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Naomi: Season One

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When a fight between Superman and Mongul crashes into a small northwestern town, Naomi begins a quest to uncover the last time a super-powered person visited her home--and how that might tie into her own origins and adoption. DC's biggest, newest mystery starts here! Follow Naomi's journey on a quest that will take her to the heart of the DC Universe and unfold a universe of When a fight between Superman and Mongul crashes into a small northwestern town, Naomi begins a quest to uncover the last time a super-powered person visited her home--and how that might tie into her own origins and adoption. DC's biggest, newest mystery starts here! Follow Naomi's journey on a quest that will take her to the heart of the DC Universe and unfold a universe of ideas and stories that have never been seen before. Join writers Brian Michael Bendis, David Walker and breakout artist Jamal Campbell in Wonder Comics' massively ambitious new series and star...Naomi! Aimed at providing readers with honest and innovative reading experiences, Brian Michael Bendis' Wonder Comics is a celebration of the moments of in life when discoveries are made - when purpose and meaning are revealed and destinies are defined. Featuring the young heroes of the DC Universe as penned by all-star creative teams in exciting new adventures that will celebrate the wonders of life, love and comics. Collects Naomi issues #1-6.


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When a fight between Superman and Mongul crashes into a small northwestern town, Naomi begins a quest to uncover the last time a super-powered person visited her home--and how that might tie into her own origins and adoption. DC's biggest, newest mystery starts here! Follow Naomi's journey on a quest that will take her to the heart of the DC Universe and unfold a universe of When a fight between Superman and Mongul crashes into a small northwestern town, Naomi begins a quest to uncover the last time a super-powered person visited her home--and how that might tie into her own origins and adoption. DC's biggest, newest mystery starts here! Follow Naomi's journey on a quest that will take her to the heart of the DC Universe and unfold a universe of ideas and stories that have never been seen before. Join writers Brian Michael Bendis, David Walker and breakout artist Jamal Campbell in Wonder Comics' massively ambitious new series and star...Naomi! Aimed at providing readers with honest and innovative reading experiences, Brian Michael Bendis' Wonder Comics is a celebration of the moments of in life when discoveries are made - when purpose and meaning are revealed and destinies are defined. Featuring the young heroes of the DC Universe as penned by all-star creative teams in exciting new adventures that will celebrate the wonders of life, love and comics. Collects Naomi issues #1-6.

