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Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds: 100 New Ways to See the World

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A singular atlas of 100 infographic maps from thought-provoking to flat-out fun Publisher's note: Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds was published in the UK under the title Brilliant Maps. Which countries don’t have rivers? Which ones have North Korean embassies? Who drives on the “wrong” side of the road? How many national economies are bigger than California’s? And where c A singular atlas of 100 infographic maps from thought-provoking to flat-out fun Publisher's note: Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds was published in the UK under the title Brilliant Maps. Which countries don’t have rivers? Which ones have North Korean embassies? Who drives on the “wrong” side of the road? How many national economies are bigger than California’s? And where can you still find lions in the wild? You’ll learn answers to these questions and many more in Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds. This one-of-a-kind atlas is packed with eye-opening analysis (Which nations have had female leaders?), whimsical insight (Where can’t you find a McDonald’s?), and surprising connections that illuminate the contours of culture, history, and politics. Each of these 100 maps will change the way you see the world—and your place in it.


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A singular atlas of 100 infographic maps from thought-provoking to flat-out fun Publisher's note: Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds was published in the UK under the title Brilliant Maps. Which countries don’t have rivers? Which ones have North Korean embassies? Who drives on the “wrong” side of the road? How many national economies are bigger than California’s? And where c A singular atlas of 100 infographic maps from thought-provoking to flat-out fun Publisher's note: Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds was published in the UK under the title Brilliant Maps. Which countries don’t have rivers? Which ones have North Korean embassies? Who drives on the “wrong” side of the road? How many national economies are bigger than California’s? And where can you still find lions in the wild? You’ll learn answers to these questions and many more in Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds. This one-of-a-kind atlas is packed with eye-opening analysis (Which nations have had female leaders?), whimsical insight (Where can’t you find a McDonald’s?), and surprising connections that illuminate the contours of culture, history, and politics. Each of these 100 maps will change the way you see the world—and your place in it.

30 review for Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds: 100 New Ways to See the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    I enjoyed learning the answers to many of the minor and diverse questions I’ve had over the years. I may not especially need to know this information, but it’s stuff I’ve at least briefly wondered about -- things like who drives on the opposite side of the road or whether all roads really do lead to Rome. The visual presentation is great for absorbing the information at a glance but also allows for a more in-depth perusal if one is so inclined. If you’re the curious sort, then you’ll find this t I enjoyed learning the answers to many of the minor and diverse questions I’ve had over the years. I may not especially need to know this information, but it’s stuff I’ve at least briefly wondered about -- things like who drives on the opposite side of the road or whether all roads really do lead to Rome. The visual presentation is great for absorbing the information at a glance but also allows for a more in-depth perusal if one is so inclined. If you’re the curious sort, then you’ll find this to be an interesting read that can be read as quickly or as slowly as you wish.

