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The Absinthe Earl

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They crossed centuries to find each other. Their love will shatter worlds. Miss Ada Quicksilver, a student of London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, is spending her holiday in Ireland to pursue her anthropological study of fairies. She visits Dublin's absinthe bars to investigate a supposed association between the bittersweet spirit and fairy sightings. O They crossed centuries to find each other. Their love will shatter worlds. Miss Ada Quicksilver, a student of London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, is spending her holiday in Ireland to pursue her anthropological study of fairies. She visits Dublin's absinthe bars to investigate a supposed association between the bittersweet spirit and fairy sightings. One night a handsome Irishman approaches her, introducing himself as Edward Donoghue. Edward takes absinthe to relieve his sleepwalking, and she is eager to hear whether he has experience with fairies. Instead, she discovers that he's the earl of Meath, and that he will soon visit a mysterious ruin at Newgrange on the orders of his cousin, the beautiful, half-mad Queen Isolde. On learning about Ada's area of study, he invites her to accompany him. Ada is torn between a sensible fear of becoming entangled with the clearly troubled gentleman and her compelling desire to ease his suffering. Finally she accepts his invitation, and they arrive in time for the winter solstice. That night, the secret of Edward's affliction is revealed: he is, in fact, a lord in two worlds and can no longer suppress his shadow self. Little does either of them realize that their blossoming friendship and slowly kindling passion will lead to discoveries that wrench open a door sealed for centuries, throwing them into a war that will change Ireland forever.


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They crossed centuries to find each other. Their love will shatter worlds. Miss Ada Quicksilver, a student of London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, is spending her holiday in Ireland to pursue her anthropological study of fairies. She visits Dublin's absinthe bars to investigate a supposed association between the bittersweet spirit and fairy sightings. O They crossed centuries to find each other. Their love will shatter worlds. Miss Ada Quicksilver, a student of London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, is spending her holiday in Ireland to pursue her anthropological study of fairies. She visits Dublin's absinthe bars to investigate a supposed association between the bittersweet spirit and fairy sightings. One night a handsome Irishman approaches her, introducing himself as Edward Donoghue. Edward takes absinthe to relieve his sleepwalking, and she is eager to hear whether he has experience with fairies. Instead, she discovers that he's the earl of Meath, and that he will soon visit a mysterious ruin at Newgrange on the orders of his cousin, the beautiful, half-mad Queen Isolde. On learning about Ada's area of study, he invites her to accompany him. Ada is torn between a sensible fear of becoming entangled with the clearly troubled gentleman and her compelling desire to ease his suffering. Finally she accepts his invitation, and they arrive in time for the winter solstice. That night, the secret of Edward's affliction is revealed: he is, in fact, a lord in two worlds and can no longer suppress his shadow self. Little does either of them realize that their blossoming friendship and slowly kindling passion will lead to discoveries that wrench open a door sealed for centuries, throwing them into a war that will change Ireland forever.

30 review for The Absinthe Earl

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maria V. Snyder

    This is another book I was sent for a possible cover blurb. I was a little hesitant at first because I overdosed on fairy/fey books back when they were super popular and haven't been keen to return. However, this one intrigued me as the main character is studying the legends of the Irish fey and she discovers that people who drink absinthe have the ability to see these fairy creatures. She meets the Earl, who drinks absinthe to sleep at night, otherwise he sleep walks (or in his word, "night wal This is another book I was sent for a possible cover blurb. I was a little hesitant at first because I overdosed on fairy/fey books back when they were super popular and haven't been keen to return. However, this one intrigued me as the main character is studying the legends of the Irish fey and she discovers that people who drink absinthe have the ability to see these fairy creatures. She meets the Earl, who drinks absinthe to sleep at night, otherwise he sleep walks (or in his word, "night walks"). I really liked both characters and the story was fun and fast paced and there was plenty of action and some romance! If you like Gail Carriger's books, you'll like this one as well. Here's my blurb: "Charming and filled with intriguing characters, dangerous enemies, and hidden desires, The Absinthe Earl hooked me from the start."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christie«SHBBblogger»

    Title: The Absinthe Earl Series: The Faery Rehistory #1 Author: Sharon Lynn Fisher Release date: October 15, 2019 Genre: fantasy, romance I'm going to be completely honest: I had an extremely difficult time getting the smallest bit invested in this story, and once I was able to get drawn in, there were moments I strongly considered throwing in the towel. I probably should have just admitted defeat, as it took me quite a few days of struggling to finish. This is not to say that the story was frustrating or made me angry, I think many others will find that th2019FisherRelease#1Earl Title: The Absinthe Earl Series: The Faery Rehistory #1 Author: Sharon Lynn Fisher Release date: October 15, 2019 Genre: fantasy, romance I'm going to be completely honest: I had an extremely difficult time getting the smallest bit invested in this story, and once I was able to get drawn in, there were moments I strongly considered throwing in the towel. I probably should have just admitted defeat, as it took me quite a few days of struggling to finish. This is not to say that the story was frustrating or made me angry, I think many others will find that they connect better with the writing, especially if they are into Celtic mythology. However for me, there was something missing that made it difficult to care for the characters. At the start of the book, we meet Ada Quicksilver, a student at Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women. She studies Celtic mythology and she's researching abroad in Ireland for her thesis on the "gentle folk" (or the fae.) More specifically, whether or not the highly potent liquor Absinthe really does have a connection to the sightings and stories. She meets Edward Donoghue, earl of Meath in a bar one night and he's behaving very strangely. She isn't sure if it's wise to take him up on his invitation to visit a burial mound in Newgrange, but she can't resist the temptation of such a rare wealth of information she could find there. I should have felt some excitement or thrill over their first interaction, but sadly their formal and polite dialogue was so incredibly dry. It did nothing towards the development of creating intriguing characters that I would want to know more about. There was a definite bland and generic quality that made their personalities feel lacking. One of the things I did like was the fact that Ada was a self-supported woman and independent for her time. It was rare that a woman was not financially dependent on anyone else, and the fact that she was such a scholar at that level was refreshing to read. In the beginning I thought she may be a little bit mousy or timid, but as the book wore on, she really came out of her shell more and displayed a huge amount of courage. She went on the trip with Edward believing it would be a simple detour on her vacation, having no idea what kinds of shocking revelations would be revealed along the way. Or how she was tied to this man in ways she couldn't imagine. I have a huge weakness for fae fantasy, but it seems I've finally found one that didn't excite me the way I had hoped. The heavy Celtic mythology that lost me along the way, but I think someone who has a love for the subject or at least a fascination with it will find this the perfect book for them. The mystery regarding Edward's sleepwalking and blackouts had a bizarre, though original explanation. I can't say I've seen anything remotely like that in a book before, so I give the author credit where it's due. Overall, I thought the plot was highly creative, and though I didn't fall in love with the story it did have a pretty exciting conclusion in the end. I'm glad I stuck it out to see how it all came together. FOLLOW SMOKIN HOT BOOK BLOG ON:

