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Little Weirds

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Hello and welcome to my book. Inside you will find: The smell of honeysuckle Heartbreak A French-kissing rabbit A haunted house Death A vagina singing sad old songs Young geraniums in an ancient castle Birth A dog who appears in dreams as a spiritual guide Divorce Electromagnetic energy fields Emotional horniness The ghost of a sea captain And more I hope you enjoy these Hello and welcome to my book. Inside you will find: × The smell of honeysuckle × Heartbreak × A French-kissing rabbit × A haunted house × Death × A vagina singing sad old songs × Young geraniums in an ancient castle × Birth × A dog who appears in dreams as a spiritual guide × Divorce × Electromagnetic energy fields × Emotional horniness × The ghost of a sea captain × And more I hope you enjoy these little weirds. Love, Jenny Slate


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Hello and welcome to my book. Inside you will find: The smell of honeysuckle Heartbreak A French-kissing rabbit A haunted house Death A vagina singing sad old songs Young geraniums in an ancient castle Birth A dog who appears in dreams as a spiritual guide Divorce Electromagnetic energy fields Emotional horniness The ghost of a sea captain And more I hope you enjoy these Hello and welcome to my book. Inside you will find: × The smell of honeysuckle × Heartbreak × A French-kissing rabbit × A haunted house × Death × A vagina singing sad old songs × Young geraniums in an ancient castle × Birth × A dog who appears in dreams as a spiritual guide × Divorce × Electromagnetic energy fields × Emotional horniness × The ghost of a sea captain × And more I hope you enjoy these little weirds. Love, Jenny Slate

30 review for Little Weirds

  1. 4 out of 5

    emma

    while i was reading this, i had to stop for a moment, close it, put it down, take a breath, and whisper to myself: oh, my gosh. i love this so much. review to come / 5 stars ---------------- i am 11 pages into this book and i already know i've never read anything like it in all my life. ---------------- i love jenny slate and i can't wait to have this book in my brain.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣

