Hot Best Seller

What Is a Girl Worth?: My Story of Breaking the Silence and Exposing the Truth about Larry Nassar and USA Gymnastics

Availability: Ready to download

ECPA 2020 Christian Book Award Finalist! Written by Rachael Denhollander, recipient of Sports Illustrated's Inspiration of the Year Award and one of Time's 100 Most Influential People (2018) "Who is going to tell these little girls that what was done to them matters? That they are seen and valued, that they are not alone and they are not unprotected?" Rachael Denhollander's v ECPA 2020 Christian Book Award Finalist! Written by Rachael Denhollander, recipient of Sports Illustrated's Inspiration of the Year Award and one of Time's 100 Most Influential People (2018) "Who is going to tell these little girls that what was done to them matters? That they are seen and valued, that they are not alone and they are not unprotected?" Rachael Denhollander's voice was heard around the world when she spoke out to end the most shocking US gymnastics scandal in history. The first victim to publicly accuse Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics team doctor who sexually abused hundreds of young athletes, Rachael now reveals her full story for the first time. How did Nassar get away with it for so long? How did Rachael and the other survivors finally stop him and bring him to justice? And how can we protect the vulnerable in our own families, churches, and communities? What Is a Girl Worth? is the inspiring true story of Rachael's journey from an idealistic young gymnast to a strong and determined woman who found the courage to raise her voice against evil, even when she thought the world might not listen. In this crucial cultural moment of #metoo and #churchtoo, this deeply personal and compelling narrative shines a spotlight on the physical and emotional impact of abuse, why so many survivors are reluctant to speak out, what it means to be believed, the extraordinary power of faith and forgiveness, and how we can learn to do what's right in the moments that matter most. Published by Tyndale, this inspirational, empowering book is available in both hardcover and e-book editions.


Compare

ECPA 2020 Christian Book Award Finalist! Written by Rachael Denhollander, recipient of Sports Illustrated's Inspiration of the Year Award and one of Time's 100 Most Influential People (2018) "Who is going to tell these little girls that what was done to them matters? That they are seen and valued, that they are not alone and they are not unprotected?" Rachael Denhollander's v ECPA 2020 Christian Book Award Finalist! Written by Rachael Denhollander, recipient of Sports Illustrated's Inspiration of the Year Award and one of Time's 100 Most Influential People (2018) "Who is going to tell these little girls that what was done to them matters? That they are seen and valued, that they are not alone and they are not unprotected?" Rachael Denhollander's voice was heard around the world when she spoke out to end the most shocking US gymnastics scandal in history. The first victim to publicly accuse Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics team doctor who sexually abused hundreds of young athletes, Rachael now reveals her full story for the first time. How did Nassar get away with it for so long? How did Rachael and the other survivors finally stop him and bring him to justice? And how can we protect the vulnerable in our own families, churches, and communities? What Is a Girl Worth? is the inspiring true story of Rachael's journey from an idealistic young gymnast to a strong and determined woman who found the courage to raise her voice against evil, even when she thought the world might not listen. In this crucial cultural moment of #metoo and #churchtoo, this deeply personal and compelling narrative shines a spotlight on the physical and emotional impact of abuse, why so many survivors are reluctant to speak out, what it means to be believed, the extraordinary power of faith and forgiveness, and how we can learn to do what's right in the moments that matter most. Published by Tyndale, this inspirational, empowering book is available in both hardcover and e-book editions.

30 review for What Is a Girl Worth?: My Story of Breaking the Silence and Exposing the Truth about Larry Nassar and USA Gymnastics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Neville Longbottom

    If I were basing my rating solely on Rachael’s determination and bravery in coming forward to bring Larry Nassar and USA Gymnastics to justice then I’d give this book a 5 star rating. However, the writing, the structure, and emphasis on some topics held me back from that being my actual rating. I’m aware this is an unfair comparison, but reading this right after finishing All the President's Men really showed off the difference in the quality of writing between the two books. This is definitely If I were basing my rating solely on Rachael’s determination and bravery in coming forward to bring Larry Nassar and USA Gymnastics to justice then I’d give this book a 5 star rating. However, the writing, the structure, and emphasis on some topics held me back from that being my actual rating. I’m aware this is an unfair comparison, but reading this right after finishing All the President's Men really showed off the difference in the quality of writing between the two books. This is definitely an important read. It can help people understand why a survivor might wait a long time to come forward about their abuse. It details how someone can freeze instead having a fight or flight response. It shows how someone might not first understand what was being done to them is actually abuse. It explains how systems can end up protecting abusers instead of protecting the people they prey on. A lot of this book is recreating conversations that Rachael had with people in her life surrounding the abuse. Most non-fiction where there aren’t actual records of what was being said just focuses on getting the gist of what was being said, even if it isn’t verbatim. The dialogue that was written in the book just came across as really stilted and not natural human conversation. Maybe this isn’t a fair criticism since I wasn’t there when she was talking to her mom as a teenager, but a lot of the writing in a lot of the book just seemed off. Also, especially in the first half of the book I felt like there was too much time spent covering things that didn’t directly relate to “Exposing the Truth about Larry Nassar and USA Gymnastics.” Related to that, I wasn’t aware that there was going to be such a focus on religion in here. I don’t want to say this is a negative thing since god is obviously important to Rachael, but that’s just not something I’m interested in reading about. I almost feel bad giving this book anything other than a completely glowing review because I do have so much respect for Rachael and everything she’s done. But just as a book, this didn’t completely work for me. I think I would’ve been better off reading a book that covered the Nassar/USA Gymnastics case as a whole rather than one person’s story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Darby Stouffer