  2. 4 out of 5

    MissBecka

    I enjoyed a lot of what was in this book and found the various demographics fascinating. Learning new things is always fun! I do wish that the maps had been a bit more distinct in the presentation. Many of the pages had 3-4 versions of one colour when several completely different colours would have been much easier to absorb. Also I found it a bit annoying that the countries were not labelled on most of the pages. Slight inconvenience to have a second map up on google and flip between the two. Th I enjoyed a lot of what was in this book and found the various demographics fascinating. Learning new things is always fun! I do wish that the maps had been a bit more distinct in the presentation. Many of the pages had 3-4 versions of one colour when several completely different colours would have been much easier to absorb. Also I found it a bit annoying that the countries were not labelled on most of the pages. Slight inconvenience to have a second map up on google and flip between the two. Thank you NetGalley and The Experiment for my DRC.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A perfect bathroom book. Each two-page spread is a map of the world that visually displays some interesting statistic, demographic, or bit of trivia. You can speed past the dull ones and linger on the most fascinating, read it straight though or just flip around randomly. Fun.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    This was interesting but still somewhat flawed. What I liked: • Some of the maps addressed things I’d wondered about, such as time zones and plug/socket shape. • Some of the maps addressed things I’d never thought to wonder about, such as cats vs. dogs. In this way, the book lives up to its title—it does indeed inspire curious minds. • Bright colors • Quirkiness. It has serious elements such as casualties from wars, but it also has some unabashedly bizarre entries, such as the one titled “Chile is a This was interesting but still somewhat flawed. What I liked: • Some of the maps addressed things I’d wondered about, such as time zones and plug/socket shape. • Some of the maps addressed things I’d never thought to wonder about, such as cats vs. dogs. In this way, the book lives up to its title—it does indeed inspire curious minds. • Bright colors • Quirkiness. It has serious elements such as casualties from wars, but it also has some unabashedly bizarre entries, such as the one titled “Chile is a ridiculously long country.” • A sense of fun. There is a lot more that I could say here, but I don’t want to take away from the pleasure of discovering it for yourself. What I didn’t like: • Data was unclear. It’s definitely more for entertainment than for information. One of the maps, for example, shows different statistics, each in a shade of pink. Okay, it’s a very pretty map, but I have no idea which of the 6 or so almost-identical shades I’m looking at for any given country. Cute, but not helpful. There were several like this, where the data was illegible. • Data was incomplete. Sometimes the maps just raised more questions about the research. One map, for example, compares homicide statistics among certain countries (randomly? I assume?). The data goes by number of deaths, but it doesn’t show the number as a percentage of the total population, so naturally, the more populous countries tend to have more deaths by any cause, because they have more people in the first place. This doesn’t help me understand anything about the countries’ safety or violence levels. Another map, comparing the U.S. and Europe, shows murder stats as percentages, which would have been more meaningful if two-thirds of it weren’t shades of blue. As before, I couldn’t tell them apart. • Data was misleading. For example, one of the maps showed only four countries that don’t use the metric system. The U.S. was one of them. Only, here’s the thing: I live in the U.S., and this country uses the metric system in official capacities all the time. It’s taught in public schools, even to the youngest grades, and it’s the standard for any American working in science, medicine, or the military. Even our currency is based on the metric system, which I don’t think the case in every nation. So I’m not clear whether the author’s information is wrong, or whether he meant that all the other countries on their map no longer use any non-metric system. And it’s one thing to use the metric system—which we absolutely do—it’s another thing to abandon a different system altogether. If there aren’t any remnants left of other measuring systems in the whole world except for 4 nations, well, that’s really very sad. • Data might not have been neutral. Okay, I get it. The author is making a point; he’s entitled to that, since it’s his book. But some of these maps seem to raise loaded questions. I’m going to use the previous example of the metric system map. Seeing all the world drawn in one color (metric system) except for only four countries gives the impression that most of the world has agreed on something, and there are few stubborn holdouts. (I assume that was intentional?) It might be completely innocent, and yet it feels rather pointed, especially give the vague parameters by which he singled out these four nations. I have read enough British literature to know that Europeans have, on occasion, made fun of Americans. So maybe I’m reading too much into this, but it definitely felt like it was meant in that same vein. So what is the result of this? The U.S., which uses another system simultaneously with metric, is sort of mathematically bi-lingual, and like any bilingualist, we are heir to different traditions and heritages. We use a system that’s mostly standard worldwide, but which is also a relatively recent, inorganically manufactured newcomer to the world scene. We also use a different system which stems from an older form of measurements previously used in Great Britain. And Britain