Hot Best Seller

Little Bird: The Fight for Elder's Hope

Availability: Ready to download

Award-winning filmmaker Darcy Van Poelgeest teams up with Angoulême nominated artist Ian Bertram to bring you the highly acclaimed dystopian sci-fi, Little Bird. With the same limitless scope as Star Wars, and the social-political explorations of A Handmaid's Tale, Little Bird tells the story of a young resistance fighter battling against an oppressive American Empire while Award-winning filmmaker Darcy Van Poelgeest teams up with Angoulême nominated artist Ian Bertram to bring you the highly acclaimed dystopian sci-fi, Little Bird. With the same limitless scope as Star Wars, and the social-political explorations of A Handmaid's Tale, Little Bird tells the story of a young resistance fighter battling against an oppressive American Empire while searching for her own identity in a world on fire. A gorgeously illustrated epic where one girl risks everything to save her people, their land, and the freedom they so desperately deserve. Collects Little Bird #1-5.


Compare

Award-winning filmmaker Darcy Van Poelgeest teams up with Angoulême nominated artist Ian Bertram to bring you the highly acclaimed dystopian sci-fi, Little Bird. With the same limitless scope as Star Wars, and the social-political explorations of A Handmaid's Tale, Little Bird tells the story of a young resistance fighter battling against an oppressive American Empire while Award-winning filmmaker Darcy Van Poelgeest teams up with Angoulême nominated artist Ian Bertram to bring you the highly acclaimed dystopian sci-fi, Little Bird. With the same limitless scope as Star Wars, and the social-political explorations of A Handmaid's Tale, Little Bird tells the story of a young resistance fighter battling against an oppressive American Empire while searching for her own identity in a world on fire. A gorgeously illustrated epic where one girl risks everything to save her people, their land, and the freedom they so desperately deserve. Collects Little Bird #1-5.

30 review for Little Bird: The Fight for Elder's Hope

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    Visually stunning and narratively cliché, Little Bird tells a post-apocalyptic tale of resistance and revolution—with a few brief nods to the history and present conditions of Canada’s indigenous population. But as the book builds toward a conclusion, it ends up instead retelling an increasingly muddled version of Star Wars. If not for the beautiful art and action sequences, there would be few reasons to recommend the book. [Read in single issues]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    A story about a hero vs a tyrranical religious movement should be right up my alley. But somewhere around the second issue, my interest in the story started to wane. The dialogue and narration suggested an epicness in scope that the story didn't really deliver on. The grotesque violence was rendered beautifully by Ian Bertram but it was too over the top for me. I found no plot point unexpected, no resolution made me happy or angry. I just wasn't invested in the characters. The villains too A story about a hero vs a tyrranical religious movement should be right up my alley. But somewhere around the second issue, my interest in the story started to wane. The dialogue and narration suggested an epicness in scope that the story didn't really deliver on. The grotesque violence was rendered beautifully by Ian Bertram but it was too over the top for me. I found no plot point unexpected, no resolution made me happy or angry. I just wasn't invested in the characters. The villains too cartoonishly evil. The protagonists too martryish and magically invincible. Fans of art that ranges from Frank Quitely to Moebius will probably love this book. It also has some Grant Morrisonly appeal. So it's not a bad book. It just isn't for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    "A story about my mother, my father and everyone else that's tried to kill me", set in a theocratic future North America, and between the stylings of the clerical armies and the body horror, there's a definite note of John Smith to this. The aesthetic recalls Prophet meets East Of West, and the protagonist's silhouette even has a hint of Leonora Carrington's Giantess - all good reference points. But little things stopped me entirely connecting, whether it was the overfamiliar underground redoubt "A story about my mother, my father and everyone else that's tried to kill me", set in a theocratic future North America, and between the stylings of the clerical armies and the body horror, there's a definite note of John Smith to this. The aesthetic recalls Prophet meets East Of West, and the protagonist's silhouette even has a hint of Leonora Carrington's Giantess - all good reference points. But little things stopped me entirely connecting, whether it was the overfamiliar underground redoubt of the resistance, or the villains' capital being New Vatican - I can all too easily envision a fundamentalist US, but a Catholic-styled one seems a leap too far in the wrong direction. (Edelweiss ARC)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Good lord this was incredible

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Hawpe

    Little Bird is a treat for fans of dark fantasy and weird dystopian worlds. There are shades of a His Dark Materials style totalitarian theocracy in Darcy Van Poelgeest's story, mixed with brutal, Mad Maxian violence and an almost Dune-like combo of science fiction and mysticism. Ian Bertram's visuals are wild, gorgeous, grotesque, and eye-poppingly otherworldly in a Princess Mononoke meets Moebius kind of way. Book one comes to a somewhat satisfying stopping point, yet definitely whets the Little Bird is a treat for fans of dark fantasy and weird dystopian worlds. There are shades of a His Dark Materials style totalitarian theocracy in Darcy Van Poelgeest's story, mixed with brutal, Mad Maxian violence and an almost Dune-like combo of science fiction and mysticism. Ian Bertram's visuals are wild, gorgeous, grotesque, and eye-poppingly otherworldly in a Princess Mononoke meets Moebius kind of way. Book one comes to a somewhat satisfying stopping point, yet definitely whets the appetite for a book 2, 3 or more.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Y.S. Stephen

