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Lost and Found

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"Are you really a thief?" That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in "Are you really a thief?" That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it's up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most. Master storyteller Orson Scott Card delivers a touching and funny, compelling and smart novel about growing up, harnessing your potential, and finding your place in the world, no matter how old you are.


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"Are you really a thief?" That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in "Are you really a thief?" That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it's up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most. Master storyteller Orson Scott Card delivers a touching and funny, compelling and smart novel about growing up, harnessing your potential, and finding your place in the world, no matter how old you are.

30 review for Lost and Found

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    Upping my rating to a solid 4 stars. Review first posted on Fantasy Literature: Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel has a special power. Not a superpower; though, just a small power: he’s drawn to lost items — hair scrunchies, toys, and even bikes — combined with the innate knowledge of who the owners are and where to go to return the items, and a strong compulsion to return them. Unfortunately, this hasn’t worked out so well for Ezekiel: everyone thinks he stole the things and returned them for the attentio Upping my rating to a solid 4 stars. Review first posted on Fantasy Literature: Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel has a special power. Not a superpower; though, just a small power: he’s drawn to lost items — hair scrunchies, toys, and even bikes — combined with the innate knowledge of who the owners are and where to go to return the items, and a strong compulsion to return them. Unfortunately, this hasn’t worked out so well for Ezekiel: everyone thinks he stole the things and returned them for the attention or a reward. He’s got quite a file with the police by the time he’s a teenager, and that, combined with his mother’s tragic death when he was four, has made Ezekiel an embittered social pariah. Ezekiel’s actual last name is Bliss, but in his own mind he calls himself Ezekiel Blast. So when Beth, a tiny classmate with proportionate dwarfism, insists on joining him on his lonely walk to and from school, he actively tries to discourage her overtures of friendship. And when a detective begs him to try to use his talent to find a missing six-year-old girl, Ezekiel does his best to shut that down too. In any case, as he explains to Detective Shank, his power doesn’t work on anything living. But sometimes it’s not so easy to say no, either to friendship or an urgent request for help. With Beth’s and others’ help, Ezekiel starts to explore ways to expand the usefulness of his micropower … an exploration that’s kicked into higher gear when another terrible event occurs. In Lost and Found, Orson Scott Card begins with a superpowered teenager and a mystery, a common enough theme, but approaches it from a different direction and with unusual thoughtfulness for the genre. Card’s works frequently feature an intelligent person with unusual talents who is having trouble fitting into society (and typically that’s society’s problem, not the individual’s). As a result, the dialogue is sharp and witty, if a little unrealistic.“Now I am an efflorescent adolescent.” Beth whooped in delight. “Efflorescent adolescent,” she repeated. Then her lips moved as she subvocalized it several times. “Such a cool euphemism for acne.” “So you have to move your lips to memorize.” “Memory is more about sound than sight, and more about kinetics than optics,” said Beth.I’m not sure who really speaks like that, especially if they’re fourteen, but it does make for interesting reading. Ezekiel, in his justifiable bitterness, goes overboard with his snark and even some quite rude name-calling. But the heartening part is that he has people around him who are willing to dig past his surliness to find the lonely person within who needs their care and understanding. This novel makes several worthwhile points about values like trust, friendship and love.“I’m really sorry. I was so focused on that lost girl, and I only just now got it that we lost you a long time ago.”Too many young adult novels have parents and other adults who are either absent or oblivious, but Ezekiel’s father (a butcher, not a doctor or lawyer) is actively involved in Ezekiel’s life, communicates with him in a meaningful way, and actually joins Ezekiel and helps when events reach their crisis point. It’s almost stunning. This sensitivity and attention to interpersonal relationships and characters’ deeper motivations are another distinguishing point in Card’s works, and I generally come away feeling enriched. Lost and Found is a much different story than Ender's Game or Speaker for the Dead (still my favorite OSC novel), but you can tell they’re by the same author, and all are thought-provoking science fiction. Content notes: Though Lost and Found has a pair of young teens as its main characters, it’s written on an older level and there are disturbing elements to the plot. Detective Shank tells Ezekiel, fairly early on, that young girls are being kidnapped by guys for child pornography and snuff film purposes, and that plays out in the plot. The punches are pulled to some extent, since this is a YA novel, but it’s not for very young or sensitive readers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Some good bits, some just average. * the characters were not especially likeable except for Ezekiel's dad, who was great! * the dialogue was occasionally funny, sometimes snappy and smart, sometimes verging on infantile and not funny at all. * the story was good and went in some interesting directions. * there was too much internal monologue on various social issues. Overall it was a readable book, somewhat entertaining, but I guess I expected more from this Some good bits, some just average. * the characters were not especially likeable except for Ezekiel's dad, who was great! * the dialogue was occasionally funny, sometimes snappy and smart, sometimes verging on infantile and not funny at all. * the story was good and went in some interesting directions. * there was too much internal monologue on various social issues. Overall it was a readable book, somewhat entertaining, but I guess I expected more from this author.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    A compelling read, written in a very simple and engaging way, the book touches upon some very dark topics, so I probably wouldn't recommend it to middle graders, but rather to slightly older teenagers. The protagonist Ezekiel is 14 years old, so perhaps this is the target age, although the story flows so easily that you might first think it was written for younger audience. Ezekiel Bliss (or Ezekiel Blast as he keeps calling himself -names are important to him) is an outsider. In fact, othe A compelling read, written in a very simple and engaging way, the book touches upon some very dark topics, so I probably wouldn't recommend it to middle graders, but rather to slightly older teenagers. The protagonist Ezekiel is 14 years old, so perhaps this is the target age, although the story flows so easily that you might first think it was written for younger audience. Ezekiel Bliss (or Ezekiel Blast as he keeps calling himself -names are important to him) is an outsider. In fact, other teenagers give him a wide birth and even crss to the other side whenever he approaches. The reason for all this is that Ezekiel has a reputation of being a thief and who would like to be friends with somebody you cannot trust? One day a girl from his school, short enough to seem to be a six or seven year old, although she is actually 13, starts walking next to him. She also tries to engage him into a conversation and break into Ezekiel's 'shunning bubble'. Beth is the first and only person who actually wants to know his real story. It turns out Ezekiel has never stolen a single thing in his life. it's just that he has a special talent. Lost objects seem to call to him and ask to be returned to their rightful owners. When it started happening, Ezekiel was just six and returned his first object- a newand shiny bike- and was promptly accused of having stolen it in the first place. Years and years of police interviews and pages and pages in his school and police files, Ezekiel learnt a few survival techniques.First of all, never return the object directly. Secondly, do not trust the authorities, including teachers, school counsellors and police officers. When a new counsellor suggests that Ezekiel should join a scientific study, his father first checks this is not a new attempt to make his son have therapy 'to cure him of something'. The Group of rare and Useless Talents (GRUT) meets once a week and does resemble group terapy sessions, although the main objective is to let the teenagers understand the limits of their micropowers (as opposed to 'superpowers') better. Some of them are uttely bizarre such as knowing if somebody's navel is of an in or out kind or forcing somebody yawn in an uncontrolled manner. Beth encourages Ezekiel to do a few experiments to see how far his own unusual talent extends. Unfortunately, Ezekiel and Beth fall out and she walks away without the protection of Ezekiel's company. Because this is exactly what she needed him for first- protection from school bullies ready to pounce on a little defenceless person. Only then they became friends, unlikely, improbable, mismatched friends, who would do anything for each other. When Ezekiel is asked by a police officer to help him find a kidnapped little girl, he cannot even share the story with Beth who appears to have gone somewhere with her mother. But has she really? The story makes a compulsive reading. There are twists and turns, and dark discoveries that made me revise my initial idea of the target audience. It did raise a question of what kind of topics we should include or exclude from YA books. The content warnings for this book include: death of a parent, child kidnapping and child pornography. There are no graphic descriptions and the issues are dealt with maximum sensitivity. Should we let our children that, although mercifully rare, these things exist? We do not learn much about the main villains in the book (apart from a few details about one of the kidnappers), so the picture is black and white here. Ezekiel and Beth make fantastic protagonists. Despite the dark things that happened to them, they are still typical teenagers: smart and sarcastic, looking for love and friendship, exploring what their limits are and what they can do to make a difference in other people's lives. The relationship between Ezekiel and his father was so loving and tender that it brought tears to my eyes. The police officer who trusted Ezekiel to help him with the investigation is a secondary character, but he also helps to explore some very important questions such as what does it mean to be friends with somebody, especially if we are talking about different ages. The GRUT guys deserve a special mention. I would have loved to get to know them better, but I do understand that to keep the story focused and streamlined, the author needed to make some sacrifices. A moving story of finding friends and dealing with loss, Lost and Found is a powerful book that explores important topics in an absorbing and highly readable way. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for the DRC provided in exchange for an honest opinion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Fourteen year old Ezekiel Blast has a talent ('micropower') for finding lost things and being able to sense who lost them. However, returning lost things to their owners has got him labelled as a thief and by the time he got to high school he was shunned by everyone and had no friends. That is until Beth Sorenson, a very smart thirteen year old and fellow outcast as a result of her dwarfism, decides to walk with him to and from school starting an unusual friendship. I'll be interested Fourteen year old Ezekiel Blast has a talent ('micropower') for finding lost things and being able to sense who lost them. However, returning lost things to their owners has got him labelled as a thief and by the time he got to high school he was shunned by everyone and had no friends. That is until Beth Sorenson, a very smart thirteen year old and fellow outcast as a result of her dwarfism, decides to walk with him to and from school starting an unusual friendship. I'll be interested to see if YA readers like this better than I did. This is not Orson Scott Card at his best, although it has its moments and is very readable. I found the constant smart, snarky banter between Ezekiel and Beth and his father a little unrelenting for even a bitter, lonely teenager. In many places less would have been better and sharper. The plot also felt like it could have been developed more to extend the drama and action, particularly in the first half of the novel. I felt the inclusion of other teens with micropowers was also underdeveloped and the group could have been better utilised in the plot. The suggestion that together they could potentiate each other was never clearly demonstrated or explored. However, I think that teenage fans of Orson Scott Card will nevertheless enjoy this ya novel. With thanks to Netgalley and Blackstone Publishing for a digital ARC to read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    A very lite fare for non-discriminating YA readers. Sure, it reads fast with some interesting and likable characters, but there's nothing stand-out about this. Snark, check. Minor superpowers so minor that they're MircoPowers, like being able to find lost objects? Check. Murder, kidnapping, and fairly dark situations for a couple of new teens? Check. What are we expecting, really? A YA version of that recent defunct tv show called The Finder. Or back it up to the rather huge quasi-gen A very lite fare for non-discriminating YA readers. Sure, it reads fast with some interesting and likable characters, but there's nothing stand-out about this. Snark, check. Minor superpowers so minor that they're MircoPowers, like being able to find lost objects? Check. Murder, kidnapping, and fairly dark situations for a couple of new teens? Check. What are we expecting, really? A YA version of that recent defunct tv show called The Finder. Or back it up to the rather huge quasi-genre of psychic detectives in general, and you'll get a pretty good idea about the kind of book you'll be picking up. Is this anything like early Card? No. Is it okay for the general throwaway YA market, being pleasing and usual and cute and uplifting as a result of getting through all the dark stuff? Yes. I actually enjoyed it for what it is. Lite fare. ... And there's nothing wrong with this. Unfortunately, nothing really stands out about it other than the solid characters.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus

