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The Flash: Year One

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THE SCARLET SPEEDSTER'S ORIGIN STARTS HERE! Barry Allen is stuck in place. As a forensic scientist for the Central City police, it's his job to catch criminals after they've committed their crimes. It's like he's lost the race before he even leaves the starting line. Then one-night lightning strikes--and everything changes. Electrocuted and doused in chemicals, Barry emerges THE SCARLET SPEEDSTER'S ORIGIN STARTS HERE! Barry Allen is stuck in place. As a forensic scientist for the Central City police, it's his job to catch criminals after they've committed their crimes. It's like he's lost the race before he even leaves the starting line. Then one-night lightning strikes--and everything changes. Electrocuted and doused in chemicals, Barry emerges from a coma with the force of incredible speed humming in his very atoms. He's faster than bullets, faster than sound, faster than anyone can imagine. And he'd better be. Because even as Barry learns how to harness his incredible new powers, a new breed of criminal is stalking Central City. Some can slow him to a standstill. Others can freeze him in place. Still others run so hot and so fast he can't see them coming. The race is on for one of the DC Universe's most iconic superheroes to become the legend he is destined to be. Collects The Flash #70-75


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THE SCARLET SPEEDSTER'S ORIGIN STARTS HERE! Barry Allen is stuck in place. As a forensic scientist for the Central City police, it's his job to catch criminals after they've committed their crimes. It's like he's lost the race before he even leaves the starting line. Then one-night lightning strikes--and everything changes. Electrocuted and doused in chemicals, Barry emerges THE SCARLET SPEEDSTER'S ORIGIN STARTS HERE! Barry Allen is stuck in place. As a forensic scientist for the Central City police, it's his job to catch criminals after they've committed their crimes. It's like he's lost the race before he even leaves the starting line. Then one-night lightning strikes--and everything changes. Electrocuted and doused in chemicals, Barry emerges from a coma with the force of incredible speed humming in his very atoms. He's faster than bullets, faster than sound, faster than anyone can imagine. And he'd better be. Because even as Barry learns how to harness his incredible new powers, a new breed of criminal is stalking Central City. Some can slow him to a standstill. Others can freeze him in place. Still others run so hot and so fast he can't see them coming. The race is on for one of the DC Universe's most iconic superheroes to become the legend he is destined to be. Collects The Flash #70-75

30 review for The Flash: Year One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Eh. 2.5 stars The Flash origin is retold again and this time his nemesis is The Turtle. <--not kidding And once again, time travel plays a huge role in the overall plot. <--shocking, I know It was underwhelming. Not terrible. Not unreadable. Just very underwhelming. I think if you're a fan of The Flash (like me) you'll feel compelled to read this. I mean, I usually feel the need to read all of the Year One stuff anyway, but that may not be how everyone feels. Anyway. The Turtle + Time Travel = Eh. 2.5 stars The Flash origin is retold again and this time his nemesis is The Turtle. <--not kidding And once again, time travel plays a huge role in the overall plot. <--shocking, I know It was underwhelming. Not terrible. Not unreadable. Just very underwhelming. I think if you're a fan of The Flash (like me) you'll feel compelled to read this. I mean, I usually feel the need to read all of the Year One stuff anyway, but that may not be how everyone feels. Anyway. The Turtle + Time Travel = You Decide

