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Requiem Infernal

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On a distant world, an obscure order of the Adepta Sororitas study their founder's visions. They live in solitude… which is about to be broken as danger approaches. The Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle have stood vigil over their sanctuary world for centuries, striving to decipher their founder's tormented visions. Outsiders are unwelcome… yet still they come On a distant world, an obscure order of the Adepta Sororitas study their founder's visions. They live in solitude… which is about to be broken as danger approaches. The Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle have stood vigil over their sanctuary world for centuries, striving to decipher their founder's tormented visions. Outsiders are unwelcome… yet still they come. Decimated by an encounter with a lethal xenos entity, the survivors of an elite Astra Militarum company have journeyed to the Candleworld in search of healing, escorted by a woman who is no stranger there – Sister Hospitaller Asenath Hyades, who turned her back on the order decades ago. As the seekers near the sect's bastion, malign forces begin to stir among the planet's storm-wracked spires, but the most insidious shadows lie in their own souls.


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On a distant world, an obscure order of the Adepta Sororitas study their founder's visions. They live in solitude… which is about to be broken as danger approaches. The Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle have stood vigil over their sanctuary world for centuries, striving to decipher their founder's tormented visions. Outsiders are unwelcome… yet still they come On a distant world, an obscure order of the Adepta Sororitas study their founder's visions. They live in solitude… which is about to be broken as danger approaches. The Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle have stood vigil over their sanctuary world for centuries, striving to decipher their founder's tormented visions. Outsiders are unwelcome… yet still they come. Decimated by an encounter with a lethal xenos entity, the survivors of an elite Astra Militarum company have journeyed to the Candleworld in search of healing, escorted by a woman who is no stranger there – Sister Hospitaller Asenath Hyades, who turned her back on the order decades ago. As the seekers near the sect's bastion, malign forces begin to stir among the planet's storm-wracked spires, but the most insidious shadows lie in their own souls.

30 review for Requiem Infernal

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alina Zabiyaka

    “Never go gently into the long night!” This is my very first review on Goodreads, but I couldn’t miss a chance to write about the recent book that I most loved – ‘Requiem Infernal’, the latest Warhammer 40K novel by Peter Fehervari. I’ve already enjoyed his previous books in brilliant Russian translations (and will certainly get the local edition too, when it hits the shelves). Unlike other Black Library authors mostly writing about the major, iconic warzones and characters from the worlds of W “Never go gently into the long night!” This is my very first review on Goodreads, but I couldn’t miss a chance to write about the recent book that I most loved – ‘Requiem Infernal’, the latest Warhammer 40K novel by Peter Fehervari. I’ve already enjoyed his previous books in brilliant Russian translations (and will certainly get the local edition too, when it hits the shelves). Unlike other Black Library authors mostly writing about the major, iconic warzones and characters from the worlds of Warhammer, Fehervari meticulously and lovingly creates his own cozy little demesne within the greater lore of this universe. And since all of his stories are interconnected, it’s a good idea to also acquaint oneself with them after visiting the infernal architecture of the ‘Requiem’ – the journey shall definitely be worthwhile! Without reciting the ‘Dramatis Personae’ at the start of the book, I’ll simply note that the novel features a host of engaging characters whose life stories, values and actions are varied, twisty and often surprising. The author lends richness of portrayal and depth of character not just to the protagonists whose story arcs are hugely intriguing to follow, but also to the ones who get much less coverage time yet still remain memorable and worthy of rooting for – or against. The tale unravels at a number of locations as interesting and original as any devised by Fehervari’s imagination (fancy one day seeing them recreated on the tabletop…), as well as some other places already familiar to the fans of his talent. These are the worlds and locales that slowly bring down those who dare venture into them, and in turn are often brought down by the characters, unwittingly or not… And of course, as the book’s title suggests, the special place in the storyline is reserved for the dreaded inferno of Warhammer universe – Chaos in the baleful glory of all its realms. For the characters, it’s an ever-present truth that even the staunch belief in the Imperial Creed – the religion of the human Imperium – serves as a weak shield against. Even the most devout are not immune to the dark gods’ countless lures, for there are few deadlier enemies than those lurking within one’s own soul... So, will the light of faith glowing in the human heart be able to keep at bay the long night threatening to engulf anyone unfortunate enough to have been born into the dystopian, quasi-medieval reality of the far future? Or will they all give in to the chaotic insanity coiling deep within themselves?.. A note on the language of the story: it is excellent! Just read it (or any of Peter’s other books) and you’ll see for yourself. His writing style is one of my favourites, with almost every sentence a small masterpiece in its own right. Besides, Fehervari’s trademark italics-presented thoughts and confessions of the characters let the reader experience an atmosphere of growing unreason slowly awakening as the heroes venture ever deeper into the chaos of the surrounding world and of their own psyches. Honestly, I think there really are no downsides to this book – expect maybe the absence of Space Marine action hinted at in mid-story, which I’m sure would be also presented magnificently. Amidst the sheer bulk of literature devoted to the exploits of these defenders of humanity, Fehervari does a great deal of justice to some little-explored Space Marine Chapters, always making it a pleasure to read about them! Personally, I also missed (view spoiler)[ the presence of Calavera (the guy familiar to those who have read Peter’s previous stories), but… who knows? He might be right there in the shadows, plotting and scheming Warp knows what mysterious webs, with all other characters blissfully unaware of his clandestine involvement. That’s what I want to think, at least… (hide spoiler)] In my opinion, Fehervari is one of those contemporary authors who manage to step beyond the borders of their chosen genre, capable of bringing in depth of plot, thought and emotion that we more often encounter in high literature. It’s great to know that a universe as rich and detailed as Warhammer 40000 has enough capacity not only for the good old bolter-and-chainsword action, but genuinely deep, meaningful works, as demonstrated by the ongoing contribution by Peter Fehervari. Even his Space Marine characters are not the glorious indefatigable superheroes as they’re mostly portrayed, but complex and often troubled souls, which makes them all the more sinister for their isolating transhumanity. All in all, ‘Requiem Infernal’ is yet another masterful work by one of the deepest and most fascinating authors of the Warhammer series. I most highly recommend it to anyone who would like to enjoy an intricately woven mystical horror story set against the fantastic backdrop of the grim, galaxy-spanning darkness of the distant future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jack +Books & Bourbon+