    REVIEW: How Much Is A Girl Worth? I have eagerly followed Rachael Denhollander since she first appeared “on the scene” when she bravely spoke with Christian love and wisdom at her abuser’s trial. I was so thrilled to learn she was writing a book, and so pleased to be able to get an advance copy to review for you, my friends. I truly, truly cannot recommend this book enough. If you are an abuse survivor, you will feel seen, understood, ministered to, and pointed to Christ. If you are married to an REVIEW: How Much Is A Girl Worth? I have eagerly followed Rachael Denhollander since she first appeared “on the scene” when she bravely spoke with Christian love and wisdom at her abuser’s trial. I was so thrilled to learn she was writing a book, and so pleased to be able to get an advance copy to review for you, my friends. I truly, truly cannot recommend this book enough. If you are an abuse survivor, you will feel seen, understood, ministered to, and pointed to Christ. If you are married to an abuse survivor, you will see a beautiful and inspirational picture of a marriage that thrives in spite of those difficult obstacles. If you want to know more about the struggles of abuse survivors, how their minds work, what they need the most, and how you can help, this book is for you. If you are a committed Christian who still struggles with how rampant sexual abuse is in our culture and in our churches, this book will stir you to prayer and to action without embittering you. I 100% recommend it, and would even say that for any who may have potentially heard negative things about Rachael in other venues, that this book might really help you see her heart for justice but also her commitment to Christian principles in the process. **Disclaimer** I received a free copy of this book in exchange for providing an honest review. My opinions and words are solely my own.**

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Manchester

    Note: I read this book while also reading Not Forsaken: A Story of Life After Abuse by Jennifer Michelle Greenberg. As they are both about abuse, their respective reviews might bleed together somewhat. Reading both together, I saw many similarities between them and the differences I saw between the two books showed their unique strengths. I strongly recommend reading both books, though they are unrelated outside of topic. I am in awe of this book. I was torn apart by this book. SUMMARY There are Note: I read this book while also reading Not Forsaken: A Story of Life After Abuse by Jennifer Michelle Greenberg. As they are both about abuse, their respective reviews might bleed together somewhat. Reading both together, I saw many similarities between them and the differences I saw between the two books showed their unique strengths. I strongly recommend reading both books, though they are unrelated outside of topic. I am in awe of this book. I was torn apart by this book. SUMMARY There are a lot of memoirs in the world. When something tragic happens, it is almost expected for the victims and survivors to write a book about it, detailing their side of the story and what really happened. This is not that kind of book. Denhollander is expertly and passionately focused on one thing: detailing what happens when people and organizations don't value children/people, particularly women and girls. This book will break you over and over again. At one point while reading (and even now) I said "I'm physically crying and I'm screaming on the inside without end.". Other readers reached out to me to tell me they were feeling the same way. Denhollander's book isn't about MSU or the USAG. It's not even about Larry Nassar. It's about how our culture looks at, treats, and abuses females, even children. It's about how we don't listen, believe, or properly engage with abuse victims/survivors. Simply put: we are not getting this right. THE GOOD I am in awe at this book. Not just for how strong and unbelievably caring Denhollander is, but for how great of a writer she is. I checked, there's no ghostwriter. She crafted this book. Every word is poignant. As a lawyer, she knows how to build a case, and as a mother she knows how to craft a convicting story. It is so well written that I cannot adequately put my feelings to words. This has been the best book I have read this year. Hands down. It's that good. Audiobook note: I had the privilege of listening to Denhollander read her own story/book about her own experiences. If you think reading the book is emotionally heavy, the audiobook will tear you apart (in good ways). She's a wonderful narrator. I'm glad that she trusted no one but herself to write/narrate her story. It's all the better for it. This book really helps people see what's inside the mind of a sexual abuse victim/survivor. It immediately starts tackling the (ignorant) questions like "Why don't victims say something when it happens?". By the end of the book, I was left with a profound respect for victims and survivors and a heart that bleeds for them and others that might be affected. On a separate note, I found the cover incredibly clever and well designed. Props to the publisher and designer for that. The hardcover book is beautiful. It should win an award. This book also gave me a new respect for journalists and prosecutors that actually care and do their job incredibly well. In our current age, it's good to be reminded that there are sincere people out there doing great work. I also admired Jacob in this book. What an example of a Christian husband. This is what true complementarianism (should we even use that word anymore?) looks like. Denhollander's foundational roots in the gospel shine through in this book. On every page. This is what happens when a true Christian truly loves. THE CHALLENGES I found absolutely zero issues with this book. It was a delight, as hard as the book was to read. CONCLUSION What we think and believe about personhood and the inherent worth of a person matters. Denhollander does more than she needed to. In fact, she never should have needed to share her story, to keep repeating details about her abuse, day after day, interview after interview, book proof over proof. The situation never should've happened at all, and after happening she shouldn't have had to walk through and the share the details with people, over and over again. This has cost her almost everything, including her privacy. But to quote Denhollander: "The more you love, the harder you fight." Without going into detail, this book has changed my life. The realizations and revelations have made a significant impact in my life. I want to love more. I want to fight more. I want to be an oasis of care for victims and survivors. There are victims and survivors all around us. Something has to change. Something is changing. Five stars. ---------------------------- Also check out Rachael Denhollander's children's book: How Much Is a Little Girl Worth? Side-note to my Reformed followers: How many books do we have to read before we realize that there are certain beliefs and connections in our reformed theology that allow for abusers to stay hidden and thrive?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Telaina