    The case of 'little weird' being a tad too weird. And that vagina was really singing. And dancing. Kidding. We start at 5 stars: -> (-1 star) The miraculous singing vagina. Q: I Died: The Sad Songs of My Vagina … My vagina never sang the Andrews Sisters, like it could have. It didn’t even croon out any Perry Como. It was just Jo Stafford “Keep It a Secret” and sometimes it sang “Ghost Town” in a minor key, with a lot of snark. (c) -> A very bad case of poor understanding of history (-1 star): Q: The case of 'little weird' being a tad too weird. And that vagina was really singing. And dancing. Kidding. We start at 5 stars: -> (-1 star) The miraculous singing vagina. Q: I Died: The Sad Songs of My Vagina … My vagina never sang the Andrews Sisters, like it could have. It didn’t even croon out any Perry Como. It was just Jo Stafford “Keep It a Secret” and sometimes it sang “Ghost Town” in a minor key, with a lot of snark. (c) -> A very bad case of poor understanding of history (-1 star): Q: The Code of Hammurabi is one of the first examples of legalized patriarchy, and it instilled these violent and demented ideals: A woman is the property of a man. A woman does not deserve to have as much as a man and she should not ever have as much as a man ever again. It says that in order for the men to thrive, women must be kept in line and controlled. (c) Actually, there were laws protecting woman's rights and safety. For example: a women who got leprosy was not to be put on the street, a woman was not to be raped... etc. As for controlling women, I imagine, it happened to the society long before the guy even thought of preparing his laws code. Anyway, the Hammurabi Code was not about women, it was about creating a legal society with clear laws, you dolt. It was a step to the modern constitutions and not some anti-fem-bullshit. -> (-1 star) And don't even get me started on the 'obsidian fallus' bit. How do you look at a column a see a fallus? Freudian or what? -> The bad (-1 star): Q: The can of pineapples was a cousin to the airport hot dog. (c) Q: We believe that choice builds strength, and so we have provided a list of approved chat items for you. As we grow more confident in your ability to not secretly shit on yourself all of the time, we shall expand the list. Our hope is that one day, you will not need this list at all, and will be able to speak freely and without the secret sibling of self-abuse and shaming. But for now, your approved topics are as follows: “I want to learn to be a better gardener,” “Veal is a bummer and it’s not even that good,” “Library,” “Baryshnikov: any and all performances/his face/his voice/him,” “How to do bagels,” “Swimming in the Atlantic Ocean,” “Swimming in the Pacific Ocean,” “Evergreen trees,” “Why celery is not exactly what you wish,” “Fits of bras,” “Fits of jeans,” “Caves,” “Explain Easter?” “Paper cut stories,” “Grandmothers,” “Mustards of the world,” “The astronaut who wore the diapers so that she didn’t have to stop on her way to murder somebody,” “Snowboarding: I can’t try,” “Aunts and their houses,” “Ghosts, of course,” “Going to the bathroom on the plane or the train,” “Jars,” “Maggots and mold,” “Pumpkin carving,” “Doritos,” “Can a skunk be de-skunked and become a pet or will it be fundamentally gloomy without its stink?” and the follow-up “I love skunk smell, actually.” Furthermore you may access themes around “Grapes,” “Tropical fruits,” “Volcano,” “Cucumber,” “Sesame Street in the past,” “Wars,” and “Gaudí was the One and Only and I love how he stuck fruits and shells into the holy structures he was inspired to create,” “Monochromatic outfits,” “New Year’s resolutions,” “Silk outfits,” “Graves,” “In Peter Pan, did you ever notice that the actor who plays the dad also usually plays Captain Hook? But not in Hook the movie,” “Potluck dinners,” “Swamps, marshes, and bogs,” “What mushrooms do,” “Acrimony,” “Scoliosis,” “Wells and buckets,” and “The amazing Dukakis family.” … Sincerely yours, The Office of Internal Affairs (c) Q: My colon is now apparently filled with lava? (c) Q: I cover my body with a fabric that has been made into a certain shape to help remind you of my butt and vagina, but it does not show the actual butt or vagina that I have. (c) -> (+1 star) The good: Q: Important Questions I’m humble enough to admit that I don’t know everything and I’m secure enough to ask questions. Examples: How can I shrink enough to be small enough to respectfully ride a lamb or dachshund? What would my body look like (specifically boobs, butt, hair) if I only ate food cooked by bolts of summer lightning? What happens if I put a spell on a tiny piece of paper, put that into a nectarine, and bury it? What kind of tree could result from this action? Does the violin know about the cricket? Has a cricket ever lived in a violin? What if, when I felt a little off, I could flip up the top of my head and sprinkle just a few flowers around my brain and then flip the top of my head back down? What if a moonbeam gets caught in my soup and I swallow it in a sip and then I always float a little bit off the ground because there is a moonbeam in my stomach? Can I wrestle on the lawn? Can I sleep on the lawn? Who invented lawns? Who is more chatty, a squirrel or a seagull?