Hot Best Seller

Batman, Volume 11: The Fall and the Fallen

Availability: Ready to download

Eisner Award winner Tom King reunites with Mikel Janin as he continues his best-selling Batman run. Batman faces his most personal battle yet as he is locked in a life or death battle with... his father? Ever since Batman's impending wedding went south on him, the Caped Crusader has had the sinking suspicion that there has been someone lurking in the shadows setting events Eisner Award winner Tom King reunites with Mikel Janin as he continues his best-selling Batman run. Batman faces his most personal battle yet as he is locked in a life or death battle with... his father? Ever since Batman's impending wedding went south on him, the Caped Crusader has had the sinking suspicion that there has been someone lurking in the shadows setting events into motion. After the attempted assassination of Nightwing he starts to question his commitment to his war on crime, his relationships and even his own sanity. There has been an unseen hand orchestrating these events. And while the true villain has yet to reveal himself, his minions are starting to step forward and break the Bat down once and for all--beginning with Thomas Wayne, the Batman from the Flashpoint Universe! Collects Batman #70-74 and Secret Files #2


Compare

Eisner Award winner Tom King reunites with Mikel Janin as he continues his best-selling Batman run. Batman faces his most personal battle yet as he is locked in a life or death battle with... his father? Ever since Batman's impending wedding went south on him, the Caped Crusader has had the sinking suspicion that there has been someone lurking in the shadows setting events Eisner Award winner Tom King reunites with Mikel Janin as he continues his best-selling Batman run. Batman faces his most personal battle yet as he is locked in a life or death battle with... his father? Ever since Batman's impending wedding went south on him, the Caped Crusader has had the sinking suspicion that there has been someone lurking in the shadows setting events into motion. After the attempted assassination of Nightwing he starts to question his commitment to his war on crime, his relationships and even his own sanity. There has been an unseen hand orchestrating these events. And while the true villain has yet to reveal himself, his minions are starting to step forward and break the Bat down once and for all--beginning with Thomas Wayne, the Batman from the Flashpoint Universe! Collects Batman #70-74 and Secret Files #2

30 review for Batman, Volume 11: The Fall and the Fallen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    What. The. Actual. Fuck. This was pretty much an extension of Knightmares, and Knightmares went on about 5 issues too long, in my opinion. So more of that trippy shit was not a welcome sight for me. Is whatever happening in this volume actually happening in Batworld? I don't honestly know. And then there's the goddamn song (Thomas Wayne singing Home on the Range) and weird folktale (The Animals in the Pit) playing out over top of the action & other dialogue. Oh, for fuck's sake please stop What. The. Actual. Fuck. This was pretty much an extension of Knightmares, and Knightmares went on about 5 issues too long, in my opinion. So more of that trippy shit was not a welcome sight for me. Is whatever happening in this volume actually happening in Batworld? I don't honestly know. And then there's the goddamn song (Thomas Wayne singing Home on the Range) and weird folktale (The Animals in the Pit) playing out over top of the action & other dialogue. Oh, for fuck's sake please stop doing that. It's annoying and pretentious when coupled with two dudes wandering around in the desert wearing helmets with pointy ears on them. So, by the time I got to the equally nutty Batman Secret Files #2 (that stuff with Hugo Strange was just a HUGE pile of whatthefuckisthisshit) I was over it. I mean, the Secret Files issue really wouldn't have been a bad addition if the rest of the volume wasn't a whacked out bag of nonsense. I'm probably going to be in the minority, but I was incredibly disappointed by everything but the art. <--because that was mostly great. I just...I have no idea what's happening in this title. I even went back and made sure that I hadn't skipped over a volume accidentally or something and I guess I need to read Heroes in Crisis: The Price and Other Tales. And I suppose that means I need to read Heroes in Crisis? What the hell? WHAT THE HELL?! Fuck. Is it not possible to just read ONE title anymore? Don't answer that.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Oh nooooooooooo! Tom Kings Batman continues to nosedive in quality in Volume 11: The Fall and the Fallen - what an unfortunately fitting subtitle! Banes gonna break Batman. But not if Batman can break Bane! Hes gonna break Bane. Batmans gonna break who? Bane! Wait - whats Batman going to do to Bane? Break him! But not if Banes gonna break Batman! Then again Batmans gonna break Bane. Batman break Bane break Batman break break break Baneman Bat Bat break Breakman bane bat bane break Fuck me. Did Oh nooooooooooo! Tom King’s Batman continues to nosedive in quality in Volume 11: The Fall and the Fallen - what an unfortunately fitting subtitle! Bane’s gonna break Batman. But not if Batman can break Bane! He’s gonna break Bane. Batman’s gonna break who? Bane! Wait - what’s Batman going to do to Bane? Break him! But not if Bane’s gonna break Batman! Then again Batman’s gonna break Bane. Batman break Bane break Batman break break break Baneman Bat Bat break Breakman bane bat bane break… Fuck me. Did Tom King suffer severe head trauma and/or a stroke while he was writing this? A lot of this book was just loopy as all hell. Repetitive, dumb, pointless rubbish that summarised over and over the series storyline to no effect. Batman escapes Bane’s nightmare machine in Arkham, goes into the break cycle, then goes on a jolly in the desert with Flashpoint Batman (his dad from another dimension with major pinkeye) who’s wearing the desert outfit Batfleck wore in Batman v Superman. That desert sequence was the only part of the book that somewhat engaged me because it’s so dreamlike and weird that I couldn’t tell at all where King was going or what it all meant. That and Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes’ art which was fan-nan-men-al. Loved it. Janin is becoming one of the best artists Batman’s ever had. The book closes out with some