model obsolete, so embrace it 24. Focus on future and not on past 25. Its easy to be optimistic when everyone is telling you you're great. It's much harder and much more necessary, when your sense of yourself is on the line 26. Treating others with respect is an undervalued currency when it comes to negotiating 27. Do your homework 28. If something doesn't feel right to you, it won't be right for you 29. Acquisition is not only about physical assets but about people as well 30. As a leader you are embodiment of the company 31. Be honest in your conversation on difficult news to people 32. Hire people who are good in addition to being good at what they do 33. In any negotiation be clear about where you stand from the beginning 34. Communicate yourself being part of stressful situation with the people 35. Most deals are personal. Know what's at stake for the other person 36. Be in the business of making something great 37. To disrupt requires to take short term losses for better long term success. This requires great courage 38. Power for too long corrupts and so you have to work consciously and actively to fend off its corrosive effects 39. Approach your work and life with a sense of humility 40. Hold on to you awareness of yourself and don't get drawn by your title Throughout the book, Rob has been telling his journey with candor and humility. It's a rare sign of great leadership.

  23. 5 out of 5

    *mk*

    I decided to read this book because I worked at Walt Disney World for almost 4 years post-college, and I knew my thoughts and feelings as a minimum-wage worker, so I was intrigued to see the other side of it, from the literally the highest peak of the Disney tier. As a writer, Iger is solid. The book drags a bit at the end, but he writes a strong opening and he shares interesting parts of Disney history without the book sounding like a gossipy tell-all (though it does get a little bor I decided to read this book because I worked at Walt Disney World for almost 4 years post-college, and I knew my thoughts and feelings as a minimum-wage worker, so I was intrigued to see the other side of it, from the literally the highest peak of the Disney tier. As a writer, Iger is solid. The book drags a bit at the end, but he writes a strong opening and he shares interesting parts of Disney history without the book sounding like a gossipy tell-all (though it does get a little boring in the final half; he loses a lot of momentum once we hit present-day, it just isn't as interesting). I never thought I would say this, but I think Bob Iger might be a decent guy. It was hard for myself and most, if not all, of my colleagues to struggle through on low wages and having every money we earned debated by higher-ups and every person on the internet, while at the same time Iger was getting huge bonuses. But after reading this I do genuinely believe Iger cares about the company and the employees, and though he wasn't necessarily our salavation I don't think he was making things terrible. Anyway, the book is interesting because the author has had such an interesting career, and I wish he had spent more time talking about his passion for Shanghai Disney and his time on that project, and his younger years where he worked for ABC before and after the Disney takeover. The book starts with him as basically a TV grunt then skips ahead to him as a top executive. I want to know more of his struggle; and I think this would be helpful to other people who are/were in my position, to see him as someone who also worked hard and started from the bottom. Once ABC is bought out by Disney in the book, then we get to hear all the inside scoop (I wasn't in the Disney bubble then so most of this was news to me, but might not be news to hardcore Disney fans). Most interesting is Iger's relationship with Steve Jobs, and his times working with Pixar, and his plan to fix Disney. The chapters about Marvel and Star Wars were interesting but short and lacking in drama honestly, and the Fox/Disney Plus stuff at the end was just boring. I will be interested to see if he writes a longer version of this: the way he presents information is very clear, and he does take responsibilities for mistakes and he doesn't sugarcoat things, but it also isn't tinted with nostalgia (at least not the chapters about Disney, the chapters about ABC are a bit but no in a heavily sentimental way). It is clear and concise and entertaining, and he does have some interesting takeaways. Sorry this review was a bit of a ramble but these are my thoughts and my thoughts are a messy but there you are.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Zhou

