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The Batman Who Laughs

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Left rattled by the events of Dark Knights: Metal, Bruce Wayne must come face to face with the ultimate evil spawned from the Dark Multiverse. One part Batman one part Joker. The Batman Who Laughs. "A Batman who laughs is a Batman who always wins." The mastermind behind Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder, gives you a look inside the most terrifying version of Batman ever! He Left rattled by the events of Dark Knights: Metal, Bruce Wayne must come face to face with the ultimate evil spawned from the Dark Multiverse. One part Batman one part Joker. The Batman Who Laughs. "A Batman who laughs is a Batman who always wins." The mastermind behind Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder, gives you a look inside the most terrifying version of Batman ever! He and superstar artist Jock (Batman: The Black Mirror) kick off a chain of events that makes Dark Nights: Metal seem like child's play. The Batman Who Laughs not only survived his fight with The Joker at the end of Dark Nights: Metal, but is now enacting a sinister plan across the Multiverse--something both terrifying and oddly familiar. When Bruce Wayne realizes the only way to stop this madman is to kill him, he must consider violating the very rule Batman can't ever break ... the rule that created this insatiable villain--the Batman Who Laughs! As Bruce begins to deduce that his current life is somehow wrong and that all the mistakes he's made are somehow connected, the Batman Who Laughs unleashes a brand-new evil. Enter one of the most punishing Batmen of the Dark Multiverse: the Grim Knight! Collects The Batman Who Laughs #1-7 and The Batman Who Laughs: The Grim Knight #1.


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Left rattled by the events of Dark Knights: Metal, Bruce Wayne must come face to face with the ultimate evil spawned from the Dark Multiverse. One part Batman one part Joker. The Batman Who Laughs. "A Batman who laughs is a Batman who always wins." The mastermind behind Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder, gives you a look inside the most terrifying version of Batman ever! He Left rattled by the events of Dark Knights: Metal, Bruce Wayne must come face to face with the ultimate evil spawned from the Dark Multiverse. One part Batman one part Joker. The Batman Who Laughs. "A Batman who laughs is a Batman who always wins." The mastermind behind Dark Nights: Metal, Scott Snyder, gives you a look inside the most terrifying version of Batman ever! He and superstar artist Jock (Batman: The Black Mirror) kick off a chain of events that makes Dark Nights: Metal seem like child's play. The Batman Who Laughs not only survived his fight with The Joker at the end of Dark Nights: Metal, but is now enacting a sinister plan across the Multiverse--something both terrifying and oddly familiar. When Bruce Wayne realizes the only way to stop this madman is to kill him, he must consider violating the very rule Batman can't ever break ... the rule that created this insatiable villain--the Batman Who Laughs! As Bruce begins to deduce that his current life is somehow wrong and that all the mistakes he's made are somehow connected, the Batman Who Laughs unleashes a brand-new evil. Enter one of the most punishing Batmen of the Dark Multiverse: the Grim Knight! Collects The Batman Who Laughs #1-7 and The Batman Who Laughs: The Grim Knight #1.