    Ezekiel is almost 15 and in ninth grade at Downy High School. His usual mood is one of “resentful loneliness”. The other kids have actively avoided him since the fifth grade because they think he’s a thief, although he isn’t. He actually has a micropower, which enables him to find things that are lost and return them to their owner. It was as if he had been born with this mission in life: to see that all lost things were returned. Beth is almost 14 but is in tenth grade and declares she’s “sma Ezekiel is almost 15 and in ninth grade at Downy High School. His usual mood is one of “resentful loneliness”. The other kids have actively avoided him since the fifth grade because they think he’s a thief, although he isn’t. He actually has a micropower, which enables him to find things that are lost and return them to their owner. It was as if he had been born with this mission in life: to see that all lost things were returned. Beth is almost 14 but is in tenth grade and declares she’s “smart enough for college”. She tells Ezekiel she’s “a proportionate dwarf” and her height is referenced at every opportunity during the book, often in offensive ways. Beth is Ezekiel’s only friend. Ezekiel’s micropower is of interest to Dr. Withunga, who runs the Group of Rare and Useless Talents (GRUT). The others in the group also have their own individual talents, which run the gamut from being able to make people yawn to knowing if someone’s belly button is an innie or an outie when they’re fully clothed. While these talents are used by the participants they’re not exactly lining up to save the world with them. These are micropowers, after all; there’s no one from DC or Marvel in sight. Until Ezekiel is approached by a police officer with an unusual request. Help him find a missing girl. Except Ezekiel has never found a person before, only objects. Scrunchies appear to be a particular forte. I was really excited to read this book. I love anything superhero related so figured anything even hinting at micro heroes would be right up my alley. I’ve had Ender’s Game on my TBR pile for years but this is my first Orson Scott Card read. I’m not sure if there’ll be a second. I loved the concept and there were sections of this book I would have loved as a kid. I’m certain I would have spent considerable time figuring out what my micropower would/should be and I would have cheered Ezekiel on as he figured out what he was truly capable of. Adult me is conflicted. I had trouble figuring out the audience for this book. The writing felt like I was reading a middle grade book but then very dark themes were introduced, which would be more suitable for older readers. I found the reveals predictable and I didn’t like most of the characters. Ezekiel could be a semi thoughtful human being at times but when he was in “brat mode” I found him insufferable. Besides knowing which character had which micropower, the kids in GRUT were fairly interchangeable. No one had a distinct voice and practically everyone in this book was trying to out-snark each another. While I usually enjoy banter it exhausted me here. Most of the characters spoke almost exclusively in sarcasm (I would usually love this) but there was a lot of dialogue that was mean, rude and offensive. I wanted to throw my Kindle at the wall with the sentences that irritated me and needed to switch my brain into ‘don’t question this’ mode whenever law enforcement allowed children to be involved in their investigation. What police officer would allow a child to be (view spoiler)[involved in interviews? What police investigation includes a child wandering with the officers into unsecure locations where they expect to encounter the baddies, who probably have weapons? (hide spoiler)] Some conversations had me scratching my head: “But that’s how scared I am, Dad. I’m just shaking. Like I’m freezing cold.” “It’s going to be a chilly night, maybe under forty. It really is getting cold.” Others infuriated me with their poor taste, even if they were intended to be sarcastic. A psychology professor calls Beth Ezekiel’s “companion animal” and doesn’t seem to understand why Beth can’t see the “joke”. I almost refused to keep reading because of the flippant use of ‘crazy’ and ‘insane’, like when Ezekiel “played the crazy-kid card”. And who thought this was a good sentence: (view spoiler)[Maybe almost getting killed and killing a guy yourself was a weight loss program that could really catch on. (hide spoiler)] Although it’s made clear that Beth has her own mind, and a very intelligent one at that, Ezekiel and her father both take it upon themselves to speak on her behalf towards the end of the book. At no time has she requested this. She even annoyed me at times. Even though I assumed this was sarcastic, when discussing who could own a lost toy cement mixer, she comes up with, “With a truck it has to be a boy.” The (view spoiler)[trauma that Beth (hide spoiler)] experiences is glossed over and there are unanswered questions, like (view spoiler)[which police officer/s were involved in the crimes (hide spoiler)] . Content warnings include (view spoiler)[mention of bullying, death of a parent, kidnapping, child pornography, murder, trafficking of children and abandonment (hide spoiler)] . Oh, and if you haven’t read it already, this book spoils the ending of Charlotte’s Web. Thank you so much to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for the opportunity to read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Krista