  3. 4 out of 5

    Krista

    Rating: 3.5 faerie stars rounded up to 4 stars This was a good start to a new paranormal series centering around faeries. It is a bit of alternative history, steampunk, romance and adventure with all manner of faerie creatures included in the story. While this started out just a little slow for me, the action soon picked up after our heroine, Ada Quicksilver and hero, Edward Donoghue the Earl of Meath, met in an absinthe bar in 1882 Dublin, Ireland. An erratic queen rules this Ireland Rating: 3.5 faerie stars rounded up to 4 stars This was a good start to a new paranormal series centering around faeries. It is a bit of alternative history, steampunk, romance and adventure with all manner of faerie creatures included in the story. While this started out just a little slow for me, the action soon picked up after our heroine, Ada Quicksilver and hero, Edward Donoghue the Earl of Meath, met in an absinthe bar in 1882 Dublin, Ireland. An erratic queen rules this Ireland. The potato famine never occurred, and the faeries have been banished from Ireland for centuries. What ensues is well-plotted but sometimes confusing world inhabited by all manner of creatures. Ada and Edward enter the faery world spurred on by their own ancient ancestors who have been star-crossed lovers for centuries. At first, the recounting of the Irish myths and the world building sometimes distracted from moving the plot along. However, the deeper I got into the book’s strange world, the more all the elements made sense. That early information enabled the full understanding of why the story progressed as it did. I won’t spoil the ending here by giving away main plotlines. I loved that Ada was nobody’s fool and could stand toe to toe with Edward. I hate a vapid heroine. This is a promising start to a new series. Initially I didn’t think that pulling so many different genres together in one book would work, but the author has done a good job of making it work here. ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Blackstone Publishing; and the author, Sharon Lynn Fisher; for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Fisher

    AUTHOR NOTE - Readers from NetGalley and Edelweiss, thank you so much for your early interest in The Absinthe Earl, the first book in The Faery Rehistory series. This is the book I've been wanting to write since I was a girl and my mom gave me my first fairy picture book. It has... - A Celtic mythology scholar from the Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women - A charming but troubled Irish earl who is much more than he seems - An eccentric Irish queen with a pirate, a goddess, and Q AUTHOR NOTE - Readers from NetGalley and Edelweiss, thank you so much for your early interest in The Absinthe Earl, the first book in The Faery Rehistory series. This is the book I've been wanting to write since I was a girl and my mom gave me my first fairy picture book. It has... - A Celtic mythology scholar from the Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women - A charming but troubled Irish earl who is much more than he seems - An eccentric Irish queen with a pirate, a goddess, and Queen Elizabeth in her ancestry - Fae creatures galore I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it! And if you are able to take a moment to leave a review, I shall be eternally grateful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    See this review at Whispers & Wonder “We have been dreaming until now...We need only awaken.” Time is of little consequence to immortals, but a passion brewing for centuries is about to force the hands of two strangers and alter the courses of their lives forever. The paths of a scholarly orphan and a tormented earl inevitably cross on a crisp and chilled winter evening, greatly drawn to each other despite the gap between their social stations. Agreeing to accompany each other on an investigati/>“We See this review at Whispers & Wonder “We have been dreaming until now...We need only awaken.” Time is of little consequence to immortals, but a passion brewing for centuries is about to force the hands of two strangers and alter the courses of their lives forever. The paths of a scholarly orphan and a tormented earl inevitably cross on a crisp and chilled winter evening, greatly drawn to each other despite the gap between their social stations. Agreeing to accompany each other on an investigation of a mysterious uncovered cairn, they’re soon heaved into a magical story of their own, as a long-lost history begins to resurface, and horrors threaten to reclaim the island of Ireland. An oath vowed in another time and place dictates the future as the fate of all hangs in the balance. The Absinthe Earl is the first installment in The Faery Rehistory series, and my personal introduction to Fisher’s work, and what an introduction it has been. This is a charming and immersive tale of believing – believing in the things we cannot see; believing in fate; believing not only in others, but in ourselves, as well. A compelling narrative with a strong focus on kindness and understanding, and placing your trust in another to guide you from the darkness when facing hardship. The saga of Ada Quicksilver and Edward Donoghue, while a fiction of the present, feels as if it’s a legend of old, and one whose echoes will surely roam well into the future. Diving into this book is comparable to traversing through a portal into Victorian Ireland and beyond. Detailed by the need to adhere to socially acceptable behavior, and a style of dialogue one would expect of this period so skillfully executed, readers are fully submerged within the first few pages. The beautiful blend of known historical aspects and Irish mythology make for a unique and alluring read I wished would continue on once the final page was turned. We carefully descend into ancient burial mounds hosting hidden secrets, we race across the captivating Irish countryside astride creatures of myth, and we find ourselves on mystical vessels piloted by pirates in between the worlds of man and fae. Fisher intelligently weaves a yarn using two separate first-person POVs, allowing us to witness events from alternating perspectives throughout the entirety of this breathtaking and emotional adventure through time. The story of us. At its heart, The Absinthe Earl is of a romance that has been written in the bright and glittering stars across a clear winter sky. It’s no coincidence Ada and Edward meet by a rustling fire within the walls of a particular house of absinthe deep within the Emerald Isle. What begins as an innocent conversation of myth and legend quickly transforms into a slow-burn romance, where a man and a woman both attempt to mask their true affections for one another. Each contains an otherworldly beauty the other finds compelling and unable to ignore, and as feelings begin to intensify, we learn of a powerful and eternal love spanning centuries between their ancestors. The organic nature of the progression of their relationship is so deftly crafted, and such an exquisite thing to watch unfurl. The underlying plot of impending war brings forth all manner of nail-biting action that often sent shivers flittering down my spine. Edward, a naval officer, is accustomed to, yet unprepared for what’s to come without the aid of someone or something he has spent his adult life attempting to repress. Ada, more comfortable within the safe confines of a library, must bolster her resolve in order emerge unscathed from the grasp of ancient foes. The reclamation of Ireland is central as all factions of man and fae clash, and aid from beings of lore, kings of old, and influential deities must surely turn the tide, or the human population may face annihilation. The ultimate battle within the final chapters, occupying land, sea, and sky, was a non-stop whirlwind that kept me on the edge of my seat. The author’s ability to manage and easily portray so many moving pieces in a way to keep readers fully engaged is just marvelous. I initially began this book expecting an account of a steamy love affair, but I was presented with so much more. Fisher’s elegant writing style and sharp attention to detail wonderfully capture the essence of not only 19th Century Ireland, but also of the magical lore that defines the history of the area. While this story ties up nicely, I’m thrilled it’s just the start of our journey and I have more of Ada and Edward (I hope!) to look forward to in the future. The Absinthe Earl is for those seeking an absorbing expedition of the heart while roving a quaint countryside blanketed by snow and secrets, and one I highly recommend. Available October 15, pre-order now. Note: A huge thank you to Blackstone Publishing for providing me with this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karissa

    This is the first book in the Faery Rehistory series and it was okay. I liked the historical Victorian setting in Ireland and enjoyed some of the Irish fae mythology. However, the writing was a bit disjointed and I had trouble following some of the story. Ada is a student doing research on Irish fairies and, while visiting an absinthe bar, she runs into the Earl of Meath who has a keen interest in the history of faeries as well. They end up journeying together to an archeological fairie site whe This is the first book in the Faery Rehistory series and it was okay. I liked the historical Victorian setting in Ireland and enjoyed some of the Irish fae mythology. However, the writing was a bit disjointed and I had trouble following some of the story. Ada is a student doing research on Irish fairies and, while visiting an absinthe bar, she runs into the Earl of Meath who has a keen interest in the history of faeries as well. They end up journeying together to an archeological fairie site when things start to get strange. They are drawn to each other in more than an academic way, but the Earl of Meath has periods where he doesn’t seem to be himself. The writing didn't flow very well throughout the book, and I thought the actions and settings of the characters were very hard to picture and imagine. I really struggled with some parts of this and found myself rereading parts a lot. Additionally, there are so many Irish mythology names thrown around it was hard to keep track of who is who. A lot of the characters are two people (current day and mythological one) and it got confusing who was talking when and what reality we were in. Overall I was very excited to read this, it ended up being okay but was not as good as I had been hoping. It's a very neat idea and the first half of the book was well done. As the story continued it got confusing and hard to follow. I don't plan on reading any more of this series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Minx