tossed off short stories: Joker’s trying to unmask Batman, Psycho Pirate’s got a cult, Riddler’s riddling, Hugo Strange is being strange, and Bane’s breaking someone other than Batman for a change. Each one was unmemorable, uninteresting and pointless - tacked-on filler. I really hope this isn’t the standard the title goes out on but, sadly, for now, Tom King’s Batman, Volume 11: The Fall and the Fallen maintains its crapitude set in the last book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    On the one hand, I admire the audacity of what Kings done over the course of this run; its been a long and intricate set-up for a psychologically perplexing payoff. On the other hand, Im kind of ready to just watch Batman brood, solve a discrete mystery, and punch someone in the face and call it a day while Alfred chastises him for getting too many bruises. I need a break from all this Bane insanity. On the one hand, I admire the audacity of what King’s done over the course of this run; it’s been a long and intricate set-up for a psychologically perplexing payoff. On the other hand, I’m kind of ready to just watch Batman brood, solve a discrete mystery, and punch someone in the face and call it a day while Alfred chastises him for getting too many bruises. I need a break from all this Bane insanity.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    "Your mother just could not quit. She had faith, this eternal faith in you. That you could see the horrors. And still dream of a better world." Volume 11 of Tom Kings remarkable Batman run is a transition volume, a set-up for the finale, the City of Bane, (which may take two volumes?). Not much actually happens here beyond a recap and a clarification thst Bane has been behind everything bad that has happened in Kings whole run, ending in the (almost) complete physical and psychological decimation "Your mother just could not quit. She had faith, this eternal faith in you. That you could see the horrors. And still dream of a better world." Volume 11 of Tom King’s remarkable Batman run is a transition volume, a set-up for the finale, the City of Bane, (which may take two volumes?). Not much actually happens here beyond a recap and a clarification thst Bane has been behind everything bad that has happened in King’s whole run, ending in the (almost) complete physical and psychological decimation of the very human being Bruce Wayne. The volume opens with The Riddler. I had heard that Batman writers hate to write Riddler stories because they have to then write riddles, but this is not a problem for King, who uses the idea of the riddle to reflect on the nature of story and meaning itself as enigma, puzzle, riddle. Know thyself! What are you made of?! So the opening pages here on The Riddler feature a poem—a kind of riddle—and ends the volume with a kind of extended Batman nightmare—another kind of riddle. The Bane of Bat’s existence briefly throws a series of villains at him such as Freeze, Scarecrow, Two-Face, and then throws him into the desert; why? To continue to break him down in preparation for the Final Showdown. And then we are in the desert, with Bruce Wayne’s dead father, Thomas Wayne, a.k.a. the Flashpoint Batman, and we spend some time reflecting on, once again, what kind of life Bruce has lived after watching the murder of his own parents. We revisit a story from a Russian horror book his father had given him, featuring a story, “The Animals and the Pit.” It’s a bloody horror story where no one seems to come out of the pit alive. This experience in the desert would seem to be King’s version of Batman as Jesus in the desert, trying to figure out who he is, fighting his inner demons. Bat’s The Dark Night of the Soul. There’s a sense that things could still get worse before they get better. So it’s obviously not an action volume, but a psyche volume, which is largely what the whole run has been about. King’s writing is as usual very good, very assured, assuring us he has known where every piece of this epic puzzle/riddle fits. And the artwork of Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes befits one of the great Batman runs of all time. I think King may be wearing out his welcome, though, here, so it is time to finish.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Tom King seems to be stuck in a time loop with Batman and Bane taking turns breaking each other. By the way, why does every Bane story have to involve one of the two of them getting their back broken? I don't like how after the Knightmares arc, it's still difficult to differentiate in this if things are really happening or if it's a dream. The story got much better in the last two issues with Bruce and Thomas travelling through the desert. This ends with a bunch of decent short stories from Tom King seems to be stuck in a time loop with Batman and Bane taking turns breaking each other. By the way, why does every Bane story have to involve one of the two of them getting their back broken? I don't like how after the Knightmares arc, it's still difficult to differentiate in this if things are really happening or if it's a dream. The story got much better in the last two issues with Bruce and Thomas travelling through the desert. This ends with a bunch of decent short stories from Batman: Secret Files #2.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    The Fall and the Fallen feels like the volume of final preparations and table-setting, and it should, since it's the penultimate arc of Tom King's Batman run (on the main series at least). I still dig it a lot, though like with the previous volume I don't have that much to say about this particular arc it's a book where many pieces of the puzzle finally fall into place, and at this point I'm just rolling with it and waiting to see where King takes us next on this wild and amazing journey The Fall and the Fallen feels like the volume of final preparations and table-setting, and it should, since it's the penultimate arc of Tom King's Batman run (on the main series at least). I still dig it a lot, though like with the previous volume I don't have that much to say about this particular arc — it's a book where many pieces of the puzzle finally fall into place, and at this point I'm just rolling with it and waiting to see where King takes us next on this wild and amazing journey through the Batman psyche. City of Bane promises to be phenomenal, and I can't wait to find out how the best Batman run since Grant Morrison wraps up.