    Rating: 3.5 curious stars rounded up to 4 stars This was such an interesting book. Orson Scott Card took me on a really unique reading experience. This Young Adult book slotted, as in the Sci-Fi genre was not was I expecting to read at all. I was pleasantly surprised it get to know Ezekiel Bliss/Blast and most of the characters that surrounded him. Ninth grader, Ezekiel has a not a superpower, but a micropower that enables him to find lost things. He then feels compelled to try to fin Rating: 3.5 curious stars rounded up to 4 stars This was such an interesting book. Orson Scott Card took me on a really unique reading experience. This Young Adult book slotted, as in the Sci-Fi genre was not was I expecting to read at all. I was pleasantly surprised it get to know Ezekiel Bliss/Blast and most of the characters that surrounded him. Ninth grader, Ezekiel has a not a superpower, but a micropower that enables him to find lost things. He then feels compelled to try to find the owner of the objects, which has gotten him into trouble in the past because the assumption is that he has stolen the item, not simply found it. What I especially loved about the storytelling in this book was that the dialogue was so clever. Pay close attention while reading this book. It is often subtle. The book is so funny when you catch the irony and the understated humor. It can also be heartbreaking. I imagine Ezekiel as somewhere on the autism spectrum, or in the genius IQ range. I can’t decide which. Either way he can be obstinate in his logic that to him sees perfectly correct. Ezekiel and his friend Beth join a research group to if they can harness their micropowers to provide some good in the world. However, all may not be as it seems on the surface. This is a bit of a family drama, a coming-of-age story, and a quirky sci-fi adventure. Keep reading. This is a good one! ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Blackstone Publishing; and the author, Orson Scott Card; for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Faith (BookSelf ~ You Are What You Read)

    I received this eARC from Blackstone Publishing via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of this book in any way. All quotes are taken from the uncorrected proof and are subject to change. Obligatory Summary Ezekiel Blast is a thief, or that’s what everyone thinks. Truth is, he’s a finder. It’s his micropower. He finds lost things and returns them, which has given him quite the reputation. Beth Sorenson, a proportionate little person, wants in on that reputation a/> I received this eARC from Blackstone Publishing via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of this book in any way. All quotes are taken from the uncorrected proof and are subject to change. Obligatory Summary Ezekiel Blast is a thief, or that’s what everyone thinks. Truth is, he’s a finder. It’s his micropower. He finds lost things and returns them, which has given him quite the reputation. Beth Sorenson, a proportionate little person, wants in on that reputation and the shunning bubble that comes with it, and makes fast (and reluctant) friends with Ezekiel. When the FBI ask for his help finding a missing little girl, he isn’t sure he can do it. But when the unthinkable happens, it’s up to Ezekiel to do what only he can: return lost things to their owners. "When people treat you like you’re guilty, then you feel the shame just as if you were. Shame is what other people force on you." My Thoughts I was honestly pretty conflicted about this book. To begin with, I didn’t even want to finish it until the plot actually kicked off, which really wasn’t for a long time. The first few chapters threw me into things too quickly (mostly thanks to the inordinate amount of dialogue) and left me feeling drained and disinterested. But then stuff happened, and it kinda took me by surprise. This was way darker than I had ever imagined it would be. What felt like a middle grade book suddenly had very adult themes and elements, and it resulted in an intriguing but tonally unbalanced story. The biggest issue, though, was the writing. Consider me surprised that someone who’s been writing for longer than I’ve been alive somehow needs to brush up on his atmosphere and pacing and descriptions of any kind. It felt consistently like a white room. Dialogue went without tags for so long, and the characters speaking had essentially the same exact syntax, that I often forgot who was who and had to sleuth my answers from context clues. It honestly felt like a script for a comic book, not a regular novel. The things that were severely lacking were beginner mistakes. It really makes no sense. Add to that Card’s weirdly important discussion about pubescent breasts and the highly questionable descriptor “concentration-camp scrawniness” and you’ve got yourself a WTF kinda book. And why on Earth was Ezekiel so butthurt about people calling him by his actual last name? That was such an unnecessary detail and it only made me dislike him. His character definitely grew on me, but he was such a bratty smart aleck most of the time. I did, however, like some things. The banter was sometimes great, especially between Ezekiel and his father. The mystery was alright, but some extremely concerning aspects were kinda brushed over. I liked how it ended and the train of logic some scenes had. The climax was handled well and I appreciated Shank’s character a lot (but what is it with male LDS authors and their insistence on weird nicknames? Card and Dashner do this and it’s so annoying and juvenile). Overall, this was fine. It could have been really cool, with superhero elements merged with a very Criminal Minds meets SVU plot, but the technical errors and some poor choices really dragged it down. I’m disappointed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Moonkiszt

    Lost and Found This was my first OSCard book, and I was captured from the very start. The tag line got me, even though it was listed as YA, and as I’m very OA, I don’t usually dip my toes in this pond much. I am so very glad I did! Main protagonist Ezekiel isn’t comfortable in his own skin, world, and life. He’s got many good reasons, all of which give him plenty of justification for his crankiness. The short girl who steps up on the walk from and to school invading his bubble doesn’t Lost and Found This was my first OSCard book, and I was captured from the very start. The tag line got me, even though it was listed as YA, and as I’m very OA, I don’t usually dip my toes in this pond much. I am so very glad I did! Main protagonist Ezekiel isn’t comfortable in his own skin, world, and life. He’s got many good reasons, all of which give him plenty of justification for his crankiness. The short girl who steps up on the walk from and to school invading his bubble doesn’t help. . . .until she does. This book is about the growth of that relationship, and the irony of where the people who bug you most turn up in your priority list if they last. But like Ginsu knives, Wait! There’s More! Introduced for the first time to this reader are Micropowers and how they fit in a person’s life, and if they make any difference at all. Clearly, they do. There’s a book about it! And a non-therapy group of micropotents with a leader, and an FBI agent, and kidnappers, and threats of death are involved. There are responsible parents, irresponsible parents, dead parents, bullies, reformed bullies, discussions of belly-buttons, spiders and the power of the yawn. Randomness you’d never believe could work so well together. I enjoyed the character development, and the depths to which the author explored “head talk,” those voices in our heads that never stop contradicting themselves until you get down to the nugget of what’s being discussed. For some that might be tedious, but since that happens in my head, it felt very familiar. So many tidbits got me - but the wordplay and fun with words written and verbalised, their origins and uses - that had to be very close to the top. The banter between Ekeziel and his dad as they discussed language and its power was sporty and nimble; it made me smile. The engaged reader of Lost and Found finds, at its heart, how families succeed, how they fail; and of what fabric friendship is made. Just so you know, I’ve begun working on identifying my micropowers (I can recognize a “face” in just about any textured surface! HA!) I highly recommend this book, and will be looking for my own copy to keep on hand for the grandkids. And in case anyone is taking a vote, I’d love to read more of these characters, along the line of a series. My sincere thanks to Orson Scott Card, Blackstone Publishing and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review an ARC copy of this book.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sherwood Smith