    Three stars is not because Rachael Denhollander isn't an amazing person, who did a brave, hard thing with tenacity and intelligence. I'm having a really hard time articulating exactly what I didn't like about this book, and it's hard, so I will start with the things I liked. 1) Denhollander is very aware that if someone from a loving, supportive family had trouble coming forward, and paid in multiple ways for doing so, that those without her resources suffered even more. (Not that this is the suf Three stars is not because Rachael Denhollander isn't an amazing person, who did a brave, hard thing with tenacity and intelligence. I'm having a really hard time articulating exactly what I didn't like about this book, and it's hard, so I will start with the things I liked. 1) Denhollander is very aware that if someone from a loving, supportive family had trouble coming forward, and paid in multiple ways for doing so, that those without her resources suffered even more. (Not that this is the suffering Olympics.) But she realizes that no one would believe her--with her white skin and her loving parents--that they are probably not going to believe a person of color or someone who doesn't have the same familial and financial resources she had. 2) Denhollander is a hero. Full fuking stop. She put herself through all of this so other girls would not suffer. She believes in justice, and you can feel that earnestness on every page. Things I had trouble with: 1) Denhollander doesn't mention rape culture until page 279. She has been fighting against it for the entire book, but she doesn't write those words until almost the end. She is trying so hard not make this a political issue, but it is, oh it is. One would think in a perfect world it wouldn't be. But there is a party that has a pussy-grabber as president in chief, and it is hard to read this and not see the word "feminism" or have that idea explored at all which leads me to... 2) there is never really an acknowledgement that little girls aren't worth anything. Even though this is her lived experience. Oh, if little girls are lucky, they're worth something to their families, but little girls certainly aren't worth ruining a doctor or coach's reputation. She asks over and over again what a little girl is worth, and she knows the answer. She wants to change the answer, but again, there is no acknowledgement of the current answer. I mean 1 in 3 women wouldn't be victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, molestation or rape if girls were valued at all in this society. I think this frustrated me--she was fighting for girls to matter without ever truly admitting they didn't when she was abused and still don't. Look what justice cost her. Look at how many times and how many women had to come forward before there were any consequences at all. 3) I'm happy that Denhollander's faith helped her, but after reading about the trouble with churches that she had, it disappointed me that she couldn't see (or at least didn't put in her memoir) that the same patriarchy in the legal system, at MSU, at USAG, etc, was also the same patriarchy at the churches. When you set God up as male, and Jesus as male, churches are also buying into the fact that women are products to be used or objects. I found her faith to be childish, and I guess that could be a compliment, but I would have loved more of an acknowledgement about how even a woman's spiritual life is used against her. Denhollander experiences this in the book as a series of "bad" churches, and my heart just went, "oh honey, don't you know that they are all bad?" (Yes, I know in some traditions now women are reverends and priests, upending some of the institutional issues and some religious prevarications. I guess I would have liked thoughtful ruminations on how not being believed in a patriachal system is never going to change until women have equal power, and religion is one of the ways women have been subjugated and subverted throughout human history.) 4) Denhollander is intelligent, but I'm not sure she has the literary chops to fully articulate everything she wanted to say. Or maybe everything I wanted to hear? I guess I wanted more, and I felt she could give it, but she might have to unwrap herself from Jesus a bit to give it, and that was something she wasn't able to do. I personally find it hard to read anything religious without feeling it's a platitude. So I guess an alternate reading of this review might be that I may not be the intended reader of this memoir.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    What is a girl worth? More than just the title of the book, this is the theme and question that is woven into every fiber of the book. From the first page to the last, you are presented over and over again with the dichotomy of people and institutions who do things right against those who cannot seem to do anything but wrong. Or, in other words, those who recognize and extend value and those who don't.       Rachael's memoir is not for those who want to avoid the hard situations or who shy away f What is a girl worth? More than just the title of the book, this is the theme and question that is woven into every fiber of the book. From the first page to the last, you are presented over and over again with the dichotomy of people and institutions who do things right against those who cannot seem to do anything but wrong. Or, in other words, those who recognize and extend value and those who don't.       Rachael's memoir is not for those who want to avoid the hard situations or who shy away from the dark side of the news. Though I suspect that most people who pick up this book will already be at least partially familiar with her and the other survivor's stories. In case you don't know, this book is talks about sexual abuse in detail including not just the immediate horrors, but its long-lasting effects on victims and their families. This book also spends the majority of it's time dealing with the arrest and ultimate conviction of Larry Nassar, one of the most prolific pedophiles and sexual abusers in US history. Along the way to that conviction this book does not shy away from the mistakes, lies, or failures of individuals, institutions, or the legal system that allowed this abuse to continue for decades      One of the things that Rachael has done so beautifully with this book is to explain not just by definition but also by example what she means by worth. Or, what it is to value something. She is consistently contrasting faithful, sacrificial love of her family, her husband, and the church against the selfish desires of her abuser, institutions, coaches, and, unfortunately, the church. To understand her definition of worth and how it is expressed, Rachael walks you through not just her abuse, but also through her journals, her thoughts, and scripture that helped her. She pulls everything back to this source and asks the question, "What is good and what is evil?" From that point she moves forward. What do we do with good? What do we do with evil? How is worth or value expressed? The reader soon finds out in her story that while love is the answer, it can often come with a price. That doing good with the right motives does not make you exempt from the loss of friends, family, and relationships. "Love is the motivation that will give joy and peace when doing the right thing is hard and hurts." On a personal note, sexual abuse is a topic about which I wish I could say it has never impacted me personally. Unfortunately, I can't say that. The feelings of anger, shame, guilt, and loss are real and raw. Rachael wasn't afraid to confront those feelings head on. Also, while this memoir ends in partial resolution, it feels like nibbling on croutons while waiting for the gourmet dinner. But even here Rachael is helpful; God is good and he is just. His justice will be realized in time. We are simply called to love well and be faithful. "Success (isn't) defined by a result but by faithfulness." And what is success? "Always be motivated by love." Full disclosure - I was given a copy of this book as a gift from the promotional team. That has not biased my decision in any way or impacted my review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Mcknight