30 review for Naomi: Season One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A kid, sent to Earth on a spaceship by their birth parents who’re left behind on a doomed planet, is raised by surrogate parents in a small American town and discovers they gots superpowers. Wow - how DOES Brian Bendis come up with such original ideas? Bendis - the dude also writing both Superman titles! But yeah this kid is Naomi, not Superpants - although he is all over that first issue to let you know this be a DC book and, y’know, parallels and junk. I know I sound dismissive but actually Na A kid, sent to Earth on a spaceship by their birth parents who’re left behind on a doomed planet, is raised by surrogate parents in a small American town and discovers they gots superpowers. Wow - how DOES Brian Bendis come up with such original ideas? Bendis - the dude also writing both Superman titles! But yeah this kid is Naomi, not Superpants - although he is all over that first issue to let you know this be a DC book and, y’know, parallels and junk. I know I sound dismissive but actually Naomi, Season One wasn’t bad. There’s nothing about it that’s especially unique, particularly if you’re familiar with Bendis’ work, but it’s well done - the usual “Lil ol me’s a superhero waaaa?!” but slick and surprisingly compelling. Though I wouldn’t say Naomi is up there among them, read the first Miles Morales or Riri Williams books and you’ll know Bendis can write some absolutely cracking opening volumes in this vein. Like a lot of Bendis books, Season One is a slow burn, though it’s enjoyable enough to see the mystery of who Naomi really is unfold. Where it kinda lost me was the third act when the fifth issue turned into one long artless info dump, all of which revealed Naomi’s secret origin to be, unfortunately, unremarkably bland by superhero standards. And the usual Bendis line of supporting characters - the ditzy bestie, the loving (but of course tough) parents, the troubled mentor - did nothing to show me any of this was fresh new territory for the Bendyman. I really hate when the villain turns out to be this giant monster who wants to take over the world because it’s such a tedious cliche at this point but that’s precisely who the big bad in this story is. So of course things end with an uninspired and rote punch up - guess who wins? Exactly - we’re only on “Season One” member. Also, does Naomi have any weaknesses? She doesn’t seem to have a kryptonite. I hope she’s not some dull flawless protagonist because that will lead to some very boring stories very quickly. Jamal Campbell’s art is a revelation. It’s very pretty and extremely polished whether he’s drawing close-ups, distance shots, splash pages, action or talky scenes - it’s never less than impressive. Some of the characters have that appealing Disney-esque look to their faces - very expressive, big eyes, dramatic body language - and the book has an appropriately cinematic look to it (“Season One” - it certainly looks like a big budget TV series). If you’re a fan of David Marquez’s art (he drew Bendis’ Invincible Iron Man and Civil War II), you’ll dig Jamal Campbell’s style. It’s nothing that most superhero comics fans won’t have seen before but Naomi Season One is a decent read and another interesting addition to Bendis’ new Wonder Comics line. I’ll come back for Season Two but I hope Bendis and co. dare to stray a bit from the superhero formula they seem to be content chugging for the umpteenth time in Season One.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    This started out really well but petered out in the second half into a pretty generic superheroic punchy-punch thing with tons of awkward exposition dumps. Naomi is a cool new character that has that Miles Morales-esque feel to her, but her origin ended up being far too convoluted and hard to follow, and yet there is a lot of time devoted here to explaining how exactly she came to be. Otherwise it's an okay read, but could have been so much better. Kind of made me wish that Naomi wouldn't end up This started out really well but petered out in the second half into a pretty generic superheroic punchy-punch thing with tons of awkward exposition dumps. Naomi is a cool new character that has that Miles Morales-esque feel to her, but her origin ended up being far too convoluted and hard to follow, and yet there is a lot of time devoted here to explaining how exactly she came to be. Otherwise it's an okay read, but could have been so much better. Kind of made me wish that Naomi wouldn't end up being a super-powered character at all, just remaining a normal teenager fascinated with superheroes like we meet her in issue #1, probably the best issue of the whole collection. Jamal Campbell's artwork is absolutely gorgeous though, the book is a total eye-candy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    I'm a pretty big fan of Bendis. He is a huge reason I'm into comics (Ultimate Spider-man was my first major Marvel comic growing up) and so I will always give his work a chance. For the most part, all his Jinx stuff and DC stuff has been pretty entertaining, and I think Naomi follows in those footsteps even though it feels like it covers familiar ground. We start with a everyday situation in DC. Superman comes crashing into town and Naomi, our main character, misses it. She seems to always miss I'm a pretty big fan of Bendis. He is a huge reason I'm into comics (Ultimate Spider-man was my first major Marvel comic growing up) and so I will always give his work