30 review for The Batman Who Laughs

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    In a way, Scott Snyder was seen as rescuing Batman from the horror-based Dark Knight that the eighties Frank Miller and Alan Moore created. Righting the ship, in a way.But Snyder himself had done horror in American Vampire and Wytches and his own version of Dark Knight Batman in Metal, and this is a continuation of that horror-fest, focusing on a character from Dark Knights: Metal, a demonic Batman-Joker villain. And that title from Ed Brubaker about Joker: Batman: The Man Who Laughs. And this In a way, Scott Snyder was seen as rescuing Batman from the horror-based Dark Knight that the eighties Frank Miller and Alan Moore created. Righting the ship, in a way.But Snyder himself had done horror in American Vampire and Wytches and his own version of Dark Knight Batman in Metal, and this is a continuation of that horror-fest, focusing on a character from Dark Knights: Metal, a demonic Batman-Joker villain. And that title from Ed Brubaker about Joker: Batman: The Man Who Laughs. And this comic unites Snyder and Jock, who were the Black Mirror team, so it's in conversation with all of the above. I think it's solid, 3-ish stars, with great insane depictions of the villain from Jock.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "Right now we have a bigger damn problem than Joker, and the only way we beat this monster . . . is by staying true to who we are . . . whatever the hell it takes." -- Batman, to Alfred, on page 36 The Batman Who Laughs opens with a slam-bang action sequence involving the Bat-Raptor (a three-wheeled motorcycle) in pursuit of a tractor-trailer that was commandeered by a quartet of nameless mooks who are brandishing military-grade firepower. It all takes place on an elevated highway over Gotham "Right now we have a bigger damn problem than Joker, and the only way we beat this monster . . . is by staying true to who we are . . . whatever the hell it takes." -- Batman, to Alfred, on page 36 The Batman Who Laughs opens with a slam-bang action sequence involving the Bat-Raptor (a three-wheeled motorcycle) in pursuit of a tractor-trailer that was commandeered by a quartet of nameless mooks who are brandishing military-grade firepower. It all takes place on an elevated highway over Gotham City, and it was sort of exciting . . . until I recalled movie critic Roger Ebert's old axiom that a story which begins with a chase scene usually means a standard or unoriginal plot will then follow. Well, this volume isn't typical at all . . . but it quickly derails after the first chapter or so, and gets bogged down with (to quote another dissatisfied GR reviewer) a nightmarish mess of "technobabble" or "pseudo-scientific" plot development and it became a chore to read. Also, the illustration style at times was particularly unpleasant - an extreme amount of close-ups with psychotic grins and teeth (just see the cover) - and the red ink used for one character's dialogue balloons was difficult to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    The Batman Who Laughs returns to somehow poison Gotham. None of this is very clear. The plot was so complicated, with all these "twists and turns" that it was often hard to tell what was going on. Jock's art style doesn't help either. It's scratchy and unfinished sometimes making it difficult to decipher. I did like that Snyder delves into his horror roots. Snyder needs to learn to edit himself. His writing since Metal has gotten mindnumbingly verbose. Most of this book is just a Batman The Batman Who Laughs returns to somehow poison Gotham. None of this is very clear. The plot was so complicated, with all these "twists and turns" that it was often hard to tell what was going on. Jock's art style doesn't help either. It's scratchy and unfinished sometimes making it difficult to decipher. I did like that Snyder delves into his horror roots. Snyder needs to learn to edit himself. His writing since Metal has gotten mindnumbingly verbose. Most of this book is just a Batman character droning on and on for several pages. He does realize comics is a visual medium, right?

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    So I was a little nervous with Scott's new Batman Who Laughs story. I thought Metal was okay and didn't love a lot of his All Star Batman. So I wasn't to eager to get this, especially since The Batman Who Laughs is easily one of the most uninteresting characters in Metal and his defeat was anti-climatic as can be. This is the story of The Man who Laughs, who recruits another Bruce named Grimbat, and together they tear down the regular universes Bruce. While that's happening we have Jim and his So I was a little nervous with Scott's new Batman Who Laughs story. I thought Metal was okay and didn't love a lot of his All Star Batman. So I wasn't to eager to get this, especially since The Batman Who Laughs is easily one of the most uninteresting characters in Metal and his defeat was anti-climatic as can be. This is the story of The Man who Laughs, who recruits another Bruce named Grimbat, and together they tear down the regular universes Bruce. While that's happening we have Jim and his son James working together to stop the psycho known as The Batman who laughs. Part a sequel to Metal, part a sequel to Black Mirror. Will Bruce be able to overcome one of his greatest challenges? A man like him with no remorse or code? You'll have to read to find out! For the most part I really enjoyed it. For once I liked Alfred here and what he brought to the table. I enjoyed the villains enough, and their plans were pretty cunning. I also thought James and Jim together was brilliant and a nice closure for them. The art was also solid throughout. It did feel a bit stretched out and also some of the lettering, especially for Batman who Laughs is hard as hell to read. Overall though, it was a fun and breezy read and a solid sequel to black mirror. A 3.5 out of 5, but I'll bump it to a 4.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roy