    Fairies, folklore, and absinthe, oh my! The Absinthe Earl was an interesting story set during the Victorian era in Ireland with main characters who were more than meets the eye. Ada Quicksilver was an independent woman who had come to Ireland to make progress on her thesis. She was one who believed that fairies could be real and was looking for evidence to explain the disappearance of fairies from Ireland. Lately, she had been frequenting houses of absinthe because it has been rumored that absin Fairies, folklore, and absinthe, oh my! The Absinthe Earl was an interesting story set during the Victorian era in Ireland with main characters who were more than meets the eye. Ada Quicksilver was an independent woman who had come to Ireland to make progress on her thesis. She was one who believed that fairies could be real and was looking for evidence to explain the disappearance of fairies from Ireland. Lately, she had been frequenting houses of absinthe because it has been rumored that absinthe consumption and seeing fairies could possibly be connected. At one such bar she came across Edward Donoghue, the Lord of Meath, and started a conversation about being in Ireland and her educational focus. Luckily for her, Lord Meath had just been tasked with, by Queen Isolde, inspecting a ruin that was found inside of an ancient fairy mound and he was most interested in having her accompany him there for her expertise in all things fairy. Unbeknownst to Ada, he also had an ulterior motive for his request but it was one that was meant to be protective. Edward had a few secrets of his own and after his brief introduction to Ada he began to believe that what he considered a curse of sorts was in reality possibly something entirely different. Willing to explore his new theory, he brought Ada along on his journey to lend her thoughts on things discovered but neither one of them could have ever expected where things would lead once they entered the ancient fairy mound. The Absinthe Earl was charming and roused my curiosity greatly. I was immediately drawn into this story and wanted to know more. In the beginning the fairies and mythology discussed were easily understood and flowed with the story taking place but there was a point where the story started to get very hard to follow. I found myself having to re-read passages and refer back to different points in the story and that disrupted the experience. I believe if the reader was already well versed in both Irish and fairy folklore then following the story could have been easily accomplished but for a reader who wasn’t entirely familiar that would lead to another outcome entirely. There were many names banded about that were unfamiliar to me and I will admit that I had a hard time, at points, following who was who and what was what. Also, the dialogue between Ada and Edward felt stilted. The way they spoke, even when alone, never truly gave me a sense of ease between them. In the end, The Absinthe Earl was a story that had portions that were both engaging and entertaining but there were also points where I struggled. This review is based on a complimentary book I received from NetGalley. It is an honest and voluntary review. The complimentary receipt of it in no way affected my review or rating.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    As a scholar of Irish mythology and the anthropological signs of fairies, Miss Ada Quicksilver is spending her Christmas holiday in Ireland hoping to finish her thesis. She begins her research in absinthe bars, hoping to examine a hypothesized connection between the consumption of the spirit and the ability to see fairies. It is in such a bar that she meets the very attractive Irishman Edward Donoghue, more properly the Earl of Meath. She is intrigued to learn that he's visiting a ruin near Dubl As a scholar of Irish mythology and the anthropological signs of fairies, Miss Ada Quicksilver is spending her Christmas holiday in Ireland hoping to finish her thesis. She begins her research in absinthe bars, hoping to examine a hypothesized connection between the consumption of the spirit and the ability to see fairies. It is in such a bar that she meets the very attractive Irishman Edward Donoghue, more properly the Earl of Meath. She is intrigued to learn that he's visiting a ruin near Dublin on behalf of his cousin, Queen Isolde, so when he invites Ada to join him, she eagerly accepts in hopes of furthering her research. Edward relies on nightly doses of absinthe to alleviate his sleepwalking and Ada wants to learn of his own experiences with fairy sightings. She longs to ease his suffering even as she is leery of growing too attached to him. Soon it becomes apparent that Edward is torn between two worlds and can no longer fully suppress this other side of himself. Unbeknownst to either Ada or Edward, their fast-growing friendship and developing passion lead them to a different world and a battle that could change Ireland and its people forever. This book was very different from anything I've read before and I really enjoyed that. I loved the re-imagination of history and the incorporation of so much Irish folklore. It's left me wanting to learn more about Celtic mythology now. I think this book definitely warrants a second read just because there was so much going on that I feel like I probably missed some things. Either way, this turned out to be a beautiful love story full of lovely, flawed, relatable characters, plus action, adventure, and fantasy. This was way out of my normal comfort zone and I'm glad I decided to give it a try. I'm looking forward to the future installments in this new series. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Absinthe Earl by Sharon Lynn Fisher is a historical fantasy romance that brings in elements of Celtic mythology. Ada, a Trinity College student, is researching the connections between drinking absinthe and seeing the fey when she meets Lord Edward who happens to see a banshee near her as she interviews him. Lord Edward is determined to save her from the potential death threat that the banshee represents, so he asks for her to help hi/>The I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Absinthe Earl by Sharon Lynn Fisher is a historical fantasy romance that brings in elements of Celtic mythology. Ada, a Trinity College student, is researching the connections between drinking absinthe and seeing the fey when she meets Lord Edward who happens to see a banshee near her as she interviews him. Lord Edward is determined to save her from the potential death threat that the banshee represents, so he asks for her to help him on a job for the queen and on that mission they uncover a bigger threat to the wider world. Fisher's world-building is my favorite aspect of this series opener. It's clear that she's done a lot of research with all of the detail in Ada's world, plus all of the Irish mythology that it features. The romance stuff wasn't really for me, but I liked Ada and Lord Edward together especially their banter. Overall, I liked The Absinthe Earl but I would have preferred it to be a little heavier on the fantasy than on the romance. I am looking forward to reading book two of The Faery Rehistory series from Sharon Lynn Fisher, it could become a favorite.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Moon Love

    4.25 stars! I loved the mix of Irish mythology, folklore, and history that make up the backdrop and an integral part of the story. The romance between Edward the Earl of Meath and Miss Ada Quicksilver was interesting; I enjoyed it but had a cumbersome feel. The verbiage used for the romance portions reminded me a lot of the 80s and 90s romances and I feel those parts could have been stronger, especially for something being classified as an Irish Fantasy Historical Romance. Sharon Lynn 4.25 stars! I loved the mix of Irish mythology, folklore, and history that make up the backdrop and an integral part of the story. The romance between Edward the Earl of Meath and Miss Ada Quicksilver was interesting; I enjoyed it but had a cumbersome feel. The verbiage used for the romance portions reminded me a lot of the 80s and 90s romances and I feel those parts could have been stronger, especially for something being classified as an Irish Fantasy Historical Romance. Sharon Lynn Fisher did a great job at setting the scene and I ended up thoroughly enjoying this book after a slow start. I'm excited to read more in The Faery Rehistory Series and see what new things I learn and what adventures await us in Faery!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    DNFed this one early, which would ordinarily mean I don’t review. But it’s getting 2 stars for unbearably stilted dialogue. It took me four days to get to 10% because it’s an unpleasant reading experience. There didn’t seem to be anything wrong with the plot or characters, but the prose really needs some work.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Donna Frelick