    This has been a rough year for reading for me. Where I usually finish several books a month, lately it takes me more than a month to even finish one. It’s frustrating, and the reading rut shall likely continue until I get some stuff in my personal life sorted out. I preface this review with that little blurb to point out that finishing this book took me an inordinate amount of time, but that is by no means a reflection on the quality of the story or the writing. In all actuality, this This has been a rough year for reading for me. Where I usually finish several books a month, lately it takes me more than a month to even finish one. It’s frustrating, and the reading rut shall likely continue until I get some stuff in my personal life sorted out. I preface this review with that little blurb to point out that finishing this book took me an inordinate amount of time, but that is by no means a reflection on the quality of the story or the writing. In all actuality, this is a rather engaging read, and anytime a Black Library book about the Adepta Sororitas (even in passing) comes out, I’m a happy camper. Another reason it took me so long to finish Requiem Infernal is because I bought it hardback, instead of reading it digitally. Due to my work situation, it’s much easier to read on my iPad, though I absolutely LOVE this hardback edition. In fact, there’s just something about Black Library hardback books (or hard shell books, as my teenager calls them, as if they are literary tacos) that is just highly appealing. Anywho, enough of my blathering and dithering, you’re here for the review, so let’s get to it! As with all my reviews, I will attempt to keep spoilers to a minimum. Though this may not be a “revelation” heavy book, and indeed most Warhammer 40,000 books are not exactly revelatory, I still believe it’s best to go into a book with as few preconceived notions as possible. So, if something is not mentioned in the official synopsis, I’ll do my level best to avoid mentioning it here. As with any Black Library release, fans of the lore of Warhammer 40,000 will have more of an understanding of the various factions and concepts at play here, but let it be known that Warhammer familiarity is not a MUST. This is first and foremost a tale of chaos and horror, and Peter Fehervari does a very fine job of writing a dark and disturbing story. I am getting more and more into the Warhammer books, especially as my friends and I are starting to play the miniatures based game as well, but I will readily admit that I mostly picked this up due to the appearance of the Adepta Sororitas. As the all-female contingent within the Imperium, there’s just something intriguing and enthralling about these warrior women that keeps me coming back. And though they aren’t as prevalent in this particular tale, I am willing to take what I can get. As the most zealous and devoted of the Emperor’s followers, the battle sisters of the Sororitas take no shit, and I love me some strong women. But like I said, they are featured in this tale, but only in small doses. One of the two main characters is a former Battle Sister, who turned her back on the order for what she believed was a greater calling. But this is a multi-character affair, though Sister Hyades and Brother Tythe get the most page time. Of the two main characters, Sister Hyades is certainly more fleshed out, though Requiem Infernal seems to start out as Jonas Tythe’s tale. But I am completely ok with this, as her tale is more fulfilling, though his certainly has more emotional heft. What makes her story more enjoyable is that she is returning to a planet and Adeptas order that she has history with, while also having a different side to her that becomes more evident as the tale goes on. She is, quite literally, a multi-layered character, and it’s enjoyable to see where Peter Fehervari takes her. I also loved her somewhat tragic backstory. Suffice to say, Sister Hyades bet on the wrong horse in her past, though her reasons were sound, and that has come to haunt her in a big way. It essentially informs almost every decision she makes in the book. But while Sister Hyades is both doubt and determination rolled into one, Brother Tythe is more of an enigma. I wouldn’t go so far as to call him a “Mary Sue” type character, but he’s certainly more than he seems and the danger for him is much less significant. I suppose this is tempered by his tragic tale, as he got caught up in the thrall of Chaos by simply trying to survive and provide for his family. One of the things I love about Warhammer 40k, and this book in particular, is that chaotic things happen in a truly Chaotic way. If there IS a plan, it’s hidden behind layers of madness. Jonah’s brush with Chaos is, for all intents and purposes, highly random. He’s nobody special, but through his unfortunate luck, he becomes special, though not in a way that he would have chosen. There are a handful of chapters from other characters, from Commandant Lemarche of the Void Breachers to several supporting cast of minor players. Mileage varies with these characters, but they are mostly well drawn. I like how, with one of the villains (who isn’t a villain at the start), there is an attempt to give him reasoning for fighting hard against turning and how insidious Chaos can be. I guess the question of any book that is released within a well-established series (and I use that term loosely with Warhammer 40k books, as they cover a LOT of various stories across multiple timelines) is how well do they stand on their own? Can a reader new to the lore jump in at this point and not be completely lost? I would say, for the most part, that the answer to these questions is YES for this novel. Enough concessions are made to at least give some kind of context to the various machinations within the Imperium. Truth be told, even someone like myself who is decently versed in the lore still found myself lost a few times, but not to the detriment of the story being told. In all fairness, there are several obscure hints at Warhammer lore that only the most devoted of fans will recognize, but they are few and far between. Ultimately this is a science-fiction horror tale that just so happens to take place in the 40k universe. As such the book is more focused on psychological shenanigans and body horror than bolter blasting and melta massacres. And it works well. The madness of Chaos is well represented within these pages, and I applaud Mr. Fehervari’s efforts. In fact, as testament to the chaotic nature of the story, things sometimes don’t play out like you think they will. Big hero moments that you expect don’t materialize, people/creatures who seem like they may play some important part kind of peter out, and the ending isn’t what I would call “definitive”. Due to the cyclical nature of the final chapters, some readers may get turned off by the lack of clear resolution. But again, I think this ties into the overall narrative flow and makes sense in the scale of the story being told. Warhammer 40k purists might have a hard time with this book, as there’s only passing mention of the vaunted Space Marines, and there’s very little actual visceral combat to be found. This one is a more meditative take on the Imperium of Man, and I was actually totally ok with it. I love action as much as the next guy, but there’s only so much Adeptus Astartes antics one can take before a break is required. If you like your Warhammer tinged with a bit of horror, madness, and Chaos, then Requiem Infernal is the book for you. But if you want Space Marine mayhem, you’re gonna want to look elsewhere. This isn’t THAT book. But it is definitely a GOOD book, and I for one would love to read other 40k works by Mr. Fehervari. Blood locked and void sealed!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rostislav Markelov

    It looks like I’m a little late this time. There are already many magnificently crafted reviews here. So, let’s see if I would be able to add something worthwhile. For me this novel release was indeed long awaited for several rather unusual reasons, so it’s no wonder that I have already read it several times. The novel opens with an Exordium and with it we get an example of Fehervari mastery right from the start. Actually, I was mesmerized by this little but carefully craft It looks like I’m a little late this time. There are already many magnificently crafted reviews here. So, let’s see if I would be able to add something worthwhile. For me this novel release was indeed long awaited for several rather unusual reasons, so it’s no wonder that I have already read it several times. The novel opens with an Exordium and with it we get an example of Fehervari mastery right from the start. Actually, I was mesmerized by this little but carefully crafted piece of text. Style and word choice aside – it’s wonderful how many purposes it serves in the novel. It exists in-universe as a prologue to the book (view spoiler)[yet to be written (hide spoiler)] , interacts with the main character in various ways (some of them actually quite amusing), provides unusual context for some events in the novel, and it even speaks to the readers themselves. And even then it is two conversations in one. The first message is a warning (and very harsh one) for those who tries to take this book for what it is not. And while I enjoy Fehervari writing myself I should admit that new readers should consider this warning. If it feels repulsive to you or if you are offended by it, it would be better to put this book aside, at least for a time. This is not a coquetry nor the attempt to dare you – it is just a warning – as honest as you can get. Dark Coil isn’t for everyone. And then there is a second message, heartwarming one, and those who have already gone through those thorns and spirals will recognize it for what it is (honestly, it felt so personal that I was overwhelmed for a moment). In my opinion to put so much meaning in the same words requires a combination of talent, skill and sufficient amount of work. That’s what I mean when I talk about brilliance of Fehervari writing. And remember, all this was about first page of the novel! The second aspect of Fehervari style that is significant here is his ability to utilize structural elements of the story. And it is not only about masterfully crafted escalation, from mystery to discovery to cataclysm. For example, the book is divided not into Parts or Acts but into Gospels. And it is so right on different levels. It not only stylistically matches the story about Adepta Sororitas, but this connection goes right through Forth Wall out of universe because the book itself is indeed a gospel. A gospel about true, psychological nature of Chaos. Speaking about Forth Wall. While I very appreciate how Fehervari texts force their readers to interact with them, to become part of the Coil, it was originally one of my concerns about his writing. I even mentioned it in my review on Cult of Spiral Dawn. The Forth Wall is a delicate matter. Push it too far, made interaction with it obvious and everything will crumble. However, to my initial disbelieve in Requiem Infernal Peter Fehervari somehow managed to make his work with the Forth Wall more subtle, despite the fact that Dark Coil literally takes shape of a book this time instead of painting. Honestly, I still can’t figure it out how it was achieved. In this case, my expectations were blown away. Another important topic is characters. The cast is smaller than Fire Caste, but still “colorful” (you know, in a very grim way) and ooooh, sooo broken. But as you should expect in different ways than in previous stories. It is also important to mention that Fehervari almost never writes about characters and subfactions that are prominent in mainstream wh40k lore. And it actually helps to resurrect the feeling that wh40k is supposed to be the setting for our stories to play out. Fehervari writing is a good example of how far you can get with your creativeness because all regiments and worlds created by him are undoubtedly unique but they still belong to the Grim Darkness Of Far Future and remain interesting. Than there should be a long passage about characters themselves and their interactions, but I try to take a hold on myself to avoid spoilers. All I tell here is that relationships dynamic between two certain sisters was superb. I was also fascinated by depiction of commissar’s duty to the soldier in this novel. It was rare brilliant. Next aspect of the Requiem Infernal that should be brought up is the fact that it is a horror story. But more importantly, it is existential horror story. To scare someone with fictional monsters, blood and gore is one thing. To implant fear in your perception of reality, to scare not with claws and characters deaths, but with concepts and metaphysics is another level and it requires a lot more from both writer and reader. In my opinion, this enormous task was achieved here. (view spoiler)[ Brrr, that description of how the person feels when their reality was rewritten... It would be way too difficult for me to write this off as “bad/false memory” from now on. (hide spoiler)] Another reason why I like this novel so much is beautiful application of unreliable narration here. I’m a little bit biased because it is one of my favorite tropes, but still this technic makes wonders with tension and feeling of mystery and Fehervari sure knows how to handle it. And of course Requiem Infernal is connected to other stories. Almost to all of them. You can clearly see it here for example. I already say a lot about this aspect of Fehervari writing in my previous reviews and I still can’t praise it enough. But still, don’t be discouraged by this web. Turns out, Requiem Infernal is a dissent entry point into the Coil. Someone may argue that everyone should start with Fire Caste, but it is not that simple. While Fire Caste indeed could be considered a starting point and great example of Fehervari virtues as a writer, but to someone unprepared to get into this book would be much more difficult. Fire Caste is more complex – it is a blessing and it is a curse. Yes, if you started with Requiem you miss the meaning behind some places and events, but this is fine. This book is supposed to be read twice anyway, at least to truly appreciate unreliable narration. So it is possible to start your pilgrimage into Dark Coil here and then return. Paths in the Coil are twisted after all and they have no end nor beginning.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Dodd