a chance. For the most part, all his Jinx stuff and DC stuff has been pretty entertaining, and I think Naomi follows in those footsteps even though it feels like it covers familiar ground. We start with a everyday situation in DC. Superman comes crashing into town and Naomi, our main character, misses it. She seems to always miss the badass fights. But then she feels something is off and begins investigating the town and her past. What feels like a Nancy drew comic soon becomes a sci-fi adventure with tons of colorful fights and a ton of new lore for the DC Universe. I personally enjoyed parts of this a lot, while others I was bored. I Like the cast, especially Naomi, her parents, and Dee. The girlfriend was okay but the rest worked well. I also enjoy the art a lot, it's really pretty and the fights are epic and fun. The pacing is solid up until issue 5-6 where they become HUGE exposition dumps. And while the lore could be interesting there's parts I was very bored learning about who Naomi is and the one dimensional villain. Overall, the idea of this being season 1, makes me feel this might work out in the long run. Like most season 1 TV shows, it builds up a new universe I like and I'm involved with but didn't blow me away. It's good, especially for giving us a new hero, but I hope season 2 drops the heavy exposition for more natural storytelling while keeping this amazing art. A 3.5 out of 5.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Naomi is an adopted teenager trying to find out about where she came from after Superman and Mongul passed through her town in the midst of a fight. One of Bendis's main strengths is writing believable and engaging teenagers, that trend continues. I like how Bendis layered the story, building on it with each issue. My only issue is how the later issues are static info-dumps. Naomi doesn't do anything, she just listens. All in all though, a great start and I'm ready to read more. Jamal Campbell's Naomi is an adopted teenager trying to find out about where she came from after Superman and Mongul passed through her town in the midst of a fight. One of Bendis's main strengths is writing believable and engaging teenagers, that trend continues. I like how Bendis layered the story, building on it with each issue. My only issue is how the later issues are static info-dumps. Naomi doesn't do anything, she just listens. All in all though, a great start and I'm ready to read more. Jamal Campbell's art is tremendous. My one complaint about it is that it can get too effects driven at times, to the point where it's hard to make out the action in a panel.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    After trying his Superman books, I wasn't too hot about trying more of Brian Michael Bendis' DC Comics work, but this is considerably better as he, David F. Walker and Jamal Campbell introduce a new young heroine. Nice art and a fairly light tone make this a pretty good YA title. I thought for a moment this was a reintroduction of the Milestone universe, as one character shown from the rear seemed to be sporting Static's original costume and Naomi's last name is a tribute to Dwayne McDuffie, but After trying his Superman books, I wasn't too hot about trying more of Brian Michael Bendis' DC Comics work, but this is considerably better as he, David F. Walker and Jamal Campbell introduce a new young heroine. Nice art and a fairly light tone make this a pretty good YA title. I thought for a moment this was a reintroduction of the Milestone universe, as one character shown from the rear seemed to be sporting Static's original costume and Naomi's last name is a tribute to Dwayne McDuffie, but that just might be wishful thinking on my part.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    Do something that makes someone feel better or do better or just help. Just pick someone up.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This second Wonder Comic has a lot of heart, but unfortunately it doesn't have the writing chops that it needs to succeed. It's a fun coming of age story, about a girl who wants to be a hero. And, the author(s) really place a spotlight on the fact that it's a wish-fulfillment story. Fair enough. Oh, and it's nicely integrated into the DC Universe, which is both to its benefit and its deficit. Really, Naomi: Season One has two big problems. The first is that it's almost all told, not shown. Throug This second Wonder Comic has a lot of heart, but unfortunately it doesn't have the writing chops that it needs to succeed. It's a fun coming of age story, about a girl who wants to be a hero. And, the author(s) really place a spotlight on the fact that it's a wish-fulfillment story. Fair enough. Oh, and it's nicely integrated into the DC Universe, which is both to its benefit and its deficit. Really, Naomi: Season One has two big problems. The first is that it's almost all told, not shown. Throughout the middle issues, we get an endless series of infodumps as a sequence of characters each tell Naomi who she is. The author(s) try and play this like a multi-layered onion, revealing a new truth each issue, integrating into at least three different major DC elements, but in doing so they come up with a confusing and muddled story. Bit by a radioactive spider: that's a simple origin. This mixture of Gemworld, the Rann/Thanngar War, and the 52 is anything but simple. Still fun, and without all this exposition the next volume might be much better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dimitra