    Just cant get into any snyders post 52 metal stories.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Is happiness a state of complete release of all worries in the world? Is it an indicator of one’s own satisfaction with his behaviour and accomplishments in life? What happens when you live a life where you simply can’t indulge such a luxury? Writer Scott Snyder continues to develop the complex ramifications of his dark multiverse by looking into the mind of one of the deadliest villains to have ever been created. Drawing upon all of his work, You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Is happiness a state of complete release of all worries in the world? Is it an indicator of one’s own satisfaction with his behaviour and accomplishments in life? What happens when you live a life where you simply can’t indulge such a luxury? Writer Scott Snyder continues to develop the complex ramifications of his dark multiverse by looking into the mind of one of the deadliest villains to have ever been created. Drawing upon all of his work, from The Black Mirror to The Court of Owls, he creates one of the most terrifying stories that pushes Batman on the verge of insanity looking for solutions to the impending end that is promised in this war where only one Batman comes out alive. This isn’t about revenge or about proving a point. This is a battle about winning or losing against one another. And Batman does not plan to go down gently. What is The Batman Who Laughs about? Following the events of Dark Nights: Metal, the dark multiverse is introduced to the DC Universe and paved the way for dark versions of Batman to reign havoc. Among these alternate evil creatures born from the fears of people is the Batman Who Laughs from Earth-22 who succumbed to the Joker’s toxin and lost his sanity. By far the most chilling version of Batman, he’s now enacting a sinister plan across the Multiverse and has Bruce Wayne right at the heart of it. Although the future now lies in Batman’s hands as he’s forced into contemplating breaking the one rule he’d never break, the Batman Who Laughs brings into play another Batman whose mere presence crushes all hopes of life: the Grim Knight. Facing these deadly threats, Batman now has to play a very perilous game and seek help in the dark corners of Gotham if he wants to win this war. Collecting The Batman Who Laughs #1-7 and The Batman Who Laughs: The Grim Knight #1, this limited mini-series is Scott Snyder’s most personal story as he looks into exploring the little voice in the back of everyone’s head, the one that reduces everyone into nothingness and irrelevancy. By far the most gruesome Bat-centric story—definitely rated R—the level of violence escalates to unprecedented levels. There are limbs sliced off, heads rolling down mountains of corpses, and an incredible amount of blood covering each page of this story. You just can’t help but fall into a never-ending loop of insanity as Batman struggles to find the right approach to taking down the Batman Who Laughs and the Grim Knight. As expected from Scott Snyder, this is what writer Grant Morrison would have created in his prime but with a bit more trouble gauging the pacing and the amount of exposition in his stories. It’s his ambition and endeavor that made me enjoy this more than I should’ve but the ideas explored remain sublime in every way possible. Throughout the story, Scott Snyder also explores the meaning of happiness: what is it and how do you attain it? With the Batman Who Laughs’s personal experience, Batman receives a whole oratory on his own perception of happiness and the symbolism behind the bat he wears honorably on his chest. He thus limps his way through the creature’s torturous plan and slowly realizes that he might indeed be the worse Batman in the multiverse and there’s nothing he can do about it. To accentuate the dread, the despair, and the chaos within himself, Scott Snyder leans onto artist Jock’s phenomenal visual style. Relying a lot on shadows, smudges, and vibrant contrasts, his artwork relays the horrors that Batman lives through as well as his continuous and strainful battle with insanity. Letterer Sal Cipriano also plays a big role in contributing to the overall theme of this volume as he utilizes a horror calligraphy in red for The Batman Who Laughs but also for Batman when he is pulled into the lunacy. He even leaves some letters in white, conveying a coded message that expresses the terror within Bruce Wayne and how he’s trying as well as he can to hold on to reality and remain sane. The colours by David Baron also give the story a peculiar and atmospheric tone. It’s safe to say that this creative team made sure to work in sync and explore the madness taking place right in Bruce Wayne’s mind. The Batman Who Laughs is a ghastly tale that mutates Batman into his worse nightmare to outplay a deadly scheme drawn by a monster straight from the underbellies of the Dark Multiverse. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    I think that this will be my last modern DC comic. For the most part, I hated Scott Snyder's BATMAN run. His METAL crossover was a glorious mess of whacked-out ideas that made no sense whatsoever, but it was a fast, fun ride. And his dopey, derivative "Batman Who Laughs" character is at least visually interesting, so...I figured I'd give this a shot. As with METAL, I could barely tell you what this was about. It had the typical Snyder tropes that drive me nuts, though: The cryptic Joker I think that this will be my last modern DC comic. For the most part, I hated Scott Snyder's BATMAN run. His METAL crossover was a glorious mess of whacked-out ideas that made no sense whatsoever, but it was a fast, fun ride. And his dopey, derivative "Batman Who Laughs" character is at least visually interesting, so...I figured I'd give this a shot. As with METAL, I could barely tell you what this was about. It had the typical Snyder tropes that drive me