(c) Q: I am a geranium that is hardy and wild, but I want to sleep in a neat little pot. I belong in a castle that was built with the determination and ingenuity of a person who was deeply in love. I feel the warmth vibrating through the centuries and that’s why it is hard to kill me even with a frost. (c) Q: One time, my dog sneaked six licks of coffee from my mug. I caught him on the sixth and I’m certain that he would have gone all the way. But I did catch him on the sixth. After he’d had his coffee he went and he stretched out on the armchair and spent a long time by the window, and I thought, “At least he knows how to have coffee properly, even though he is a thief.” (c) Q: I want to be a part of a system of power that does not disgust me. I have to give myself many pep talks. I am not sure of what to do most of the time, but I do not want to do what I was doing before. I need a new story, please. I suppose I have to give it to myself. (c) Q: My father says, “After a while you understand that you can create and raise the child, but the spirit…the spirit comes from the universe.” (c) Q: I was born with a fatal allergy to both subtext and traditional organization techniques and I will tell you I have really had a few near-death experiences. I was born two years ago when one of my friends described me as “the least able-to-be-controlled person that I know,” and I started living right away. (c) Q: But when I stop feeling pleasure and stop imagining things I also forget my beliefs, the things that float my spirit on this sea. When my beliefs float my spirit on the sea, I imagine the depths beneath me and all of the options for life in there. I can feel, with relief, the wideness of the sea. I can remember that things from faraway locations wash up right on your private wedge of sand and present themselves as yours right away. (c) Q: I am told that I should try to date online. My reaction to this is that I want to walk away so forcefully that I don’t even pause to open the door, I just go through the wall. I will never ever go into the internet to look for anything that I feel that I really need, except for turtlenecks and sheets and candles, and even then I will do that in a very small circle of places that I know have exactly what I want. (c) Q: I am supposed to be touched. I can’t wait to find the person who will come into the kitchen just to smell my neck and get behind me and hug me and breathe me in and make me turn around and make me kiss his face and put my hands in his hair even with my soapy dishwater drips. (c) Q: While you are on the walk, if there is a person with a dog, look at the dog and say, “Hi!” Say hi to the dog first. (c) Q: You are happy for yourself that you have received the honor of a new day on which to ride. You realize that you love yourself easily in this gravity-free space between the worlds of waking and dreaming. You are dear to yourself in the morning and it is the morning now. It is very private to have such a love for yourself. Closer, closer to the curtain. (c) Q: I look up to you because I love the heavenly bodies of the universe, and the way I see it, your heart is a planet. Your heart is factually a part of the universe, which is a miracle of endless force and boundless beauty. … Your heart is a planet. I can see that you are from the sky. (c) Q: I am that mysterious stranger that I hoped to meet. I met her at a dark dance. We came here to live together until I could stay by myself. The place is here. The time is now. This is all my lifetime. (c) -> (+1 star) Body-positivity: Q: Who will let me be the real animal of myself? ... All day long and in my life after I have this dream, I pet myself in the space that lives under my breasts and down to my waist and I feel calmed when I think of my fur. I sometimes imagine a man petting my fur. I will know him as the man who is allowed to be here because he is the one who will be at ease with my fur and pet me when I am nervous and not be mad at either of the following: that I have not removed my fur and that I live here in this non-dream world where it does feel that often people hunt me for my hide and I am nervous a lot. (c) The end result is 3 stars.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Janday