didn’t invent it; it was fashioned naturally by different practices from different cultures dating back to ancient times, not just for the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes, but also the Romans, and presumably, the other countries for whom Rome was a center for trade and commerce. All roads lead to Rome (that’s another one of their maps)! The foot was just one ancient measurement that corresponded roughly to body parts, and it, along with the palm and cubit, was used by many ancient peoples. Some body-based measurements, common in Roman (the root of the U.S. system) had connections to similar methods in Egypt, Greece, Assyria, Persia, Babylon, the Akkadian Empire, and Sumeria, among others. They were used by ancient Jews, and later, by Christians and Muslims as well as by followers of ancient polytheistic faiths. It was a common ground of sorts among people who spoke different languages and wore different clothes and had different skin tones. It was multi-religious, mult-racial, multi-cultural. It was multi-everything. It was a shared world history. And now it’s just a joke on a map. This book was interesting and colorful and thought-provoking, but it never lets the reader delve deeper into a topic. It has enough information to be entertaining, but not enough to be useful. It was based on a website, but it just feels like a series of highlights from the site—not anything that can expand on it. It doesn’t make full use of the book form, since it just feels like a collection of info graphics, and it severely underestimates its readers’ attention spans. I give it four stars for being interesting and encouraging people to ask questions.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    Maps have been a particular fascination of mine ever since I was a small child. It always amazed me to see all the places I could go. One of the highlights of my childhood was getting a librarian to help me look at the "big atlas", whose pages were literally almost as big as my 6-year-old self. So I was thrilled to receive an ARC of Ian Wright's Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds. Ian Wright created and maintains the website Brilliant Maps. This book is a collection of 100 of the most interesting Maps have been a particular fascination of mine ever since I was a small child. It always amazed me to see all the places I could go. One of the highlights of my childhood was getting a librarian to help me look at the "big atlas", whose pages were literally almost as big as my 6-year-old self. So I was thrilled to receive an ARC of Ian Wright's Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds. Ian Wright created and maintains the website Brilliant Maps. This book is a collection of 100 of the most interesting and educational. One of my favorites, "Map of the Entire Internet in December 1969", shows a map of the United States. The internet ranged from...UCLA to Utah. The maps are clear and brightly colored. The book is divided into chapters for easy reference. Chapters include: "People and Populations" (How the North American Population Fits into Europe); "Politics, Power, and Religion" (Birthplaces of Religious Leaders); "Culture and Customs" (Heavy Metal Bands per 100K People); "Friends and Enemies" (22 Countries the United Kingdom Has Not Invaded); "Geography" (World's Five Longest Domestic Nonstop Flights); "History" (If the Roman Empire Reunited , Using Modern Borders); "National Identity" (Countries Whose Flags Include Red and/or Blue); "Crime and Punishment" (Prison Population per 100K People); and "Nature" (Countries with the Most Venomous Animals). This book will be published in November. It would be a fantastic gift book for the winter holidays. It would also make a great coffee table book, bet settler, and conversation starter. ("Hey, did y'all know California, all by itself, is one of the world's biggest economies?"). Having access to maps on the internet is nice. But as the little girl I used to be knew, sometimes it's nice to look at them in a book. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This was a fascinating and fun book that exceeded my expectations. While I expected some interesting little infographic types of maps like causes of death by country (none of those, surprisingly), there were so many really interesting maps that I never would have thought to look for. The world map of all the countries who have not been invaded by the United Kingdom was shockingly on point, while others were fascinating like seeing the map of what would be the Mongol empire with today's countries This was a fascinating and fun book that exceeded my expectations. While I expected some interesting little infographic types of maps like causes of death by country (none of those, surprisingly), there were so many really interesting maps that I never would have thought to look for. The world map of all the countries who have not been invaded by the United Kingdom was shockingly on point, while others were fascinating like seeing the map of what would be the Mongol empire with today's countries. You can see things like the death penalty, locations of McDonalds, states where Americans think global warming will affect them, average hours of sunlight, countries where people drive on the left or the right side of the world and on and on. The book is divided by themes like history, culture, geography and history. This would make a great gift, and I may give it to one of my kids or my husband this year. It would also be a great library pick for "strewing" and inspiring some great homeschool investigations. I read a temporary digital ARC of this book for the purpose of review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I lobe books with maps and Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds is a book that's completely filled with maps. It's all about the maps. I enjoyed every second of pouring over them. Now if only they were bigger....