nuts, though: The cryptic Joker appearance. Bruce beating up Alfred and generally acting like an asshole. Long-forgotten plot points from other books being brought up with absolutely zero frame of reference. Don't know who James Gordon, Jr. is, or why he is being watched by the police? Tough shit! (Or, if you did know, shake your head in awe, as Gotham lets a vicious serial killer loose on parole because...because.) Someone getting emergency, on-the-spot open heart surgery, and then running around like nothing happened five minutes later. James Tynion IV shoehorned in, because he grew up with Snyder. There's also the great DC tradition of a mini-series having an essential part of the story happen in a one-shot that was released concurrently. Why not make it A PART OF THE FUCKING MINI-SERIES....? And that thing that DC does oh so well.....have the self-contained mini-series end with a cliffhanger that leads directly into another big storyline. Can nothing that DC publishes ever have "The End" on the last page? And Jock's art.....ugh. I am not a fan of his muddled, unfinished-looking work. The one-shot has art by Eduardo Risso, and seeing that issue sandwiched in between Jock's dark mess is like being doused with ice water. "Ah, so THAT is what beautiful art and clear storytelling look like!" As Roger Ebert once said "I hated, hated, hated this (book)."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    I hated Snyder's run on Batman but sort of enjoyed the Dark Nights: Metal limited series. This tie-breaker tells me I should stop reading anything by Snyder that actually has "Batman" in the title. The technobabble alone drove me crazy, justifying any needed plot development by chanting a string of pseudo-scientific words that might might as well have been magic spells. Comic book rubbish to the max. The homage in the middle to Batman: Year One was a bit interesting at least, but then James Tynion I hated Snyder's run on Batman but sort of enjoyed the Dark Nights: Metal limited series. This tie-breaker tells me I should stop reading anything by Snyder that actually has "Batman" in the title. The technobabble alone drove me crazy, justifying any needed plot development by chanting a string of pseudo-scientific words that might might as well have been magic spells. Comic book rubbish to the max. The homage in the middle to Batman: Year One was a bit interesting at least, but then James Tynion IV helped co-write that little aside.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Meh. Remember that weird "Dark batman" from the "Dark metal" run? Well that Bruce Wayne/Joker hybrid is back and trying to fight for the soul of Batman. Sounds strange? It is. Is it good. Not really. It can pass for "ok". The art style is as fragmentary and unformed as the main story itself. A lot of use of red lettering and the script is annoying in terms of being easy to read. The story itself is convulated, throwing in Gordon and his homicidal son, as a few batmen fight for control. It's a Meh. Remember that weird "Dark batman" from the "Dark metal" run? Well that Bruce Wayne/Joker hybrid is back and trying to fight for the soul of Batman. Sounds strange? It is. Is it good. Not really. It can pass for "ok". The art style is as fragmentary and unformed as the main story itself. A lot of use of red lettering and the script is annoying in terms of being easy to read. The story itself is convulated, throwing in Gordon and his homicidal son, as a few batmen fight for control. It's a multi-verse thing. Perhaps a thing that is better left unexplored? If you are truly bored or a hard-core Batman fan, you can pick up this strange "Dark metal" story arc. I didn't think much of "Dark metal" myself and feel similarly about this Volume. Neither in art nor story does it ever elecit more than a meh from me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Following his work both Detective Comics and Batman, writer Scott Snyder haven't quite lived up to the brilliance of before, even with working alongside the artist Jock on some issues of All-Star Batman and Wytches for Image. Especially after doing DC's 2017 event Dark Nights: Metal, Snyder fell into the pitfalls of the typical event comic. However, if there is one thing to like about Metal was the evil Batmen from the Dark Multiverse, including the Batman Who Laughs, a Joker-like figure that Following his work both Detective Comics and Batman, writer Scott Snyder haven't quite lived up to the brilliance of before, even with working alongside the artist Jock on some issues of All-Star Batman and Wytches for Image. Especially after doing DC's 2017 event Dark Nights: Metal, Snyder fell into the pitfalls of the typical event comic. However, if there is one thing to like about Metal was the evil Batmen from the Dark Multiverse, including the Batman Who Laughs, a Joker-like figure that could exist in the demonic world of Clive Barker’s Hellraiser. Combining everything that makes the Caped Crusader a hero and the Clown Prince a killer, the Batman Who Laughs teams up with another evil version of Batman known as the Grim Knight, to turn Bruce Wayne's home of Gotham City into an incubator for evil. As Bruce and Commissioner Gordon struggle to stop these multi-versal forces, both compromise in their own way to stop this threat, from the former losing his insanity to the latter confronting his past. Reuniting the writer and one of the two artists behind The Black Mirror — one of the best self-contained Batman stories — Snyder and Jock presents their most demented Bat-tale, on the basis of its eponymous villain, showcasing Snyder's love of horror. Snyder's pushing of said horror is also evident in not only the appearance of the Joker, but our heroic Bruce Wayne slowly loses his mind, due to contacting with the Joker's toxin that will turn anyone into the next Clown Prince of Crime. Although you can see plot similarities to the 2015 videogame Batman: Arkham Knight, Snyder