    I read this book in one sitting, and was transformed. Yes, I had a transformative experience while in the middle seat of an American Airlines red-eye. This is nonfiction magical realism. Jenny is my witch godmother and this is her spellbook. Jenny’s magic is reaching into the multiverse of her heart, gripping an emotion and pulling it into reality. Emotion-magic is a croissant who makes a wish, a castle named Karen, a dog with flowers on his face. Weird and wonderful and full of discovery, this I read this book in one sitting, and was transformed. Yes, I had a transformative experience while in the middle seat of an American Airlines red-eye. This is nonfiction magical realism. Jenny is my witch godmother and this is her spellbook. Jenny’s magic is reaching into the multiverse of her heart, gripping an emotion and pulling it into reality. Emotion-magic is a croissant who makes a wish, a castle named Karen, a dog with flowers on his face. Weird and wonderful and full of discovery, this grimoire is equal parts vulnerability and self-indulgence we don’t normally allow from young women writers. Finally, I, too, love dogs and hate horses. I read an early, unedited manuscript I obtained as an employee of Hachette Book Group

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ Looky looky – it’s the annual “Kelly Actually Posts a Review of a Book on #pubday” post! I don’t really know if Little Weirds will work for everyone, but boy oh boy did it work for me. To begin with, let’s take a gander at the cover . . . . Oh, it’s just so perfect. And the insides pretty much match the outside. It’s just a jumble of truly “little weirds” conjured up by Jenny Slate’s oddball brain. (Spoiler alert: I had no clue she Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ Looky looky – it’s the annual “Kelly Actually Posts a Review of a Book on #pubday” post! I don’t really know if Little Weirds will work for everyone, but boy oh boy did it work for me. To begin with, let’s take a gander at the cover . . . . Oh, it’s just so perfect. And the insides pretty much match the outside. It’s just a jumble of truly “little weirds” conjured up by Jenny Slate’s oddball brain. (Spoiler alert: I had no clue she was such a wordsmith, but wowza does she know how to use gajillions of the entries that can be found in the nearest Webster’s.) Basically, this is the literary equivalent of . . . . Delightful. Now to be very clear, I have had a massive girlcrush on Jenny Slate for quite some time. From her accidental dropping of an F Bomb on my standing Saturday night television watching date . . . . (Which, unfortunately, led to her promptly being fired). To her stealing the scene as a guest star on another fave, Parks and Rec . . . . To her voiceover work . . . . To me trying to figure out how to rob a Brink’s armored truck in order to buy her childhood home that is currently on the market . . . . (And don’t even ask the level of commitment my stalkery has taken that I discovered that bit of information because I don’t even remember.) To her drunken narration of the invention of Coca-Cola . . . . . To her new stand-up special on Netflix – I simply adore her and I adored everything about this book – so much so that I’m breaking the rules and posting a taste despite receiving an advanced copy . . . . A Tender Thief One time, my dog sneaked six licks of coffee from my mug. I caught him on the sixth and I’m certain that he would have gone all the way. But I did catch him on the sixth. After he’d had his coffee he went and he stretched out on the armchair and spent a long time by the window, and I thought, “At least he knows how to have coffee properly, even though he is a thief.” Buy the book if you want, don’t buy the book if you don’t want, I don’t really care. I’m just happy to have these little weirds in my own life. However, you all should do yourself a favor and watch Jenny define a “Shit Show” . . . . . https://twitter.com/drunkhistory/stat... ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, NetGalley!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    Does anyone have a more distinct voice than Jenny Slate? This book of what I will call micro essays (micro memoir?) discuss a lot of topics from small observations, relationships and dating, silliness, feminism, and childhood. My absolute favorite is the one where she died listening. Thanks to the publisher for giving me access through Edelweiss. It comes out November 5, 2019.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Portia

    LITTLE WEIRDS by Jenny Slate was a case of the book not living up to the beautiful cover. I’m a fan of Jenny Slate’s so I was really excited when a galley of her new book came in. And then I was so disappointed by the content. This feels like a book that is trying way to hard to be literary and special. It is incredibly overwritten, filled mostly with confusing metaphors and I found myself getting to the end of each piece feeling empty. What she is trying to say gets so lost behind the language LITTLE WEIRDS by Jenny Slate was a case of the book not living up to the beautiful cover. I’m a fan of Jenny Slate’s so I was really excited when a galley of her new book came in. And then I was so disappointed by the content. This feels like a book that is trying way to hard to be literary and special. It is incredibly overwritten, filled mostly with confusing metaphors and I found myself getting to the end of each piece feeling empty. What she is trying to say gets so lost behind the language she is using. Many of the essays (if they can be called that) revolve around her feelings of being alone and lonely. It felt like she needed to write this book to deal with those feelings but, seeing as they are not unique feelings, I don't believe that it needed to be put out into the world Every once and a while a piece would work for me (usually when Slate stepped back from her flowery writing and just let her thoughts stand on their own) but I would immediately be let down by the next one. I recommend picking this one up to look at the beautiful cover art (there are some fun things hidden in there) and then putting it down and getting something else.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fatma