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kitty Verduin

    Brilliant maps for curious minds is a book that warms my big nerdy heart. Not only did I enjoy learning new facts about the world, the graphic side of this book is extremely appealing. Ian Wright succeeded in giving me a new perspective on items we tend to take for granted. On top of that, the author offered me food for thought and making me want to dive in some of the complex topics that he very nearly brought back to ‘just’ a map. I call that being talented and passionate. This book is highly Brilliant maps for curious minds is a book that warms my big nerdy heart. Not only did I enjoy learning new facts about the world, the graphic side of this book is extremely appealing. Ian Wright succeeded in giving me a new perspective on items we tend to take for granted. On top of that, the author offered me food for thought and making me want to dive in some of the complex topics that he very nearly brought back to ‘just’ a map. I call that being talented and passionate. This book is highly accessible, and perhaps even necessary on some issues/maps, for every type of reader. I do wish there was a bit more background on some of the maps, but hey, that’s just me being greedy. Overall, I think the title says it all.. Brilliant work that really satisfied my very curious mind! Special thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a free, electronic ARC of this novel received in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Peterson

    This book is filled with so many fun and sometimes shocking stats. Although I wish there was more information given for some of the maps I couldn't quite understand, it was still a fun read! I learned things about the world that I hadn't ever considered before.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kevidently

    As part of my ongoing new interest in geography, I am trying to start learning new things about maps, countries, and the world. The first snag I hit was reading this book: I am unfortunately colorblind, and I did not realize how big a stumbling block that was going to be. The information in this book is quite interesting, from Maps about which countries have the largest number of homicides, to historical data on where lions used to exist, to some really cool information about which countries are As part of my ongoing new interest in geography, I am trying to start learning new things about maps, countries, and the world. The first snag I hit was reading this book: I am unfortunately colorblind, and I did not realize how big a stumbling block that was going to be. The information in this book is quite interesting, from Maps about which countries have the largest number of homicides, to historical data on where lions used to exist, to some really cool information about which countries are friendly with which other countries. The problem I had with the book was my problem not the book’s problem. First off, I didn’t always know the countries that were singled out (although a map of the world in Mercator projection is included at the front of the book. This was helpful, but not as helpful as I wanted it to be.) The biggest issue, of course, was the fact that I couldn’t always match the key up with the map itself. If the colors were too close together, I couldn’t always tell which countries have the highest speed limits, say, or which countries had the most gold. There is one maddening map included about the winners of the Miss World pageant, and they are all shades of pink, and I couldn’t for the life of me figure out which shade was which. A lot of really interesting facts did come from the book, like how to differentiate between England, the UK, and Great Britain. But my take on studying geography using children’s books in the new year may help me out. A lot of books for younger readers tend to use brighter, more contrasting colors, Which should help me out. I remember listening to an interview with James Holzhauer, the Jeopardy! genius, in which he said that studying children’s books on facts helped him more than adult books. So I’m going to take that tactic into the new year.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    A pretty fascinating book! If you’re curious about other parts of the world, this is a must read (more like a must skim, it’s fairly easy to just flip through). The one that struck me the most was the map of countries where people who were victims of 9/11 came from.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This book was pretty great, but what made it even greater was how, about 1/3 of the way though, my son sat down next to me and we read the rest of the book together, talking about each map.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ehsan Choudhry

    Interesting maps on global culture, politics, geography and history.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Gideon

    "I wish I could do a map of which countries I like more than others. 10 stars, as many as I can"

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    It's an interesting book, showing a number of interesting and surprising map-based statistics like who drives on which side of the road or what countries lost the most people in each world war or how much sunlight does each country get? A lot of good stuff. A pity it wasn't presented a bit better. The maps mostly come from a website Brillliant Maps that Ian Wright hosts and on a computer screen the maps are generally pretty clear and you can zoom in on many of them, but printed books are a diffe It's an interesting book, showing a number of interesting and surprising map-based statistics like who drives on which side of the road or what countries lost the most people in each world war or how much sunlight does each country get? A lot of good stuff. A pity it wasn't presented a bit better. The maps mostly come from a website Brillliant Maps that Ian Wright hosts and on a computer screen the maps are generally pretty clear and you can zoom in on many of them, but printed books are a different beast. The way the book is bound generally means that for all the double-page world maps Eastern Europe, the Middle East and a goodly amount of Africa disappear into the binding. Also, the color choices for the maps are generally not great for printing, lots of low contrast data elements makes it very hard to distinguish one datum from another. I can see the appeal of wanting a gradient of colors from low to high or good to bad or just to x to y, but when the interesting bits the are the differences at the extreme ends like which countries lost more people in WWI 5-10% or >10% and the difference in the printed colors is nearly indistinguishable it's a bit frustrating and without pulling out a magnifying glass, it's really hard to tell the differences for small countries. If you are color blind, I would think a lot of the maps will probably be incomprehensible. It doesn't seem like any attempt was made to adjust the map colors for printing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katie Mac