  7. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Ah damn this probably weakest volume in the entire run. So Batman after his Knightmares is not having a good time. It actually opens interesting enough with Batman breaking out of Arkham. In doing so he slaps around some of his good old villains. The next few volumes is his complete breakdown, jumping around in time, and spending a little time with his pops. It all comes down to breaking him down before he goes pretty much insane. I think the idea is good. I see what King is doing. I enjoyed the Ah damn this probably weakest volume in the entire run. So Batman after his Knightmares is not having a good time. It actually opens interesting enough with Batman breaking out of Arkham. In doing so he slaps around some of his good old villains. The next few volumes is his complete breakdown, jumping around in time, and spending a little time with his pops. It all comes down to breaking him down before he goes pretty much insane. I think the idea is good. I see what King is doing. I enjoyed the first issue here a lot of him breaking out of Arkham. The rest? Kind of boring and all over the place. The big plan by Bane was obvious, the loss of his Batfamily is weird, and the ending is kind of meh. The secret file is also a waste of time, don't bother reading it. I usually enjoy King's work A LOT. Most of his Batman volumes are some of my favorite ever. This? This is pretty darn weak. A 2.5 out of 5.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. The Dark Knight has faced challenges of all kinds in his life, surmounting them with more bravery and modesty than humankind could ever possess. Among the obstacles hes faced, the physical strain that comes with every act of heroism remains quintessential to understanding the pain and suffering that is carried around by Gothams greatest saviour. But only some know how to get inside Bruce Waynes head and destroy him psychologically. To play mind You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. The Dark Knight has faced challenges of all kinds in his life, surmounting them with more bravery and modesty than humankind could ever possess. Among the obstacles he’s faced, the physical strain that comes with every act of heroism remains quintessential to understanding the pain and suffering that is carried around by Gotham’s greatest saviour. But only some know how to get inside Bruce Wayne’s head and destroy him psychologically. To play mind tricks and to exploit his greatest fears by manipulating his emotions is not something that even Batman could overcome with his gadgets. Eisner Award-winning writer Tom King teams up with artists Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes to continue another chapter in Batman’s saga, where he faces a traumatic, personal, and psychological battle against an unlikely foe. What is Batman: The Fall and the Fallen about? Collecting Batman issues #70-74 and Batman: Secret Files #2, this story arc picks up where things were left off as Batman wakes up from a oneiric contraption forcing him into going through nightmares somewhat related to his recent repeated experiences of trauma. From a miserable wedding event to the tragic shooting of a beloved member of the Bat Family, the Caped Crusader finds himself in an ugly and vicious cycle filled with rage and confusion, all orchestrated by one person who wishes to break the Bat beyond the physical torment that was once inflicted on him. At the heart of this devastating plan dealt out by unseen hands is the return of Bruce Wayne’s father from the Flashpoint Universe. While the mystery alone is killer, it’s what’s about to unfold that will be the most mortifying. Pseudo-poetic and literary, writer Tom King falls down a pit of repetitious creativity with his latest story arc embracing his greatest flaws, notably his choppy story-telling. Told in five parts, The Fall and the Fallen begins by having Batman steamroll through countless villains who are doing Bane’s bidding right in Arkham Asylum. Right when the story begins to spark some sort of originality, it falls back on flashbacks as it presents his current emotional state which is at the heart of the chaos occurring right inside his mind. While it is impressive to see Batman and Bane—a villain that writer Tom King has obsessively used during his comic book run; while failing to impress me so far—go at it with no restraint, the dialogue and narration is ultimately distractful and blurs the reader in his ability to understand what’s actually going on or if the story is even going anywhere, especially when some of the key character’s have incomprehensible motives. Despite this story arc serving as a recapitulation of the past events that have slowly cracked Batman’s self-control, it is essentially the foundation of the upcoming two-part event that will mark the end of writer Tom King’s Batman run. Nonetheless, the artwork remains stellar with artists Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes working together in unison. While the former was assigned the present time events where things seemed to occur without any confusion, the latter seemed to have scenes that were more likely to be illusions or nightmares lived by Batman, with no assurance that they actually occurred. Fornes’ artwork is also a bit thicker, heavier, and less detailed to accentuate the action scenes, while Janin’s visuals excelled in splash pages with a touch more emotion and profoundness to convey personal significance. While it felt like the whole story was being dragged through the mud—or just on the back of a horse in the middle of a desert—there were some interesting ideas conveyed in the form of a metaphor that can be understood in the childhood books that Bruce Wayne loved to read. His understanding of it allows for an interesting interpretation of his way of life. Unfortunately, the final issue, Batman: Secret Files #2, was an unnecessary addition filled with short stories where villains try to take down Batman. It is safe to say that none of these stories by various different writers and artists had anything significant to contribute to the story afoot. Batman: The Fall and the Fallen is a messy yet artistic arc setting up the pieces to an inevitable confrontation told through literary metaphors. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Hating Tom King's run seems to be the 'fun' thing to do lately, for some reason. I'm still loving it, personally. Knightmares was a bit of a misstep, but The Fall And The Fallen gets right back on track, as King's long-form Bane story ramps up with Batman spiraling further and further away from himself and the people he cares about until it forces him into the arms of the one person he should be staying away from - his father, the Flashpoint Batman. The first three issues of the volume are the Hating Tom King's run seems to be the 'fun' thing to do lately, for some reason. I'm still loving it, personally. Knightmares was a bit of a misstep, but The Fall And The Fallen gets right back on track, as King's long-form Bane story ramps up with Batman spiraling further and further away from himself and the people he cares about until it forces him into the arms of the one person he should be staying away from - his father, the Flashpoint Batman. The first three issues of the volume are the spiral, and the second two after that show what happens when Bruce and Thomas Wayne finally start working together. Spoiler alert: nothing good. The journey that King is taking Bruce through is really quite harrowing at times, and this volume is almost the precipice of it all. If you think Bruce has fallen as far as he can go, you've got some major surprises coming. Also included is Batman Secret Files #2, which are mostly little vignettes about all of Batman's foes, the ones that he battles through in issues #70-71, and how they're going to play into his final downfall in the next two volumes. It's a nice little addition, but none of the stories are particularly essential. On art for the main five issues are Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes, who split each issue fairly evenly. Their styles are quite different, but they mesh surprisingly well. King's run has been full of excellent artists, and these guys are two of the best. The Secret Files has a few different artists thrown in, not least of which is Eduardo Risso, who deserves a special mention as ever. The Fall And The Fallen is a painful volume to read at times, but it's all just more set-up for what's about to hit. Batman may think he has it sussed, but he'll be surprised - and I bet you will be too.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    Smart, yet stupid. Deep, yet empty. Beautifully written, yet stilted. Not the worst written in his run or my least favorite, but definitely a step back.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    Batman Vol 11: The Fall and the Fallen feels incomplete. Like they didn't include the finishing issue. And that's what brings it down I think, because King is going somewhere and I'm excited to get there but we've been setting up and planting for City of Bane since the beginning, and Bane's plan started in issue 59 when Bruce got abducted to be put into a knightmare state. By the end of this collection we're at 74. 15 issues since Bane has taken an active role in his plan and it feels very slow, Batman Vol 11: The Fall and the Fallen feels incomplete. Like they didn't include the finishing issue. And that's what brings it down I think, because King is going somewhere and I'm excited to get there but we've been setting up and planting for City of Bane since the beginning, and Bane's plan started in issue 59 when Bruce got abducted to be put into a knightmare state. By the end of this collection we're at 74. 15 issues since Bane has taken an active role in his plan and it feels very slow, like it didn't need this many issues for me to see Batman kick Banes ass. Getting the pace of this run out of the way I enjoyed the volume even if I think it's incomplete. And sure comic runs until they finish will always feel incomplete and I'm just waiting for that point where we'll have the whole thing and can look at it from that perspective. But right now issue 76 is the latest and I believe he's writing until 85 so 9 more issues then a 12 issue maxi series. 21 more issues until we can look at the whole story. And within that hundred issue story by issue 70-74 we're just now seemingly entering the endgame. It's a bit of a contrast to say Scot Snyder or Grant Morrison where you have this whole bigger thing going on but you also get really satisfying trade paperbacks of the collected issues. Take say Death of the Family or Batman R.I.P, both of them are in a larger narrative that gets played into later and is used as setup, but both of them are fucking satisfying on their own and can be taken as that. I don't think you could take this one on it's own as the groundwork has been laid elsewhere and it's still laying groundwork for a bigger story in the next two volumes. A bit of an anticlimax? Yes. Is King's Batman still worth reading? Yes. Is it going to improve when we have the whole story? I think so. 3 stars for now, if you've read this far you're a saint.