    An absolutely incredible book on leadership by one of the most business-savvy CEOs alive. Iger not only talks about his climb to the top, but what he did when he got to the top: acquire some of the most innovative and creative companies of this era and having them work together under a single banner. I especially loved reading about how he went about acquiring Pixar and how he negotiated and befriended Steve Jobs whilst making the deal. I also enjoyed hearing about the behind-the-scenes negotiat An absolutely incredible book on leadership by one of the most business-savvy CEOs alive. Iger not only talks about his climb to the top, but what he did when he got to the top: acquire some of the most innovative and creative companies of this era and having them work together under a single banner. I especially loved reading about how he went about acquiring Pixar and how he negotiated and befriended Steve Jobs whilst making the deal. I also enjoyed hearing about the behind-the-scenes negotiations with George Lucas about acquiring Lucasfilm – and how both of them reacted when things didn't quite go according to plan. One main theme that comes out of this book is how to respect people in a business setting. Respect, as Iger demonstrates on numerous occasions, doesn't mean just being nice to people. It also means being brutally honest and effective, and owning up to mistakes. In his opinion, employees in general do better when they hear the feedback they need to hear to improve, and negotiations turn out well for every party when people are honest with what they want from the get-go. This is an incredibly important lesson I feel like I will try to integrate into my own life, both at work and at home. One other thing about Iger I also appreciate is his massive appreciation and push towards innovation. Disney+, the much talked about streaming service launching next month, is being developed because of Iger's belief in having to innovate or die, a lesson he learned early on in his career. In my eyes, it's rare to see an executive so clearly see that the path forward is not trying to keep old business models alive, but forging new ones, even if there might be a short-term loss for the company. His ability to see what fans and the market wants has led him to tirelessly push the boundaries of Disney innovation, in both animation and distribution of content. It's crazy knowing how much impact Iger's decisions had on my childhood and young adult life, and how much his decisions have affected the landscape of both the entertainment and media industries. Iger strikes me as an effective and a humble CEO, and I'm glad he shared his learnings about being the leader of one of the most valuable companies our world has ever seen. The world will certainly remember him fondly when it's his time to retire – and whoever takes his place will have massive shoes to fill.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Annie Ke

    For context: I immediately wanted to read this book after reading Maureen Dowd's profile on Bob Iger (great profile btw), realizing only after I bought the book the profile was written by Maureen Dowd, toward whom I felt distaste after her summer column shading AOC. So I started reading this book warily, assuming it'll be some type of neoliberalism bible. While Bob definitely values hard work and attributes much of his success to it, he also acknowledges his priv*lege, racism, luck, the sacrific For context: I immediately wanted to read this book after reading Maureen Dowd's profile on Bob Iger (great profile btw), realizing only after I bought the book the profile was written by Maureen Dowd, toward whom I felt distaste after her summer column shading AOC. So I started reading this book warily, assuming it'll be some type of neoliberalism bible. While Bob definitely values hard work and attributes much of his success to it, he also acknowledges his priv*lege, racism, luck, the sacrifices of his wife, and the people who helped him along the way. I genuinely like the guy in the book! His pride for making Black Panther and the effects it had on black communities feels earnest, and his guilt for firing people and failed family commitments is palpable. Most of Bob's early big breaks relied significantly on being at the right place at the right time and he recognizes that, but I also would be unfair if I didn't admit that not everyone could have risen to the occasion like he did. If anything, this book made me doubt capitalism more, instead of the people who benefitted from it. Personally, I enjoyed Bob's life lessons. Most are pretty cliche. However, his focus on integrity is all the more respectable because he acted accordingly, and he makes some great distinctions between ideation and execution (he's a gifted executor). My personal favorite lesson is actually from Steve Jobs: "Steve was great at weighing all sides of an issue and not allowing negatives to drown out positives, particularly for things he wanted to accomplish." Though this book really isn't written for pre-self-actualization existential crises, I found myself thinking a lot about my values as I read it. I expected to like Bob, but I couldn't forget the vast inequality that exists between his life and his workers'. Are our markets really an adequate way of determining how well people deserve to live, when some balance on the brink of death daily? On the personal, micro scale, I had a lot of respect for Bob - his work ethic, his emotional control, his admission to his flaws. Whether I like it or not, I want to win in The System, but I also hate it, possibly as a brand. Maybe that's why I work at one of the only mid-sized crypto companies that's supposed to ~unseat traditional finance~ but will likely become the future face of it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Kiedis