    I put this on hold a while back and promptly forgot about it, so it was a nice surprise to see it on the hold shelf yesterday! As someone who loves and appreciates data visualization, this was a real treat. It's one of the rare books I may purchase for myself. (It's a great little collection of factoids with which you can impress your guests.)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katra

    Some of these maps may bother you. Some may make you giggle. All of them will make you want "just one more." I hope there's a sequel in the works!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeanjean

    Fascinating and thought provoking

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Fascinating and diverse; this book will appeal not just to people who enjoy geography, but also people who enjoy trivia. I am a visual learner and I was riveted by every page.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Would have been a whole lot better if the book would lay flat, allowing readers to see eastern Europe and the Middle East 🤨

  21. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    This is a great wee gem to dip into every time you sit at your coffee table. You can easily lose yourself in the colourful and engaging infographics, especially if you're anything like me and want to go and find out precisely why we all have different plug sockets, days for elections, ways of saying "football" and just how ridiculously long Chile is! Some of the maps in the book are wacky, some are alarming, some are sobering; all are striking and thought-provoking. A very minor quibble, if I'm This is a great wee gem to dip into every time you sit at your coffee table. You can easily lose yourself in the colourful and engaging infographics, especially if you're anything like me and want to go and find out precisely why we all have different plug sockets, days for elections, ways of saying "football" and just how ridiculously long Chile is! Some of the maps in the book are wacky, some are alarming, some are sobering; all are striking and thought-provoking. A very minor quibble, if I'm being pressed, is that a couple of the graphics can be hard to read (at least without a magnifying glass) due to the particular colour shade or design. The 'most recurring word on each country's English wikipedia page' map was an enjoyable diversion, and those for 'largest source of imports and exports by country', 'highest-valued export' and 'countries with economies larger than California's' (SPOILER: 3, excluding the US!) were especially interesting to a Brit in these days of Brexit-related trade headlines and deadlines.

  22. 4 out of 5

    LauraW

    I LOVE MAPS!!! And I would dearly love to give this book 5 stars or even more, if that were possible. But, there are two things that knock this down from a 5 star rating: First of all the center of the two page fold goes across Russia, the Middle East, and eastern Africa and, unless I crack the spine of the library book, I can't see the data for the countries on either side of the center for about 5 mm. And secondly, there are some maps where the color choices are ridiculous, e.g., pp. 98 and 99 I LOVE MAPS!!! And I would dearly love to give this book 5 stars or even more, if that were possible. But, there are two things that knock this down from a 5 star rating: First of all the center of the two page fold goes across Russia, the Middle East, and eastern Africa and, unless I crack the spine of the library book, I can't see the data for the countries on either side of the center for about 5 mm. And secondly, there are some maps where the color choices are ridiculous, e.g., pp. 98 and 99. There is no reason that two of the four colors used are so similar that you can't tell them apart. They do NOT represent similar things, they shouldn't be so similar in color. See p. 136 for an example of all of the various colors available. That said, I still love this book. I love to study maps and think about the implications of the differences. Maybe I will have to buy my own copy, so I can open it up fully. That won't remedy the color problem, but I could at least see the full layout better.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Tierney