  12. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Probably the weakest volume of Kings run so far

  13. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    It's finally the beginning of the end for King's run. This volume contains the Scooby-Doo moment, where someone in-story goes over the entire run from the beginning and explains how it was all planned and why. It's needed, because it has been a long and winding road, but wasn't that satisfying to me. Possibly because I already knew who was behind it al because I've only been reading the TPBs and from the news media covering the book. It's also a little confusing because it jumps back and forth It's finally the beginning of the end for King's run. This volume contains the Scooby-Doo moment, where someone in-story goes over the entire run from the beginning and explains how it was all planned and why. It's needed, because it has been a long and winding road, but wasn't that satisfying to me. Possibly because I already knew who was behind it al because I've only been reading the TPBs and from the news media covering the book. It's also a little confusing because it jumps back and forth between two different time periods, nearly every other page. Looking forward to reading the conlusion, but I know I'll have to read the whole thing straight through to see if it really comes together well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    2.5 stars. A bit of buildup, a bit scattered, and a bit confusing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Sadly, one of King's weaker volumes. We get the inevitability of Batman's escape (#70) followed by a really confusing chronological issue (#71) and then worst of all an issue-long exposition dump (#72). It only really takes off in the last two issues (#73-74) which focus on Thomas and Bruce at odds with each other. (Wait! This is the Flashpoint Thomas Wayne? Not the Simon Hurt Thomas Wayne from Morrison's run!? I'm so confused. Still, it's quite interesting.) Unfortunately, the book then Sadly, one of King's weaker volumes. We get the inevitability of Batman's escape (#70) followed by a really confusing chronological issue (#71) and then worst of all an issue-long exposition dump (#72). It only really takes off in the last two issues (#73-74) which focus on Thomas and Bruce at odds with each other. (Wait! This is the Flashpoint Thomas Wayne? Not the Simon Hurt Thomas Wayne from Morrison's run!? I'm so confused. Still, it's quite interesting.) Unfortunately, the book then anti-climaxes with some mediocre "Secret Files" by many authors who are not Tom King.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alí Flores

    Kinda meh. Arc is way too weird, lacks of action and it doesnt feel like a preview of the next big event: City of Bane. Art is still on fleek tho. Kinda meh. Arc is way too weird, lacks of action and it doesn’t feel like a preview of the next big event: City of Bane. Art is still on fleek tho.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Abell

    What the hell is it with King? Why does he like going over old ground? I can understand why he does it. For example, Batman's escape from the bowels of Arkham is in representation to Bane's attack on the Asylum, when he was looking for Batman and Psycho Pirate. But to have it so precisely copied was irksome. I like new, I want new, but King does love to regurgitate. Then we have the entire King Batman story arc narrated to us in a condensed format. This works better as it unfolds the entire story What the hell is it with King? Why does he like going over old ground? I can understand why he does it. For example, Batman's escape from the bowels of Arkham is in representation to Bane's attack on the Asylum, when he was looking for Batman and Psycho Pirate. But to have it so precisely copied was irksome. I like new, I want new, but King does love to regurgitate. Then we have the entire King Batman story arc narrated to us in a condensed format. This works better as it unfolds the entire story from a new perspective... However, I don't fully agree with the conclusion you're given. Knowing the characters I don't think this in-depth planning and carrying out is feasible. However, it is a comic and the tales are meant to be fantastic, so I'll let it go. Then we are back to the morbid little Russian fable of the cute furry animals down a pit who take to eating one another... down to the bones. This is my least favourite of the stories in his volume, though it does go to show everybody has an ulterior motive. I now the story is to parallel what's happening in the pit but do we need the whole fable again? Each of these, though vexatious to me, works. They work even better with the artwork of Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes (though at times, these two artists styles don't work together). For me, it feels as though King is trying too hard to be clever and it comes across a tad precocious. The other annoying element of this story is The Worlds Greatest Detective. Batman does not deserve this mantle. Surely, with the amount of planning needed to get to this broken Batman, there would have been a clue or two. I have always loved the fact that Batman was human under the cowl. King's Batman though is habitually human. Hardly has he ever thought with anything other than his fists, throughout this series. I think that's the reason I enjoyed the previous volume, Knightmares, so much - he was back to deducing situations. All that said, it's still a good story, and it's the artwork that adds strength to the ongoing story, rather than the narration and dialogue. So I would recommend buying the book as I hope this is a minor lull, in what is still looking to be an epic tale.