    "Promise me you'll make your world a better place. Any way you can. Your dad says: every day. You do it every day. Like breathing and eating. Do something that makes someone feel better or do better or just help. Just pick someone up."

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    If the final issue had not been such a let down after a really good fifth issue the rating would have been higher. A surprise in my opinion, as Bendis' writing while he was Marvel never really held my interest. Which makes me wonder how of much what kept me around after the first issue, and through the, for now, final issue, is David Walker's work. Until the last couple of issue I liked what he was doing on Catalyst's Superb (the company appears floundering as are some of the titles). Naomi is, g If the final issue had not been such a let down after a really good fifth issue the rating would have been higher. A surprise in my opinion, as Bendis' writing while he was Marvel never really held my interest. Which makes me wonder how of much what kept me around after the first issue, and through the, for now, final issue, is David Walker's work. Until the last couple of issue I liked what he was doing on Catalyst's Superb (the company appears floundering as are some of the titles). Naomi is, gasp, an original character. Yes, one of the Big Two is actually not re-booting another name or character. The key to this story arc is who are Naomi's real parents, and what is her potential. As usual no spoilers. (read as digital floppies)

  10. 4 out of 5

    L. McCoy

    This was not quite what I wanted... What’s it about? In a small town an incident occurred where Superman briefly ended up there. To everyone’s surprise there’s nothing about it to be found online. It’s been said however that years ago another space related event happened there but when Naomi asks around most people are saying it’s false... but she knows something different is up and she finds out some surprising things that may reveal some more surprising things about her. Pros: The story is alright This was not quite what I wanted... What’s it about? In a small town an incident occurred where Superman briefly ended up there. To everyone’s surprise there’s nothing about it to be found online. It’s been said however that years ago another space related event happened there but when Naomi asks around most people are saying it’s false... but she knows something different is up and she finds out some surprising things that may reveal some more surprising things about her. Pros: The story is alright. Admittedly it’s your standard superhero stuff but hey, there’s a reason I read so many superhero comics, it works. The art style is pretty cool, we get quite a few impressive panels. The characters are interesting. There’s more emotion and things that make me care about them than many superhero comics have. Cons: This book does not have as much action as I had hoped for. There’s a bit but it’s mostly family drama which is an interesting attempt but I will admit I ended up feeling slightly bored. The dialogue is poorly written. Admittedly dialogue was never quite Bendis’ strong-suit and it fortunately doesn’t go into a “fellow kids” category that I thought it would (for the most part) but is still iffy at best. The humor attempts in this book are kinda weak. There’s some political commentary about politicians ignoring climate change which without going into a political debate, it seems out of place. If I’m not mistaken (I may be) this comic is intended for young readers more than adult readers which... what do you expect them to do? You’re just making the future seem bleak to people who can’t do anything about it, especially if you’re somebody who legitimately believes the world is ending and/or that it’s already too late. So unless I missed something there’s no explanation on why nothing was reported on Superman in the small town this story takes place in. It’s weird because they had it act like it would be one of the biggest parts of the story for 2 issues then nothing. The cover is very misleading. The cover has a big bunch of popular superheroes surrounding Naomi which leads you to believe these characters are probably gonna show up somewhere in this comic... yeah only one (Superman) does and even then it’s like a couple of panels in the first issue. I know some may argue “oh it’s meant to be symbolic that she’s the next big superhero with these characters.” but that’s no excuse IMO, it’s a cash-grab. The costume design is terrible but I didn’t notice until the bonus material. It’s like most of Naomi’s feet are bare for no reason and it just looks super silly, not to mention her feet will get very dirty and sore when doing superhero stuff like that. Seriously she may wanna get some shoes that go with it! Power Girl’s boob window is less silly than this (at least that sells comics). (Above: best pic of her costume I found for reference) Mixed thoughts: This book’s predictability. I saw pretty much most of the entire story coming right when I opened the book but it was done in a way that was different from what I expected. Overall: This comic isn’t terrible but it’s still in the end not a good one, at least to me. Admittedly yes, I kinda nitpick things but despite a decent plot, some good artwork and interesting characters there was still a lot more to this comic that I disliked than liked. Maybe this one will work for those previously mentioned younger readers, many of whom may just be getting into comics but for me, I’ll pass on the second book of this series. 2/5