    Peter Fehervari’s third novel, Requiem Infernal, continues to develop his Dark Coil metaplot and the complex, intense, interconnected storytelling that defines his work. Many years after leaving her birthplace, the austere home of the Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle, Sister Asenath Hyades returns seeking answers, and aid for the few survivors of a once-proud Imperial Guard regiment. She finds the holy Candleworld much changed, it’s deepening darkness profoundly challenging her faith as she a Peter Fehervari’s third novel, Requiem Infernal, continues to develop his Dark Coil metaplot and the complex, intense, interconnected storytelling that defines his work. Many years after leaving her birthplace, the austere home of the Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle, Sister Asenath Hyades returns seeking answers, and aid for the few survivors of a once-proud Imperial Guard regiment. She finds the holy Candleworld much changed, it’s deepening darkness profoundly challenging her faith as she attempts to unravel its secrets while reluctantly facing up to her chequered past. Her unlikely companions on this testing journey all have their own secrets, and their own parts to play in the ensuing drama. Fehervari has a unique perspective on the dark heart of the 40k setting, a mind-bending balancing act which takes familiar 40k elements and explores them in wildly different ways. It’s deeply unconventional and won’t appeal to everyone; readers who want to see bombastic, adrenaline-fuelled action bringing the familiar aspects of the setting to life might well find this impenetrable and unfamiliar. For those looking for a story which goes way beyond the battlefield and explores Fehervari’s intriguing corner of the 40k universe, this is an incredibly rewarding read which starts to consolidate much of what’s been written before about the Dark Coil. Read the full review at https://www.trackofwords.com/2019/04/...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tim Van Lipzig