    I am nearly always a sucker for stories about teens with powers (except horror and zombies). I've also always liked Card's super smart kids. And all the snark is here, as oddball Ezekiel Blast (he tends to rename people, including himself) deals with the fallout of his micro power, which is to always know where lost things are. He finally makes a friend for the first time in his life. Beth is another really smart teen, hampered as she's a little person--at first glance she I am nearly always a sucker for stories about teens with powers (except horror and zombies). I've also always liked Card's super smart kids. And all the snark is here, as oddball Ezekiel Blast (he tends to rename people, including himself) deals with the fallout of his micro power, which is to always know where lost things are. He finally makes a friend for the first time in his life. Beth is another really smart teen, hampered as she's a little person--at first glance she looks about eight years old. But she is determined, focused, and when she decides to make friends with prickly Ezekiel, she is going to prevail. It's she who inspires Ezekiel to stop ignoring his power (which is having emotional and even physical fallout) and help out a cop, who is trying to find a kidnapped child. Here's where I get ambivalent. There are certain subjects I try to avoid in my fiction reading, and the subject matter lying behind this missing child pretty much tops the list. Add to that that this book is slated for teens, and my ambivalence heightens. (Yes, I know teens are watching Game of Thrones etc. But I still would not have given this book to either of my teens, until they were college age.) That aside, the story was fast-paced, racing to a frenetic finish. I loved Ezekiel's relationships--with his dad, with Beth, with the crusty cop he ends up working with, despite initial antagonism. Except for that one aspect (and at least there is no excruciating detail) I found it an absorbing read, with some real gems of scenes, all of these being interactions between Ezekiel and the people he gets close to. Copy provided by NetGalley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Not every science fiction involves an intergalactic space battle where all of humanity is saved from extinction. Lost and Found takes place in a much smaller scale universe. It involves two high school outcasts, who buddy up with some real snarky dialogue. One is too short for a high school student and no one ever lets her forget it. The other has a micropower ( you heard that correctly), which is the exact opposite of a superpower. A micro power is a talent or power that others don’t have, but Not every science fiction involves an intergalactic space battle where all of humanity is saved from extinction. Lost and Found takes place in a much smaller scale universe. It involves two high school outcasts, who buddy up with some real snarky dialogue. One is too short for a high school student and no one ever lets her forget it. The other has a micropower ( you heard that correctly), which is the exact opposite of a superpower. A micro power is a talent or power that others don’t have, but it’s not always obvious how useful it can be. In some cases, indeed, it can be downright annoying and get you accused of being a thief. But, you can’t help it if you have a talent for reuniting lost items with their owners. It’s an enjoyable quick-reading story told from a teenager’s snarky precocious point of view. Interesting characters. 3.5 to 3.75 stars. Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alison

    Ezekiel Blast is a 14 year old boy with an unusual gift, he senses when objects are lost and returns them to their owners or to Lost and Found. Unfortunately other people, being cynical and suspicious, prefer to believe that Ezekiel is a thief (although why he feels the need to return things is never explained) and he has become a pariah, ostracised by his school-fellows and living a sad, solitary life with his father, the only one who believes him. Then two extraordinary things happe Ezekiel Blast is a 14 year old boy with an unusual gift, he senses when objects are lost and returns them to their owners or to Lost and Found. Unfortunately other people, being cynical and suspicious, prefer to believe that Ezekiel is a thief (although why he feels the need to return things is never explained) and he has become a pariah, ostracised by his school-fellows and living a sad, solitary life with his father, the only one who believes him. Then two extraordinary things happen to Ezekiel. First, a new girl called Beth Sorenson, 13 years old but with a growth hormone deficiency and a metabolic disorder that makes her look like a proportionate dwarf, decides to make friends with Ezekiel, or at least travel in his "shunning bubble" on the way to school so she doesn't get bullied. It's the first time that Ezekiel has had a friend, although he finds her more of a nuisance at first. Secondly, Ezekiel is invited to take part in a study called 'Group of Rare and Useless Talents' which explores the boundaries of talents like Ezekiel's through scientific experiments. Then a policeman comes to Ezekiel's home, not this time to arrest him for stealing things but instead to assist with looking for a young girl who has gone missing. Although Ezekiel refuses to help the policeman at first, explaining that he finds objects not people, because people are never really lost, as he and Beth test his talent he finds he may be able to find people after all. The first half of this book is everything I would expect of a young teen novel. Funny, clever, full of the trials and tribulations of being a child, especially a clever child, in a world where adults rule. Obviously it's Orson Scott Card so the writing is witty and engaging right from the get-go but like his other young adult series, the incomparable Ender's Saga, there is a dark and scary undertone. When tragedy strikes (and it is shocking) Ezekiel must put his new found skills to their limit. I loved this book although I found the adult theme shocking for a teen novel, maybe that's a sign of my age, so I would recommend parental caution if the reader is a young or sensitive reader. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review. Bumped for release.

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Nerd Daily

    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Sarah C From best-selling author Orson Scott Card comes Lost and Found, a touching and quirky novel. This story was a quick page turner about bizarre “supernatural” abilities, missing people, and it handles some real issues facing teenagers and families. So back to those “supernatural” abilities. This book calls them “micropowers” as the abilities are too odd and useless to be deemed “superpowers”. Ezekiel Blast has such a power Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Sarah C From best-selling author Orson Scott Card comes Lost and Found, a touching and quirky novel. This story was a quick page turner about bizarre “supernatural” abilities, missing people, and it handles some real issues facing teenagers and families. So back to those “supernatural” abilities. This book calls them “micropowers” as the abilities are too odd and useless to be deemed “superpowers”. Ezekiel Blast has such a power. His micropower means he finds lost things and will always know who they belong to and how to return them to their owners. However, finding lost hair ties and scrunchies leaves him looking a bit odd, and at worse, finding missing bikes and toys leaves him looking like a thief. He has earned a bit of a reputation at school and finds himself alone and distrusting of adults. One day, he meets another outcast named Beth, who insists on walking to school with him. It appears he has met his match, and he cannot shake her. She talks and talks and probes him with questions. The two of them try to look at his micropower and dismantle and analyse it to see just how it works, whilst wondering if Beth has one of her own. When Beth goes off the radar, Ezekiel is faced with the challenge – is she missing, lost, or something else? Can he find her? On the surface, and when first starting the book, it seems hard to get connected with moody teenager Ezekiel, as he is a loner with an attitude, and can be quite sharp with his words. However, what unfolds is a novel which looks at anxiety, loss, bereavement, and friendship. It is handled with gentle humour, but with raw honesty too. The thing that was different about Lost and Found than other stories with “powers” in, is that the first part of the book is where the micropower is discussed at length and tested and evaluated by the characters. The readers are finding out about how this all works along with them. The reader will also come across a character that can make people yawn, as well as a someone who knows whether a person has an innie or outie bellybutton – useless micropowers right? After this, comes a mystery type story with a few shocks and turns. It was my first time reading something by this author and I was surprised by this book. It starts off as something sweet, but soon turns sinister and parts were quite sad, but there was always some form of wit, humour, or hope to keep things from becoming too dark. At first, I thought the story would be good for younger teens, but after finishing it, I would say it is more in the young adult genre due to some of the subject matter (child abduction, trafficking, and death). I didn’t think I would like at first, but there were parts that got me right in the feels. You’ll find lots of dialogue in this book, including plenty of back and forth banter between Ezekiel and Beth. There are sniping and playground insults, it seems like they always have to have the last word. Ezekiel argues with everyone and I think he uses his sass as a defense mechanism. Some of it seems childish, but you have to remember that Ezekiel and Beth are young teens. I sometimes felt there was too much banter and meandering conversations, and readers may feel parts of the story are about to go off tangent, but it goes with the style of the book, and to be honest, it made a change for me to read something like this and not lots of prose. I don’t think this style will be to every reader’s taste, but it does ease up halfway through. A special mention must go to Mr Blast, Ezekiel’s father, as it is good to see a parent taking a positive and supporting role in a YA novel. He’s a real hero and I really liked the tender scenes between father and son. I would recommend this to all YA fans, plus anyone who is going through a hard time at the moment, feeling lonely or lost, or missing someone, or who just wants to read a book and escape for a while and go through a whole range of emotions. Read this and come back and tell me…What’s your micropower?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Davyne DeSye