    I picked up The Ride Of A Lifetime on recommendation from of one of the sharpest leaders I know (thank you, Joel). I am so glad I did. Robert Iger's work will add significantly to your leadership toolbox. It is also a delight to read. The author distills the best of four decades of his leadership experience and lays it out in less than 250 pages. There is so much to appreciate here: 1. Leadership experience: Iger's career is a long elevator ride to the top of the Walt Disney Company. It is a ride made all the more I picked up The Ride Of A Lifetime on recommendation from of one of the sharpest leaders I know (thank you, Joel). I am so glad I did. Robert Iger's work will add significantly to your leadership toolbox. It is also a delight to read. The author distills the best of four decades of his leadership experience and lays it out in less than 250 pages. There is so much to appreciate here: 1. Leadership experience: Iger's career is a long elevator ride to the top of the Walt Disney Company. It is a ride made all the more interesting in that he started "in the basement" as a lowly studio supervisor for ABC Television in 1974. He chronicles challenges and opportunities, the people who shaped him, and the experiences that matured him. 2. Compelling narrative: Iger weaves his leadership lessons around a fascinating narrative; part memoir, part leadership coaching. 3. Unvarnished vignettes: Whether Iger is relaying experiences such as his unlikely encounter with Frank Sinatra, or learn from his acerbic mentor Roone Arledge, or the opportunities and challenges of serving as number two to Michael Eisner, or inking multi-billion dollar deals with Steve Jobs, George Lucas or Rupert Murdoch, he gives you an honest picture. That is refreshing. 4. The leadership lessons:There are too many to list, so buy the book. That said, here are five of my favorites: (1) Innovate or die. There can be no innovation if you operate out of fear. (2) Know what you don't know (and trust what you do know). (3) What people think of you is what they will think of your company. (4) Sweat the details. Micromanaging is underrated (read page 81 before you raise that eyebrow!). (5) Establish a few (Iger had three) CLEAR priorities that function as a template for your efforts. Those who lack the patience to hear his story (and you are missing out if you skip it), Iger summarizes his ten leadership principles in the prologue. He also provides a leadership insights highlight reel in his final chapter, "Lessons To Lead By." Delightfully, most everything he summarizes here were insights I had highlighted as I read. Sit down next to Robert Iger for The Ride of a Lifetime. You will be glad you did.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Federico Lucifredi

    This is part memoir and part business book. The former reads like a truly inspiring and hopeful statement that a career of hard work and dedication can be successful and rewarding. The author's 40-year career at ABC and then Disney, with the remaking of the company under his leadership and crossing paths with great figures is both interesting and inspiring. The business book aspect reads like a primer on leadership, and I really enjoyed the straight thinking of the author. He does not This is part memoir and part business book. The former reads like a truly inspiring and hopeful statement that a career of hard work and dedication can be successful and rewarding. The author's 40-year career at ABC and then Disney, with the remaking of the company under his leadership and crossing paths with great figures is both interesting and inspiring. The business book aspect reads like a primer on leadership, and I really enjoyed the straight thinking of the author. He does not stretch the point, he says what he means in a clear and direct fashion — and his points are about treating employees and partners with respect, not compromising on ideals, and best of all the "relentless pursuit of perfection" in creating an environment in which you refuse to accept mediocrity. What makes it all the more remarkable is his stated intent of doing so while "exuding calm", not for his own sake but for the team's. This thought returns in another context: a clearly laid strategy has a calming effect on the team by identifying what is not a priority. Iger ponders in several passages the thoughts of other individuals (or groups) as he pursues a specific goal or a negotiation, showcasing how much leadership is about asking the right question and then just listening. I rarely see this in autobiographies, the authors seems invariably focused inwardly and wrapped in their own thoughts, not what they saw in others at the time. Iger time and again returns to the delicate balance between his agenda and his counterpart's feelings — and does so always respectfully, even in difficult circumstances. The author has collected the core of his management thinking in a convenient and concise appendix at the end. One interesting (if easily misused) quote: "micromanagement is underrated (to a point)".