    The Absinthe Earl signals a new direction for award-winning SFR author Sharon Lynn Fisher. But from all indications, she’s not having any difficulties switching gears with this venture into the new territory of historical fantasy/paranormal romance. This first book in a projected series is set in an alternate Ireland of the late 1800s, one ruled by its own queen, rather than England’s Victoria. But the real power may lie in the faery realm, as university student heroine Ada Quicksilver disc The Absinthe Earl signals a new direction for award-winning SFR author Sharon Lynn Fisher. But from all indications, she’s not having any difficulties switching gears with this venture into the new territory of historical fantasy/paranormal romance. This first book in a projected series is set in an alternate Ireland of the late 1800s, one ruled by its own queen, rather than England’s Victoria. But the real power may lie in the faery realm, as university student heroine Ada Quicksilver discovers. Ada is in Ireland on an unusual project to research the effects of the addictive liquor absinthe on ESP abilities, particularly the ability to see fairies. She gets more than she bargained for when she meets hero Edward Donoghue, the Earl of Meath, who takes absinthe to cure his habit of “sleepwalking.” Of course, Edward is hiding deeper secrets, which Ada discovers as she accompanies him on a trip into the Irish countryside. All the many creatures of Irish myth—fairies, water horses, banshees and more—come to life as they seek out Edward’s high-born cousin, Queen Isolde, and agree to take on a mission to preserve the balance of the world. I was provided an ARC of this book in exchange for an unbiased review. Author Fisher accomplishes the twists and turns of this plot with aplomb and weaves in a slow-building romance, too. It’s all a lot of fun for readers who love their paranormal fantasy with a romantic Irish brogue and an air of misty suspense.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Annemieke / A Dance with Books

    Thank you to Blackstone Publishing and Netgalley for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. This does not change my opinion in anyway. Sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone a little. The Absinthe Earl was that for me. The cover suggested a very romance heavy book, not quite my cup of tea as you know. However the title and the synopsis convinced me to give it a try. The combination of Absinthe and Fae I found interesting. The start of the book was slow. It is set during Thank you to Blackstone Publishing and Netgalley for the review copy in exchange for an honest review. This does not change my opinion in anyway. Sometimes you have to step out of your comfort zone a little. The Absinthe Earl was that for me. The cover suggested a very romance heavy book, not quite my cup of tea as you know. However the title and the synopsis convinced me to give it a try. The combination of Absinthe and Fae I found interesting. The start of the book was slow. It is set during the 1800s and as such the author does have to deal with what is the norm at that point. However it was interesting as our main character is an orphan and student to an academy of promising young woman and she is working on her thesis, as you will. This is about Fae and Absinthe. She’s come to Ireland to get more proof. When she goes into a pub she meets Edward, cousin to the queen. At about page 80-100 we suddenly get tossed into a world of Fae and we never recover the slow pace of the start. I loved every minute of that. I can’t quite judge the use of some of the Irish folk legend regarding Fae as they are used here as that is not my area of expertise but what I do know from it, it seemed to keep close to it. And there is still room to discover more so I am curious to see how that will play out in the next book. Writing was it was mostly fine. I had some problems with the switching between first person point of view in chapters. In some cases the cross worked really well and it didn’t bother me, in other parts it jolted my out of the story. As said I knew what I was getting into with the romance. I’m not going to judge that part in regards to the star rating because I knew what kind of book I was picking up. It was quick, there was sex, there was a virgin who had no pain the first time she had sex. However I will say this. I think the whole book the relationship between the characters, they were questioning regarding some of the romance with the plot elements. There was also a respectfulness from the man to the woman that you don’t often see in this time period, especially when the woman is very used to taking care of herself. The jealousy and the I am the man bits were dealt with by talking about it and reflection on them, and she never did back down from him. All in all I enjoyed this book for what it was. A fantasy historical romance with Fae abound. It is not ground breaking. It doesn’t have to be

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Green

    Full review coming soon. I will add that this story is as lush, richly detailed and mysterious as the cover promises it will be, shot through with Irish legend and history, and flavored with Absinthe--a spirit also known as The Green Fairy. An exciting first book in a brand new series!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I was intrigued by the blurb and the sample was fine but the story (writing?) did not grip me right away - I might wait for a price drop because but no insta-buy for now.

  16. 5 out of 5

    FV Angela

    Review originally posted at https://smexybooks.com/2019/10/angela... I love paranormal/historical fiction novels of all kinds, but I really enjoy one with an interesting romance. The Absinthe Earl features a heroine in Ireland researching the tall tales and myths of the faery. She has a chance meeting in a pub with a man who knows all too much about what she seeks. Ada Quicksilver is in Dublin to discover why the faeries have all disappeared in Ireland. Her research leads her to visiting several absinthe bars and in one she me Review originally posted at https://smexybooks.com/2019/10/angela... I love paranormal/historical fiction novels of all kinds, but I really enjoy one with an interesting romance. The Absinthe Earl features a heroine in Ireland researching the tall tales and myths of the faery. She has a chance meeting in a pub with a man who knows all too much about what she seeks. Ada Quicksilver is in Dublin to discover why the faeries have all disappeared in Ireland. Her research leads her to visiting several absinthe bars and in one she meets the Earl of Meath, cousin of Queen Isolde and a man who has his own interests in faeries, for reasons. They end up on a trip together to an ancient faery mound and this is where the easy flow of the story starts to get a bit more difficult to follow. There is a reference at the beginning of the book with Irish/Fae names and terms, but I still had a bit of a time following along. I did enjoy these characters interactions, but the dialogue felt a bit stilted at times. But overall I did enjoy this story and look forward to reading more in this world. Final grade- C