    Another wonderful book by Orson Scott Card! The protagonist is a fifteen-year-old boy, Ezekiel, so this book would be classified as Young Adult, but there’s plenty in here for grown-ups, too. The book starts on a silly note, with Ezekiel attending Downy Soft High School, situated near the Haw Haw River, on the corner of Blynken and Nod streets… It doesn’t take long to figure out that these aren’t the real names of the school, river and streets, but what Ezekiel calls them in his mi Another wonderful book by Orson Scott Card! The protagonist is a fifteen-year-old boy, Ezekiel, so this book would be classified as Young Adult, but there’s plenty in here for grown-ups, too. The book starts on a silly note, with Ezekiel attending Downy Soft High School, situated near the Haw Haw River, on the corner of Blynken and Nod streets… It doesn’t take long to figure out that these aren’t the real names of the school, river and streets, but what Ezekiel calls them in his mind, as he seems to have a funny secret name for just about everything and everyone. Ezekiel is shunned by everyone in school (including faculty) because he has a reputation as a thief. How did this come about? Because Ezekiel is a thief? Of course not. Instead, Ezekiel has a micropower (as opposed to a superpower) and that power is knowing when he passes by something that is lost – and who and where the owner is. Now, of course, he no longer returns lost items because his youth has taught him that when you return an item to a perfect stranger, the assumption is naturally made that you stole it in the first place. How else would you know where to return it? Ezekiel’s lonely life changes when Beth insists on being his friend (she is wonderfully pushy about it). With Beth’s help, Ezekiel starts learning the strengths and limitations of his power but also learns the meaning of having and being a friend. When Beth is kidnapped by ring of child kidnappers and her life is on the line, Ezekiel has to take what he knows of Beth and of his micropower to help the police find her in time… As usual, this is a terrific read, with great characterization (no cardboard characters here!), great character interaction (between Ezekiel and Beth, Ezekiel and his father, Ezekiel and the Shank (a policeman), and even between Ezekiel and the school counselor). There is also plenty of plot, to include a kidnapped six-year-old, a desiccated corpse, a psychologist gathering a group of people with micropowers for study, and – of course – the attempted rescue of Beth. This was a fun and quick read, but included moments of seriousness – even profound sadness – and also contained lessons about friendship, family, and the coming-of-age lesson of beginning to realize your own potential. Highly recommended!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    A very solid 4.5 stars, which I will round up because I enjoyed it so much and had to force myself to stop halfway through so I could catch some sleep! I ended up finishing it on the plane at midnight with a satisfied sigh. So why not a 5 star rating? I think it's because the mystery of the first girl seemed to be resolved a bit too quickly, and then it was fairly easy to predict how it would end for the second part. It didn't take away from my enjoyment of the story and yet, I wish it had been A very solid 4.5 stars, which I will round up because I enjoyed it so much and had to force myself to stop halfway through so I could catch some sleep! I ended up finishing it on the plane at midnight with a satisfied sigh. So why not a 5 star rating? I think it's because the mystery of the first girl seemed to be resolved a bit too quickly, and then it was fairly easy to predict how it would end for the second part. It didn't take away from my enjoyment of the story and yet, I wish it had been a bit more balanced. So what did I love about the book? I loved the characters. I loved the banter that Ezekiel had with others, especially his dad, Shank, Beth, and "Banshee". I have always loved the author's writing style and these conversations are intelligent without being condescending. The idea of "micropowers" was very interesting and I loved how the characters explored and talked through what they were feeling or thinking of, etc., so that they could figure out how they might work. The friendships Ezekiel eventually developed as he learned what friendship was and who really mattered to him were also very enjoyable to read about. I would probably categorize this as young adult rather than middle school age, mostly because some of the topics mentioned (kidnapping, child trafficking/pornography, death) might be tough for some younger readers. But an older middle schooler could probably handle it. Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Queen Cronut

    I've never read Ender's Game (though I'd heard the hype and praise) or anything by Orson Scott Card so I was curious to see how good this one would turn out based on his sci-fi rep. Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast has a unique affinity to find and return lost items, a micropower both a curse and a blessing as he constantly gets labeled as a thief and liar since people assume he stole the items in the first place. However, a girl goes missing, Ezekiel must use his talent to find them while also t I've never read Ender's Game (though I'd heard the hype and praise) or anything by Orson Scott Card so I was curious to see how good this one would turn out based on his sci-fi rep. Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast has a unique affinity to find and return lost items, a micropower both a curse and a blessing as he constantly gets labeled as a thief and liar since people assume he stole the items in the first place. However, a girl goes missing, Ezekiel must use his talent to find them while also trying to find the missing things is his own life... This book was an interesting fusion of sci-fi, contemporary, and a bit of magical realism. The themes brought up throughout this novel including child pornography, abandonment, trafficking which definitely gave it a darker tone more geared toward older audiences. Also, while there was a lot of sarcasm and dry humor (both things I am OK with and love in literature), there was an awful lot of poor taste in humor and came across very insulting and offending. The plot was decent though I had to suspend my belief and fill in plotholes here and there. Also, there were many sub-plots such as Beth's family situation, Ezekiel's father's religious beliefs, and the idea of micro-powers, that they felt very glossed over and felt kind of thrown in. And the writing style was a bit odd. Lost and Found is written in the third person yet when Ezekiel expresses his inner thought, it transitions to first-person rather awkwardly. Also, I found it a bit odd that Card changes "Father" and "Dad" interchangeably and uses it in dialogue that makes the dialogue choppy. That is not to say that there was not quality dialogue but it varied throughout from amazing to sub-par. Ezekiel was a solid MC yet didn't have much substance and rubbed me the wrong way with how snarky he was to his father. Beth was a bit better (ha, a tongue-twister!) and I found her character to be refreshing in here (but less so towards the end). Overall, not as impressed as I wanted to be, but it still was moderately good that I could see this concept being developed better. *Thank you to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for providing a free ARC

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dee/ bookworm

    Card is a very diverse writer and this book is no exception. I love the fun language with sarcasm that seems to follow the main character, but he is so funny and sincere. I like the relationship between father and son and how he interacts with Beth. I would defiantly recommend this book, unlike any other Card book I have read, but still fun and insightful and contains a range of emotions that you will experience while reading. I received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair r Card is a very diverse writer and this book is no exception. I love the fun language with sarcasm that seems to follow the main character, but he is so funny and sincere. I like the relationship between father and son and how he interacts with Beth. I would defiantly recommend this book, unlike any other Card book I have read, but still fun and insightful and contains a range of emotions that you will experience while reading. I received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen Kay