    Requiem Infernal is the third full-length novel by Peter Fehervari, one of the best and arguably most fascinating authors currently writing for Black Library, the british publisher of literature set in the dystopian universe of Warhammer 40.000. Make no mistake, though: this is no tale of heroism and the fate of humankind, but a twisted road of terror, secrets and personal redemption. It's a masterstroke of a novel, bringing together everything that already made Fehervari's *Fire Caste* and *Cul Requiem Infernal is the third full-length novel by Peter Fehervari, one of the best and arguably most fascinating authors currently writing for Black Library, the british publisher of literature set in the dystopian universe of Warhammer 40.000. Make no mistake, though: this is no tale of heroism and the fate of humankind, but a twisted road of terror, secrets and personal redemption. It's a masterstroke of a novel, bringing together everything that already made Fehervari's *Fire Caste* and *Cult of the Spiral Dawn* so distinctly gripping and even cultivates Fehervari's unique style of writing even further. If one had to apply a label to it, it would be that of a Horror Novel - Requiem Infernal is one of the scariest books I have ever read, and that is a rare feat for a 40k-book to accomplish, despite the abundance of horror-influences and -tropes in most novels set in the 41st millennium. Requiem Infernal is part of the "Dark Coil", the collective name that fans have given Fehervari's cycle of stories set in the universe of Warhammer 40.000 (the two aforementioned novels as well as a novella and around a dozen of short-stories). All of the Dark Coil-stories are connected - through characters, places and themes, some readily apparent, some obfuscated or merely hinted at. Through this, Fehervari's stories become part of a giant riddle themselves, and the obsessive search for knowledge and answers that characterizes many of the unfortunate travellers of the Coil extends to the reader as well. Requiem is probably the most essential Coil-story yet, with links to almost every other story that Fehervari has penned yet. This does *not* mean that it's inaccessible for readers unfamiliar with his earlier works, though - Requiem stands well on it's own, and could arguably well work as an entry point to Fehervari's remote corner of the Warhammer universe. It's just that his stories gather different meanings and interpretations depending on how deep the readers has already investigated the wider Fehervari-verse, which makes his stories hugely re-readable. You might be wondering why I haven't talked about about Requiem's actual content as of now. That's because Fehervari's stories are best experienced without knowing exactly what to expect, to go on the same journey that the character's have to undertake, without knowing what twists and turns the path ahead will take. One of the aspects of Fehervari's  writing that makes his stories so distinctly gripping is that Fehervari goes to great lengths to place the reader in his characters' shoes, never above them, and Requiem is his most consistent work in that regard. He rarely uses a God's Eye-point of view, and Requiem especially is exclusively  told in a subjective fashion. We become part of and see the world through the character's scewed, biased, oftentimes only dubiously sane perception, which adds a disorienting layer between what we're seeing, what we believe is really happening and what's only happening in the character's heads (and wonder whether the difference really matters all that much...). Adding to this is the fact that Fehervari's characters always only have a limited amount of knowledge of the wider world. You will find no Khayons in Fehervari's stories: knowledge of the world and it's workings is rare, dangerous and hard-won, and gets dearly paid for in blood and sanity. Another fascinating aspect of Fehervari's writing is his ability to make the places that his stories take place in become an active part in the story. Just like the sickening, infectious world of Phaedra in "Fire Caste", the places that Requiem's characters visit all breathe with an uncanny life of their own and reflect the themes of the story and the psychology of the characters: the claustrophobic bowels of a ship in a storm, the sinister halls of an old hospital, the eerie towers dedicated to virtues and infected by sin, the twin suns in the sky promising salvation and damnation alike...everything, from places to characters and stylistic choices, feels deliberate and fine-tuned to become a part of and enhance the texture of the story. Requiem Infernal and Fehervari's Coil as a whole are in many other ways refreshing, too: his focus on psychology instead of bombast and action, his even use of both genders - Requiem's main protagonist, Sister Azenath, as well as most supporting characters on the world that Requiem takes place on are nuns of the Adeptus Sororitas, many of them primarily dedicated to healing and learning instead of fighting (make no mistake, though, there are also plentiful of Sisters fully capable of kicking some serious arse, and Sister Azenath has lived an unquiet life of her own...) - as well as his focus away from the battlefields towards the intimate workings of the hearts, minds and society of humans living in the Imperium of Man. To re-iterate: Requiem Infermal is one of the best books I've read in a long while, and Fehervari has showed again that he is an author who's able to push the boundaries of what 40k-literature is capable of in terms of genre, style and quality. I, for one, can't wait for him to write the next turn of the Coil, and have already started to re-read some of the earlier stories with fresh ideas from Requiem etched into my mind. Everyone interested in Warhammer 40.000 or horror-literature would do well to give him a go. But beware, fellow traveller, and treat carefully; lest you become ensnared in the Coil yourself, and the shadows following you are always hungry...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I received a copy of Requiem Infernal through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Requiem Infernal is part of the Dark Coil series, which will hopefully have more books added to it in the near future. Written by Peter Fehervari, the novel fits in with the world of 40K, with a delightful focus on the Adepta Sororitas. If you've read any other 40K novels, let me just say that you need to lay down all of your expectations before picking up Requiem Infernal. This book reads n I received a copy of Requiem Infernal through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. Requiem Infernal is part of the Dark Coil series, which will hopefully have more books added to it in the near future. Written by Peter Fehervari, the novel fits in with the world of 40K, with a delightful focus on the Adepta Sororitas. If you've read any other 40K novels, let me just say that you need to lay down all of your expectations before picking up Requiem Infernal. This book reads nothing like all of the others – and that's not a bad thing. This novel read as a blend between 40K lore and a disturbing and disquieting horror novel. It had the best of both worlds and told a tale unlike any other. The world and characters are captivating – even as their quest and the mysteries surrounding them give readers chills down their spines. The Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle live on an isolated island, on an isolated planet. And they like it that way. But that's all about to change, as a desperate group of survivors are seeking their medical aid. Sister Hospitaller Asenath Hyades is one of the Adepta Sororitas. But there's so much more to her than meets the eye – though she would prefer that nobody else knows or recalls everything that she has seen or done. Commissar Ichukwu Lemarch is one of the few surviving members of his company – The Exordio Void Breachers. They are his brothers. Even if they see him as an outsider, he'll always consider himself part of their group. They are the family he has always sought. Jonah Tythe is an Imperial Preacher. But like many others in this world, he is nothing and everything that he appears to be. His mission is his world, though it is one that he keeps close to his chest. “'Truth is our first and lasting light' Asenath recited. 'Speak only as you see and seek to be, for all else is darkness.'” Requiem Infernal was a seriously intense novel – but in the best of ways. Peter Fehervari's writing style perfectly complemented the dark and disturbing tale, with events unfolding in the eeriest ways possible. It's so easy and tempting to walk into a novel like this and expect it to follow a specific formula. But Fehervari quickly destroyed that preconception. It was fascinating seeing what elements of the larger world were included here, and he left more than one false trail for readers to follow. It was thrilling, trying to put together the pieces of the puzzle before it was too late. I'll confess that part of me wanted to be frustrated that only one of the perspectives given to us was an Adepta Sororitas. But honestly? Requiem Infernal was so brilliantly written that I couldn't even hold a grudge if I wanted to. Instead, I find myself hoping for more works like this. There was something so florid about the way in which Requiem Infernal was written. The words seem to just flow off the paper – getting immediately trapped inside my head. The world – as creepy as it was – came to life with the descriptions given. I was shocked by how intricate and disturbing parts of this novel was. It was perfect, and should be included in anybody's thrilling reads list. And best of all, this book comes out just in time for Halloween! This was my first piece of work written by Fehervari, but I can assure you that it won't be my last. He has officially made my list of authors to watch, not to mention that I will absolutely be checking out his backlog of works. For more reviews check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is one of the best Warhammer books I have read, from one of the Black Library’s best, and most underrated, authors. I first discovered Peter Fehervari via a short story in the Crusade omnibus (A Sanctuary of Wyrms), and I was hooked by the uniqueness of the tale. The mystery, the dark atmosphere, the close paranoia, the twisting narrative. In a few pages, Fehervari had captured the mood of the 40k universe better than anything else I had read. I looked deeper into Fehe This is one of the best Warhammer books I have read, from one of the Black Library’s best, and most underrated, authors. I first discovered Peter Fehervari via a short story in the Crusade omnibus (A Sanctuary of Wyrms), and I was hooked by the uniqueness of the tale. The mystery, the dark atmosphere, the close paranoia, the twisting narrative. In a few pages, Fehervari had captured the mood of the 40k universe better than anything else I had read. I looked deeper into Fehervari’s works and found that they are all like this. They take place in a shared setting, characters recur, events and locations from one story are carried forward or echoed in another. Each story can act as a standalone piece, but the more you read of the Dark Coil meta-narrative the more you will get from it. Each work enriches and feeds into the rest. There is no single entry point into the Dark Coil, but Requiem Infernal would be a great place to start. It is Fehervari’s most fully realised work to date. I won’t summarise the plot here, but I will say that the characters are given plenty of time for their narrative arcs to develop, for the plot strands to intertwine, so that each action and every twist of the plot feels earned and truthful. This isn't a book about the adventures of your Warhammer toys, this is a literate work of skilled fiction writing. The word-choice, the linguistic play, the flashbacks, the pacing of events, the revelations that accompany each twist and turn, all show an author writing with great skill and care, both for the characters and the reader. Don’t expect to skim this book, looking for bolter-porn or predictable endings or cartoonish villains. This is a book that rewards careful reading, and re-reading. Praise must also go to the Black Library commissioning editors for publishing this book. It's different to most other books, and so maybe it won’t appeal to every 40k reader, but it also represents the greatest literary aspirations of the Warhammer universe, and shows just how far the Black Library has come since it first started publishing fiction.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    There's so much that could be talked about in Requiem Infernal that to write it all would take hours, but i'll sum it up by saying that this novel is fantastic! Peter Fehervari absolutely nails the horror aspects, the tone and the setting in ways that few other Black Library authors do, his characters are fascinating, multi-layered and frequently surprise with their actions and beliefs, and though he admits that action isn't his priority that doesn't stop his battle scenes from being great and v There's so much that could be talked about in Requiem Infernal that to write it all would take hours, but i'll sum it up by saying that this novel is fantastic! Peter Fehervari absolutely nails the horror aspects, the tone and the setting in ways that few other Black Library authors do, his characters are fascinating, multi-layered and frequently surprise with their actions and beliefs, and though he admits that action isn't his priority that doesn't stop his battle scenes from being great and very visually epic. And it goes without saying the story is top-notch, you'll appreciate it a lot more if you've read his other works but you could enjoy Requiem infernal on it's own merits without having read the other Dark Coil stories.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mat Rees