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Williamson expands The Flash's first year. I will give Williamson kudos for making Barry's foe in this, The Turtle, since that's who Barry first fought back in Showcase #4. Of course back then, he was just a guy in a green turtleneck. I'm not a fan of more time travel in The Flash which almost seems a crutch for The Flash as this point. But for what it is, it's a decent story. Howard Porter is really knocking it out of the park on the art chores. I like how his art is evolving.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Every hero’s journey begins somewhere. Whether it’s in a dark alley or in a spacecraft, these individuals are launched on an endeavour that is beyond their wildest imagination as they take upon themselves new responsibilities that put the safety of the world before their own. While some choose to walk this path, proud and honoured to serve a greater good, others learn their lesson the hard way, through adversity and challenges. And so, how did You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Every hero’s journey begins somewhere. Whether it’s in a dark alley or in a spacecraft, these individuals are launched on an endeavour that is beyond their wildest imagination as they take upon themselves new responsibilities that put the safety of the world before their own. While some choose to walk this path, proud and honoured to serve a greater good, others learn their lesson the hard way, through adversity and challenges. And so, how did the world’s fastest man alive come to be? It is thanks to writer Joshua Williamson (Nailbiter, The Flash) and artist Howard Porter (JLA) that fans are given the opportunity to discover a brand-new origin story for the Scarlet Speedster, a story that will transform him into the hero that will inspire countless lives and cities as he streaks his way across towns, countries, and universes. What is The Flash: Year One about? Forensic scientist for the Central City police, Barry Allen routinely helps solve cases after the fact, once the crime is committed and while the culprit is either in custody or in the wild. His job places him in a tough position where his ability to reduce crime is never immediate or tangible as he remains behind the scenes. It’s after being struck by lightning in his laboratory, doused in chemicals, that his life changes forever. He now possesses incredible speed surging from the depths of his atoms which allows him to run faster than anything imaginable. Collecting The Flash issues #70-75, this origin story explores the Scarlet Speedster’s journey to becoming Central City’s greatest hero as he not only discovers who he is destined to be but also faces an evil adversary bound to become an archnemesis with his ability to slow The Flash down to a standstill. Here’s why this story arc works quite well as it crystallizes into a cohesive whole by the end of the graphic novel. Writer Joshua Williamson utilizes the best elements of Barry Allen’s lore to infuse this story with spark and dazzle. From his various abilities and his lack of control over them to the myriad of key figures that shape his life for the better, there’s a lot of elements packed into this adventure. And that’s where everything doesn’t hum at the same frequency. In the optics that this story arc is meant to be a Year One episode, an origin story for Barry Allen as The Flash, there were way too many ideas in store for a hero in the making. For an accustomed fan, this will undoubtedly seem slightly ambitious, leaving the impression that there’s barely any room left after this story for new discoveries or further development of the character or the world. For a newcomer, this will, however, be exciting as it lays out in the open almost all of The Flash’s secret weapons. To accompany this origin story is a superbly colourful and explosive artwork. Despite minor facial design flaws that distract you from the excellent movement mechanisms utilized to display The Flash’s abilities, this story arc contains very electric and exciting visuals. The roughness of the penciling unleashed amidst Barry Allen’s high-paced and chaotic learning curve offers readers a stimulating experience that never slows down. The emotional depth of the iconic hero is properly conveyed in his journey of discovery and is felt through the character’s mannerisms and behaviours. Although he’s almost forced into a destiny, making you doubt in his free will, the artwork exposes the hero’s rapid growth as a hero and illustrates his confidence through trial and error. Leave it to the colouring to juice this story with life, verging on psychedelic but not quite, while still capturing the joyful nature of Barry Allen in the middle of his heroic plight. The Flash: Year One is a dazzling and slightly ambitious exploration of a forensic scientist’s journey to becoming Central City’s greatest hero. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Flash Year one is Barry's first year as flash. While some parts are amazing, mostly him learning his powers and going through a rough time in some spots, the second half of this is him going into the future and seeing what COULD be. So basically this book is one big "how to stop a terrible future" from happening. It feels kind of odd as a year one story. Too much for flash to go through so early in his time. I think this story is better served much later. Saying that, the art is great and Flash Year one is Barry's first year as flash. While some parts are amazing, mostly him learning his powers and going through a rough time in some spots, the second half of this is him going into the future and seeing what COULD be. So basically this book is one big "how to stop a terrible future" from happening. It feels kind of odd as a year one story. Too much for flash to go through so early in his time. I think this story is better served much later. Saying that, the art is great and there's some funny and exciting moments. While I don't think this is a must read I still had a good time reading it. A solid 3 out of 5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Every now and then a DC character gets an origin overhaul. This time around, it's Barry Allen's. Not a lot's changing however - it's mostly just an excuse to take a look back at Barry's first adventure as the Flash, and tie him into the greater Force story that Joshua Williamson is telling by dragging in the Turtle. It's a solid story, don't get me wrong. Whether it works as a standalone Year One story for new readers, I wouldn't go quite that far. It does help refocus Barry's mindset going Every now and then a DC character gets an origin overhaul. This time around, it's Barry Allen's. Not a lot's changing however - it's mostly just an excuse to take a look back at Barry's first adventure as the Flash, and tie him into the greater Force story that Joshua Williamson is telling by dragging in the Turtle. It's a solid story, don't get me wrong. Whether it works as a standalone Year One story for new readers, I wouldn't go quite that far. It does help refocus Barry's mindset going forward though, so in the grander scheme of things, if you're already reading Flash, it's worth sticking around for. Howard Porter's on art, and he's great. The amount of detail the guy rams into his pages borders on ridiculous, and everyone has a stunning amount of weight to them. He's up there with Scott Kolins and Francis Manapul as one of my favourite Flash artists, tbh.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Georgie