    I received this from Netgalley.com for a review. Ezekiel and Beth are 14 yr old geniuses in 10th grade and total awkward outcast weirdoes. They have micro powers, which is not the same as super powers. This is my first book by this author and I truly enjoyed it. Great read. 4☆

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

    Fourteen-year Ezekial Blast has an unusual 'micropower' (a power that isn't quite super). He not only can find lost objects but, once found, he can locate the owner. Unfortunately, after being accused of stealing a bike he was trying to return, he is labeled a thief and has become an outcast at school. When an FBI agent approaches him to help locate a missing child, he is reluctant. However, when his new (and only) friend, Beth, who has a form of dwarfism that makes her appear much younger than Fourteen-year Ezekial Blast has an unusual 'micropower' (a power that isn't quite super). He not only can find lost objects but, once found, he can locate the owner. Unfortunately, after being accused of stealing a bike he was trying to return, he is labeled a thief and has become an outcast at school. When an FBI agent approaches him to help locate a missing child, he is reluctant. However, when his new (and only) friend, Beth, who has a form of dwarfism that makes her appear much younger than her age, is taken, he agrees to help. Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card is aimed at a middle grade audience but I enjoyed it quite a bit. In fact, once started, I couldn't put it down. Both Ezekial and Beth are precocious but very likeable characters, the story is infused with wit and dark humour, and the mystery is compelling. A warning though: it might not be suitable for a child under twelve as the story does deal with the issue of child pornography. Overall, a high recommendation for children (and adults) 12 and up. Thanks to Edelweiss+ and Blackstone Publishing for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pam (Who Cried Books)

    I tried VERY HARD to like this book, mostly because 1) it was by Orson Scott Card and 2) I loved Ender's Game and had some pretty [unacceptable] high expectations before diving in. I knew, from reading the blurb, that it will be NOTHING like Ender's Game, but I still had high hopes. My bad. I just really couldn't get into it. The first thing I noticed and was mainly the reason why I'm dropping this, was how the characters all sound alike and are all snarky, snotty, and, a lot of times, come off I tried VERY HARD to like this book, mostly because 1) it was by Orson Scott Card and 2) I loved Ender's Game and had some pretty [unacceptable] high expectations before diving in. I knew, from reading the blurb, that it will be NOTHING like Ender's Game, but I still had high hopes. My bad. I just really couldn't get into it. The first thing I noticed and was mainly the reason why I'm dropping this, was how the characters all sound alike and are all snarky, snotty, and, a lot of times, come off as rude? So it was hard for me to connect the characters because I can't differentiate their personalities. I was actually planning to give this 1 star, but gave it a 2 since I found the concept of ~micropowers~ interesting. Made me think about MY micropower or if I even have one. The main character's micropower is finding lost things. Again, it was interesting, but the author spent so much time forming debates around the concept of "finding lost things" and other micropowers that instead of making me go "OH. YEAH. RIGHT.", it just made me... lost. One laughable micropower mentioned in the book is how a Doctor can accurately pinpoint and describe/picture where a person's belly button is and whether it's an innie or an outie. Still, thank you Edelweiss and Netgalley for giving me a chance to read the DRC.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erika O’Neill

    4.25/5 ⭐ Quite an enjoyable read! The characters are fun, the dialogue is silly and entertaining, and the storyline is intense! I had a blast (😉😉😅) reading this book. What is it about?: A teenage boy named Ezekiel has a micropower — a superpower that you may not always know you possess that does ordinary things, but can be used in useful ways. His micropower? Finding lost items and knowing where they belong and who they belong to. When he was younger, everyone thought he was a thief an 4.25/5 ⭐️ Quite an enjoyable read! The characters are fun, the dialogue is silly and entertaining, and the storyline is intense! I had a blast (😉😉😅) reading this book. What is it about?: A teenage boy named Ezekiel has a micropower — a superpower that you may not always know you possess that does ordinary things, but can be used in useful ways. His micropower? Finding lost items and knowing where they belong and who they belong to. When he was younger, everyone thought he was a thief and he ran into trouble and was basically shunned, which caused him to neglect his micropower. However, he meets Beth, a fourteen year old girl who is the height of a six year old, and despite his attempts to push her away, she joins his shunning bubble and pushes him to learn more about his micropower. The base of this story is very strange and unique, but I found it highly enjoyable and exciting to read. It was definitely an adventure, and I never found myself bored at any point. Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for allowing me to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review!! ❤️

  22. 4 out of 5

    The Bookish Austin

    You can read my full review here: https://thebookishaustin.tumblr.com/p...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Keith Blodgett

    A thoroughly enjoyable read. Though I found the first half to be better than the back half. The introduction of the players, wrapping my brain around microtalents (maybe we all DO have one). Just getting into the story. The dialog in some places seems a little too polished for teenagers, even exceptionally intelligent ones (I don't think anyone swore in this book!). At one point when Ezekiel is relaying a conversation to Beth he tells her what he would have said had he had a moment to think abou A thoroughly enjoyable read. Though I found the first half to be better than the back half. The introduction of the players, wrapping my brain around microtalents (maybe we all DO have one). Just getting into the story. The dialog in some places seems a little too polished for teenagers, even exceptionally intelligent ones (I don't think anyone swore in this book!). At one point when Ezekiel is relaying a conversation to Beth he tells her what he would have said had he had a moment to think about his words, what he wanted to say. I think Card did that a little too well. The characters have flaws, doubts, dreams, pains but their vocabulary seems too polished, even my 88 year old mother swears. Anyway, the second act, half, of the book was, for me pretty easy to guess. I got Beth's secret before it became a thing but I'm not really the target audience for this book so, yeah, I think it might be better for actual YA readers and not older, well read (and fans of cop shows) fans of the genre. I'm wondering if Card is going to work this into a series. The microtalent group working together has endless possibilities for more stories and I liked the characters enough that I wouldn't mind revisiting them. Then again it would also be nice to see someone write a good stand alone story and let it go. An enjoyable easy read. Adults welcome but more geared at the YA crowd.

  24. 4 out of 5

    annika burman

    *I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. **3.5 Orson Scott Card's Lost and Found tells the story of a young teenage boy with a micropower for returning lost items to their owners. He's had the gift his whole life, and so far it's brought him nothing but misery. However, after he meets Beth, he starts to understand that his power is more super- than he thought, and sharing his gifts could potentially save lives. The book focuses on themes o *I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. **3.5 Orson Scott Card's Lost and Found tells the story of a young teenage boy with a micropower for returning lost items to their owners. He's had the gift his whole life, and so far it's brought him nothing but misery. However, after he meets Beth, he starts to understand that his power is more super- than he thought, and sharing his gifts could potentially save lives. The book focuses on themes of friendship, individuality, and acceptance. It's full of snappy dialogue (maybe even too much!), uber-smart children, and solid writing. I've always enjoyed Orson Scott Card's prose, most of all in Ender's Game. His books tell these grand stories, yet they focus in on one or two characters to drive the message home. Sometimes that feels rare in YA fiction. I also appreciate his depiction of teenagers as smart, individual—and fully functioning decision makers!—people. Another YA trend he breaks is obsessive romance. In fact, there is no romance at all. What a relief! He could have easily changed the main two characters' friendship into a straight relationship, but he held off, and the book was better for it in the end. The plot has a few issues in my opinion, still I think the concept of a micropower is very clever. The main reason I didn't love this book is the plot line and the pacing. I thought the beginning was enticing, and I sped through the first half in two sits. What originally seemed like the main storyline was resolved at exactly 50%, though, leaving me unmotivated to finish the book, considering the second half felt like I was starting over. Especially since the two parts of this story are incredibly similar. Because of this, I was able to predict the twist just past the halfway point. Deep down, I expected there to be more to it... I guess not. In terms of pacing, again, the first problem especially was resolved too easily. Too quickly. Ezekiel's character is highly gifted (in all adjective meanings of the word), but he did not seem to struggle with any main issue, even though I think he showed a lot of character development by the end. The things he underwent did not seem difficult enough to completely change his character. Overall, I would recommend this book to 11-14 year olds, plus older individuals who enjoy middle grade novels. It's a breeze to read. Lost and Found does mention a few heavy topics as part of the plot, not to the point where I would give strong trigger warnings, though. Just in case: - kidnapping - rape - death