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    As someone who has championed Tom King's long run on the main Batman title, I found the last volume titled "Knightmares" to be underwhelming as despite the impressive range of diverse artistry, what great moments of writing King can come up with, the main conceit of the volume takes place in a dream, which makes the whole thing redundant. At the start of this volume, Batman has broken himself free from the dream machine and the first issue is just him fighting a lot of his great rogues gallery As someone who has championed Tom King's long run on the main Batman title, I found the last volume titled "Knightmares" to be underwhelming as despite the impressive range of diverse artistry, what great moments of writing King can come up with, the main conceit of the volume takes place in a dream, which makes the whole thing redundant. At the start of this volume, Batman has broken himself free from the dream machine and the first issue is just him fighting a lot of his great rogues gallery through Arkham Asylum. You do get the sense that you've seen this scenario before, most likely from King's own run and the only purpose of this whole issue is so that Batman can deliver a message to Bane, who is very much the main antagonist of the whole run. The only thing that saves it is the always great art by Mikel Janin and Jorge Fornes, both are becoming the stars of the book, more so than the writer. At this stage in the comic, it seems that King is just retreading old ground and not pushing the story forward, with many of his allies, including Commissioner Gordon not on the Dark Knight's side, suggesting he is losing his sanity. There is even a whole issue, in which Bane invades the Wayne mansion, leading to a brutal fistfight between the hero and the villain (drawn by Jorge Fornes), whilst there are stunning double-page spreads (drawn by Mikel Janin) that just recap the events of King's extensive story, which suggests that Bane has been the mastermind behind all the numerous events. I know Bane has always shown an intelligence than just his Venom-injected muscles, but even this seems like a stretch. However, things perk up with Bane's unexpected alliance with the Flashpoint Batman, Thomas Wayne, who kidnaps his own son and takes him during a long journey through the desert. Loosely continuing the four-issue event “The Button”, you get this unusual father-son narrative that adds another perspective to the ongoing question of King's run, "Can Batman ever be truly happy?" Throughout reading this volume, there was the worry that we are in another dreamscape, but fortunately it is only a metaphorical one and certainly Janin draws the desert like a dream, with the two distinct Batman journeying through. Concluding with another Secret Files issue with a mixed bag of short stories by different writers and artists, I still get the sense that Tom King is just not going anywhere, but with his big finale "City of Bane" coming up, hopefully Tom King and his frequent artistic collaborators end the run on a high note.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    Oh, no! What a disappointment. :( This is the first volume in a looooong time that I've been unhappy with King's Batman run (maybe since vol. 1 where I was on the fence re: King). This volume is four short issues of nothing (In my estimation this vol. did not progress the plot at all & we're right back where we left off in vols 9 & 10, except maybe Bruce now has even more phycological trauma relating to his parents.) followed by more nothing, which I consider to be an insult added on top Oh, no! What a disappointment. :( This is the first volume in a looooong time that I've been unhappy with King's Batman run (maybe since vol. 1 where I was on the fence re: King). This volume is four short issues of nothing (In my estimation this vol. did not progress the plot at all & we're right back where we left off in vols 9 & 10, except maybe Bruce now has even more phycological trauma relating to his parents.) followed by more nothing, which I consider to be an insult added on top of this injury... Batman Secret Files #2 is a bunch of lukewarm one-offs (except for maybe The Riddler in "Alone" by Mairghread Scott, which I liked the best of the bunch). There were aspects of this volume which I did like: like the red Bat-signal & the ingathering of the Batfamily (as always, poor Tim), and the art/gorgeous 2-page spreads, like Bruce & Selina in their bedroom & Batman and Catwoman in the green, throwbacks to previous volumes, but. But. These four issues (#70-74) should not have been sold as its own independent volume. It made for a bad book & a disappointing read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I'm going to be really annoyed if I find out the whole Catman-Batman romance was just part of an elaborate plan to bring down Batman (which is hinted at here). This whole "plot" doesn't have a lot of weight to it--Bane is behind it all, but no one will believe Bruce/Batman, because Bane is pretending to be weak and broken (and incarcerated)? And somehow, he decides/announces that Batman is broken? Hmm, when did this happen exactly? And where did this alternate-universe Thomas Wayne come from? I'm going to be really annoyed if I find out the whole Catman-Batman romance was just part of an elaborate plan to bring down Batman (which is hinted at here). This whole "plot" doesn't have a lot of weight to it--Bane is behind it all, but no one will believe Bruce/Batman, because Bane is pretending to be weak and broken (and incarcerated)? And somehow, he decides/announces that Batman is broken? Hmm, when did this happen exactly? And where did this alternate-universe Thomas Wayne come from? This is a pretty disappointing volume from King. About the only thing going for it is some strong Mikel Janin artwork. And then there's the inclusion of Batman Secret Files #2, which doesn't really add anything to the whole mixture.