    We get another year one story and this time it’s Flash’s turn and it’s pretty good, but it’s bigger purpose is to tie in the turtle with Joshua Williamson’s bigger force story. The story is really cool, it’s Barry learning to adapt to his new powers and learning how to be hopeful and more optimistic as he faces more obstacles as the flash and Barry Allen. The whole time loop thing with future Flash and Turtle is really interesting and makes for a good story. I started to not enjoy as much in the We get another year one story and this time it’s Flash’s turn and it’s pretty good, but it’s bigger purpose is to tie in the turtle with Joshua Williamson’s bigger force story. The story is really cool, it’s Barry learning to adapt to his new powers and learning how to be hopeful and more optimistic as he faces more obstacles as the flash and Barry Allen. The whole time loop thing with future Flash and Turtle is really interesting and makes for a good story. I started to not enjoy as much in the end though because I felt it was dragged on a bit. The art is being illustrated by Howard Porter again and he doesn’t disappoint, his art is so detailed and exciting it makes the story even more awesome and Hi-Fi’s colouring compliments his art a bunch. Overall, really good.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Plot: A re-telling of how the Flash got his powers and came to be the hero we all know and love, then a connection to the Year of the Villain overstory. Solid art throughout, and a good story. I like how everything tied together from beginning to end. Seeing Barry and Iris come together was sweet, and seeing how Barry gained his sense of optimism gave me some very needed hope. The tie in to the current overplot ought to help me make some more connections between the various stories. A solid Basic Plot: A re-telling of how the Flash got his powers and came to be the hero we all know and love, then a connection to the Year of the Villain overstory. Solid art throughout, and a good story. I like how everything tied together from beginning to end. Seeing Barry and Iris come together was sweet, and seeing how Barry gained his sense of optimism gave me some very needed hope. The tie in to the current overplot ought to help me make some more connections between the various stories. A solid book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Iris Nevers

    [Read in single issues]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alí Flores

    Another year one Volume means same old crap, I really still don’t get the reason of doing this. Same Barry Story, same origins, differen foe, The Turtle. Art is crap as always but after 75 issues you kinda get used to it. Also something different is the Old Flash, still not that good tho.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rizzie

    A pretty solid introduction to the Barry Allen Flash. The dialogue was rather awkward and forced in many places, and Williamson doesn't seem to understand the difference between a CSI and a detective, but it was good popcorn fun. It was very clearly written to be adaptable as a blockbuster film, complete with trademark skybeam, but I don't think that hurts it much. The real highlight is the Turtle, a somewhat obscure villain elevated to be a bit more interesting here. I also liked the portrayal A pretty solid introduction to the Barry Allen Flash. The dialogue was rather awkward and forced in many places, and Williamson doesn't seem to understand the difference between a CSI and a detective, but it was good popcorn fun. It was very clearly written to be adaptable as a blockbuster film, complete with trademark skybeam, but I don't think that hurts it much. The real highlight is the Turtle, a somewhat obscure villain elevated to be a bit more interesting here. I also liked the portrayal of Iris West, though I wish more could be done to distinguish her from Lois Lane. Seriously, they're identical in just about every character aspect. Oh and personally, I don't like how quickly Barry discovers his powers. He figures out all of his most interesting (and previously difficult) abilities in mere minutes, including ACCIDENTALLY TIME TRAVELLING LIKE IT'S NOTHING?? The whole thing just seems too big and too sudden to be Barry's FIRST story, more like his "Long Halloween" than his "Year One". All that being said, however, it's still a fun story, and like I said, a good introduction to the concept and character himself for newcomers. The best part is that it is written (almost) continuity-free, so it can (mostly) fit into the Post-Crisis universe, despite being written for the post-Flashpoint one. It closes a strange gap that I always felt was an injustice, since Barry was the only major Leaguer to never get his own modern origin mini. I don't particularly give a shit about New 52 canon, so this fits nicely for me in the main (old) universe.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Flash is one of my favorite characters, and reading this take on his origin... it was kind of perfect. Some of the time travel stuff was a little confusing, but everything else was so darn good that I kind of didn't care. It was jarring to see Barry start out as a pessimist (even though it made perfect sense). Watching him evolve and grow into that optimist that would one day be worthy of a Blue Lantern ring was a joy--Joshua Wiliamson knows what he's doing when it comes to character The Flash is one of my favorite characters, and reading this take on his origin... it was kind of perfect. Some of the time travel stuff was a little confusing, but everything else was so darn good that I kind of didn't care. It was jarring to see Barry start out as a pessimist (even though it made perfect sense). Watching him evolve and grow into that optimist that would one day be worthy of a Blue Lantern ring was a joy--Joshua Wiliamson knows what he's doing when it comes to character development. The art was great, and I also loved watching him and Iris fall in love. The emotions were definitely the strong bedrock this graphic novel was built upon, but that doesn't mean there wasn't also a ton of action and dynamic moments. THIS here is how I picture Barry learning to be Flash, and it was amazing!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    I'm a sucker for any comic that includes the words "year one." I don't care that much about rehashing origins but exploring a hero's early first steps as something new is like catnip for me. The Flash: Year One is big when those stories tend to be little but you still feel the sense of growth and becoming that makes "Year One" stories work so consistently and every step along the way Barry Allen's inexperience doesn't overshadow the core components of a character well known to readers as fully I'm a sucker for any comic that includes the words "year one." I don't care that much about rehashing origins but exploring a hero's early first steps as something new is like catnip for me. The Flash: Year One is big when those stories tend to be little but you still feel the sense of growth and becoming that makes "Year One" stories work so consistently and every step along the way Barry Allen's inexperience doesn't overshadow the core components of a character well known to readers as fully developed which is a testament to Williamson's writing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim Lang