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anna Tan

    Ezekiel Bliss finds lost things and returns them, a compulsion that has gotten him into trouble with the police so often that he drives himself to distraction to ignore it. Beth Sorenson is a proportionate dwarf too smart for her own good, who can pretty much get anyone to do what she says just by talking to them. Beth wiggles her way into Ezekiel's "shunning bubble", they agree to take part in a research group that studies their micropowers (which are like superhero powers, just not as useful), Ezekiel Bliss finds lost things and returns them, a compulsion that has gotten him into trouble with the police so often that he drives himself to distraction to ignore it. Beth Sorenson is a proportionate dwarf too smart for her own good, who can pretty much get anyone to do what she says just by talking to them. Beth wiggles her way into Ezekiel's "shunning bubble", they agree to take part in a research group that studies their micropowers (which are like superhero powers, just not as useful), and along the way, Ezekiel helps the police and learns how to be a friend to the only one he's got. Lost and Found is one of those books I'd probably love a lot more if I'd read it when I was younger. Sometimes, I wonder if I liked Ender's Game as much as I do because I read it at just the right age. Because I really wanted to like this. You've got two snarky teens against the world, and the only two humans who aren't against them are Ezekiel's father and the police detective who really wants Ezekiel to help him find a missing kid. What's there not to love? (Though I probably have to note that Ender's Game reads like it's written for adults whereas this one was definitely written for the much, much younger end of YA.) Card still hits the right spots with his emotional arcs and there's nothing lacking in the action; the only major thing I can pinpoint for sure is that after a while, all the snarkiness became a little too over the top. There could have been a little more variance in the way the characters interacted with each other. I also saw one of the twists from quite far off, but seeing I'm probably two decades older than the target market, that's probably me and not him. I'm giving this 4-stars because whilst it's not AMAZING, it's actually pretty enjoyable for someone a lot younger and less cynical than me (e.g. hopefully the actual target age group). Personally, it fits more on the 3-star scale. I liked it, but eh.

  26. 5 out of 5

    James Bryant

    3.5 stars rounded up to 4 Thanks to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for providing an advanced reader copy of the novel Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card. Ezekiel (never Zeke) has the unique gift of being able to sense lost things and who they belong to. It’s not a superpower, he isn’t a superhero, and as he gets older, he finds that it isn’t always the most useful of gifts. Rather than being seen as a hero, he is shunned by his peers and suspected by the police for being a thief. 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 Thanks to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for providing an advanced reader copy of the novel Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card. Ezekiel (never Zeke) has the unique gift of being able to sense lost things and who they belong to. It’s not a superpower, he isn’t a superhero, and as he gets older, he finds that it isn’t always the most useful of gifts. Rather than being seen as a hero, he is shunned by his peers and suspected by the police for being a thief. After all, who could find so many lost objects and return them to their owners if they weren’t the one that stole them in the first place. That begins to change when a detective asks for Ezekiel’s help finding a missing girl and then when someone close to Ezekiel is kidnapped, it really begins to hit home. Ezekiel learns how to open himself up to others and let them in. He learns how to value himself and be valued by others. Having read and enjoyed Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game series I was thrilled to find this new novel by him and I wasn’t disappointed by the story, the characters, or the writing. At first, I had a hard time connecting with Ezekiel’s personality. He came across as very cynical and disconnected but as his relationship grows with Beth and Shank I found my relationship growing with him as well. By the end of the novel when he realizes that he was just as lost as the objects he was able to find, I found myself excited for him to be found and to realize that he was important to the people in his life, after all, everyone needs rescuing. Though I wouldn’t recommend the novel to everyone and it is certainly different from Card’s other novels, this was still a fun quick read that deserves its spot on my shelf. The book also left me wondering, what is my micropower?

  27. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    I was excited to get to read an ARC of this novel through Netgalley.com. I was a big fan of Orson Scott Card as a teenager and in middle school, and I think I would have been more excited to read this book as well if I were that age, late middle school, early high school. While I believe part of the point of the novel was to get to see Ezekiel’s growth throughout the book, I found that I never warmed up to him at all as a character. He was egotistical and suspicious throughout the boo I was excited to get to read an ARC of this novel through Netgalley.com. I was a big fan of Orson Scott Card as a teenager and in middle school, and I think I would have been more excited to read this book as well if I were that age, late middle school, early high school. While I believe part of the point of the novel was to get to see Ezekiel’s growth throughout the book, I found that I never warmed up to him at all as a character. He was egotistical and suspicious throughout the book, with only some moments of levity in between. The banter, while I might have enjoyed it when I was younger, was too much. There was so much banter to sort through and it didn’t help the characters but made them seem overly self assured to the point that Ezekiel came off as a mansplainer. I often found myself skimming through the dialogue, which is a part I enjoy, but if you even have to explain allusions in the story (like from The Princess Bride), it just loses the effect. While I think the idea of “micro powers” and a coming-of-age story focused on a character that might be misunderstood are things I appreciate, this just was not my favorite middle-grade/early high school read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kristi Drillien