makes his story a psychologically scary one with Bruce becomes his own antagonist, as well as towards his allies such as Alfred and Gordon. Although The Black Mirror was a self-contained narrative that may evoke elements of Bat-history, The Batman Who Laughs juggles a lot more elements that heart back to previous DC titles that Snyder wrote, including a brief appearance from the Court of Owls, which seems padded on. Being a loose continuation of Snyder's run on Detective Comics, Gordon reunites with his psychopathic son James Jr. in order to stop the evil Batmen. Although the relationship between the two Gordons was the standout theme previously, there are echoes here that remind us of the tension between the father and the son, although the attempt of redemption towards the end feels unearned. Ever since reading The Losers, I have been an instant fan of Jock's artwork, which is gritty and applies well to the crime-ridden streets of Gotham, especially under Snyder's horror-based writing. Showing three different versions of Batman, Jock achieves each of these characters their own unique look, from our hero slowly becoming Jokerized, to the Grim Knight packing as many guns as he can, to finally the Batman Who Laughs looking more demonic than ever before. It also helps that the lettering by Sal Cipriano serves a device in capturing the language of several characters, including Bruce Wayne's word balloons becoming red and scratchy as the series goes on. In between the main series, Snyder and co-writer James Tynion IV do a one-shot issue about the origins of the Grim Knight, showing how Bruce's life (in another universe) was changed by not only the death of his parents, but also killing that mugger by his own gun. Presenting a more dystopian spin on Gotham City — stunningly drawn by Eduardo Russo, who references Frank Miller's two Bat-masterpieces from the 1980s — it really shows the worst scenario of Batman taking the laws into his own hands and bending the citizens to his will, much to the resistance of the former police commissioner. After the baggage of Metal, this miniseries reaffirms Snyder's strength by writing more self-contained tales, which have a more singular vision that does more justice to the Dark Knight, along with Jock's freakishly awesome art.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Scott Snyder + Batman = Win. Scott Snyder + Batman Who Laughs = Win, but I'm frightened. The Batman Who Laughs is probably the best original character to come out of DC for a little while, and even though he's a simple idea, he's so well executed under Snyder's pen that he becomes far more than the sum of his parts. Snyder is all about deconstructing what it means to be Batman, what drives Batman, and being able to look at him through The Batman Who Laughs' lens makes for some super interesting Scott Snyder + Batman = Win. Scott Snyder + Batman Who Laughs = Win, but I'm frightened. The Batman Who Laughs is probably the best original character to come out of DC for a little while, and even though he's a simple idea, he's so well executed under Snyder's pen that he becomes far more than the sum of his parts. Snyder is all about deconstructing what it means to be Batman, what drives Batman, and being able to look at him through The Batman Who Laughs' lens makes for some super interesting narration even as the fate of Gotham City is once more in the balance. We do lean a little far into undefeatable Batman territory, as he manages to outlast something that should have killed him for far longer than you'd expect, but that's a minor quibble - this is comic books, after all. Snyder even manages to rope in James Gordon Jr. for this story, taking what's been done to him outside of Snyder's stories in his stride. There's definitely a hint of 'this story was a prelude to something much larger' by the time this series is over, but it still works as its own complete thing on its own - you'll just definitely want to know what happens next. If you've read Wytches, you know Snyder and Jock can do some awful, awful things together. The atmosphere in The Batman Who Laughs is disgusting, and I love it. Everything from the constant jagged edges to the bloodspattered pages, right down to the creepy-ass font that The Batman Who Laughs talks in is perfect for creating the kind of fear that Snyder wants to inspire in his readers. I especially liked the little Easter eggs dotted through the dialogue - go back and just read the big red letters, and you'll get some additional insight into Batman's state of mind that puts things into even more perspective than before and adds an additional cliffhanger to the series that you (and Batman) weren't even aware of. The Batman Who Laughs is yet another showing in a long line that highlight why Scott Snyder is the Batman writer that has defined the character for the past five plus years; he always has new ideas and new ways to break the character, and he tells his stories with equal parts flair and terror.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Well, that was all kinds of creepy!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Circumvoluted and self-important plot that took one issue more than planned when it should have taken 2 less. My eyes ate still bleeding from Jock's crappy art.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    The artwork throughout was just sublime. I only wish the plot made a bit more sense. The Batman Who Laughs has got to be one of Snyder's best contributions to Bat-Lore, other than the Court of Owls. This dark version, who combines the Joker and Batman into one horrific creature, is plenty scary. What he was trying to do here, though, wasn't really all that clear. Otherwise, this was a lot of fun, and I'm sure we'll see the character again at some point, since our Batman "never kills."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    So much needless babbling, I couldn't wait to finish reading this.