    I've never read a Warhammer novel before and I've never reviewed a book on Good Reads before. I felt compelled as this was utterly brilliant. Recommended by a friend and set within a mythos I barely know, it's driven by characters and drama that are authentic, surprising and universally understandable - Requiem Infernal is one of the best, most magnetic, enigmatic and intriguing stories I've read in some while. To say anything of the plot would spoil it, but suffice to say I've never read a Warhammer novel before and I've never reviewed a book on Good Reads before. I felt compelled as this was utterly brilliant. Recommended by a friend and set within a mythos I barely know, it's driven by characters and drama that are authentic, surprising and universally understandable - Requiem Infernal is one of the best, most magnetic, enigmatic and intriguing stories I've read in some while. To say anything of the plot would spoil it, but suffice to say it demonstrates astounding breadth and a streak of true originality in both prose and structure that made me excited for the horror genre and not just Warhammer. It has ambition! And Fehervari's use of POV makes every character an unreliable narrator which always sets you on the back foot - what do you know? Who do you trust? What actually happened? Question everything. For a person weaned on King, Barker, Gaiman and Morrison it's certainly a gateway drug for non-warhammer readers. It sits beside a recent favourite - The Library at Mount Char - as something truly, wonderfully unique written by an author with a fresh distinctive voice. This has made me extremely intrigued about a mythos that I assumed was teenage, grim-dark nonsense. I'll be looking for recommendations for other Warhammer novels that share a similar tone and depth. I hope they exist!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Giordano