    (rating: 2.5 / 5) Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast has a talent for finding things and knowing who they belong to. Along with this talent comes a strong need to return things to the owner. This has earned him the label of thief by people who assume he stole the items in the first place. Now ostracized by peers and authority figures alike, he is not expecting to be befriended by fellow outcast Beth, who is thirteen, but looks like she’s seven. When he’s asked to use his “micropower” to (rating: 2.5 / 5) Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast has a talent for finding things and knowing who they belong to. Along with this talent comes a strong need to return things to the owner. This has earned him the label of thief by people who assume he stole the items in the first place. Now ostracized by peers and authority figures alike, he is not expecting to be befriended by fellow outcast Beth, who is thirteen, but looks like she’s seven. When he’s asked to use his “micropower” to find a missing girl, Ezekiel initially refuses for a multitude of reasons, not the least of which is that he finds things, not people. However, with the help of his friend and some others, Ezekiel realizes that there may be more to his micropower than he ever knew. I was pretty excited when I was approved to read an advance copy of this book, since Orson Scott Card is a big name author. I haven’t read anything else by him (though Ender’s Game is on my TBR short list), but fortunately, I’ve read other reviews that say this isn’t like his other, especially earlier, work. Because this could have turned me off to his writing otherwise. I struggled a lot with various aspects of this book. My biggest issue was the dialog. Not just the dialog itself, but the way it was framed. I’m a huge dialog person, both in my reading and my writing. And this book was something like 75% dialog. Because outside of the actual events that occurred surrounding the lost girl (and even during that), it felt like the characters were always either standing around or sitting around talking. And there was very little in the way of action happening during the talking, but while this worked in Lock In (which I also read recently), it just didn’t work the same in this book. I’m not sure if I can explain why though. Maybe because the MC in Lock In is more of a mind at work, then a physical person? Maybe because it wasn’t 75% of the book? But then, it might be because of the actual content of the dialog. There was so much snark and snappiness, it was just overwhelming. Almost like it was trying too hard to be witty and intelligent. Most of the characters talked nearly identical, even the minor ones, so it was really difficult to get a sense of who was talking. The only thing that really led me to understand that Ezekiel was particularly smart was that the detective said as much to him. But sometimes, the detective talked just like him, except without the constant need to correct people, so I guess that’s what made Ezekiel smarter? Some dialog scenes actually read as if the characters were doing nothing but one-up’ing each other in being more and more correct about what they were trying to say. And I really didn't buy either Ezekiel or Beth as early teens due to their dialog. Ezekiel’s micropower is analyzed to death, right up until the end of the book. On the other hand, a few certain elements (that I won’t detail for the sake of spoilers) were left completely unexplained. And there were certain things that happened in this book that reminded me of my 10-year-old self writing about a girl who got her best friend adopted alongside her simply because she was plucky enough to ask. It just felt a bit too unlikely in several spots (including what would likely allowed in police work). But maybe Card has done some research and knows some things I don’t (I am definitely not an expert). As far as the plot goes, it got off to a bit of a slow start, and then started to get interesting. And then (view spoiler)[the main plot point in the synopsis is solved at the halfway mark, which is fairly shocking (not exactly in a good way) and makes the next thing that happens all too predictable. (hide spoiler)] And a warning: it's fairly dark and gritty for a YA book, dealing with things like kidnapping of young children, (view spoiler)[child pornography, parent death, and even one death scene (not a parent) described a bit graphically (hide spoiler)] . Now, the positives. Because I did give this book some stars. Ezekiel’s dad. I really like seeing a parent portrayed in such a great light, especially a father, because let’s face it, they’re pretty beat up in fiction of various mediums these days. I also liked the way the detective treated Ezekiel, for the most part, outside of the unlikely things. I really did like the premise, and even the plot, for the first half of the book. Then it felt like a rinse and repeat for the second half. I struggled with how many stars to give this book. While I was reading it, I was hovering around 3-3.5. But by the end, I couldn’t figure out what I was seeing that gave it even that much redeeming value. I hate writing a review like this, and I will sum up by saying that a lot of this is personal preference. But it really didn’t suit my preference. I think there are plenty of people who would enjoy the quick, snarky dialog though, considering that the writing actually reminded me of a few people I know. So for those who enjoy that type of writing, it’s probably worth a read. Thank you to Netgalley and Blackstone Publishing for providing me a copy of this book to review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Madison

    Orson Scott Card has a fantastic writing style that provides such a compelling and put-together story. Lost and Found had me hooked - I didn’t want to put it down and I just had to know what would happen next, all while loving every moment of this fun and unique story. Ezekiel can find lost things. He’s not sure why he has this usual talent and it has certainly made his life hard, especially when everyone - from his classmates to the police- think he is a thief when he returns the los Orson Scott Card has a fantastic writing style that provides such a compelling and put-together story. Lost and Found had me hooked - I didn’t want to put it down and I just had to know what would happen next, all while loving every moment of this fun and unique story. Ezekiel can find lost things. He’s not sure why he has this usual talent and it has certainly made his life hard, especially when everyone - from his classmates to the police- think he is a thief when he returns the lost items to their owners. His new friend Beth, a girl with her own reasons for staying away from other people, tries to convince him that his talent has the power to help people and encourages him to experiment with it. Then Ezekiel is approached by a police detective who thinks Ezekiel may be the key to solving a little girl’s kidnapping. I love YA mystery novels, yet sometimes the reason for the teen to be involved in the detective work is a stretch at best or seems a little unlikely. Not so in Lost and Found. Yes, perhaps Ezekiel’s micropower stretches the boundaries of reality but the world that is built around the story makes complete sense. Ezekiel is not the only one with a micropower and the sections of the book devoted to him meeting others with similar but unique seemingly useless powers are fantastic additions to the story. As Ezekiel discovers more about the possibility of the existence of mircopowers, comes to accept that his ability to locate and rehome lost items is a micropower and starts to experiment with this ability, he earns his place as a junior detective. And it turns out he is pretty good at it. I loved Ezekiel’s voice. Loved his sense of humour and self-depreciation. Having been labeled by the police, by teachers and peers, he expects little from those around him. Ezekiel has a colourful and unique way of viewing his world, or labelling and spinning the details he sees, and he tells the hell out of his story, with his own unique twist. It also makes him an unreliable narrator - there were a few times I had to do a double take at some of the names of streets, for example, only to realise later that Ezekiel has a thing about renaming things and people. I loved, loved, loved Ezekiel’s relationship with his dad. I loved the relationship his dad had with Ezekiel. It is a solid relationship, only made more so by the events of the book. It is a pleasure to read such a positive father-son relationship in YA fiction. While Lost and Found has a young tone to its storytelling, I would recommend this book to mature YA readers due to the reasons given behind the kidnapping, and while most details are spared, there is enough detail given and very serious themes raised that make this book more appropriate for older teen readers. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own. Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Tichota

    Thank you to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review! Orson Scott Card’s Lost and Found is the story about learning to trust and opening yourself up to possibilities. The characters at the center of the story are Ezekiel Bliss/Blast and Beth Sorenson. Ezekiel is a freshman in high school. He has not one single friend, because he is believed to be a thief. He has a micropower, which is a smaller scale superpower, cool but not quite Thank you to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review! Orson Scott Card’s Lost and Found is the story about learning to trust and opening yourself up to possibilities. The characters at the center of the story are Ezekiel Bliss/Blast and Beth Sorenson. Ezekiel is a freshman in high school. He has not one single friend, because he is believed to be a thief. He has a micropower, which is a smaller scale superpower, cool but not quite as impressive. He can find things that are lost and tries to return them, which more often than not backfires. He has a file with the local police department in the small town where he lives that is about 6” thick. He is considered persona non grata because of this. Beth is a proportionate dwarf. She is 13 but she looks like a young child. She is also incredibly intelligent (as is Ezekiel), so she is a sophomore in high school. Somehow and for some reason, Beth decides to worm her way into Ezekiel’s “shunning bubble”. Try as he might to ditch her, they soon grow dependent on one another. Before he even realizes it, he starts referring to Beth as his friend. Ezekiel is approached by his guidance counselor to join a group called GRUT, for others with micropowers. Some of the powers are laugh out loud funny. There is a young woman that can make people yawn, for example. Ezekiel will only attend if he can bring Beth. This is a turning point, in my opinion, of when he realizes how much she means to him (even though he doesn’t realize the full extent). Ezekiel is also questioned by a local detective, Shank, who thinks that maybe he can help with an investigation. There are some dark elements that the author touches on in this book, one of which is the case that Ezekiel assists the police with. Children are going missing and Ezekiel is tasked with helping locate them. When his own dear friend Beth disappears, he knows something does feel right. Not only does he learn that she was keeping secrets; but he also realizes how important he is to Beth. I enjoyed this book more than I thought I would, although I won't re-read it. It is a younger book than I would normally read. It is a perfect read for middle grade students. I’m a long-time fan of Orson Scott Card and his Ender’s Game series so I was excited to have an opportunity to read it. Ezekiel’s snark was in a league of it’s own but I loved that as much as he could dish it out, he could take if (from Beth and Shank specifically). It was a bit over the top at times but the characters and plot were both well developed. There were moments that were absolutely laugh out loud funny and times that were so raw and real. It's an odd combo; it is a light, fast read but some of the subject matter is deep and dark. The way that the relationships evolved in this story was so touching and beautiful, in the end, I was a blubbering mess.

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