    "Look! Look at this woman who is both the emergency and the relief. Let me be both (I have no choice.) Give in. Fall apart. Look at the pieces. Reassemble. This is the essential movement of my holy flux." this book is the best friend that gives u a big, long hug and tells u that everything's gonna be okay but also tells u to get dressed, get out of ur house, and get ur shit together. i loved it. It feels like Jenny Slate wrung her soul out into this book. And what a weird, beautiful little "Look! Look at this woman who is both the emergency and the relief. Let me be both (I have no choice.) Give in. Fall apart. Look at the pieces. Reassemble. This is the essential movement of my holy flux." this book is the best friend that gives u a big, long hug and tells u that everything's gonna be okay but also tells u to get dressed, get out of ur house, and get ur shit together. i loved it. It feels like Jenny Slate wrung her soul out into this book. And what a weird, beautiful little book it turned out to be. Little Weirds is a deeply personal book; it's also a deeply moving book. Really, it's the former that allows for the latter. Its title is a perfect encapsulation of what you'll get inside it: stories short and long, weird in small and not-so-small ways. And Slate is such a talented writer, so good at a surrealist, off-center kind of writing that only serves to make the emotion at the root of her stories all the more affecting. Some of my favourite quotes (and I was listening to this on audiobook too so the fact that I got a hold of these quotes is a Big Deal): "I see it. I know it. That natures makes art and I am a creation and I make things. This is an expansive fact that I could never measure, and it calms me. The elemental companionship of light and air make it so beautiful on those leaves that when I turn in my chair to really look, the leaves are just there existing, and I feel my heart break even more and I say, Good, let it fall away, and look, look, everything is always remaking itself and so are you. Everything is art and nature and so are you." "Very boring, very lonely, very tired, again. It was hard to feel anything, except I am not one of the creatures who will experience anything precious." well. that, uh, hit close to home. One more thing: this book is a perfect companion piece to Slate's Netflix special, Jenny Slate: Stage Fright. Consume them in whatever order you want, but I think your experience of one will be very much enhanced if you see/read the other.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I want to be Jenny Slate’s best friend. Funny and entertaining read! Enjoyed reading this little book of essays so much. They were so amusing. The sandwich dream had me laughing. Just the thought of it! This is a quick read and I highly recommend reading it. I want to be Jenny Slate’s best friend. Funny and entertaining read! Enjoyed reading this little book of essays so much. They were so amusing. The sandwich dream had me laughing. Just the thought of it! 🤣 This is a quick read and I highly recommend reading it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Toderash

    I already appreciated Jenny Slate. I had my ideal version of a night out seeing her perform a few years ago. I walked away from her stand up performance feeling light and airy and ready to act and honour myself, which doesn’t necessarily happen to me after a night of comedy. In the aftermath I saw the woman I am (and maybe I want to be?!) more clearly. Her book is a continuation of that feeling. Reading something that doesn’t shy away from naked talk of love (even going as far as expressing the I already appreciated Jenny Slate. I had my ideal version of a night out seeing her perform a few years ago. I walked away from her stand up performance feeling light and airy and ready to act and honour myself, which doesn’t necessarily happen to me after a night of comedy. In the aftermath I saw the woman I am (and maybe I want to be?!) more clearly. Her book is a continuation of that feeling. Reading something that doesn’t shy away from naked talk of love (even going as far as expressing the want of it), insecurities and just plain beautiful petal soft things is a revelation. As woman aren’t we always told these are the most frivolous? Finishing this book, I realized carving out space for this is a form of rioting. It made me write an ode to my independence. An ode to my emotional self sufficiency, of which I am the most proud. They can yell from the sidewalk.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cortney

    Memoir? Poetry? Musings? Daydreams? Maybe a little bit of everything. It was amusing and weird. I felt like I was watching a one woman stage play.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    2.5 Not really my cup of tea. It’s surreal and not what I expected. It’s not bad it just wasn’t really something I necessarily enjoyed or learned much from. There were some really interesting lines and ideas in here, but also a lot of “nonsense.” In quotations because it was nonsense to me and may not be so for others. 2.5⭐️ Not really my cup of tea. It’s surreal and not what I expected. It’s not bad it just wasn’t really something I necessarily enjoyed or learned much from. There were some really interesting lines and ideas in here, but also a lot of “nonsense.” In quotations because it was nonsense to me and may not be so for others.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kate Vocke (bookapotamus)