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    There's a practical reason that so few new superhero characters survive their initiation and first years to become truly classic, always-there-always-on regulars in either major mainstream comic universe: it's really hard! Think about all the characters that are mediocre, that for all that they've been around FOREVER have never had their own book and probably are never going to. Or, a rarer number, the number of characters who have been lifted out of obscurity by a beloved creator who loves them There's a practical reason that so few new superhero characters survive their initiation and first years to become truly classic, always-there-always-on regulars in either major mainstream comic universe: it's really hard! Think about all the characters that are mediocre, that for all that they've been around FOREVER have never had their own book and probably are never going to. Or, a rarer number, the number of characters who have been lifted out of obscurity by a beloved creator who loves them and makes them awesome for a while--until they fade into obscurity again as soon as that creator moves on. Why all of that? Because Bendis is trying something really difficult here a brand-new, apropos of nothing, superhero character for the DCU. He does a pretty good job. It's a mash of a number of comic origin elements that gives us a new, young hero with a lot of the classic elements, and one who checks all the right boxes for a protagonist in 2020. And he tells a good story. The artwork is solid. But one volume doesn't a series make, and I wasn't blown away. Still the best stories I've ever read, the best heroes, rise over time from the accretion of layers. Naomi has (and deserves) as much a chance as any character I've seen lately. I hope Bendis pulls it off.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    I read this right after a Miles Morales collection and it's fairly obvious that Bendis is trying to re-capture that same "lightning in a bottle" that he did the first time around. And, in some respects, I think he does. It's still too soon to really get a good sense of who Naomi is or what her everyday life is like, though she does have one staunch friend/ally. The origin stuff is interesting and unusual. I thought the artwork throughout was really strong. But the main villain is not that origin I read this right after a Miles Morales collection and it's fairly obvious that Bendis is trying to re-capture that same "lightning in a bottle" that he did the first time around. And, in some respects, I think he does. It's still too soon to really get a good sense of who Naomi is or what her everyday life is like, though she does have one staunch friend/ally. The origin stuff is interesting and unusual. I thought the artwork throughout was really strong. But the main villain is not that original and some of the stuff that went on here just got rushed-through and glossed-over (such as the origins of Naomi's adopted father and town mechanic Dee). But there's enough here that I'll definitely be interested in reading the next collection to see where all this goes. Naomi's got potential, but she's not quite as fully-formed out of the box as Miles was.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lukas Holmes

    This was FUN! Rarely do super hero comics actually get me excited, especially about a new character, but DC/Bendis finally found a way to do so.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I loved everything about this. Bendis and Walker deliver a great mystery and Campbell's art is breathtaking.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    I'm really enjoying this series and its first arc. So far, the Wonder Comics I've read (Wonder Twins, Young Justice and Naomi) have blown my mind in ways I wasn't expecting. This time, with Naomi, it's origin mystery. I loved the twists played in the story and how things weren't exactly what I could have guessed. Plus the characters, all of them, are so endearing that I want to have them for neighbors. Of course, minus the explosions and destruction. I'm really interested on what will come up nex I'm really enjoying this series and its first arc. So far, the Wonder Comics I've read (Wonder Twins, Young Justice and Naomi) have blown my mind in ways I wasn't expecting. This time, with Naomi, it's origin mystery. I loved the twists played in the story and how things weren't exactly what I could have guessed. Plus the characters, all of them, are so endearing that I want to have them for neighbors. Of course, minus the explosions and destruction. I'm really interested on what will come up next and I hope Bendis and Walker keep Naomi fresh. By the way, Jamal Campbell's art needs a special mention. It's just fantastic!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    I am going to make a big pass on this series, it simply does not bring anything new to the table. A super powered being, left on Earth as her parents battled on a doomed planet, to be raised by other super humans and humans alike. Not its not about Superman or Supergirl because...well Naomi is black and has dredds, so you know, she is like tons different. So so story and no originality which is surprising and disappointing considering its Brian Michael Bendis at the helm. Nope this character is I am going to make a big pass on this series, it simply does not bring anything new to the table. A super powered being, left on Earth as her parents battled on a doomed planet, to be raised by other super humans and humans alike. Not its not about Superman or Supergirl because...well Naomi is black and has dredds, so you know, she is like tons different. So so story and no originality which is surprising and disappointing considering its Brian Michael Bendis at the helm. Nope this character is destined for junior justice league material.