    This story is not for the faint of heart. The author is a strong, resilient and tenacious person who fights for girls (including herself) who have been sexually abused so that their voices are heard. The institutional coverups by Michigan State University, and US Olympic Committee and the US Gymnastics organization are appalling. This book is an eye-opener and is recommended for every parent and adult who desires to be an advocate for children.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    3.5/5 stars. Unfortunately, as much as it pains me to say it...this wasn't all that well-written. There were so many moments, so many pieces of dialogue, that were just so incredibly cringe-worthy. The worst part is, many of these instances came during an incredibly powerful and/or heartbreaking moment of the book. So I would be so incredibly invested, in tears or nearing there, and then there'd be a line of dialogue or a cliche-sounding sentence, and it would bring me right back out. Despite all 3.5/5 stars. Unfortunately, as much as it pains me to say it...this wasn't all that well-written. There were so many moments, so many pieces of dialogue, that were just so incredibly cringe-worthy. The worst part is, many of these instances came during an incredibly powerful and/or heartbreaking moment of the book. So I would be so incredibly invested, in tears or nearing there, and then there'd be a line of dialogue or a cliche-sounding sentence, and it would bring me right back out. Despite all that, I'd still argue that this is an incredibly important book. And it's a powerful book--Rachael Denhollander has such amazing and admirable strength and courage and resilience, and all of that shown through here. What she did cannot be quantified. The worth of what she did has the same answer as the title of her book--what is a girl worth? Everything. And what Denhollander accomplished and went through and survived? Also worth -everything-. She helped change the world. A world that still needs so much more change, but is a little bit better because of what she did.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ericka

    Incredibly well-written and compelling look at the story behind Rachael Denhollander's courageous battle to take down Larry Nassar. She gives you every detail on how she strategically planned to ensure the truth came out. Reading, however, you will learn that this was much more than just about Nassar. Rachael sends a powerful message about community protectionism, the power of Christ's love and JUSTICE. I couldn't put it down and was honored she would share her story in so much honest, beautiful Incredibly well-written and compelling look at the story behind Rachael Denhollander's courageous battle to take down Larry Nassar. She gives you every detail on how she strategically planned to ensure the truth came out. Reading, however, you will learn that this was much more than just about Nassar. Rachael sends a powerful message about community protectionism, the power of Christ's love and JUSTICE. I couldn't put it down and was honored she would share her story in so much honest, beautiful detail.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Must-read. We need more people like Rachael Denhollander in our churches and communities today. While this book primarily focuses on her work in bringing down Larry Nassar, I've watched and admired the work that both her and her husband continue to do in helping to break the silence about what sexual harassment and abuses in churches and denominations as well. If you want to see what a portrait in courage looks like, this book is it. Rating: 4.5 Stars (Excellent).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Raw. Real. Heartbreaking beyond belief. Immense thanks to Rachael Denhollander for being brave enough to share her story. My youngest daughter was a competitive gymnast for ten years, and we have been following this story closely since it broke. My heart is shattered for what these girls went through at the hands of this doctor, but also for the fact that it was next to impossible for the perpetrator to be tried and convicted. We must do better for victims of assault of any variety, but especiall Raw. Real. Heartbreaking beyond belief. Immense thanks to Rachael Denhollander for being brave enough to share her story. My youngest daughter was a competitive gymnast for ten years, and we have been following this story closely since it broke. My heart is shattered for what these girls went through at the hands of this doctor, but also for the fact that it was next to impossible for the perpetrator to be tried and convicted. We must do better for victims of assault of any variety, but especially those young children who are either so confused, frightened, or coerced into silence--or worse, those who are not believed or are even blamed for the assault. This is a very, very difficult book to read. If you have a history with sexual abuse, definitely come into this reading with some emotional protection because it will likely bring so much to the forefront. I cried buckets of tears for these young ladies, and pray that their path to healing is taking place. Rachael does not hide that her strength lies in her faith in God, but she doesn't sugar coat her deep anguish and wrestling with God to attempt to understand why evil occurs in the world. Her faith is the framework of this story, but if you don't have these same beliefs, don't let that stop you from reading her story. Because if her experiences help just one victim to have their story told, it will be worth it. I recommend that everyone read this book. Listen to people when they communicate possible abuse. Believe them. Fight for them. Fight for the truth. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Todd Starowitz