  16. 4 out of 5

    DoctorWoofWoof

    I am really eating up DC's books of late, especially the Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV! Yes, there are some hiccups along the way, as true for even the best of publishers, but the overall good output far outshines the bad/MEH output! I am quite liking this whole "Rebirth" thing and the way it ties into WATCHMEN, can't wait to see it all wrapped with DOOMSDAY CLOCK #12. *ahem* Let's not get ahead of ourselves then, eh? Onto my thoughts on TBWL.. I liked it quite a bit! Yes, it probably could I am really eating up DC's books of late, especially the Scott Snyder and James Tynion IV! Yes, there are some hiccups along the way, as true for even the best of publishers, but the overall good output far outshines the bad/MEH output! I am quite liking this whole "Rebirth" thing and the way it ties into WATCHMEN, can't wait to see it all wrapped with DOOMSDAY CLOCK #12. *ahem* Let's not get ahead of ourselves then, eh? Onto my thoughts on TBWL.. I liked it quite a bit! Yes, it probably could easily have been a 5-issue mini, but I don't feel the story suffered by the added length. It allowed for the crazy roller coaster ride that it was to be even crazier, helped to spread just a bit more darkness in Gotham! Oh, and it showed how Alfred truly is the necessary light in Batman/Bruce's life, something B-Man totally needs, far more than Selina (sorry, Tom King, but I don't think the romance between the two works. Jus' sayin' is all!). I know a lot of folks absolutely abhor DARK NIGHTS: METAL and anything relating to it, including the Batman Who Laughs! Me? I am enjoying it to no great end! It reminds me of some of the best things about the 90's, just turned up to 11! I think it's an interesting concept, bringing some clever creepiness into DC's "Rebirth"! And besides, it is at least something fresh and different (unlike the umpteenth X-deaths/reboots over at Marvel!)! One aspect of the mini that really drove it all home was the art by Jock. I loved what he did in the WYTCHES (also with Snyder), and here it is just as good, if not better. The use of shadows and angles brings the creepiness all up and about, leaving with you long after the lights have gone out and sleep comes over you! I already mentioned it, and several others have as well in their reviews, but Alfred was clearly the MVP here! He was totally on board, taking being a butler to a whole new level beyond 100%! I think sometimes he is under-utilized, but here he definitely got some much needed appreciation and respect! Kudos to you, Scott Snyder, for giving Alfred his due! And lastly, that ending, the last couple panels? Ewwwww... chills!! Now, I can not wait to read Joshua Williamson's BATMAN/SUPERMAN #1! No spoilers, tho', promise! So, yes, I was super-impressed with THE BATMAN WHO LAUGHS, just as I was with Snyder's DARK NIGHTS: METAL. If you didn't like METAL, then, well, chances are pretty likely you won't like this one!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    There are moments where the writing really shines, and the art is phenomenal throughout, really setting the tone perfectly. However, this is unbelievably convoluted and I just couldn't buy into any of the "stakes" because the story is so out-there. If you weren't a big fan of Dark Nights Metal, might as well pass on this. I really miss Snyder's New 52 run. I'm very over the "metal" stuff.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    SO IMMERSIVE!! THE PLOT IS INSANE AND ALFRED IS BEST HUMAN ON EARTH!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Omar