  17. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    Fun book! Reads great in single issues and I looked forward to it every single month. The world-building around Naomi and her origin story were interesting and the art was top notch. Definitely looking forward to seeing what they do with this character in the future, this first volume is just the set up of who Naomi is and what she is (will be) all about, now that that is all taken care of I'm curious as to her place in the DC universe.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

    Pleasant enough debut. A scooch padded. And has that problem where everybody talks the same even though there at least two aliens from massively-different cultures but hey, I guess they were all watching the same sitcoms in their 15, 16 years on Earth?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eli Seibert

    A fun and intriguing origin/mystery, with characters that have heart, and wonderful art.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Krystl Louwagie

    I'm surprised I didn't like this more because Brian Michael Bendis! But...the plot felt too general, vague and.........."Mary Sue" ish. The art looked pretty, but connected with the story super poorly. Everything was over dramatic and distracting (which is something I fell into when I very briefly started trying to draw my own comic years ago) drawing dramatic emotions and reactions makes for exciting pictures, but doesn't always work with the dialogue and feel of the story very well. This is de I'm surprised I didn't like this more because Brian Michael Bendis! But...the plot felt too general, vague and.........."Mary Sue" ish. The art looked pretty, but connected with the story super poorly. Everything was over dramatic and distracting (which is something I fell into when I very briefly started trying to draw my own comic years ago) drawing dramatic emotions and reactions makes for exciting pictures, but doesn't always work with the dialogue and feel of the story very well. This is definitely one of those times. I appreciated the variety of body types used, but, again, only as side characters, not as main ones! Can't have a main chubby nerdy girl... Anyways, this fell flat for me and is pretty forgettable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    So, this was much better than I expected. It's just convoluted and steeped in DC history enough to satisfy long-term fans, but also fresh and lively in way that many things with a heavy backstory are not. The art is gorgeous, and the characters are well-developed. Bendis' dialogue is in low-gear, heavy-lifting mode here, only really returning to his early roots with the cut-off sentences and Naomi's BFF. Linked to a lot of DC's major events, but also somehow lifted above them, this would be an e So, this was much better than I expected. It's just convoluted and steeped in DC history enough to satisfy long-term fans, but also fresh and lively in way that many things with a heavy backstory are not. The art is gorgeous, and the characters are well-developed. Bendis' dialogue is in low-gear, heavy-lifting mode here, only really returning to his early roots with the cut-off sentences and Naomi's BFF. Linked to a lot of DC's major events, but also somehow lifted above them, this would be an excellent first comic series for someone curious about the genre.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Naomi issues #1-6 This is a great new title, with an excellent (and original) origin story. I really appreciate what Bendis and Walker are doing here, and I honestly thought that as the story was building in this first volume, every issue got better and better. The plot points and mysteries were growing throughout this collection in a way that was very compelling. I can't wait to see what the writing team does with this character in the future.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    One of those books despite what on paper looks like a great creative line-up makes one wonder was it written for a younger audience. Not much else to add really... big wow she's an African-American, but the story is not new at all, the artwork is just average if that, although it's good to see an artist drawing more real women shapes. 7 out of 12, for the first half of intrigue and mystery.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Setting a new origin story for a brand new character, Bendis and Walker bring some engaging complexity to the life of Naomi as she struggles to understand her place in the world. Season one brings a balance of humor and real emotion, setting up an intriguing new story with clear ties to the larger DC Universe. It doesn't fully set itself apart from other superhero narratives as the story continues to develop, but the central characters and Campbell's dramatic art make this a worthwhile read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ginny

    I need more Naomi like right the hell now! Loved this one so damn much!