    Book #48 of 2019: Joshua Williamson just gets everything that makes the Barry Allen version of the Flash so special, and it’s all on display here: his moral code, a memorable supporting cast (Iris Allen is at her best here), quirky villains, and most especially, hope and optimism. Here, Williamson has Howard Porter’s brilliant art to help him tweak and retell the Flash’s origins, and the result is a story that takes me back to why the Flash was one of my childhood favorites. This is a fun, Book #48 of 2019: Joshua Williamson just gets everything that makes the Barry Allen version of the Flash so special, and it’s all on display here: his moral code, a memorable supporting cast (Iris Allen is at her best here), quirky villains, and most especially, hope and optimism. Here, Williamson has Howard Porter’s brilliant art to help him tweak and retell the Flash’s origins, and the result is a story that takes me back to why the Flash was one of my childhood favorites. This is a fun, meaningful, and memorable Flash story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Chris Robertson

    Enjoyed this. I like when throwaway villains are revamped and become compelling, and this was one of the best. Don’t mess with the Turtle, man. Good art. Got a little lost in how the Turtle was defeated, but it wasn’t any more convoluted than the TV show. You just kind of roll with it and enjoy the finish.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rylan

    This story was amazing. The graphics were amazing. This would be a great story for young readers. The story has a great order. It has funny moments sad moments and suspencful moments. It had a lot of action. This is a great book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lillian Francis

    Artwork is great. Story is an origin so it's interesting too see a new take on the characters. Not even going to bother trying to work out where this fits in DC timeline, although it looks like it's tying back in with issue 69. Just enjoying myself for the moment but need to go back to read 1-69!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shim

    Good art, storyline isn’t really anything you didn’t already know. Some slightly interesting variations littered with mostly people acting unnecessarily reckless.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

    A retelling of Flash’s early days. This revision of the story was clearly influenced by the TV series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Wilson

    The colorist Hi-Fi really made this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    A solid effort to duplicate Batman Year One as a Flash story. I really liked the use of the Turtle as the first key villain.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beelzefuzz

    An origin story that is almost completely all new and, as a result not boring like these often are.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mike Jorgensen

    Great summary of Barry Allen as a character and well told origin. I don't think this is as good of an on ramp as most of the "Year One" titles but wouldn't be too difficult to navigate. Just get ready for all the flashy goodness of time travel, multiverse theory, and of course, multiple versions of the same character.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    Joshua Williamson sets to write a post-New 52/DC Rebirth origin for the Barry Allen Flash and it actually works quite well. It's not over the top great, but it's an enjoyable read that incorporates the sort of time travel hi-jinks that have been part of the Flash books for years and at the same time pays tribute to the classic origin of the character. I like the fact that the Big Bad for this book is the Turtle, just like in the Silver Age. Williamson to make the turtle a solid threat without Joshua Williamson sets to write a post-New 52/DC Rebirth origin for the Barry Allen Flash and it actually works quite well. It's not over the top great, but it's an enjoyable read that incorporates the sort of time travel hi-jinks that have been part of the Flash books for years and at the same time pays tribute to the classic origin of the character. I like the fact that the Big Bad for this book is the Turtle, just like in the Silver Age. Williamson to make the turtle a solid threat without compromising the character. Overall, this is a worthy take on the Flash's origin that's well worth reading.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aritra Ghatak

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abheshek

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

  27. 4 out of 5

    T

  28. 4 out of 5

    John H

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bethany Justine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Maluck

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