    This is exactly what the title says. A bunch of little weirds. Little snippets, ramblings, thoughts, essays, monologues, lists. All very weird. I was confused. I laughed hysterically. I smiled. I don't know what I just read read but I kinda liked it. And Jenny Slates voice is up there with James Earl Jones and Morgan freeman. She can read the phonebook and I'll listen!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    A quirky, dreamy take on the memoir genre. Slate brings her signature oddball humor together with a meandering but articulate written voice that reads like a floaty fever dream. Though I wish the narrative had skewed more toward self-deprecating than self-indulgent, Slate writes well enough to (mostly) get away with what is essentially a vanity project. Some of the little weirds are better than others, but on the whole it’s an entertaining little piece of frippery, long enough to establish the A quirky, dreamy take on the memoir genre. Slate brings her signature oddball humor together with a meandering but articulate written voice that reads like a floaty fever dream. Though I wish the narrative had skewed more toward self-deprecating than self-indulgent, Slate writes well enough to (mostly) get away with what is essentially a vanity project. Some of the little weirds are better than others, but on the whole it’s an entertaining little piece of frippery, long enough to establish the meta-reality that Slate has invited us into, and short enough to keep us from ODing on the concept. *I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    "In the last light of a long day, I sit on a chair on my porch and watch the sky drain colors down and out and I realize I want to hear my voice and only mine. Not the voice of my voice within a cacophony of old pains. Just mine, now." I am loath to ever give a book a low number of stars, especially a memoir. Books are so much work and come from a place deep in one's soul. And who am I to judge that? And at the same time, there are books that connect with me and books that don't. This doesn't "In the last light of a long day, I sit on a chair on my porch and watch the sky drain colors down and out and I realize I want to hear my voice and only mine. Not the voice of my voice within a cacophony of old pains. Just mine, now." I am loath to ever give a book a low number of stars, especially a memoir. Books are so much work and come from a place deep in one's soul. And who am I to judge that? And at the same time, there are books that connect with me and books that don't. This doesn't mean there's anything wrong with the book, or me. It just means that at this juncture of our lives, in this moment, this book and I are not connecting. And instead of attaching a bad rating to that, I decided to give it no rating. "I was pleased that she made sure. Because in making sure, Kathleen gave me the opportunity to say out loud to another person that I would like my old dog to have flowers stuck to his face, and when I said it out loud—that yes, I would like that—I knew it was true. Then I admired myself. What’s more, I felt tenderness about my personality and my choices for delight. I said who I was, on my land." I didn't know anything about Jenny Slate before I read this book. I don't watch the TV show she's famous for and I had no idea what to expect from this book. It's a most unusual style. I'd say if you don't like magical realism, you will have a tough time with this book but I love magical realism and yet I still had a tough time. It's maybe more on the eclectic/absurd as well as magical realism. "I know what I want to hear when I hear myself in this life, and I am feeling very certain that there is absolutely no good reason to ever be disrespectful, no matter how upset you are. I do not need to hear bullying voices ever again and there is no reason to ever do that sort of emotional violence to anyone." There were definitely beautiful and resonant moments in it. Thoughts around loneliness, belonging, and kindness. And I will remember these and leave the others. With gratitude to netgalley and Little, Brown and Company for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Chidester

    Thank you Libro.fm. For the ALC for an honest review. I adored this book!!!! It is goofy, wild, weird (duh), warm, feminist, hilarious, sad, and everything possible in between. Audio is pristine because Jenny Slate has the most soothing and confident, quirky voice.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Hopkins