    This is a culture-changing book and a must read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Susan Bazzett-Griffith

    The second half of this memoir is a phenomenally detailed account of the Larry Nassar court case, and it was riveting. The first half was a very drawn out autobiographical account of a super churchy Michigan gymnast, growing up in the burbs, getting an education, and dealing with the aftermath of a sexual assault by a physician. While I find everything Denhollander did as a survivor, an advocate, and an attorney commendable, and respect her work, I didnt particularly care for the first half of t The second half of this memoir is a phenomenally detailed account of the Larry Nassar court case, and it was riveting. The first half was a very drawn out autobiographical account of a super churchy Michigan gymnast, growing up in the burbs, getting an education, and dealing with the aftermath of a sexual assault by a physician. While I find everything Denhollander did as a survivor, an advocate, and an attorney commendable, and respect her work, I didnt particularly care for the first half of the book. It took me longer than I thought it would to read because I was frequently bored and/or turned off by all of the talk of religion and how Rachael struggled with her faith, so I can only give 3 stars if I'm being honest about how much I actually liked the book. An important book, but not a great read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aberdeen

    I cried at the end of this book. I was trying not to make audible sobs while listening to it on the bus ride home. Rachael is eloquent, sensitive, and wise. There are graphic details in here but not gratuitous. They are necessary and she explains the heart-wrenching struggle behind the decision to share them. This book showcases the perversity of human nature and the damning silence of people who should have helped. It also tells a rare story of justice finally achieved, the incredible cost of o I cried at the end of this book. I was trying not to make audible sobs while listening to it on the bus ride home. Rachael is eloquent, sensitive, and wise. There are graphic details in here but not gratuitous. They are necessary and she explains the heart-wrenching struggle behind the decision to share them. This book showcases the perversity of human nature and the damning silence of people who should have helped. It also tells a rare story of justice finally achieved, the incredible cost of obtaining that justice, and the strength of those who fought for it. Every every every one needs to read this. We will all face situations like this to some degree in our lives, and Rachael’s story can help prepare us (as well as provide understanding and support for those who are survivors). Rachael’s struggles with reconciling her faith with what happened to her is important—unflinching in its honesty and doubts as well as its confidence in the forgiveness and goodness of God and the belief that only Christianity offers a “straight line” by which we can judge the crooked. She is both intelligent and empathetic, and it’s a powerful and winsome combination I am so grateful for.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Mwanthi

    "How Much is a Girl Worth?" is so much more than a memoir. It begins with a dedication "To every survivor.... it is not your fault. It is not Your shame. You are believed. May you know how much you are worth." It ends with, "So much work remains. So much evil to fight. So much healing to reach for. So many wounded to love. Consider this your invitation to join in that work. To do what is right, no matter the cost. To hold to the straight lines in the midst of the battle. To define your success b "How Much is a Girl Worth?" is so much more than a memoir. It begins with a dedication "To every survivor.... it is not your fault. It is not Your shame. You are believed. May you know how much you are worth." It ends with, "So much work remains. So much evil to fight. So much healing to reach for. So many wounded to love. Consider this your invitation to join in that work. To do what is right, no matter the cost. To hold to the straight lines in the midst of the battle. To define your success by faithfulness in the choices you make. The darkness is there, and we cannot ignore it. But we can let it point us to the light." In between there is a beautifully written account or one survivors journey not just towards justice but towards acting faithfully, acting to protect, acting to love. This is a book that will make you cry. You might throw the book across the room as you read of adults not caring, not responding, not protecting, not loving, little girls. We read the consequences of not valuing little girls. The mishandling of sexual abuse never occurs in a vacuum but it occurs within organizations that have determined something is more important than protecting the vulnerable. And while this is a story of one organization, of one survivor, what must be recognized is this is the story of sexual abuse survivors across the country. People ignoring, minimizing, and not caring about the story. People finding it more convenient to ignore reported abuse than to investigate. People who view their personal comfort as more valuable than little girls. However, the gift most evident in this book is Rachael herself. She bares her soul in a way that is so personal. She shares pain common to all who have suffered sexual abuse. She gives a window into the soul of one who has been abused. If you know and love a survivor, this book will give you a window to struggles they may have. Who should read this book? Anyone who loves any girl be it wife, daughter, niece, sister, grandma. IT's easy to think we would never allow a Nasser like abuser to be present in our space, but too many of us have stories with many similarities. May we learn from this story to act faithfully and to recognize that little girls are "Worth fighting for Justice, worth standing alone, worth whatever it takes for your worth to be shown" (taken from How Much is a Little Girl Worth by Rachael Denhollander). Rachael's life demonstrated that she believed that and sacrificed greatly with little hope of exposing evil. May each of us strive for similar faithfulness no matter what!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Persis