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mike Ryan

    I may be skewed because I've worked for the The Walt Disney Company for such a long time, but I really enjoyed this book. I am truly inspired by Bob Iger and have had the pleasure of seeing him speak before. Still, this book gave me additional insight to his career path and the intricacies of some of the key acquisitions he has managed (Pixar, Lucas, Marvel, 21st Century Fox). He is truly a man with the ability to see the path forward for a behemoth company like Disney. Most of the ac I may be skewed because I've worked for the The Walt Disney Company for such a long time, but I really enjoyed this book. I am truly inspired by Bob Iger and have had the pleasure of seeing him speak before. Still, this book gave me additional insight to his career path and the intricacies of some of the key acquisitions he has managed (Pixar, Lucas, Marvel, 21st Century Fox). He is truly a man with the ability to see the path forward for a behemoth company like Disney. Most of the acquisitions were companies that he really had to convince the board to act on. It is largely his singular vision which has propelled Disney forward. I was also impressed with his background. He was not born into a wealthy family. It was a chance meeting with a mid-level executive at ABC Sports that started Bob's career. Hard work pushed him higher and higher at ABC Sports. Subsequent mergers (Capital Cities bought ABC, Disney then bought Cap Cities/ABC) brought him to Disney. Most of his stories are also infused with emotion and the importance of personal relationships. With Pixar, Lucas, Marvel and Fox, it was his relationship with the CEO that drove the deals forward. This is also a cited reason for backing out of a purchase of Twitter. One note, in case you decide to read the book. Opt for the paper/Kindle version. I listened to this book on Audible. Bob only narrates the prologue and epilogue. The narrator for the rest of the book has a self-important voice akin to J. Peterman on Seinfeld; it's annoying. Also, with the print/Kindle version of the book, you can copy the final few pages of the book, which are excellent principles to live by and lead with.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    It doesn't break new ground in the "business autobiography" genre, but there are a few things that make it better than average: (1) Iger and his editors did a pretty good job of editing. There aren't many slow sections or self indulgent unnecessary details. (2) Iger comes across as having some self-awareness and humility and doesn't relentlessly toot his own horn. (3) There are lots of funny and interesting stories about companies and personalities people care about such as Steve Jobs It doesn't break new ground in the "business autobiography" genre, but there are a few things that make it better than average: (1) Iger and his editors did a pretty good job of editing. There aren't many slow sections or self indulgent unnecessary details. (2) Iger comes across as having some self-awareness and humility and doesn't relentlessly toot his own horn. (3) There are lots of funny and interesting stories about companies and personalities people care about such as Steve Jobs, George Lucas, Marvel Studios, Pixar, Rupert Murdoch and so on. All the above makes it a pleasant and entertaining read. Few things that stood out to me: (1) I never realized that the CEO of a multibillion dollar conglomerate like Disney would get quite so involved in the details of the numerous movies and TV shows being produced by their dozens of studios. I thought they would delegate most of the details and just approve it at a very high level. It turns out they can get very involved, down to demanding plot or character or other very detailed changes. (2) I didn't realize how seriously Bob Iger had considered running for president. (3) I was surprised how personal these multibillion dollar mergers are. The way Bob Iger tells it, they have as much to do with personal chemistry between the CEOs as with objective business data. So overall, no amazing takeaways or very big surprises, but an interesting and fun read if you are interested in what it's like being Disney CEO.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diego Parada Herrera

    The lessons, tips, realizations and values shared in this book are of great benefit, not only for people that work in the creative industry, but for any leader. Iger’s life and work as CEO of Disney is a great example of hard work and the determination of never settling. The book encompasses lessons on leadership and stories from Iger’s 15 year tenure at Disney. From taking a company in a very bad shape, dealing with the board and shaping a new strategy to every negotiation, acquisiti The lessons, tips, realizations and values shared in this book are of great benefit, not only for people that work in the creative industry, but for any leader. Iger’s life and work as CEO of Disney is a great example of hard work and the determination of never settling. The book encompasses lessons on leadership and stories from Iger’s 15 year tenure at Disney. From taking a company in a very bad shape, dealing with the board and shaping a new strategy to every negotiation, acquisition and deal made, it’s all in here. His friendship with Steve Jobs and his difficult relationship with George Lucas. Iger tells everything in a candid, humble and friendly way. His optimism and determination is felt throughout every page. ——- Las lecciones, consejos, realizaciones y valores compartidos en este libro son de gran beneficio, no solo para las personas que trabajan en la industria creativa, sino para cualquier líder. La vida y el trabajo de Iger como CEO de Disney es un gran ejemplo de trabajo duro y la determinación de nunca conformarse. El libro abarca lecciones sobre liderazgo e historias de la gestión de 15 años de Bob Iger en Disney. Desde tomar una empresa en muy mal estado, lidiar con el directorio y dar forma a una nueva estrategia para cada negociación, adquisición y trato, todo está aquí. Su amistad con Steve Jobs y su difícil relación con George Lucas. Iger cuenta todo de una manera sincera, humilde y amigable. Su optimismo y determinación se siente en todas las páginas.

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