  17. 5 out of 5

    keikii Eats Books

    To read more reviews, check out my blog keikii eats books! 77 points, 4 stars! Quote: "But why am I afflicted thus? What have I to do with the other world?" "I don't know, my lord," I replied quietly. "But I think you may be more than you seem." Review: With The Absinthe Earl, what you see is what you get. If you read the blurb, and you look at the cover, you probably have a fair idea of what the story is going to be like. You're not going to be wrong. There are no surprises here. Just goo To read more reviews, check out my blog keikii eats books! 77 points, 4 stars! Quote: "But why am I afflicted thus? What have I to do with the other world?" "I don't know, my lord," I replied quietly. "But I think you may be more than you seem." Review: With The Absinthe Earl, what you see is what you get. If you read the blurb, and you look at the cover, you probably have a fair idea of what the story is going to be like. You're not going to be wrong. There are no surprises here. Just good, clean, historically sexy fun. Ada Quicksilver is a lady of some means, but not many. She was orphaned as a child and grew up without parents. She is studying at London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, and instead of it being about sewing or homemaking or whatever it is they learned about back then, Ada is studying the Irish fae. Of all the things in the world she could be studying in the 1880s, she is looking into why absinthe might be causing an increase in the sighting of the fae. Ada, or Miss Q, is a headstrong and opinionated young woman. She isn't about to just let others take care of her. And Ada is really, really excited about learning anything, but most especially about the fae. Lord Edward Donoghue, Earl of Meath is the cousin to the Queen of Ireland. He is in the navy, and quite happy to stay there. And Edward is very typical of what you would expect an Earl to be in a paranormal romance: proper, chivalrous, and willing to put himself at risk in order to keep womenfolk safe. And boy does Edward want Ada. My favourite moment was when the Earl was getting all worked up about Ada showing her wrists. Historically sexy, indeed. Edward can also see the fae, so he drinks absinthe to stop it. He thinks he is going crazy, like the rest of his family has done. So he is trying to forestall it. By drinking absinthe. And becoming a functional alcoholic. Yeah, how's that supposed to work out for you again? This just amuses me. The relationship between Ada and Edward is lopsided. as you would expect from an orphan and an Earl. Edward is constantly trying to get her to do things she doesn't want to do. Things like leave him so she can be safe. Which leads to some spectacular fights. Fights in which I root for Ada, because boooy is Edward not handling things right. Their relationship is also very fast. Too fast. They don't really know anything about each other, yet they're in love! Not quite love at first sight, but not not love at first sight either. It is a source of some angst to them. The first half of their book focuses on Ada and Edward, mostly. They get to know each other, while Edward is trying to protect Ada after he hears a bean sidhe wail for her. He wants to keep her close, so he can protect her against death. So he dangles an ancient fae landmark in front of her to keep her with him. And she goes, because she is obsessed with the fae. Boy were they surprised when they found an actual fae at that landmark. The first half of the book was also about making excuses to get Ada undressed, and them thrown together. Personally, I think it works. The second half of the book sort of lost me. This is the part where all the action happened. There is war and fighting, and a whole bunch of faery. We find out that this is an alternative history, where certain things that were "supposed" to happen didn't happen, because reasons. There were a lot of things happening, and I just sort of..didn't care? That sounds bad, but I didn't. I was in it for the romance, with a side helping of faeries. I got both, and then I got a whole lot more. I love paranormal romance, but the story just kind of seemed..thrown on at the end. The romance just worked so much better. The Absinthe Earl was the first book in a new series, the Faery Rehistory series. I have no idea what is in store for me in the next book, but I'm looking forward to it, whatever it is going to be. I have some ideas, though. My ideas sound like fun. I received this book from Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to Sharon Lynn Fisher, Blackstone Publishing, and Edelweiss for providing the opportunity to review this copy!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    I received this book for free from the Author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Another winner from Sharon Lynn Fisher, The Absinthe Earl is a delightful historical romance, meticulously researched and full to the brim with unexpected fantasy elements and a fast moving plot. I stared wide-eyed and then dropped into a drunkard's curtsy, blushing like a lovesick maiden. "Your Majesty," I murmured. I closed my eyes, pressing/>review.The I received this book for free from the Author in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: Another winner from Sharon Lynn Fisher, The Absinthe Earl is a delightful historical romance, meticulously researched and full to the brim with unexpected fantasy elements and a fast moving plot. I stared wide-eyed and then dropped into a drunkard's curtsy, blushing like a lovesick maiden. "Your Majesty," I murmured. I closed my eyes, pressing my lips together, feeling the mortification wash over me. I'd just been discovered by the queen of Ireland, half-dressed, with torn undergarments and in the arms of a bare-chested earl who just happened to be her cousin. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Sharon Lynn Fisher comes up with the most unusual ideas, and she incorporates these ideas into thrilling stories with elements of mystery, intrigue and of course, romance. In Ghost Planet, every person on the planet of Ardagh 1 has an alien spirit attached to them, identical to someone in their life who has died. In Echo 8, “Echoes” from alternate universes must steal energy from humans in order to survive, and in The Ophelia Prophecy, the main character encounters an alien who has both insect and human DNA—and falls in love with him! Now in her latest, Fisher has created a delicious scenario in which the souls of an ancient fairy warrior and his lover are able to inhabit the bodies of an Irish mythology scholar and an Earl, causing all sorts of havoc. I’m thrilled that The Absinthe Earl is the start of a series, because I enjoyed this world so much. The story takes place in 1882 Ireland. Ada Quicksilver is a student studying Celtic mythology at Trinity College in Dublin. She's currently researching the connection between the fey and absinthe, after interviewing people who claim to have seen fairies while drinking the strong, green alcohol. Her research leads her one evening to an absinthe bar called The Green Fairy, where she strikes up a conversation with a handsome man. He introduces himself as Lord Edward, the Earl of Meath, who turns out to be related to the queen of Ireland. But Edward is a little odd. He wears green tinted spectacles and acts as though he’s seeing things that aren’t there. It turns out, he is. Edward can see spirits and fairies when he drinks absinthe, and wearing the glasses blocks them from his vision. But while talking to Ada, Edward removes his glasses, and he sees something terrifying. Hanging around Ada is a vision of a banshee, which Edward interprets as a death threat against his new friend. Determined to save her from a terrible fate, he convinces Ada to accompany him on an errand for the queen. At least if they’re together, Edward will be able to see any otherworldly dangers and prevent Ada from getting hurt. But on their journey, they discover there’s an even bigger threat. An immortal fairy warrior named Diarmuid has managed to use Edward’s body as a gateway between our world and the world of Faery, and Diarmuid’s lover Cliona is also able to cross the gateway through Ada, much to her chagrin. Long ago, Diarmuid cast a spell that exiled all of faery from Ireland. But the spell is starting to break down, and a war between the Tuatha De Danaan (fairies) and their enemies, the Fomorians, is brewing.  This is quite the intricate plot, and I don’t want to go into too much more detail because it’s best to let things unfold as you read. Fisher has done an amazing amount of research to bring her story to life. I love that she chose to set her story in the late 1800s, which gives it a wonderful historical vibe. And I’m sure that one of her core ideas—that absinthe and seeing fairies are somehow connected—fits nicely in a time period when drinking absinthe was all the rage. This time period also sets the tone for the relationship between Ada and Edward, a time when women were still under the protection of husbands and chaperones and certain behaviors were expected from them. That’s not to say that Ada follows those constraints herself, but more on our heroine later.  In addition to the historical elements, I loved all the details about Ireland and the world of Faery mythology. Fisher brings ancient monsters into her tale to spice up the plot, like the Irish water horse, a púca, and even a bog man! She also incorporates a real life tragedy from Ireland’s past, the Great Famine of Ireland, and comes up with an alternate history that involves fairies. All these details and more gave the story an extra, vivid layer that really brought the characters to life. I really enjoyed Ada and Edward, and they definitely had the sizzling chemistry and witty banter necessary for a believable, romantic couple. Edward is more of the traditional male love interest, always trying to protect Ada from the danger that seems to be lurking around every corner. Luckily, Ada wants none of that! “Miss Q,” as Edward calls her, is intelligent, headstrong, and independent, and despite her unusual silver hair and almost otherworldly beauty, she’s much tougher than she appears and holds her own very well. Let’s just say their relationship is going to be on her terms, and I loved her for that. But for me, the meatiest part of the story, and the element that gave me the most food for thought, was the way Fisher introduces Diarmuid and Cliona and has them interact with Ada and Edward. I mentioned before that the author has a knack for coming up with unusual romantic situations, and she certainly didn’t let me down with this book. As the two become more and more attracted to each other, the big question is whether their feelings for each other are real, or whether the interference of Diarmuid and Cliona is influencing those feelings. Fisher raises the question of whether they’ll ever be able to have a normal relationship with two immortals barging into their lives unexpectedly, and I thought she did a great job of resolving that conundrum by the end of the story. We do get to visit the Faery realm eventually, but I would have liked to see even more of the story take place on that side. The final and inevitable battle scene felt a little rushed at the end, but I did love the way Fisher brought out some truly terrifying mythological creatures for our characters to fight against. There’s a lot I haven’t talked about in this review (pirates, for example!), but I’ll leave you to discover those elements for yourselves. The ending was just perfect and actually gave me goosebumps! The story wraps up neatly without a cliffhanger—thank goodness—and I’m very curious to see where Fisher takes her story in the next book. Fans of lively historical fantasy romance are not going to want to miss this book. Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