    I stayed up later than I intended last night and finished "What is a Girl Worth?". I had followed the Nassar case after connecting with Jacob Denhollander on Twitter. He shared his wife’s story in the Indy Star article – a victim/survivor who had come forward to stop an evil man who had been abusing children for decades. As I read the articles and watched the news coverage, Rachael came across as so brave, strong, and capable. Her training as an attorney was evident in the clarity and power of h I stayed up later than I intended last night and finished "What is a Girl Worth?". I had followed the Nassar case after connecting with Jacob Denhollander on Twitter. He shared his wife’s story in the Indy Star article – a victim/survivor who had come forward to stop an evil man who had been abusing children for decades. As I read the articles and watched the news coverage, Rachael came across as so brave, strong, and capable. Her training as an attorney was evident in the clarity and power of her carefully chosen words. But her book reveals what was going on behind the scenes – Would anyone believe her and take this seriously? Was it too late to report? The internal turmoil and re-traumatization of having to retell her abuse. Turning her private journals over to Nassar’s defense team knowing that her abuser would be reading them himself. Waiting to be attacked personally by attempts to rip her reputation to shreds by powerful people in powerful organizations. Wondering if the case would be dismissed and her abuser allowed to continue unchecked. Fearing that this sacrifice was all in vain. This is what it costs a survivor to speak, and the cost is great. But it was counted and paid for the sake of justice and for the sake of all the little girls Larry Nassar abused. "What is a Girl Worth?" was hard to put down. My heart ached for Rachael when she struggled to make sense of what happened to her, when she doubted herself, and wrestled with her faith. As I read, there was times when I asked myself, “Where on earth did she get the courage and stamina to do this?” But I think the answer is by the grace and power of God and the love and support of her family. But Rachael has also had more than her fair share of friendly fire. In fact, she and Jacob were pretty much told to stop speaking and posting publicly about child abuse and the SGM situation because if differed from the position their current church leaders were taking. I literally sat in silence for a few minutes digesting that paragraph because I was stunned. What are people really choosing to protect? This is probably the most emotional book review I have ever written. But when it comes to child abuse, maybe we need a little more feeling because our hearts have grown calloused. There’s plenty of outrage for a host of things, but where is the righteous anger against this heinous sin? Perhaps it is because we don’t love the least of these as we should. Perhaps this reveals the state of our love for God. And I wonder what would happen in the church and beyond if we had a fraction of Rachael Denhollander's courage to count the cost and protect the vulnerable within our walls? I pray books like "What is a Girl Worth?" will educate but also challenge the complacency and coldness of our hearts. God have mercy on us.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Akers

    "People have no idea what it costs survivors to stop an abuser." @R_Denhollander #WhatIsAGirlWorth This book is something every parent ought to read. Every teacher. Every coach. Every law enforcement member. Every pastor. Every adult who loves children. The cost of doing the right things always goes up the more removed the need is from it's cause. Rachael illustrates this in no uncertain terms. So much heartache, so many wounds, so many damage done could have been avoided had those with the abilit "People have no idea what it costs survivors to stop an abuser." @R_Denhollander #WhatIsAGirlWorth This book is something every parent ought to read. Every teacher. Every coach. Every law enforcement member. Every pastor. Every adult who loves children. The cost of doing the right things always goes up the more removed the need is from it's cause. Rachael illustrates this in no uncertain terms. So much heartache, so many wounds, so many damage done could have been avoided had those with the ability had seen the need and acted. Get this book. Read it. Learn from it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Douglas

    This is such an important and powerful book I'm afraid my words will not do it justice. An incredibly emotional read (I teared up at least 5 times!), Rachael speaks truth out of a desire to love...to love what is just...to love what is right...to love sacrificially. In the face of gutwrentching and graphic sexual abuse, she boldy proclaims over and over: "Love has to be your motivation." This isn't an easy read. It is uncomfortable. It is blunt. It forced me as man and leader in the church to fac This is such an important and powerful book I'm afraid my words will not do it justice. An incredibly emotional read (I teared up at least 5 times!), Rachael speaks truth out of a desire to love...to love what is just...to love what is right...to love sacrificially. In the face of gutwrentching and graphic sexual abuse, she boldy proclaims over and over: "Love has to be your motivation." This isn't an easy read. It is uncomfortable. It is blunt. It forced me as man and leader in the church to face the times I have unknowingly contributed to keeping an important voice from speaking her pain and suffering. It forced me to think about the times I've asked some of the questions that heap shame or keep others from speaking, like "why didn't you say something?" And facing situations where I have suffered the abuse of another, though infinitesimally smaller than anything Rachael or these other women had to endure, I felt understood. There are important lessons to be learned here. Things we need to grapple with and do better engaging. This is particularly true for the church! No more covering-up, refusing to believe, or creating a culture where it isn't safe to share. The examples Rachael gives of her own church are horrifying while providing a mirror for us to evaluate our culture and policies. I love the quote she shares by CS Lewis: “My argument against God was that the universe seems so cruel and unjust. But how had I got this idea of unjust and just? A man does not call a line crooked unless he first has some idea of straight. What was I comparing the universe to when I called it unjust?” This should be required reading for pastors and other church leaders, counselors, teachers, social workers, coaches, politicians, and so many more. Rachael says some incredibly brave and difficult things for us to hear; yet in doing so, she reminds us how God's grace can meet us and propel us to stand for what is good and just while at the same time pleading for God's mercy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jessi Irwin