  26. 5 out of 5

    The Fizza

    1.5 STARSI wanted to like this but unfortunately Bendis wrote this book sooooo nothing memorable and of course: 1) Everyone has the same voice and none of those voices fit the characters. 2) It starts off decently enough with everyday things to 'ground' the story then it's takes a turn and goes heavy-handed through the most obvious well trodden ground in the YA genre. 3) Not quite bad though not quite good, finally it settles in as a middling, sometimes trite, book. All of which is sad because, sa 1.5 STARSI wanted to like this but unfortunately Bendis wrote this book sooooo nothing memorable and of course: 1) Everyone has the same voice and none of those voices fit the characters. 2) It starts off decently enough with everyday things to 'ground' the story then it's takes a turn and goes heavy-handed through the most obvious well trodden ground in the YA genre. 3) Not quite bad though not quite good, finally it settles in as a middling, sometimes trite, book. All of which is sad because, say what you will about BMB's formulas today he can do 'hard-boiled' quite well and still knows how to come up with a fun concept for his tales... the unfortunate thing being, he doesn't know enough to pass those ideas off to fresh talent with some skills but trods on with his own brand of Stan Lee style shtick. Even though that gag's got whiskers on it. If you want to read the same thing you've read a thousand times before in comics about the misunderstood youth, with the quirky friends, who finds out they're not just special, because all life is unique and each person can be their own hero, but is an actual "super" kinda special. The kind with the obligatory 'they only just need some training to save the universe'... Soooo, you know it's a meeh kinda book... So far. Maybe volume two will take a turn for the better, though I doubt it, as so far Naomi is just some Miss America knock-off with the usual Superboy style origin. What I'd give for another YA series from DC like Young Justice or the post-Zero Hour Legion or, gosh forbid, The Ray! RECOMMENDATION: If you've read all the best Ms. Marvel and Spider-Gwen stories or maybe Moon Girl and Miles Morales stories and you simply can't find something else to read... give it a shot, but don't say I didn't warn ya'