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    What's even going on here? Knightmares predictably featured an extended dream sequence for Batman courtesy of Bane. Now, in The Fall and the Fallen...we're still in the dream? Maybe? Why are Batman and Thomas Wayne in the desert? Why is Martha Wayne's corpse involved? I was happy to see "Batman Secret Files" issue at the end because it meant I didn't have to deal with Tom King's nonsense voiceovers anymore. Not that the secret files were any great shakes, but they at least made sense. The only What's even going on here? Knightmares predictably featured an extended dream sequence for Batman courtesy of Bane. Now, in The Fall and the Fallen...we're still in the dream? Maybe? Why are Batman and Thomas Wayne in the desert? Why is Martha Wayne's corpse involved? I was happy to see "Batman Secret Files" issue at the end because it meant I didn't have to deal with Tom King's nonsense voiceovers anymore. Not that the secret files were any great shakes, but they at least made sense. The only reason The Fall and the Fallen isn't a one-star volume is the art. It continues to be world class.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic plot: Batman fights his way out of Arkham only to wind up in the desert with Thomas Wayne, facing yet more horrors. I can't decide how I feel about this volume. It is intense, filled with some very powerful emotions. The narrative, though, is so confusing that the emotional arc is muddied. What is past and what is present? What is real and what is just in Batman's mind? No idea. Maybe that's the point. The art is inconsistent, furthering the confusion. Sometimes the panels are crisp and Basic plot: Batman fights his way out of Arkham only to wind up in the desert with Thomas Wayne, facing yet more horrors. I can't decide how I feel about this volume. It is intense, filled with some very powerful emotions. The narrative, though, is so confusing that the emotional arc is muddied. What is past and what is present? What is real and what is just in Batman's mind? No idea. Maybe that's the point. The art is inconsistent, furthering the confusion. Sometimes the panels are crisp and clear and others are frenetic and more impressionistic. I'm sure it is intentional, but it doesnt make the flow any easier to follow. It's brilliant, but jarring, and that makes it hard to just sit back and enjoy. I feel like I have to be analyzing every detail of every panel because I might miss something. The story ends on a cliffhanger, so I'm pushing straight on to the next volume and am actually glad for once that I'm behind in reading my issues. I can definitely sense a build up to something major about to happen.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Ehhhh. Hard to find much to enjoy in this arc.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    For those of us who have been reading (and enjoying, it might need emphasizing) Tom King's Batman, The Fall and the Fallen is where the story is spelled out. We knew as far back as the wedding issue (#50) that Bane had cobbled together the events of King's long arc to break Batman as no villain had ever done so before, but here King makes the plan explicit. In the Battlestar Galactica reboot, the opening credits always stated that the Cylons "have a plan," but the series never really got around For those of us who have been reading (and enjoying, it might need emphasizing) Tom King's Batman, The Fall and the Fallen is where the story is spelled out. We knew as far back as the wedding issue (#50) that Bane had cobbled together the events of King's long arc to break Batman as no villain had ever done so before, but here King makes the plan explicit. In the Battlestar Galactica reboot, the opening credits always stated that the Cylons "have a plan," but the series never really got around to explaining it. Later, a standalone production that was of course called The Plan attempted to do exactly that, but by then fans didn't really care anymore. You might dither over the fact that the series "showed rather than told" the plan, which is the most famous piece of advice writers are given, but the fact that the credits constantly repeated that the Cylons "have a plan" meant that the plan was apparently important enough to the series that there should have been no question as to what it was. Gradually, we learn that the Cylons have inserted doppelgangers that look and act human among the survivors of their initial onslaught, but that wasn't apparent until the end of the first season, by which point the series had already posited most of its attention to Baltar's relationship with Six. Why am I bothering to explain something that seems completely unrelated to King's Batman? Because it demonstrates another of the criticisms I've seen about it (and there have been many, and most of them seem spurious to me), that The Fall and the Fallen is just another stretch of King dithering, that he basically decompressed his story to the point of losing all credibility. And, well, I disagree. King's comics storytelling has consistently been a masterclass in storytelling, in any medium, and it's as true in the pages of his Batman as it is in his Mister Miracle, his Omega Men, his Vision...You get the idea. If he's doing something, there's usually good reason for it, whether because it's important to the story or because he's presenting something in its most dramatic form. King's genius isn't just that he can tell a good story, but that he can tell it well, too. That's the highest form of storytelling. The idea of "breaking Batman" has been done before. King knew that. He deliberately sought to find a novel way in which to do it, and Fall and the Fallen explains his reasoning brilliantly. And anyone who has since read the conclusion of his run (much less anyone who has since heard his plans for a follow-up maxi-series called Batman/Catwoman as being based on his own Batman Annual #2), knows that Batman doesn't just prove his enemies wrong, he ends up proving himself wrong. We live in an incredibly cynical age. We have access to so much information, and so many stories, we think we've seen and done it all, and are not much hopeful that we can be proven wrong about that. And yet, King keeps proving us wrong, and not just that there are no new stories, even familiar stories with familiar characters, but that the stories themselves must be cynical. Even the stories where he seems to have boxed himself into unhappy endings, even the stories readers have convinced themselves as having unhappy endings...Well, King disagrees. And there are readers who agree with him. I'm one of them. It's also worth mentioning that the volume also concludes one piece of the story King has been telling, something that cropped up after the wedding issue, a story the young Bruce Wayne used to have his father read to him, repeatedly, an unexpectedly grim story readers at first assumed must have been the request of a different character entirely (the KGBeast). Well, King finally has Batman explain that, and it's pitch-perfect and completely relevant. It's also a bookend to King's far more controversial "Young Bruce" anecdote detailed in I Am Suicide. This is the sort of detail I'm going to cherish for years.