    I was worried about bringing this book as a vacation read, thinking the material would be too heavy and depressing. While some points were indeed heartbreaking/infuriating, it was also so full of courage and hope that I couldn't put it down. I had followed Rachael's story on social media and in the press but this memoir format really drew me in. I had also listened to the NPR podcast and I enjoyed hearing about the involved individuals from Rachael's perspective. As someone who has participated I was worried about bringing this book as a vacation read, thinking the material would be too heavy and depressing. While some points were indeed heartbreaking/infuriating, it was also so full of courage and hope that I couldn't put it down. I had followed Rachael's story on social media and in the press but this memoir format really drew me in. I had also listened to the NPR podcast and I enjoyed hearing about the involved individuals from Rachael's perspective. As someone who has participated in advocacy work, I was so inspired by the Denhollander's pursuit of justice and desire to protect others. The intentionality with which they took every step speaks to how carefully the walls of defense are constructed around institutions and powerful people. I didn't understand this until I lived it via spiritual abuse, but hopefully Rachael has spelled it out clearly enough that others can understand this phenoma without having to experience it firsthand. That being said, the audacity and boldness with which her abuser operated still shocked me, and I read about abuse daily (although I hope to always be shocked by evil, honestly). Her exposure of the tactics of predators and the protection that they are provided in this book makes it an important read. I also thought to myself while reading that she was the perfect person to be the representative of victims, which is terrible that you need a "perfect" victim in order for anyone to listen. To be clear, I didn't sense self-righteousness in her story, just Rachael's realization that she was in a very unique position to be able to use her voice and she chose to do so. Her story also gave a clear picture of the cost of speaking up and fighting for justice, which is a side many don't realize. Obviously most victims who advocate don't do so in the national spotlight, but the retraumitization, the criticism, disrespect, etc. is very real and a risk many can't take. Another aspect that struck me was Rachael's respectful treatment of survivors, wherever they were in their process. She chose to speak out and knew the chance of justice would be higher if others did as well, but she did not place that expection on anyone else. While this was the story of someone who spoke up, I sensed a care for survivors and victims who could not make that same choice. The author has an evangelical worldview but this shouldn't deter anyone who does not share that theology (unless you are an exvangelical or victim of spiritual abuse who gets triggered-proceed with caution). While Denhollander expresses her beliefs at times in the book, she is also honest about how her institutional church failed to support victims both of USAG and SGM. I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    Last year, I listened to the podcast (which is excellent) on the Larry Nassar investigation and conviction. I was fascinated - it isn't really something you like or enjoy - by both the victim experiences and the legal issues involved in the case. If you're interested in the overall case, then this isn't the best book to choose. While it does go through the case, Denhollander is very clear she's writing about her own experience only. I think this provides exceptional insight into a woman's experi Last year, I listened to the podcast (which is excellent) on the Larry Nassar investigation and conviction. I was fascinated - it isn't really something you like or enjoy - by both the victim experiences and the legal issues involved in the case. If you're interested in the overall case, then this isn't the best book to choose. While it does go through the case, Denhollander is very clear she's writing about her own experience only. I think this provides exceptional insight into a woman's experiences from the victim side of a sexual assault prosecution and how faith/religious institutions can both help/support and at times harm (when used incorrectly) those who've been abused. I read the kindle version and found the links to all the news articles and other information at the end of each chapter insightful and important to the story. Highly recommend as a supplement to more overall in-depth writing on the case and would definitely recommend to anyone going through experiences similar to Rachael's.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Suzannah

    This book is not just the gripping story of how one brave woman launched the investigation that would ultimately unmask one of the most prolific pedophiles known to history - it's also a very clear and uncompromising picture of what it's like to be a survivor of abuse, and what it's like to try to get anyone to listen to you, and what it's like to try to live a normal life afterwards. Everyone who is in a position of authority or who may be called upon to advise or comfort in such a situation sh This book is not just the gripping story of how one brave woman launched the investigation that would ultimately unmask one of the most prolific pedophiles known to history - it's also a very clear and uncompromising picture of what it's like to be a survivor of abuse, and what it's like to try to get anyone to listen to you, and what it's like to try to live a normal life afterwards. Everyone who is in a position of authority or who may be called upon to advise or comfort in such a situation should read this book at a minimim. Which means that everyone should read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Russell

    This is hands down the best, most inspiring book I have ever read, and is a memoir I feel everyone should read... the book is well written and highly emotional as Rachael takes you on a journey through her life: her childhood, the assault, the traumatic emotional aftermath, and her finding her voice to speak out against Larry Nassar. As a fellow sexual assault survivor, I found her strength incredibly empowering.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I couldn't put it down. Such a moving practical theology of justice, so needed in a world that denies the value of women as God's beloved daughters. I'll want my own daughters to read this ASAP. Thanks Rachael!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Doogan