  27. 5 out of 5

    John

    Feels a bit forced.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    A strong, Harry Potter-esque start to a new superhero saga in the DC universe. Naomi's just a normal girl - so why is she so unsettled by Superman's brief appearance in her small town? Obviously, there's more to Naomi's backstory (I mean, she's adopted, so of course something's up), but Bendis twists the cliche superhero backstory a bit to make Naomi more grounded and interesting. The real revelation here is Jamal Campbell's artwork - simultaneously soaring like the best superhero stuff and intim A strong, Harry Potter-esque start to a new superhero saga in the DC universe. Naomi's just a normal girl - so why is she so unsettled by Superman's brief appearance in her small town? Obviously, there's more to Naomi's backstory (I mean, she's adopted, so of course something's up), but Bendis twists the cliche superhero backstory a bit to make Naomi more grounded and interesting. The real revelation here is Jamal Campbell's artwork - simultaneously soaring like the best superhero stuff and intimately detailed like Pixar animation. If the series starts with this level of artistic quality, I'm not sure how it's going to improve (or even stay the course!). I'm definitely excited to see where Bendis takes the story from here, though - there's a noticeable lack of "hero punching stuff" in this first volume and, honestly, I hope that continues. Give me a down-to-Earth series about superpowered aliens, thank you very much.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline O.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Naomi is one of four titles in DC Comics new young adult Wonder Comics imprint. Naomi is a young girl, who was adopted as a baby. She has good parents who love her, friends, a therapist, and she's a fan of Superman - the way one might be a fan of a sports star, musician, or actor. One day, her dream comes true as Superman fights Mongul in the heart of her small northwestern town. The fight only lasts 17 seconds, does a lot of damage - and Naomi misses it. Even when she researches what happened o Naomi is one of four titles in DC Comics new young adult Wonder Comics imprint. Naomi is a young girl, who was adopted as a baby. She has good parents who love her, friends, a therapist, and she's a fan of Superman - the way one might be a fan of a sports star, musician, or actor. One day, her dream comes true as Superman fights Mongul in the heart of her small northwestern town. The fight only lasts 17 seconds, does a lot of damage - and Naomi misses it. Even when she researches what happened online - she can find nothing. In the grand scheme of things, the biggest thing to happen to Oswego in years isn't even a blip on the national news cycle. However, this event sends Naomi on a new journey. Superman returns the next day to clean up the mess from the fight - but again Naomi misses it, and again Superman doesn't stay long. When someone tells Naomi this "isn't the first time, you know" meaning a super being or something unusual had happened in Oswego before, Naomi starts looking into it. Most people ignore her or claim nothing ever happens in their small town. But the town mechanic tells her the date of the last happening - the date of her adoption. Naomi starts asking questions - who is the mechanic? How does he know the date of her adoption? In the middle of the night, Naomi decides to get her answers and goes to interview the mechanic. She assumes he is her father, and when she sees him with a photograph of another woman of color, she assumes that is her mother. Dee, the mechanic, denies it, denies everything. But he explains that he was a soldier, and not simply in a foreign army, but in an alien army - he is a member of the elite fighting corps of Thanagar. He and his partner were tasked with surgical strikes, assassinations, spying, et cetera. But the more time they spent undercover on different worlds the more he and his female partner began to question their orders and the war. And they fell in love. After a mission goes sideways, they end up together on Gemworld. But they cannot hide there very long. They find out about a portal - Dee is able to get to the portal and to Earth, but his love and partner doesn't make it and is presumably either still on Gemworld or she was caught by Thanagarian solders. Reeling from this information, Dee and Naomi are interrupted by her mother - her extremely angry mother. She takes Naomi home, they pick up her father, and head to the hills and a cave there. In the cave, her father shows her a spaceship. Naomi asks if it's the ship she came in, and her father says - nope, it's his ship. He was a soldier too, from Rann, and also in an elite squad. He was sent on a mission to Earth to track down a missing elite Thanagrian soldier. Once on Earth though, he met Naomi's mother and fell in love. He decided to abandon his mission. And once he found Dee, finding him to be no current threat, he Dee, and Naomi's mother basically decided to stay out of each other's way and to keep their secrets, secret. Naomi's parents were happy but her mother desperately wanted a child and they couldn't have one. Traditional adoption would be difficult since her father had no history from before he suddenly arrived. One night something happens. Dee and Naomi's father rush to where their communication equipment points them - and find a small battle. And a baby that all the warriors are trying to kill. The battle ends quickly, everyone else leaves, and the baby, Naomi, is left behind. Dee admits he cannot care for a child, so Naomi's father takes her in. the only info they have is a blanket wrapped around the baby and a device with it. In the cave, Naomi gets into the spaceship belonging to her father. She touches the device and suddenly glows with power. Next, she is telling her best friend, Annabelle, everything that has happened. When she touched the device, she felt a rush of power - but also received a message. The message was from her biological mother, an alien from a planet that experienced something called The Crisis. After an environmental disaster, and the destruction of the Ozone layer, the planet is bathed in radiation. But instead of killing everyone outright - 29 people receive superpowers. In short, they are turned into gods. One of these gods is a serial killer and criminal, who makes himself dictator of the world. The others band against him, but there's some sort of infighting as well. Several of these new superheroes/gods die, others leave. Only a few are left, and the dictator, Zumbado, rules the planet, destroying everything with constant war. Naomi's parents, both newly created superhero-gods, fall in love and have Naomi, but Zumbado wants this child. They give her to a friend, Akira, to bring to Earth. Akira succeeds. Zumbado kills Naomi's birth parents. Naomi is able to use her power to escape and return to Earth. When Zumbado follows her, she uses her power to banish him. But although she is extremely powerful, she also has no idea how to really use her powers or what they are. But she is back with her family. Naomi is a beautiful graphic novel. The artwork is incredible, it really is. The story, well, it's an origin story, and is mostly exposition, with the promise of more to come. But that's not really a criticism, as this is a very fresh and exciting story - it's just only at the beginning. I hope to read more soon. Naomi does join another title in the Wonder Comics line, Young Justice plus notes on the graphic novel collection make me think her title will continue. I hope so. This book is highly recommended. Read it - you will not be disappointed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Bendis can still write a believable and endearing teenage character, but Naomi's backstory is just way too complicated. And honestly? I think I liked her better when she was "just" an ordinary girl who was mildly obsessed with superheroes.

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