    Strap yourselves in. The Grand Weaver of the Dark and Esoteric, Peter Fehervari, has released his third full-length novel, Requiem Infernal. I will post the publisher synopsis in a second; however, it goes without saying that this, being a Fehervari novel, does not adhere to any semblance of a linear narrative. Not in the least. In fact, Requiem Infernal benefits immensely from two factors: firstly, the sheer amount of intersecting storylines and character arcs ported over from previous Dark Coi Strap yourselves in. The Grand Weaver of the Dark and Esoteric, Peter Fehervari, has released his third full-length novel, Requiem Infernal. I will post the publisher synopsis in a second; however, it goes without saying that this, being a Fehervari novel, does not adhere to any semblance of a linear narrative. Not in the least. In fact, Requiem Infernal benefits immensely from two factors: firstly, the sheer amount of intersecting storylines and character arcs ported over from previous Dark Coil entries. Second, and most importantly, it benefits immensely (and I mean that in no uncertain terms) from Fehervari's evolution as an author. His prose, usage of literary techniques, intelligence, well-hidden Easter Eggs, and even humor help make this into a magnum opus of psychological horror sci-fi. Here's the synopsis: An Adepta Sororitas novel On a distant world, an obscure order of the Adepta Sororitas study their founder's visions. They live in solitude… which is about to be broken as danger approaches. READ IT BECAUSE Peter Fehervari brings a tale of an unusual order of the Sisters of Battle, a sister breaking her self-imposed exile and an Astra Militarum unit seeking respite from their woes… and it's every bit as weird and wonderful as you'd hope. THE STORY The Adepta Sororitas of the Last Candle have stood vigil over their sanctuary world for centuries, striving to decipher their founder's tormented visions. Outsiders are unwelcome… yet still they come. Decimated by an encounter with a lethal xenos entity, the survivors of an elite Astra Militarum company have journeyed to the Candleworld in search of healing, escorted by a woman who is no stranger there – Sister Hospitaller Asenath Hyades, who turned her back on the order decades ago. As the seekers near the sect's bastion, malign forces begin to stir among the planet's storm-wracked spires, but the most insidious shadows lie in their own souls. That, in and of itself, would serve as the groundwork for a solid novel. In the case of Requiem Infernal, it merely scratches the surface of what's going on. A healthy chunk of the story does focus on the Sister in question, Asenath Hyades, aka Sister Darkstar. Each chapter begins epistolary style, with a journal entry penned by her (and, as we progress from chapter to chapter, we bear witness to the erosion of her already tenuous mental state, but more on that later). After a lifetime of service, including service she turned her back on, Hyades has returned 'home' to Vytarn. Her entries are addressed to her canoness, as it appears she has been sent to Vytarn on a mission to root out any presence of taint within the Last Candle, the reclusive Order which rules the Koronatus Ring. For my fellow Coil Pilgrims for whom that name rang a bell; you are correct. Vytarn is indeed the planet which will come to be known as Redemption-219, that bleak, desolate world which served as the backdrop in Genestealer Cults. As we all know, the Koronatus Ring is a landmass all its own. Meaning, one must journey to get there. It might be good to mention now that Requiem Infernal can be broken down into sections; and the journey to the Ring is the first portion. On Vytarn, entry to the Ring is only allowable via travel by ship across the treacherous, storm-wracked Exodus Gulf. Traversing this deadly body of water is the magnificently-named barque The Blood of Demeter; upon which travels Hyades, as well as the other key players in the dramatis personae. As mentioned, Requiem Infernal is not solely about Hyades journey (descent? ascent? ascending descent?) into madness. Like in all Fehervari works, we have a robust cast of players; all of whom could carry an entire novel on their own. First and foremost among these is Jonah Tythe, a cryptic Imperial Preacher. We bear witness to his "awakening" in the book's mind-blowing prologue, which shows his roots on the harsh, dark world of Sarastus (yes, we are returning to where it all began!). The bearer of a mysterious tome; he travels under the guise of research, and has arrived on Vytarn to answer the hail of the Theologus Exegessor there. Rounding out the players on the Blood of Demeter are the remains of the Darkstar Company of the Exordio Void Breachers (remember them? From the frightening as hell opening of The Greater Evil?). Darkstar Company find themselves diminished and dying; suffering from a massacre doled out by an anomalous xenos entity which they were commanded to explore. Their paths crossing with Hyades on their egress, they are being brought to the Order of the Last Candle to seek succor from the Hospitallers there. Watching over them is Commissar Ichukwu Lemarche; a stern, stalwart man trying to hold his dying unit together. The commanding lieutenant is a tad feckless, and the sergeant who holds the troops' hearts and minds is dying a slow and terrible death. For me, this first segment, the journey aboard the Blood of Demeter, is the best portion of the book. As mentioned, this is a horror novel through and through. And Fehervari knows how to cultivate horror. Horror is not solely jump scares and blood soaked sequences. It is the pervading, ever-present anticipation of dread, lack of safety or escape, claustrophobia, inherent wrongness, etc. Fehervari pens these scenes masterfully. Insulated on the mysterious ship, bizarre and ominous events begin to unravel. A spate of brutal murders, the introduction of an invasive type of fly (the introduction of which was one of the most uncomfortable - in a good way - scenes I've read in recent memory), the loss of sanity, never-ending stairways to....nowhere. Fehervari even plays merry havoc with notions of time and spatial distortion. Beware! Never look at anything that transpires directly...that's what makes it real. After a storm-tossed trip across Hell, the cast find themselves within the Koronatus Ring, which redefines the notion of nothing being as it seems. The parties go their separate ways; the Breachers being tendered to the Hospitallers of the Bronze Candle, Jonah continuing his quest, and ending up entangled with the Sisters Dialogus of the Silver Candle along the way, and Asenath doing some investigative research outside the watchful eye of a dark phantom of her past, the sadistic Palatine Chirurgeon Bhatori. It is in this segment that the storylines grow legs (and tendrils). Character arcs and overarching events take turns for the bizarre, turns for the worse. I cannot safely go into too many details without teetering into spoilers, but suffice to say that things are indeed even worse than they seem. Throughout, Fehervari maintains a constant, oppressive level of palpable dread and discomfort. There are some truly outlandish events which transpire here. The third, and final, portion of the book brings us to our climax. This is truly the juncture at which all points converge (collide). Perhaps, we can term this sequence the 'storm', as it does unfold against the backdrop of a most unique storm. It is in this segment of Requiem that all the voices heretofore relegated to the shadows come strutting out into the light. Whatever shall pass for answers in this insane universe is unveiled; and perhaps never has wisdom brought so little profit to the man who is made wise. The most greatest shock in reaching the third segment lies in the utterly drastic shift in tone from the previous portions. While the first segment focused on claustrophobia and dread, and the second on the waiting wrongness around every bend, the climactic third act is lit with dazzling, blinding, obscene colors and images as our players step into the very heart of Chaos. It is here that the groundwork is laid out by Fehervari's inner Escher; and the answers which are revealed are the answers that had to be....not necessary the answers that were sought or hoped for, since we all know that one cannot make order of Chaos, although, as we also know, "Nothing exists without order." Again, to indulge in too much detail would reveal too much, and we will avoid spoilers. I will say that the sheer volume of detail that Fehervari packs into every moment of this portion (the relentless descriptions of the appearances and colors of everything) almost triggers a sort of sensory overload. The visuals flashing so vividly before your eyes threaten to overwork the retina of one's inner mind's eye. Now, let's take a look at the individual elements of the book. Characters: As mentioned, masterful. Fehervari has imbued his core protagonists, Asenath and Jonah, with a full, rich palette of emotions. They are complete characters; as is his forte. They have their fears, failings, and foibles, which temper their strengths. For all of her regrets, all her missteps, Asenath remains, at her core, a strongly honorable force. For all of his strength, Jonah is equally haggard; for his brilliance, he is as mentally weary. This pair has traveled too far, seen too much, been burdened with individual loads too great to bear. Rich backgrounds, revealed through evocative flashbacks, are provided for them as well. We learn of Asenath's previous 'lives'; of how she was chosen to be a Paladin for a legendary Confessor named Father Deliverance, of her time spent as a Repentia, of how she learned to keep the voices inside of her on a short leash. The same holds true for Jonah, whom me meet as a resourceful criminal on Sarastus. It is there, after a fateful delivery of a stolen book, that Tythe becomes tethered to a tome of unparalleled importance; both to the story, and to the reader as well. I mentioned earlier about Commissar Lemarche's personality. Fehervari always has a good touch when it comes to penning Commissars, and Lemarche is no different. He is a pragmatic man, who knows that the motley crew under his charge are a wild group, yet extremely potent killers. With a weak head, and a dying hero to contend with, he handles the situation in the best manner possible. Also, he is gifted one of the best completions of a character story arc in the book. All of the Breachers are enjoyable to read about. Fehervari has given each of them a core character trait; without simply relegating them to the status of one-trick ponies. Of course, the most significant of these is the misshapen giant, Sergeant Toland Feizt; the one who all the men look to. The one who is simply too stubborn to die. Most of the other characters we meet are various Sororitas, and care is given to each of them. Even the examples where it is made clear that the Sister in question wouldn't pass muster on most other worlds, we are eventually shown their redeeming qualities. Other Sisters stay with you, especially the feisty Hagalaz (whose demeanor perfectly matches the rune for which she is named). Also, in Requiem Infernal, we are treated to a few precious scenes of the Angels Resplendent. Yes, as they were. They are truly a sight to behold, and Fehervari captures this in their manner of speech, as well as the dazzling, fluctuating colors of their artisan-crafted armor. Finally, it should be mentioned that a special character makes a poignant guest appearance - Athanazius; here a boy, but whom we all know will grow to be the Chief Librarian of the Angels Resplendent (Crown of Thorns). His scenes with Asenath are intimate and beautifully written. Writing: I've always been an immense fan of Fehervari's style of writing. He blew my mind with Fire Caste, and his skill has only evolved, and improved, since then. Coupling this with all of the accumulated incidents revolving around the Dark Coil, you have a brilliant final product. Fehervari's prose remains tight, dark, and foreboding. He never wavers towards the purple, or excessive. While his writing has always been intelligent, the level of vocabulary utilize here was impressive; keeping my eyes darting to my phone to look up definitions. I also particularly enjoyed his usage of literary devices. Rhyme and alliteration are used to great effect throughout the work; reinforcing the passages which feature them. Moreover, it is his ability to match the correct tone to the right scenario that lets Requiem Infernal succeed as a sci-fi novel, as a Sororitas novel (of which we have precious few), and as a true, terrifying horror novel. World detailing and action scenes are, as always, superb. The level of detail put into even the most (seemingly) mundane of objects is intricate. Then again, in a Fehervari work, there are absolutely no wasted/unintentional words, ergo, nothing is mundane. Some examples to look for: the descriptions of the armor of the Angels Resplendent, the ornamentation of the Blood of Demeter, and, my personal favorite, even though it was a minor moment: the sheer beauty of Asenath's bolter gun, Tristesse (name ring a bell, anyone?) The action scenes in Requiem Infernal are also commendable. Fehervari has stated in other places that the action is not his primary focus; and that's understandable, especially when crafting such deep, dark stories. The thing is; I've never read an action scene of his which was a disappointment. This is also the case here. The action scenes retain the pulpy, balletic majesty for which he is known. Another thing; and I mentioned this in Genestealer Cults; for all his original takes and interpretations, Fehervari also details units as they appear on the table (in GSC, for all the intensive lore he poured into it, I was amazed to see basically the entire model lineup perfectly described in the climactic battle...pretty impressive). This is also the case in Requiem Infernal. I won't mention unit types by name, but Fehervari made the models come to life along with delivering a rich story. I suppose you can have your cake and eat it too. Name Games, Easter Eggs, and Word Play: Requiem Infernal is saturated with references to all of Fehervari's other works. A good reason for this can be that the Koronatus Ring, and to a greater extent the Shadow Orrery, serve as a tangential transportation hub for the events playing along the Dark Coil. I've found a fantastic map of sorts which diagrams some of the connections between Fehervari works; I will put it at the very end of the review so as to avoid spoilers. Readers will rejoice at many of the connections to previous works. We expect it, to a degree, but it doesn't make it any less poignant when a character steps on a world we have not seen in so long. Not only that; scenes in this book seem to hint at some of the origins of the events associated with those places. Perhaps. Perhaps not. Through the obfuscation we may glimpse hints, or hopes, but clear answers are in short supply. As for wordplay, there are lots of playful references peppered throughout Requiem Infernal. You'll see words like "puissant" dropped casually, which will instantly bring you back to Fire Caste. There are also references to other horror works. Within the first few pages I caught some nods to Aickman and Bradbury, and there are more to be found for the industrious prospector. These references will range from the fairly obvious to the frustratingly obscure. There's one I was pondering as I read; I wonder if I'm on to something. We've known since Fire Caste that the number 7 figures prominently along the Dark Coil. Also, the number 8 holds significance throughout this book as well (hmmm, seven spires plus the Perihelion....). Finally, at a critical point towards the end of the book, there is a scene where a choice out of 9 is to be made (sorry, no spoilers). Going back to Genestealer Cults, we recall that Vytarn is reborn as Redemption-219. (9-2=7, 9-1=8, 9=9). Is it coincidence? Perhaps, perhaps not. One of the great gulty pleasures in reading Fehervari's works is unraveling the mysteries behind the names he gives. Sometimes they contain a clue as to a character's importance, sometimes they are an homage to a friend, and sometimes they reference a movie/book character; which of course usually circles back to a clue as to importance. I've already speculated as to implications behind Asenath's name. What of the others? Well, for one thing, there is a huge vampire motif running rampant through the names here. Let's start with Jonah Tythe. The first connection is, of course, to Jonah of Biblical reknown. We know that there is validity here because our Jonah also has a run-in with a giant fish (of sorts; in a scene which is told incrementally over a series of flashbacks). On the other hand, and this is a stretch, we might say that Jonah is close to Jonathan Harker, of Dracula fame; which makes sense when we remember his frail sister Mina. Jonah finds himself on the Blood of Demeter; and in the mix is one of the Breachers named Rynfeld, who sees the significance in the ever-present flies dancing about his dying comrades. Other vampire nods can be seen in Sororitas Genevieve, Camille, and Marcilla. Further naming devices included (but are in no way limited to): Slavic folklore (mythological creatures), and Japanese geography - Akaishi and Aokihara, which is one character removed from Aokigahara. In Closing: I figured I would insert some closing thoughts here; taking a cue from Peter's very personal 'Afterwyrd' which closes Requiem Infernal. This is a fantastic book. It has all of Fehervari's hallmarks- it is dark, cerebral, murky, prophetic, and condemning. It teases answers, while feeding us more questions. By engaging in this author's work, we've damned ourselves to an eternal voyage along the tangled strands of the Dark Coil. It provides fantastic visions, tempered by frustrating periods between glimpses. Also, this book is more than a story. It is both a memoir and a dedication. Jonah Tythe becomes a living metaphor; the book he carries so close to his heart, written in his own blood (wasn't that something the author admitted to, so very long ago?) Some online have speculated that the closing of the afterwyd is a farewell of sorts. Perhaps it is; although we all hope such is not the case. However, if it is, what a way to close the tale. At the very least, we have fragments of a map scratched out, written in blood and at the sacrifice of what we would call comfortable, convenient norms. It is a map which charts a bizarre, arrhythmic, circuitous, looping path. Paths that cross themselves, pierce themselves, even choke themselves. We cannot chart a beginning or an end; we are in the Coil, and must simply continue our upwards descent. Thanks for reading this. Get the e-book. Get the hardcover; it'll look magnificent on your shelf. Get the paperback when it comes out. And thanks again, Peter Fehervari, for the journey. Please stop by my blog and check out the full review! http://hachisnaxreads.blogspot.com/20...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Beth ~~Just One More Chapter I Swear~~