    This is truly an incredible book. Denhollander tells her story with so much courage. It was an honor to get to read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This book is a must read. Profound. Beneficial. Sobering. It's not an easy read, but an absolute worthwhile one that tells the story of how an abuser was served justice and the road to get there. The survivors, especially Racheal, are brilliant, strong, and brave women whose voices we need to hear. I learned a great deal through this book and while MSU, and Nassar are appalling, there is such grit and hope throughout the pages, that I feel everyone who read will come away with so much more than an This book is a must read. Profound. Beneficial. Sobering. It's not an easy read, but an absolute worthwhile one that tells the story of how an abuser was served justice and the road to get there. The survivors, especially Racheal, are brilliant, strong, and brave women whose voices we need to hear. I learned a great deal through this book and while MSU, and Nassar are appalling, there is such grit and hope throughout the pages, that I feel everyone who read will come away with so much more than anger at Nassar and his enablers. Read this book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    Phew. What a story. Lord, have mercy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Winslow

    This book was really triggering for me, so it took me weeks to finish reading it. But damn, was it worth the read. Now I just have to think of a subtle way to send a bunch of copies to the Christians in my life who shrugged, stayed silent, or openly dismissed abuse disclosures... I'm leaning towards "I really enjoyed this book and it made me think of you! Especially the highlighted portions where the author's church ignores her when she stands up to her rapist. XOXO, Winslow." #NailedIt It's hear This book was really triggering for me, so it took me weeks to finish reading it. But damn, was it worth the read. Now I just have to think of a subtle way to send a bunch of copies to the Christians in my life who shrugged, stayed silent, or openly dismissed abuse disclosures... I'm leaning towards "I really enjoyed this book and it made me think of you! Especially the highlighted portions where the author's church ignores her when she stands up to her rapist. XOXO, Winslow." #NailedIt It's heartbreaking to know that others can relate to how I feel and live as a victim of sexual abuse, because they've endured similar horrors. But it's also so affirming to hear evil called "evil," and to see churches, pastors, authority figures, etc, called out for mishandling disclosures of abuse. If you're a victim/survivor, you should read this book. The author walks the readers through the times she tried to decipher the unspeakable reality of abuse as a minor, and her harrowing experience with the overwhelming thoughts that so many victims have: "It's my fault. I could have stopped it. If I hadn't done X... If I'd just done Y..." But she also outlines how she arrived at the truth: No one is to blame for crimes that someone else chooses to commit against them. It wasn't her fault. The abuse I experienced wasn't my fault. And whatever you survived wasn't your fault, either. If you aren't one of the 1-in-4 women or 1-in-6 men who've been abused, you should read this book. The author doesn't mince words about the pain and suffering she and her family will live with for the rest of their lives as the result of a felon's selfish, heinous actions. She clearly highlights people in her life who were supportive - and also those who weren't. She poignantly quotes William Wilberforce by saying, "You may choose to look the other way but you can never say again that you did not know."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim Savastio

    A brilliant book by a brilliant author. A very emotional read on numerous levels--anger, sorrow, frustration, as well as joy. Rachael tells not only her own story in a thoroughly readable and compelling way, but stands a voice for the millions of nameless victims and often get no earthly justice. Rachael's story is ultimately a testimony to the power of love.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    "What is a little girl worth?" Rachel Denhollander took the right path, the hard path, the misunderstood path . . . paving the way towards justice for the hundreds of little girls, including herself, who had endured the abusive touches of Dr. Larry Nassar, a highly esteemed USA Gymnastics team doctor, operating his medical practice on the campus of Michigan State University. Rachel, her family, and her legal team spent hours, days, and months of endless documentation and evidence retrieval; atte "What is a little girl worth?" Rachel Denhollander took the right path, the hard path, the misunderstood path . . . paving the way towards justice for the hundreds of little girls, including herself, who had endured the abusive touches of Dr. Larry Nassar, a highly esteemed USA Gymnastics team doctor, operating his medical practice on the campus of Michigan State University. Rachel, her family, and her legal team spent hours, days, and months of endless documentation and evidence retrieval; attempting to do what no one else had accomplished; giving voice to Nassar's victims in a court of law. Her journey, including its many ups and downs, is the story of courage and bravery in the face of overwhelming odds and the constant possibility of defeat; having to publicly verbalize many private details while answering many invasive questions. In the end, "everything is what these children are worth" and truth prevailed. "There are two major purposes in our criminal justice system . . . the pursuit of justice and the protection of the innocent . . . . "

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dalen

    A powerful and moving book. The author is articulate and clear, telling her story and inviting the reader in. The book is unflinching in its portrayal of the Nassar case without communicating a tone of bitterness towards those who perpetrated, allowed, and intensified the evil that was committed. What struck me most was how she seemed so unlikely to be abused, a homeschooled child with a loving family, parents who really cared about protecting their children, and yet she was still abused. I thin A powerful and moving book. The author is articulate and clear, telling her story and inviting the reader in. The book is unflinching in its portrayal of the Nassar case without communicating a tone of bitterness towards those who perpetrated, allowed, and intensified the evil that was committed. What struck me most was how she seemed so unlikely to be abused, a homeschooled child with a loving family, parents who really cared about protecting their children, and yet she was still abused. I think that this book should be read by everyone and that the discussion over how we deal with abuse needs to be had among Christians and in our churches.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Flynn Evans

    This is a decidedly incisive and sobering account of what it means to be a survivor without ever losing hope in one’s true dignity in the eyes of God. Denhollander shows us how to use the power of love in the pursuit of truth so that those who are voiceless might finally find the words to speak.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.