    I think one of the strengths of fiction is in that it can use symbolism to makes its point to a great effect. The medium does not have to entrap itself with the rigidity of reality in terms of rules, language, and cliches. Because of that, fiction is able to make good points about the real world that non-fiction finds very hard to make. For example, Goerge Orwell's Animal Farm taught a good lesson about the politics of that time without pretzelling itself with terminologies that would give too I think one of the strengths of fiction is in that it can use symbolism to makes its point to a great effect. The medium does not have to entrap itself with the rigidity of reality in terms of rules, language, and cliches. Because of that, fiction is able to make good points about the real world that non-fiction finds very hard to make. For example, Goerge Orwell's Animal Farm taught a good lesson about the politics of that time without pretzelling itself with terminologies that would give too much away about what it was talking about. In short, you could enjoy the tale without any political commentary. Unfortunately, Little Bird fails this test. The point the graphic novel was trying to make - the evils of blind nationalism, power, and religion, falls flat in the sense that there is no cloaking of words, no fallback on symbols, no employment of what makes fiction great. The venom of the writers towards what they consider vices and injustices are made too plain on the page. This error makes enjoying Little Bird quite hard for people they might be trying to reach The art is lovely. Spectacular in many parts. But the story lacks the maturity the art deserves.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Decker

    *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comic via Edelweiss. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* The description of this book has everything. It's an epic with social-political exploration. There's a young heroine fighting for what she thinks is right. I was really looking forward to this book. Unfortunately, I could not get into it. The art is very unique. There's grotesque elements and disproportion to emphasis the *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comic via Edelweiss. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.* The description of this book has everything. It's an epic with social-political exploration. There's a young heroine fighting for what she thinks is right. I was really looking forward to this book. Unfortunately, I could not get into it. The art is very unique. There's grotesque elements and disproportion to emphasis the strangeness. This is a future with an uber-religious USA, genetically modified human beings, and something called a resurrection gene. The world seems massive, but it was too much for me to grasp. I was hoping to enjoy this book, but it ended up being a DNF for me. The artwork is unnerving, but excellently fits with the story. There's a lot going on. A big world. I think I might have just not been in the right head space for this type of book. I give this book a 2/5.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Lorenz

    Very interesting book. I finished and immediately wanted to start over and try to make sense of everything I had just read. The art is unique and gorgeously detailed - the whole thing really reminded me of We Stand on Guard but with more mythos, more super powers. I wonder about the author's connection with First Nations people. All that being said this was interesting and kept me reading. I'll definitely read more, because I want to find out what's next for Little Bird. Thanks to Image and Very interesting book. I finished and immediately wanted to start over and try to make sense of everything I had just read. The art is unique and gorgeously detailed - the whole thing really reminded me of We Stand on Guard but with more mythos, more super powers. I wonder about the author's connection with First Nations people. All that being said this was interesting and kept me reading. I'll definitely read more, because I want to find out what's next for Little Bird. Thanks to Image and Edelweiss for the digital ARC

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fay

    Hm. I liked it. It was cohesive, yes, but the pacing of the book series so far is a bit too fast. I’m not sure if this is the entire series, as it left on a bit of a cliffhanger, but they could have developed characters and their relationships a bit more instead of worrying about #1-5 telling a complete arc of the story. Visually, the work is stunning. Sometimes color schemes felt off from scenes but still worked. Overall, not bad groundwork for a story going forward, but still had room for Hm. I liked it. It was cohesive, yes, but the pacing of the book series so far is a bit too fast. I’m not sure if this is the entire series, as it left on a bit of a cliffhanger, but they could have developed characters and their relationships a bit more instead of worrying about #1-5 telling a complete arc of the story. Visually, the work is stunning. Sometimes color schemes felt off from scenes but still worked. Overall, not bad groundwork for a story going forward, but still had room for improvement.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    The art is gorgeous, but the story is weird. I think it’s a religious war between Catholics and Northern Canadians. I wasn’t aware that Northern Canada was a religion. The religion bit turns me off. For most of it, I didn’t know what was happening. It was just starting to make a little sense and it ended. Don’t think I’m hooked enough to seek out future issues. ARC provided by the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    One of those genre comics that can present quite interesting things fairly well – here the battle between warrior types and technomages – but that tend to spend too much effort on world-building for the sake of clarity. I certainly felt the need of more of the latter, to justify the work expended elsewhere on this. Two and a half stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    (a)lyss(a)

    This is a graphic and beautiful book. I like the art, but it also is rather gory which I was not prepared for. I love that the story seems to be an allegory for the treatment of First Nation's people in Canada, but found the plot confusing as it progressed. There is a twist and it does sort of read like Star Wars, but I also felt like I got lost in the imagery at times instead of the plot.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Damian Mxyzptlk

    Gorgeous art and quite unique storytelling make for a great graphic novel that had me gasping over panels and story developments. This book made me very happy, as it speaks to my European heart on many levels.

  14. 4 out of 5

    JC Cornell

    An interesting take on South vs North with religion and land.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    Really, really disliked this. I didn’t like the plot or art, not really sure why I bothered to finish.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hauck Araujo

    Gorgeous artwork, exquisitely well crafted plot. A sci-fi master piece. Oddly reminds me Möebius.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jason McCracken

    Lovely artwork and a decent story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Collin Katrell

    Brilliant art, coloring, and lettering lead the way for this fascinating and wild adventure. I couldn't put this one down till I finished it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lily

    There is a lot going on in this book. I am definitely going to need to read it again as it’s quite packed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anders Nyberg

    Five stars is for the art here because this may very well be the most beautiful comic book I ever seen. I'm so glad we have Ian Bertram now that Moebius isn't around anymore.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul Zits

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gary

  23. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Barham

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maire

  25. 5 out of 5

    Daniel K

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brennan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonny Straughan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joel Thorn

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristofer

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gautham Selvamohan

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.