    I really tried to like this book. The story had wonderful potential--an aristocrat in an alternate-history Ireland could see the inhabitants of the fairy realm and felt an obligation to protect a young researcher investigation the history of ancient Ireland. Along the way the two discover that Ireland is under the threat of attack by ancient mythological beings and so the two join with Ireland's Queen, Isolde, to save the country. While the story was promising, it came across as disjointed I really tried to like this book. The story had wonderful potential--an aristocrat in an alternate-history Ireland could see the inhabitants of the fairy realm and felt an obligation to protect a young researcher investigation the history of ancient Ireland. Along the way the two discover that Ireland is under the threat of attack by ancient mythological beings and so the two join with Ireland's Queen, Isolde, to save the country. While the story was promising, it came across as disjointed and choppy a few chapters in. The plot did not flow, but seemed to be made up of weird and strange encounters strung together. The very Victorian language the characters used helped draw the reader into the story in the beginning, but by the middle it felt like everyone was just reciting lines in play, rather than truly talking to one another. The romance between the two main characters felt forced and sudden, as well. While I love historical romance, and I love Celtic mythology, this book was just not for me. I did not finish it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maxine Robinson

    I always forget that I enjoy historical fiction, its not a genre I automatically gravitate towards. But when I saw The Absinthe Earl pop up on NetGally, the cover grabbed my attention and then the synopsis sucked me right in; A historical fantasy, set in Ireland in the 1800's, full of mythology, faeries and romance. Yes please. Miss Ada Quicksilver is in Ireland on a research trip investigating the disappearance of the fae and the links between absinthe and visions of them. She is of I always forget that I enjoy historical fiction, its not a genre I automatically gravitate towards. But when I saw The Absinthe Earl pop up on NetGally, the cover grabbed my attention and then the synopsis sucked me right in; A historical fantasy, set in Ireland in the 1800's, full of mythology, faeries and romance. Yes please. Miss Ada Quicksilver is in Ireland on a research trip investigating the disappearance of the fae and the links between absinthe and visions of them. She is of the belief that absinthe can help people see the magical creatures. While visiting bars for her research, she meets Lord Meath, a friendly, proper gentleman who happens to be a little mad. He sees creatures and if he doesn't drink absinthe before bed he nightwalks. Meath is the cousin of the Queen and at her order is on his way to visit a faerie mound that has recently been discovered, on a whim he invites Miss Quicksilver, who jumps at the chance to further her research. 'There's an old Irish tale of a white trout that, when caught, transforms into a beautiful woman. No trout was ever netted so prettily as Miss Quicksilver. Fortunately for her, the fisherman had no intention of devouring her.' I loved the mythology in this book. I loved that it was set in Ireland and I loved how time appropriate the writing was. Everyone was so proper, the manners were exquisite and the outfits seemed incredibly uncomfortable but wonderful. Miss Quicksilver is an independent lady who after the death of her parents has been on her own. She is intelligent, quick thinking, brave and capable. She takes things in her stride, which is lucky as things quickly go pear shaped for her. Within the first day of travelling with Lord Meath she discovers that the rumours of his madness are not all rumours. He does nightwalk. In fact he is very interested in her when he it's occuring. She soon comes to understand that it is in fact Diarmuid, a warrior from history, who is inhabiting Lord Meath, he thinks the Miss Quicksilver is his long lost love. And Miss Quicksilver begins to think he might be right. Lord Meath is horrified to realise that his sleeping self is obsessed with her and as his ancestor makes his presence known he battles to keep control and maintain a sense of propriety. Meath and Miss Q are both great characters. Watching them get to know each other was wonderful. They are put in some hard situations, but they continued to communicate throughout the whole tale. They respected each other. Meath had moments of behaving like an egghead, but Miss Q didn't put up with his nonsense. She stood her ground. She didn't want to be put away and protected she wanted to be equal and she refused to accept anything less. When Meath doubted her, she showed him just how silly he was to do so. With a war for Ireland looming over them and the time period, I get why Meath behaved the way he did, and I love Miss Q even more for stepping away from everyone else's expectations. The introduction of all the Fae and mythological creatures in the book could definitely be a touch overwhelming but luckily there is a glossary of Irish names and terms at the front of the book so that you could go back if needed to figure out who every one is and where they fit in the grand scheme of things. I had heard of The Morrigan before of course and the Formorians but that was it, so I used the glossary a couple of times, but in the end it is all explained well. As you can probably tell I loved the romance between Miss Q and Lord Meath, it was a slow burn and based on respect. And while it was a massive part of the story, the rest of the plot didn't suffer for it. In fact it was a fascinating story and very hard to put down. I finished the book in two nights, which for me is a pretty good effort. There was plenty of action, it was funny and the side characters were great. There were pirates, redcaps, a water horse, a bog king and banshees all intertwining with the Fae. It was a story of discovering new love and for the ancestors inhabiting Miss Q's and Lord Sheath's bodies a story of finding each other again. It was a story of fighting for your country and doing what you must to protect those you love. Also it's the first in a series, HELL YES, I can't wait to revisit these characters. I received a copy from the publisher via Netgalley. All thoughts are my own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    MsArdychan

    Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions in my review in any way. Having been to Ireland in the past year, the premise for this book really drew me in. Irish lords, the Fey, some romance... I was really hoping for a fun faerie story set in Ireland. But, I should have guessed by the cover that this was more of a hunky Lord bodice-ripper (i.e. erotic fiction) than fantasy historical fiction. Please Note: I received an advance copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This did not influence the opinions in my review in any way. Having been to Ireland in the past year, the premise for this book really drew me in. Irish lords, the Fey, some romance... I was really hoping for a fun faerie story set in Ireland. But, I should have guessed by the cover that this was more of a hunky Lord bodice-ripper (i.e. erotic fiction) than fantasy historical fiction. That being said, this was a fun little romp in the hay. What I Liked: Irish Folklore: I really enjoyed the use of all the Irish myths and folklore. The author must have spent considerable time researching this to incorporate these legends into the faerie characters. Each plays an important role in the war between the Fomorians (ancient foes of the Fey) and the Irish. Characters: I liked all of the Irish characters, particularly the Irish Queen, Isolde. She is a totally made-up character (as the last king of Ireland ruled in the late twelfth-century), but so fun and fearless, that I wanted to believe she was a real person. But all the Irish characters reminded me of why I loved visiting the Emerald Isle. They were all friendly, open people. No wonder Ada felt so at ease there. Faerie Story: The story centers around how each of the central Irish characters has an alter-ego historical Fey spirit who inhabits them. I loved the concept of their ancestors taking over their bodies to replay ancient rivalries and passions. What I Was Mixed About: There was something that really bothered me about the story. I wish the author had made it clear earlier in the novel that this is an alternate reality Ireland. I was wondering why there was no mention of British oppression or even the terrible Irish potato famine of the mid-eighteen hundreds. Then, about a third of the way in, it became apparent that this Ireland had seen none of those hardships. While this served the story well, it also took away some of the core elements of what has shaped the Irish spirit. What I Didn't Like: Generally speaking, I am not a fan of erotic fiction. I just think it doesn't add much to the story to include a blow by blow of who touched whom where. But in the case of this historical fiction, it seemed completely implausible to have Ada, a young, orphaned student, fall into bed with a relative stranger. Even in an alternate reality, she would be labeled a wanton woman. And that would be not just scandalous, but disastrous for a single woman at that time. FYI: Explicit sex scenes.