    This is a book you're either going to fall in love with, or absolutely hate. At first, I thought I'd side with hate. A few sentences in, I was like god this is so flowery and pretentious, just say what you're trying to say!!! But then I realized this isn't like books that are flowery in a pretentious way, and that flowery is okay if it's genuine and the author's real voice. Every word on every page screams "Jenny Slate wrote me" and this book is so undeniably HER that it CAN'T be pretentious, This is a book you're either going to fall in love with, or absolutely hate. At first, I thought I'd side with hate. A few sentences in, I was like god this is so flowery and pretentious, just say what you're trying to say!!! But then I realized this isn't like books that are flowery in a pretentious way, and that flowery is okay if it's genuine and the author's real voice. Every word on every page screams "Jenny Slate wrote me" and this book is so undeniably HER that it CAN'T be pretentious, because it is real. It's not a memoir in the sense that she takes you through a linear story with any kind of beginning, middle, or end, and most chapters aren't things she actually experienced, but instead are essays or just sheer nonsense that you can't even begin to make out on the first or second read (or EVER), but you know that SHE means something with them, and at these moments, it's like yes, this book is written by her, FOR HER. Very little of this is about appealing to readers in the sense of wanting to impress. It's about the author putting pieces of herself on paper and it just happens to be published and we just happen to be reading it. But it's not for us, and so many people who enter this weird little world will be instantly turned off, but if something clicks with you, it's worth staying for the whole thing because maybe something else will click too. Not everything in this book clicked for me, but it's still worth all five stars because I've never read anything as uniquely belonging to a single human person before, and even when I didn't understand what she was trying to say, I know SHE got it, and while that doesn't always make for the best book for all readers to enjoy, I kinda enjoy that this didn't matter to her at all.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    I want to be Jenny Slate's best friend. This book is so wholesome and tender, and full of joy and aching. I held it close to my chest once I finished, as if trying to absorb some of its sweetness into myself. I really needed to read something like this at this moment of my life.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kell

    it's weird. i mean, it says so right on the cover. but i will say there were QUITE a number of times where i stopped and went over a phrase over and over and over again because it struck such a chord. that alone merits five stars, i think.

  19. 4 out of 5

    lizzie

    “I’d rather live with a tender heart, because that is the key to feeling the beat of all of the other hearts.”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Holland

    I was so looking forward to this book but I guess in book form the narcissism gets super grating. Her prose can be lovely but really needs to vary the subject matter to anything other than herself. Sorry to be a hater....

  21. 5 out of 5

    Billie

    Am I old or is Jenny Slate a lot? Or is it both? Maybe it's both. Whatever it was, this book fucking exhausted me.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Iris

    “Comedians writing autobiographies” is not a new concept anymore. Jenny Slate succeeds in that she makes her writing new and different. Starting with ghost stories and ending with what ifs, she creates a book that dives into her dreams and insecurities. While society might deem her “quirky” or “manic-pixie-whatever”, you as the reader get a sense of her as a fully realized person and woman. I really enjoyed Slate’s ~little~ ~weirds~!!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    June

    This book is a rollercoaster. If I called it a memoir, I'm afraid you would picture something entirely different. Yet, after having read it, you feel like you know Jenny Slate's life in as meaningful a way as if you'd read a straightforward autobiography instead of a pastiche of impressions and recollections arranged in a comical, poetical, yet also sorrowful manner. In 2019, as I write this, it seems a brave and generous thing to put something personal and artistic into the world. It inspired This book is a rollercoaster. If I called it a memoir, I'm afraid you would picture something entirely different. Yet, after having read it, you feel like you know Jenny Slate's life in as meaningful a way as if you'd read a straightforward autobiography instead of a pastiche of impressions and recollections arranged in a comical, poetical, yet also sorrowful manner. In 2019, as I write this, it seems a brave and generous thing to put something personal and artistic into the world. It inspired me to want to write a book of my own revisiting some things I might otherwise have left buried. So thank you to the author, the publishers, and NetGalley for the chance to review a digital ARC.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Astounding. Longer review to come.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shamiram