    terrifying and amazing

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    I started reading this back as single issues but gave up the story was so bad. I had hoped the story would be better when read in a collection. But I was wrong. I do not understand the fetish of writers wanting to have a "BAD! and EVIL!" Batman. I mean there are already dozens in the DC Comics Universe there really no reason to make up a new one. I mean I read comics to find heroes as the real world is full of uncaring evil. I don't need to see Batman as evil or anything like that he is just I started reading this back as single issues but gave up the story was so bad. I had hoped the story would be better when read in a collection. But I was wrong. I do not understand the fetish of writers wanting to have a "BAD! and EVIL!" Batman. I mean there are already dozens in the DC Comics Universe there really no reason to make up a new one. I mean I read comics to find heroes as the real world is full of uncaring evil. I don't need to see Batman as evil or anything like that he is just Batman if you can't tell a good Batman story without inventing an entire side universe that is dark and evil and the true mirror into the souls of man then you are not really trying. I guess the worst thing is the writing is sloppy and gets boring. The same story could have been told in just 4-5 issues without having to repeat itself a couple of times. How many times do we need to hear Alfred wail at Batman "Don't go evil, give up the fight, just find a cure." Sigh.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    This was amazing, easily my favorite of DC’s Black Label books that I’ve read. Scott Snyder has pulled off a wonderful magic trick with this story, distilling the true nature of Batman down to a perfect idea. The art, storytelling, and everything about this was top notch. I love this heavy metal aesthetic and the dark themes of the book. If DC shut down everything else they’re doing and just did this kind of thing, I’d happily branch out into similar stories about Supes, Green Lantern, etc.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mizuki

    Pre-review: I suggested the public library to buy this series but I personally am too scared to even try reading it. Bottom-line: personally I don't really care what happens to (view spoiler)[Bruce/Batman but don't you dare touch the rest of the BatFam!!!! (hide spoiler)] *angry fangirl screams and outrage*

  23. 5 out of 5

    JT

    I really enjoyed this book by Synder and Jock. A continuation of the aftermath of Metal. I love this whole dark multi verse that was created. I also love and need more of Grim Knight. I want a mini series of this character. So much potential.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Was I disappointed in Metal, yes. Do I find this character annoying-yep. So why read this (in digital floppies)? I'm crazy enough to think that Snyder can pull out a good to very good story, despite his recent misses (Metal, JLA). This isn't great, but it is close to a better than average story about what drives Batman. There have been takes on that before, and there will probably be writer(s) who take on that portion of the character again. Combined with some nice Jim and JAmes Gordon bits, and Was I disappointed in Metal, yes. Do I find this character annoying-yep. So why read this (in digital floppies)? I'm crazy enough to think that Snyder can pull out a good to very good story, despite his recent misses (Metal, JLA). This isn't great, but it is close to a better than average story about what drives Batman. There have been takes on that before, and there will probably be writer(s) who take on that portion of the character again. Combined with some nice Jim and JAmes Gordon bits, and the steadfast Alfred, Snyder manages ot make me want to stay around to see how the story plays.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Albert