  22. 4 out of 5

    M. L. Valard

    Four stars I quite enjoyed this book! A really interesting concept enjoyably executed. There was a lot here to like, an AU Victorian era Ireland, fae, romance, battle, all blended together in a very intriguing mix. The use of Irish folklore was neat, I haven't seen it used terribly often and so it made the story a bit of a novelty for me. Moreover I thought it was used -well- and to interesting effect. I will admit I have a weakness for the fae in general and this definitely lived up Four stars I quite enjoyed this book! A really interesting concept enjoyably executed. There was a lot here to like, an AU Victorian era Ireland, fae, romance, battle, all blended together in a very intriguing mix. The use of Irish folklore was neat, I haven't seen it used terribly often and so it made the story a bit of a novelty for me. Moreover I thought it was used -well- and to interesting effect. I will admit I have a weakness for the fae in general and this definitely lived up to all I hoped for from the blurb and more. I liked the characters a great deal, not just the two main characters, but the side cast as well. But both the main characters definitely deserve some mentions. Ada is a lovely character. Capable and unique, she knows her own mind and sticks to it without doing any of it in the ways that can so easily make characters frustrating. She was a really wonderful heroine and reading her was a delight. Edward as a delightful and only mildly tortured gentleman makes a lovely counterpart for her. He makes a few mistakes but he owns up to them. Their romance to me was extremely believable and enjoyable. And I like the fact that the misunderstanding as conflict was kept to a realistic minimum since there were so many other things to deal with. I like a romance where there is a lot going on outside just the relationship and I thought this one managed that quite well without sacrificing the time spent on the building of it or the getting to know the characters. I think if I have any minor quibble with it it's mainly that I might have liked to see more time spent on some bits of it. I'm not sure it was remotely necessary for the story or pacing however, I just might have enjoyed it. Overall if you want an interesting fantasy romance with some very interesting world building and a hefty dose of Irish fae this is definitely one I would suggest. I received an eARC through Netgalley in exchange for a review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    Edward’s internal conflict, brought on with bouts of sleeping walking threatens to ravage his life. Before he understands what it is, he believes he is insane. Hence the nightly absinthe nightcap to keep the monsters (insanity) away. But Ada thinks there could be a fairy reason. Ada’s scholarly interest in fairies has put her firmly in Edward’s path. Or is there some other reason fate brought them together? The age-old story of star-crossed lovers through the centuries is not a unique Edward’s internal conflict, brought on with bouts of sleeping walking threatens to ravage his life. Before he understands what it is, he believes he is insane. Hence the nightly absinthe nightcap to keep the monsters (insanity) away. But Ada thinks there could be a fairy reason. Ada’s scholarly interest in fairies has put her firmly in Edward’s path. Or is there some other reason fate brought them together? The age-old story of star-crossed lovers through the centuries is not a unique story. This particular retelling of Irish folklore in the 19th century historical setting is compelling and elegant. Reading The Absinthe Earl, I was fully immersed in 19th century Ireland due to the sights and culture and language written into the story. You might think, all authors use language don’t they? Well there is language and there is Language Sharon Lynn Fisher’s story, told from the heroine’s point of view, is full of beautiful descriptions and phrases befitting a scholar from the Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women. Without overusing 19th century colloquialisms, Ms. Fisher sets the atmosphere. Absorbed in the story, I rarely resorted to the dictionary on my Kindle, helping me feel like I was back in 1882 Ireland with Ada and Edward. It is this lush use of Language that is the first recommendation of The Absinthe Earl for me. There is an abundance of fiction that incorporates the myth of the Irish Tuatha De Danaan, especially the fairy aspect of the myths. Rehistory, as told in The Absinthe Earl is a refreshing re-telling of the history of the fairy world as it interacts with the human world. This delicate interweaving of Irish history, folklore and fairy stories is the second recommendation of The Absinthe Earl for me. Whenever I pick up a book from Sharon Lynn Fisher, I expect something unique. I expect something that will keep me reading into the wee hours of the night. I am delighted to report that The Absinthe Earl lives up to my expectations. I am already anticipating the next chapter in Faery Rehistory. Through Edelweiss, the publisher provided a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alana Bloom

    It has been some time since I’ve read a novel heavily influenced by mythology and with faeries and I’m glad I had the opportunity to read and review this! In any sort of fantasy world, I require a lot of world-building to feel immersed and Fisher really managed to craft a fascinating setting for Ada and Edward’s story to unfold. Fisher has a talent for gorgeous description, from setting to clothing, I was able to picture everything perfectly. This is an engaging, fast-paced adventure It has been some time since I’ve read a novel heavily influenced by mythology and with faeries and I’m glad I had the opportunity to read and review this! In any sort of fantasy world, I require a lot of world-building to feel immersed and Fisher really managed to craft a fascinating setting for Ada and Edward’s story to unfold. Fisher has a talent for gorgeous description, from setting to clothing, I was able to picture everything perfectly. This is an engaging, fast-paced adventure and romance and yet my interest started to flag around halfway through. I think I would have had an easier time hanging with the story if I had a deeper understanding of Celtic Mythology. Additionally, I struggled with the overly formal language. While I know it makes sense for historical fiction, I couldn’t help wishing for the language to relax as they got to know each other. I recommend this book, particularly for fans of Celtic Mythology and the more formal historical romances. The descriptions alone are gorgeous and the Irish setting was particularly enchanting. I’m looking forward to seeing where Fisher takes the story in the next book! **I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angel Hatfield

    The Irish lord Edward Donoghue, Earl of Meath, consumes absinthe to stave off his sleepwalking, but the liquor has the unintended consequence of causing fairy hallucinations. When he meets Ada Quicksilver, a Celtic mythology scholar from London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, he begins to entertain the possibility these visions may be due to the overlapping of the living world with the world of Faery. One of these visions seems to herald the young woman's death, so Edward joins Ada The Irish lord Edward Donoghue, Earl of Meath, consumes absinthe to stave off his sleepwalking, but the liquor has the unintended consequence of causing fairy hallucinations. When he meets Ada Quicksilver, a Celtic mythology scholar from London's Lovelace Academy for Promising Young Women, he begins to entertain the possibility these visions may be due to the overlapping of the living world with the world of Faery. One of these visions seems to herald the young woman's death, so Edward joins Ada in her scholarly exploration of his country in hopes of protecting her. Together they uncover a plot for the takeover of Ireland by the enemies of its most ancient people, the Tuatha De Danaan. In the process, they discover their own connections to a Danaan hero and heroine who want more than anything to use their bodies for a reunion that's been centuries in the making. I had never heard of this author, but the cover and the description were interesting, so I decided to give it a try. It started off interesting enough, but once Meath was introduced it got a bit different…I liked both main characters, particularly Ada, but Edward was a bit wishy washy. Overall it was ok. **I voluntarily read and reviewed this book