    Bits that spoke to me: "I was born happy but when anything that is large, alive, and wild gets hurt and confused, I feel so sad, and I notice that I wish I could nurse big scared things. And it is worth mentioning that "big scared thing" is one way to describe how my heart often feels. My heart can feel like an elephant who is feeling dread and has an exceptional memory and naturally possesses something valuable that might be hunted, poached, wasted." "That is an act of power, showing what you Bits that spoke to me: "I was born happy but when anything that is large, alive, and wild gets hurt and confused, I feel so sad, and I notice that I wish I could nurse big scared things. And it is worth mentioning that "big scared thing" is one way to describe how my heart often feels. My heart can feel like an elephant who is feeling dread and has an exceptional memory and naturally possesses something valuable that might be hunted, poached, wasted." "That is an act of power, showing what you know, giving it to another person, realizing that as you spread it, you get to keep it but watch it grow, and by watching others have it, you learn new things about the original thing." "Without a person to love, I am too full of what must be let out, and while at least I can use my mind enough to bring out this image of this sea, it feels like life is the beach in the winter." "I'm stuck here in a cycle and I am getting older but I am not growing up and my heart is getting soft dark spots on it like a fruit that has gone bad or is soft because too many hands have squeezed it but then put it back down not because I am not ready but because they were not ready for my type of fruity flesh. I felt so ripe and sweet-what was off? The truth is, I was forcing myself into people's mouths. I jumped out of their hands and into their mouths and I yelled EAT ME way before they even had a chance to get hungry and notice me and lift me up." The entirety of the piece called "The Pits" "And I see the leaves turn a bit in the air, and the breeze coming in feels like the whole world is a pet that is breathing on me, and I think, Well, I am so sensitive and I am very fragile, but so is everything else, and living with a dangerous amount of sensitivity is sort of what I have to do sometimes, and it is so very much better than living with no gusto at all. And I'd rather live with a tender heart, because that is the key to feeling the rest of all of the other hearts. " "Sometimes do you ever get jealous of the plants, that they only have to grow and not know about it, that they don't take anything personally?" The entirety of the piece called "From me to you, from me to everybody"

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Mary

    “Information about art and nature feels like the best stuff to have, and if you have it, it is powerful and excellent to pass it on.” Thank you Jenny Slate for passing on your wisdom, musings and daydreams of this world. Thank you to Libro.fm’s ALC program for the opportunity to listen to the absolute treasure. Jenny Slate’s distinct voice and style made me feel like I was listening to a friend. She is one of the actors/authors that I feel could be a “friend in my head”, in that, I really “Information about art and nature feels like the best stuff to have, and if you have it, it is powerful and excellent to pass it on.” Thank you Jenny Slate for passing on your wisdom, musings and daydreams of this world. Thank you to Libro.fm’s ALC program for the opportunity to listen to the absolute treasure. Jenny Slate’s distinct voice and style made me feel like I was listening to a friend. She is one of the actors/authors that I feel could be a “friend in my head”, in that, I really connected to her writing. Is it a memoir?..I don’t know if I should call it a memoir or a series of mini essays, which isn’t terribly important to label. What is important is that Jenny shares her stream of consciousness on the ways of the world, love, feminism, relationships and animals. I loved the idea of some magical realism, as I feel a strong connection to animals for sure. I was absolutely absorbed with my time listening Jenny Slate. This book is a gem. Go buy it! Go listen to it for sure!

  27. 5 out of 5

    S!

    just finished it and there's really nothing i can articulate that will make justice to the experience of reading this, of living inside jenny's mind, of sharing it with her. there's nothing i can say and so i will not try. this is simply something you feel. what a gorgeous, kind, warm, wild, weird book. thank you, ms. slate. eternally, thank you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily Beh

    I thought the dream-story, 'Fur' was cute. I like that one.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bambi

    every chapter felt like i was talking to a close friend and was being hugged for an extensive amount of time.... jenny u r so warm and i love u so much

  30. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Jenny Slate writes in a stream of consciousness that invokes a sense of nostalgia for something unknown. Her magical realism asks you to consider what perceptions of yourself and the world matter, and why not break the mold? It left a bittersweet hopefulness in my mouth, a longing for crumbling rustic houses with an unshakable sense of home in my mind, and a soft, flickering flame of possibility in my heart.

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