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    2.5 Stars Coming out of the Knightmares storyline, I expected this Volume to be a little bit odd. But... unfortunately, for me, Batman has been under and mentally/psychologically attacked for so long, the book is starting to make me question what all is real on the pages and what is hallucination. Don't get me wrong, Tom King is an excellent writer and what is contained here is good... just not exactly sure what is REALLY happening. After seemingly escaping Arkham Asylum (and providing a severe 2.5 Stars Coming out of the Knightmares storyline, I expected this Volume to be a little bit odd. But... unfortunately, for me, Batman has been under and mentally/psychologically attacked for so long, the book is starting to make me question what all is real on the pages and what is hallucination. Don't get me wrong, Tom King is an excellent writer and what is contained here is good... just not exactly sure what is REALLY happening. After seemingly escaping Arkham Asylum (and providing a severe beatdown to a large portion of his rogues gallery) Bruce goes home. Here is where the story fractures for me... I know Bane is masterminding this whole plot, but what does Flashpoint Thomas Wayne Batman have to do here? Is he a fragment of Bruce's damaged psyche? Is he a henchman for Bane? Does he have his own agenda? I think I might be able to understand more about this Volume once the next one comes out and the fighting directly against Bane begins. Recommend with slight hesitancy, but probably a vital Volume in the overall scheme of things.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Batman #70-74 and Batman Secret Files #2 This collection reveals what Bane's plan has been since the beginning of Tom King's run on "Batman," and also sheds some light on why the Flashpoint Batman would be aiding Bane in his efforts. I love the confrontations and conversations between father and son, and would have liked even more of that. The "Batman Secret Files" issue was a little bit of a waste of time, and I'm giving my 5-star rating to Tom King's work, not that extra issue that was Collects Batman #70-74 and Batman Secret Files #2 This collection reveals what Bane's plan has been since the beginning of Tom King's run on "Batman," and also sheds some light on why the Flashpoint Batman would be aiding Bane in his efforts. I love the confrontations and conversations between father and son, and would have liked even more of that. The "Batman Secret Files" issue was a little bit of a waste of time, and I'm giving my 5-star rating to Tom King's work, not that extra issue that was thrown into this collection. It may set some things up in "City of Bane," but for now it didn't do much for me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    This volume does pull a lot of the previous volumes together and clear thing up, at least a little. (view spoiler)[ I'm having trouble getting used to the idea of Batman's father from the Flashpoint universe showing up and then trying to resurrect Batman's mother. I think the idea is for the three of them to leave this universe as a family, but Papa Wayne has a screw loose so Bruce isn't going along with it. (hide spoiler)] So the table is set and we're heading into City of Bane, which is King's This volume does pull a lot of the previous volumes together and clear thing up, at least a little. (view spoiler)[ I'm having trouble getting used to the idea of Batman's father from the Flashpoint universe showing up and then trying to resurrect Batman's mother. I think the idea is for the three of them to leave this universe as a family, but Papa Wayne has a screw loose so Bruce isn't going along with it. (hide spoiler)] So the table is set and we're heading into City of Bane, which is King's big epic arc and I think his last on the title. I'm interested to see if the story reaches what it's been built up for, as King has basically spent his entire run building to it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Kings run with the Bat has Bruce Wayne battling his psyche alongside the usual cavalcade of villains. The Fall of the Fallen is slow and plotting at times, but once you give into the metaphysical manifestations inhabiting Bruce Waynes mind, the story feels in-line with Kings more personal take on the Bat. I did long for the gothic setting of Gotham at times as most of the story is set in desert locales, but it feels well worth it with only one more book on the horizon. King’s run with the Bat has Bruce Wayne battling his psyche alongside the usual cavalcade of villains. The Fall of the Fallen is slow and plotting at times, but once you give into the metaphysical manifestations inhabiting Bruce Wayne’s mind, the story feels in-line with King’s more personal take on the Bat. I did long for the gothic setting of Gotham at times as most of the story is set in desert locales, but it feels well worth it with only one more book on the horizon.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kris Ritchie

    2.5 rounded up, because I am sure this was just an "off" run for King. We get a lot of waxing poetic from Thomas Wayne, which bleh, and the Secret Files 2 was just so so bad.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marco

    "Your mother just could not quit. She had faith, this eternal faith in you. That you could see the horrors. And still dream of a better world."

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.