    WOW! Okay. After many deep meditative breathes, and a few meditative brownies, I finally feel ready to put thought to page. I have to start off by confessing that I was a bit out of my depths having no idea of the story's plot and never having read a Warhammer novel before. If you haven't either then the most important things for you to know are that this read is deep, eloquently written, (grim)dark, foreboding and creepy as all hell. Images were put in my mind and, for better or worse, they fee WOW! Okay. After many deep meditative breathes, and a few meditative brownies, I finally feel ready to put thought to page. I have to start off by confessing that I was a bit out of my depths having no idea of the story's plot and never having read a Warhammer novel before. If you haven't either then the most important things for you to know are that this read is deep, eloquently written, (grim)dark, foreboding and creepy as all hell. Images were put in my mind and, for better or worse, they feel like they have put down roots and are here to stay. Peter Fehervari's unique voice is distinct and cerebral. The prose read beautifully. It was expertly crafted but also a tad verbose. I don't mean that in a harsh way, I actually really enjoyed the sentence structures, but the body of work felt very full of itself. Although I did find myself utilizing my ereader's dictionary function more frequently than normal, it didn't detract from the overall experience. Beautiful sentence form aside, trying to figure out what was precisely going on was a true mind trip and then the gruesome imagery kicked in... here is where another admission is due you, I must admit that I am usually quite squeamish with the Horror genre as a whole. Thankfully this book wasn't rife with gore but its nasty bits leaned towards the macabre... definitely disturbing. There were memorable moments when I found myself reaching for a light (or 3)... suffice it to say, my hubby wasn't a fan of my late night reading sessions with this book. Anyway... In this Psychological/Horror/SciFi mashup, there were 2 main POVs but there were also a handful of secondary cast members (primarily from the remains of Darstar Company) that gave us access to their thoughts without preamble or introduction... you just had to go with it. Each narrator was as unreliable as the last, a trait that kept things murky, exciting and tenuous at all times. I really enjoyed watching Sister Asenath's entries at the start of each chapter, showing her slowly deteriorating mental state. She was a kick ass female MC that knew her way around a weapon or two and was ultimately ruled by her devout faith... or was she?!? Another favorite of mine was Jonah Tythe (our other main MC... it's a thing... at least now it is). Our introduction to him in the prologue was visceral and later on he was one giant (numb) ball of conflicted bad-ass-ery. On the whole, the characters were all complex and beautifully- humanly flawed. I love a motley crew colored in shades of grey and boy oh boy were these folks living it up in all sorts of greyscale. The co-mingling character arcs that intersected were intense and juggled masterfully. It was impressive how Peter Fehervari weaved each character's juxtaposed strings into a robust, vivid, cohesive tapestry. In my mind, Fehervari is the new master of Wrongness and Dread, he built those two up to a nail biting, tachycardia inducing, crescendo and didn't let up. Overall: I am amazed how much I enjoyed my mind being screwed with in a terror inducing manor. Requiem Infernal was a weird, twisty, wordy mind fuck and I mean that with as much reverence as possible. If you: - like your world building exquisitely detailed, unapologetically disturbing and lustrously portrayed. - like your characters developed eloquently, and ambivalent... neither black nor white nor simply Good or Evil. - like sentences so resplendent that you put the book aside to relish in their mastery. - like not knowing where in the hell each character and plot devise is taking you. - like your Psychological Horror genre with a side of SciFi. If you answered YES to one or more of the criteria I listed above then.... THIS BOOK IS FOR YOU!! ~ Enjoy (I did) *** I was given a copy of this book by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review ***

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia Borisova

    Peter Fehervari is one of the Black Library's most special authors and his artfully crafted horror novels are always a delight to read. Exquisite language, precisely constructed composition of both novels and entire cycles where every turn of the plot adds in new pieces to the arcane puzzle. 'Requiem Infernal' starts off with a classical horror trope 'outsiders arrive to a backwater shrine with a dark secret'. The main theme of the story is the conflict of human mind and humanity in g Peter Fehervari is one of the Black Library's most special authors and his artfully crafted horror novels are always a delight to read. Exquisite language, precisely constructed composition of both novels and entire cycles where every turn of the plot adds in new pieces to the arcane puzzle. 'Requiem Infernal' starts off with a classical horror trope 'outsiders arrive to a backwater shrine with a dark secret'. The main theme of the story is the conflict of human mind and humanity in general with things mindless and insane. In Fehervari's novels Genestealers and Chaos, two kinds of distortion, are surprisingly similar and are engaged in a dialectical conflict-unity. Recurring motifs of stormy sea and storms symbolize the madness of the warp. Though Chaos distorts time and space around the characters, puzzling circumstances get stranger with every plot turn, corruption is always the result of inner weakness. Madness is slowly overcoming the Canoness as she struggles on against the paradoxes. The characters are not only trying to unravel the mysteries but to combat insanity both within and without. Freudian Ego versus Id and a tad of religious Superego. Peter Fehervari realistically depicts schizotypical disorder and PTSD as a metaphor of Chaos possession. Both the world and the characters are surprisingly convincing in their struggle. Carefully picked accents are also stunning like the symbolism of the number 7 which reminds not only of Christian virtues and vices but also of Nurgle.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This is absolutely amazing. Warhammer 40,000 books are usually fun, but nobody's going to call them high art. Peter Fehervari's Requiem Infernal is an exception: it's a genuinely good and genuinely scary horror novel that would be fantastic in any setting. It's a combination of gothic horror, Lovecraftian eldritch horror, and even your standard 40k action, but mainly it's dark, brooding, and genuinely, deeply *unsettling* in a way that even genre horror often fails to match. It's about people This is absolutely amazing. Warhammer 40,000 books are usually fun, but nobody's going to call them high art. Peter Fehervari's Requiem Infernal is an exception: it's a genuinely good and genuinely scary horror novel that would be fantastic in any setting. It's a combination of gothic horror, Lovecraftian eldritch horror, and even your standard 40k action, but mainly it's dark, brooding, and genuinely, deeply *unsettling* in a way that even genre horror often fails to match. It's about people succumbing to the darkness within or maybe, possibly, finding a tiny sliver of hope when your grasp on sanity and reality slips into nothingness. First rate.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I received this from Netgalley for review. This is the truest yet horror novel Warhammer Horror has released. Gruesome, dark, terror inspiring, cryptic, book. This absolutely blew me away. Excellent characters, excellent storyline, excellent amount of gore and horror. A job well done on this book. This will definitely be a hard copy order for my collection!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cian