    This book is a really interesting and valuable resource. Ian Wright has broken down maps of the world with different informational statistics on each one. These statistics range from women leaders to strongest growing religions. My favorite is the first few maps showing the population size comparisons with European countries and the United States. The perspective given on global issues that you find in these maps is astounding. I am appreciative of Ian Wright's work in compiling all of this info This book is a really interesting and valuable resource. Ian Wright has broken down maps of the world with different informational statistics on each one. These statistics range from women leaders to strongest growing religions. My favorite is the first few maps showing the population size comparisons with European countries and the United States. The perspective given on global issues that you find in these maps is astounding. I am appreciative of Ian Wright's work in compiling all of this information and putting it out there for the rest of us in a fun to look at book. I will absolutely be returning to this book for information and reference.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Very enjoyable and engaging book! Pros: --I couldn't put it down! I kept thinking that I would just look at one more... --There are many things that I kept sharing with my husband as I read. It's a fun book to talk about. Cons: --The maps are printed across both pages (mostly), so you lose the middle of the maps in the crease. --Some of the maps have very subtle color variations, so they can be difficult to discern differences. --I think a map or two had a typo or misleading info. That didn't break it Very enjoyable and engaging book! Pros: --I couldn't put it down! I kept thinking that I would just look at one more... --There are many things that I kept sharing with my husband as I read. It's a fun book to talk about. Cons: --The maps are printed across both pages (mostly), so you lose the middle of the maps in the crease. --Some of the maps have very subtle color variations, so they can be difficult to discern differences. --I think a map or two had a typo or misleading info. That didn't break it for me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Queen Cronut

    Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds captures the idea of "a picture is worth a million words" through cartography. This book certainly gives the reader new ways to see the world through maps which provide clever commentary and presenting interesting trivia tidbits. Wright incorporates religion, politics, environmental science, culture, and demographics into these maps and uses this knowledge to show a unique, thought-provoking perspective of the world. These maps were colorful and easily accessible Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds captures the idea of "a picture is worth a million words" through cartography. This book certainly gives the reader new ways to see the world through maps which provide clever commentary and presenting interesting trivia tidbits. Wright incorporates religion, politics, environmental science, culture, and demographics into these maps and uses this knowledge to show a unique, thought-provoking perspective of the world. These maps were colorful and easily accessible that appeals to a large range of readers. I wish there was a bit more background information on some of the maps or a further explanation on the topic, however, this was a fun and enjoyable read, perfect for curious minds. *Thank you to NetGalley and The Experiment publishers for providing a free ARC

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    What a fascinating set of maps-- yes, 100 maps published in a book format, though he publishes many more online that give you pause and allow you to think more deeply about our world-- and it might inspire kids to also think of ways to share information themselves using infographics that have sort of hit some stasis in interest. But I think there's so much that social studies classes and even humanities courses can pull from whether it's understanding language, population, or religion but also t What a fascinating set of maps-- yes, 100 maps published in a book format, though he publishes many more online that give you pause and allow you to think more deeply about our world-- and it might inspire kids to also think of ways to share information themselves using infographics that have sort of hit some stasis in interest. But I think there's so much that social studies classes and even humanities courses can pull from whether it's understanding language, population, or religion but also technology and animals. The brightly colored book is a cool one to flip through or dive deep into though for some of them, even the differentiation in color wasn't as differentiated as I would have liked.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    My wife knows that I love maps and so this was a wonderful Christmas gift. These maps range from disheartening to amusing, important to ‘huh?!’ Brilliant Maps is a neat website and this book is a sample of what you can find there. If you like looking at maps, even if they’re in the Mercator projection, then this is for you. If you like weird data and how it interacts with other weird data, then this is for you. I expect to lead through this book again and again just for the joy of seeing the wor My wife knows that I love maps and so this was a wonderful Christmas gift. These maps range from disheartening to amusing, important to ‘huh?!’ Brilliant Maps is a neat website and this book is a sample of what you can find there. If you like looking at maps, even if they’re in the Mercator projection, then this is for you. If you like weird data and how it interacts with other weird data, then this is for you. I expect to lead through this book again and again just for the joy of seeing the world in different perspectives.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    This book will only take you an hour to read, but you'll enjoy it. Each map is uniquely imaginative. I recommend it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donald

    Gorgeous, if trivial at times, but kudos for the three or four that made me go "wow that's interesting". A great book to flick through in half an afternoon.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    Yep I know nothing about the world, and learning more with amazing maps is fascinating.

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