    The Batman Who Laughs by Scott Snyder continues the havok dealt out by a hybrid of The Batman and the Joker. But this time, The Batman Who Laughs brings along an even darker and brooding character, The Grim Knight! After the events of Dark Knights: Metal, the Batman is aware that there are forces in the Multiverse that he needs to prepare for. Forces that target him in particular and forces that want to undo all the good he has done in Gotham. The worse of these is none other than the creature The Batman Who Laughs by Scott Snyder continues the havok dealt out by a hybrid of The Batman and the Joker. But this time, The Batman Who Laughs brings along an even darker and brooding character, The Grim Knight! After the events of Dark Knights: Metal, the Batman is aware that there are forces in the Multiverse that he needs to prepare for. Forces that target him in particular and forces that want to undo all the good he has done in Gotham. The worse of these is none other than the creature known simply as the Batman Who Laughs. A Batman from another multiverse that is half Batman and half Joker. A sadistic and mad killer with the wits and cunning of the Batman. The Batman Who Laughs not only survived his duel with The Joker at the end of Metal but is now enacting an even more deranged and evil plan across the Multiverse. Bodies are piling up in Gotham, bodies that match the DNA of one Bruce Wayne. But some are younger and some are older than Bruce Wayne. So who are they and the pressing question for Batman and GCPD, is where did they come from when the real Bruce Wayne is very much alive. But that is not all, because the Batman Who Laughs has a partner with him. A Batman from the Multiverse who has a very different code, he is the Grim Knight and he is in Gotham to clean it up with deadly brutality. Now Batman must face off against both of them, but to defeat them, how far is he willing to go and at what cost? I, like most of the comic book and especially Batman geeks, looked forward to another story with the character that took the DC Multiverse by storm. The Batman Who Laughs is a stroke of genius from a writer that has owned the Batman franchise for the last few years. This character answers the question of what would happen if Bruce Wayne finally lost it. If the love he holds for Gotham turned to hate and if the sense of protection turned to a joy in torturing the city. If is a terrifying proposition and Snyder tells the tale so well. The introduction of The Grim Knight is an added bonus. This is a jaded and bitter Batman that closely resembles Marvel Comics, The Punisher. Overall this is a dark and gritty tale that is well written and has superb artwork. Very much worth adding to any Batman collection.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    I actually really liked Scott Snyder’s Batman run when he was writing it. Sure, it had its ups and downs but it was never boring. however with this return to the dark knight... I found myself yawning and ultimately not finishing it. The premise of this book is great, the fact that there may be an evil Batman out there that sort of has the mentality of the Joker, spooky! but the book goes on to become the most boring version of that premise you can think of. The book starts out strong with issue 1 I actually really liked Scott Snyder’s Batman run when he was writing it. Sure, it had its ups and downs but it was never boring. however with this return to the dark knight... I found myself yawning and ultimately not finishing it. The premise of this book is great, the fact that there may be an evil Batman out there that sort of has the mentality of the Joker, spooky! but the book goes on to become the most boring version of that premise you can think of. The book starts out strong with issue 1 and then quickly nose dives into glimpses of cool. You’ll get a page here or there in the next few issues that are great and help move the story along, but then you’re met with the rest of the issue being full of boring, meaningless babble. I don’t mean babble like boring dialog, no, just meandering monologues that don’t explain anything but are trying to be dark and creepy. It reads like a 14 year old kid writing dark poetry for the first time. Also they constantly refer to the villain as “The Batman Who Laughs” but no one talks like that. It feels really forced to say it constantly and even comes off a wee bit pretentious. I also wanted to mention that while I enjoyed the art, the red text on black pages or backgrounds was really straining for my eyes too read. Hard stop for me by the middle of issue 4.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kris Ritchie

    Enjoyed this much more than metal. James Gordon, The Black Sheep. Joker Toxin in Batman's Blood. HaHa. And punisheresque Batman. Also a big lead into the year of the villian arc featuring Batman who laughs.

  28. 4 out of 5

    James

    Once again, readers can see why the Batman Who Laughs's popularity has soared into the stratosphere even as his actions drag DC's heroes to the gutter.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shahriar Shafin

    "A Batman Who Laughs is a Batman who always wins.." Chilly, horrifying, disturbing, insane. The most Snyder-esque Batman story Snyder has ever written.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

    Overwritten, this could've been 5 issues, really, and everyone really hammers home points, no one wants to be subtle or mysterious, they really need backstories and motivations to be crystal clear to anyone within earshot? Jock's art is moody and pretty but sometimes flat. I like when he occasionally shades with smudges. But sometimes it's also just a hell of a lot of silhouettes and sometimes I wonder if deadlines were knocking. I really hope the Court of Owls is eliminated. I liked James' Overwritten, this could've been 5 issues, really, and everyone really hammers home points, no one wants to be subtle or mysterious, they really need backstories and motivations to be crystal clear to anyone within earshot? Jock's art is moody and pretty but sometimes flat. I like when he occasionally shades with smudges. But sometimes it's also just a hell of a lot of silhouettes and sometimes I wonder if deadlines were knocking. I really hope the Court of Owls is eliminated. I liked James' return, though, as Black Mirror was one of the better Snyder Bat-stories.

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