    Excellent. Far closer to Vandermeer or Cisco than to Dan Abnett or Graham McNeill, much more obviously horror and new weird, right down to being replete with callbacks to Poe and Hodgson. Fire Caste still pips it as Ferhervari's best but only by a hair. It's dark, claustrophobic and there's a lot of care and effort put towards making even minor characters feel real and significant, even where they meet messy ends. Wonderfully playful use of voice with Sister Asenath throughout and especially with the Excellent. Far closer to Vandermeer or Cisco than to Dan Abnett or Graham McNeill, much more obviously horror and new weird, right down to being replete with callbacks to Poe and Hodgson. Fire Caste still pips it as Ferhervari's best but only by a hair. It's dark, claustrophobic and there's a lot of care and effort put towards making even minor characters feel real and significant, even where they meet messy ends. Wonderfully playful use of voice with Sister Asenath throughout and especially with the narratorial voice towards the end. This is so much more twistily complex and self-consciously literary (in the best way) than even most of the other books we reach for when we think of 'good' BL works.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laurence

    Funny that BL Publishing should open their own line of horror books, and then publish this book a month later under its regular brand. This is the most overtly horrific novel they have published, one which understands how important it is to leave the reader to fill in the gaps with their own imagination. Not for this book the capitalised, easy-to-identify units from the wargame, but creations of the author's own imagination, obliquely referencing archetypes from the universe rather th Funny that BL Publishing should open their own line of horror books, and then publish this book a month later under its regular brand. This is the most overtly horrific novel they have published, one which understands how important it is to leave the reader to fill in the gaps with their own imagination. Not for this book the capitalised, easy-to-identify units from the wargame, but creations of the author's own imagination, obliquely referencing archetypes from the universe rather than the usual toy advert. For a story set in a world where 'there is only war', any large battles are glimpsed only as backdrops to the personal struggles of the characters, and fewer bullets are employed in anger than are used to forget sights that man was not meant to know.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Schoener

    THIS is how you do 40k horror. I do not want to repeat all the praise of all the other reviewers here, it really is that good. The setting, the atmosphere, the characters, all comes together to create a stunning whole. Plus, the writing is fantastic and set apart from most other Black Library books. It is one of these books where you read the first few pages and you are irrevocably hooked. More of this please.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    This is a great Gothic Grimdark novel featuring the Adepta Sororitas and the Astra Militarum caught in a forbidding castle structure. It has incredible atmosphere, literary allusions, powerful descriptions and complex broken characters. Twists and turns and non-linear storytelling evoke David Lynch and the ending may be frustrating to some but, for me, it was cruelly satisfying. What a fantastic read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juliana

    Requiem Infernal was a dark and intense, chaotic and complex read and i loved every moment! This is the first novel I’ve read by Peter Fehervari and i’m definitely interested in checking out more of his work!

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Hellier

    Amazing book Reads a bit like Edwin Drood in style; the pervasive sense of dread is excellently written into the fabric of the story, which is itself an extremely elegant web. The madness of Chaos is amazingly portrayed here as well

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danny Montgomery

    Every once in a while you read a book so good that you kinda wish you gave less 5 star reviews for books you just think are pretty good because what you just read deserves some distinction. This is one of those books. This is a bit of a slow burn and I do not mean that in a bad way. It also doesn't give you all the answers and lets you know at the start that it won't and I also don't mean that in a bad way. This is also a book that I think a person who knows nothing about 40k could pi Every once in a while you read a book so good that you kinda wish you gave less 5 star reviews for books you just think are pretty good because what you just read deserves some distinction. This is one of those books. This is a bit of a slow burn and I do not mean that in a bad way. It also doesn't give you all the answers and lets you know at the start that it won't and I also don't mean that in a bad way. This is also a book that I think a person who knows nothing about 40k could pick up and enjoy but it still has plenty of flavor so that it feels at home in this universe.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Allyn Nichols

    Purgatory? Hell? Who knows..?. This tale is as dark and distrubing as Warhammer gets. Beautifully crafted and keeps you hooked to the very last stomach churning rancid page.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brad Baker

    This is more than ‘just’ another Warhammer book. It’s in that setting to be sure, but it’s more. It’s creepy as all get out. I both enjoyed and dreaded reading it. It’s grim and dark - just how I like it. Great character development. And redemption - for some.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jack Volante

    One of the best novels to come out of Black Library in a long time. I was really gripped by the story and the steady build-up to the climatic end battle was a wonderful experience. Can't wait to read more from this author.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Luke Jensen

    Really enjoyed by Peter Fehervari. His take on the SoB was really refreshing. It's great to see a newer author from Black Library already hitting his stride.

  26. 5 out of 5

    John

    The story didn't pull me in, but it's actually good, just not really what I was expecting.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heinz Reinhardt

    A truly brilliant, multifaceted, and multilayered story that is both intellectual, and creepily disturbing all at once. A story of faith, of damnation, of struggling against darkness, and the light of hope. One of my new favorites.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joel Harris

    I loved the book. Great read. The characters and world we're will developed. I loved the description of the blood and gore. I loved how you wondered whether the Mc was going insane or not. Whether the dark sister was real or not.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Agnieszka

    As an 2.5k+ Adepta Sororitas army owner I always love to read books about my favourite faction. Unfortunately, not this time. Its a very strange and, most important, unusual book. Strange plot twists, strange references I didn't get. Overall it was OK, but if you are an Adepta Sororitas fan as I am, keep in mind that this book is very different from other Black Library fiction you probably used to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    India

    So, my first foray with Warhammer 40,000 novels. I went into this novel knowing nothing about Warhammer 40,000 and I didn't feel like I needed any real knowledge of what it was going into it. I think if I did it would have made me understand the titles and the groups of people a lot easier but I still thoroughly enjoyed it regardless. So I am just going to list what I liked and dislike about this book and a more detailed review will go up on my blog. Firstly, tha So, my first foray with Warhammer 40,000 novels. I went into this novel knowing nothing about Warhammer 40,000 and I didn't feel like I needed any real knowledge of what it was going into it. I think if I did it would have made me understand the titles and the groups of people a lot easier but I still thoroughly enjoyed it regardless. So I am just going to list what I liked and dislike about this book and a more detailed review will go up on my blog. Firstly, thank you Netgalley and Black Library for the opportunity to read and review this book. I loved seeing religion and sci-fi work alongside each other. I loved all the religious scenes more than the scenes which were geared more towards sci-fi. I was just so intrigued by the idea of a heavily devout religious group thriving in a heavy science setting. The representation of POC and woman was amazing! You have POC and women in power, leading, taking charge. You also had men who showed vulnerability and emotion which was great to see. The prose was amazing since my copy was an ARC I won't quote the novel but let me tell you the writing was beautiful and harrowing. The atmosphere created was haunting and I loved the imagery Fehervari invoked through his writing. I enjoyed reading Hyades' letters at the beginning of every chapter. I loved the constant use of flashbacks it really helped us understand our characters. I had a very strong desire to keep reading this book. I would read it every morning before work and then the minute I got home late into the night. The world-building was amazing and helped me understand a universe I had never seen or heard of before. Some of my problems were that I loved the build-up to the ending so much that I was disappointed by it. Maybe I didn't fully understand the meaning of the ending I was just overcome with a feeling of confusion. The ending to me felt very chaotic and all over the place and I just didn't feel that I got what I wanted from the ending. Loads of questions were left unanswered. I didn't really understand why everything happened or what caused it.

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