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Lilly

    This is the very first romance novel I've ever read, and I absolutely loved it. It was my privilege to work as Sharon Fisher's linguist-for-hire, helping out with various names and historical details. She does a pitch-perfect job balancing, on the one hand, the desire of readers (I know I'm not the only one) who want to dive deep into the well of Irish and Victorian culture, and on the other hand, the critical need for clarity in storytelling. I have seen some reviewers complain that the languag This is the very first romance novel I've ever read, and I absolutely loved it. It was my privilege to work as Sharon Fisher's linguist-for-hire, helping out with various names and historical details. She does a pitch-perfect job balancing, on the one hand, the desire of readers (I know I'm not the only one) who want to dive deep into the well of Irish and Victorian culture, and on the other hand, the critical need for clarity in storytelling. I have seen some reviewers complain that the language is stilted or pretentious. It's true that it's written in the high style of the great nineteenth century novelists: Jane Austen, Robert Louis Stevenson, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In fact it was Doyle's voice that seemed to me to echo the most in Fisher's writing: the careful, crisp, precise phrasing, the sweeping misty landscapes drawn with broad sure strokes, the whispers of the characters as they venture out upon the moors, not knowing if they will encounter murderers, monstrous hounds, or long-rotted lords of the bog. It's not modern, but that's the point. Why would you want to read a Victorian romance written in the style of Hemingway? Part of Fisher's strength, in any case, is the way she reaches across genres. This is a full-fledged romance novel, to be sure, but it is also a richly-developed and compelling fantasy with first-class worldbuilding. It is also a swashbuckling adventure, and also a tale of alternate history. Like all epic fantasies, the book offers glimpses of thousands of years of magical history, and a well-worked out, believable system of magic. Like all great adventures, there are cliffhangers, swordfights, strange beasts, and shipwrecks. Like all great alternate histories, a distorted mirror is held up to real history, giving us a newer, more nuanced view of the world we live in. All of these genres have their own conventions and standards, and in this book Fisher shows she's mastered them all. It was an absolute delight. Fisher has written not just a romance, but a Romance. And this is just the first book!!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Whooooo *fans self* If the cover hadn't given away that this was a bodice-ripper, there was no doubt in my mind pretty early on when there was so much tension between the two main characters that it was oozing into every aspect of the book. I don't normally request these things because I have so many other things to read but this sounded interesting at least. Overall, this is a fantasy book tangled up in Irish fairy folklore. Honestly, I'm not a scholar of Irish fairy stuff, but I've Whooooo *fans self* If the cover hadn't given away that this was a bodice-ripper, there was no doubt in my mind pretty early on when there was so much tension between the two main characters that it was oozing into every aspect of the book. I don't normally request these things because I have so many other things to read but this sounded interesting at least. Overall, this is a fantasy book tangled up in Irish fairy folklore. Honestly, I'm not a scholar of Irish fairy stuff, but I've read a lot of different fey stories so I wasn't completely out of my depth here. We briefly meet WB Yeats (which frankly, I didn't see the point of, but I get the little homage there), we read about different folk heroes and fairy kings and queens, and all the while we're on a (sexy) adventure with two pretty attractive people ;) The naughty bits are definitely graphic, so if you're not up for that then steer clear. But if you are, have fun! 4/5 stars because even though it was something I'd consider "fluff," even if you take out the bedroom romps it was still a great story with plot and character development. Thank you to NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    3.5 stars The Absinthe Earl has everything a reader of paranormal historical romance could want – a handsome, brooding, and gentlemanly earl, a beautiful, spunky, and independent scholar, and a mystery surrounding Ireland, Faery and absinthe. If you are a fan of Irish mythology and legend, you will relish the appearance of every creature, hero, heroine, and rogue you ever heard of. However, I did not enjoy this as much as I had hoped. The concept, the setting and the characters all in 3.5 stars The Absinthe Earl has everything a reader of paranormal historical romance could want – a handsome, brooding, and gentlemanly earl, a beautiful, spunky, and independent scholar, and a mystery surrounding Ireland, Faery and absinthe. If you are a fan of Irish mythology and legend, you will relish the appearance of every creature, hero, heroine, and rogue you ever heard of. However, I did not enjoy this as much as I had hoped. The concept, the setting and the characters all intrigued me, but it was so steeped in Irish lore that I found myself constantly stumbling over the names and places and words and wondering how to pronounce things. (There is a helpful glossary at the beginning, but I was reading a digital advance reader copy so it was too much trouble to switch back and forth.) I think I would have enjoyed it a lot more if I were listening to it. Alas, Absinthe plays only a very small part in the plot. :-) Recommended for lovers of Irish mythology and legend who also love paranormal and historical romance. I read an advance reader copy of The Absinthe Earl from Netgalley; it will be published on October 15.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kitty Pollock

    I love historical fiction but I have not explored much into a mixture of historic fiction and sci-fi and fantasy. After reading this book I will be keeping an eye out for more. The author has done a great job at mixing the Victorian era, with a parallel timeline of the Irish Potato Famine and Irish folklore into one story. Mix in a love triangle, a mad queen, a waterhorse, banshees, Victorian expectations of wooing, fighting against passion and an epic battle against humans and the supernatural I love historical fiction but I have not explored much into a mixture of historic fiction and sci-fi and fantasy. After reading this book I will be keeping an eye out for more. The author has done a great job at mixing the Victorian era, with a parallel timeline of the Irish Potato Famine and Irish folklore into one story. Mix in a love triangle, a mad queen, a waterhorse, banshees, Victorian expectations of wooing, fighting against passion and an epic battle against humans and the supernatural and you have a recipe for a book you cant put down. The only confusion I came across in this novel was in the beginning when it wasn't clear enough that the Irish Royal line survived meaning Ireland has its own ruling Queen and contemporary to Queen Victoria. I would highly recommend this book to others who wish to escape into a magical world based on the Victorian era and Irish Folklore. Thank you to NetGalley and the Publisher, Blackstone Publishing, for an advanced electronic copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    The Absinthe Earl is a combination of historical fiction and paranormal romance. It's an interesting tale focusing scholar/student Ada Quicksilver and the Lord of Meath, Edward Donoghue as they navigate through Irish folklore. The story does suck you in right away. The reader wants to learn more about these Irish tales, and whether or not they are true just as Ada and Edward do. The only complaint I have is that the transition into the fae world when it arrives is a bit jarring. If it is the int The Absinthe Earl is a combination of historical fiction and paranormal romance. It's an interesting tale focusing scholar/student Ada Quicksilver and the Lord of Meath, Edward Donoghue as they navigate through Irish folklore. The story does suck you in right away. The reader wants to learn more about these Irish tales, and whether or not they are true just as Ada and Edward do. The only complaint I have is that the transition into the fae world when it arrives is a bit jarring. If it is the intention of the author to have the reader on uneven footing just like the characters then it is done well. If not, then it could be a slightly smoother introduction into this part of the story would be helpful. I personally had to go back and reread that part to make sure I understood what exactly was happening. All the other instances of being in the fae world were much smoother. Other than that though, the story is engaging and entertaining. **I received an ARC of this work through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**

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