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Star Wars: Tie Fighter

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Enter Shadow Wing! The Empire's salvation - the Rebellion's doom! As the war between the rebels and the Galactic Empire stretches on, it is the innocent people of the galaxy who are most at risk. An elite squadron of TIE fighter pilots is assembled to help protect Imperial interests - and hammer the Emperor's fury down upon the treasonous and violent Rebel Alliance. But ho Enter Shadow Wing! The Empire's salvation - the Rebellion's doom! As the war between the rebels and the Galactic Empire stretches on, it is the innocent people of the galaxy who are most at risk. An elite squadron of TIE fighter pilots is assembled to help protect Imperial interests - and hammer the Emperor's fury down upon the treasonous and violent Rebel Alliance. But how far is this untested team willing to go to preserve law and order? And are the pilots of Shadow Wing as loyal to the Empire as they seem? COLLECTING: STAR WARS: TIE FIGHTER #1-5


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Enter Shadow Wing! The Empire's salvation - the Rebellion's doom! As the war between the rebels and the Galactic Empire stretches on, it is the innocent people of the galaxy who are most at risk. An elite squadron of TIE fighter pilots is assembled to help protect Imperial interests - and hammer the Emperor's fury down upon the treasonous and violent Rebel Alliance. But ho Enter Shadow Wing! The Empire's salvation - the Rebellion's doom! As the war between the rebels and the Galactic Empire stretches on, it is the innocent people of the galaxy who are most at risk. An elite squadron of TIE fighter pilots is assembled to help protect Imperial interests - and hammer the Emperor's fury down upon the treasonous and violent Rebel Alliance. But how far is this untested team willing to go to preserve law and order? And are the pilots of Shadow Wing as loyal to the Empire as they seem? COLLECTING: STAR WARS: TIE FIGHTER #1-5

30 review for Star Wars: Tie Fighter

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

    Now THIS is how you do a “Star Wars” comic. Written by Jody Houser, with art by Roge Antonia, “Tie-Fighter” is – to cut to the chase- gorgeous to look at and a blast to read. It’s a fast-paced, deliberately jocular tale that works as both a throwback to the days of the old “Star Wars” Extended Universe (“Rogue Squadron” fans in particular will eat this up) and stands as a shining example of how best to do the whole “interconnected storytelling” thing that Disney has been pushing so hard since acq Now THIS is how you do a “Star Wars” comic. Written by Jody Houser, with art by Roge Antonia, “Tie-Fighter” is – to cut to the chase- gorgeous to look at and a blast to read. It’s a fast-paced, deliberately jocular tale that works as both a throwback to the days of the old “Star Wars” Extended Universe (“Rogue Squadron” fans in particular will eat this up) and stands as a shining example of how best to do the whole “interconnected storytelling” thing that Disney has been pushing so hard since acquiring the franchise in 2012. To wit: Houser does sterling work tying her series in with the story of the recent “Alphabet Squadron” novel – one of the strongest “Star Wars” novels in recent years, IMO. On their own, “Alphabet Squadron” and “Tie-Fighter” already represent two of the best stories that modern “Star Wars” has produced; taken together, their cumulative narrative effect approaches MCU-levels of satisfying. Long story short: “Tie-Fighter” rocks. Read it.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mario

    Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat??? It cannot end like this!!! Jody Houser does another great comic series with this fantastic volume. We are introduced to the Imperial 204th TIE Fighter wing, with new characters that are instantly recognizable. Also, we have some characters carried over from previous series, like Han Solo: Imperial Cadet. During their missions, they are caught over a treasonous Imperial captain and manage to trace the Rebels that made him change sides, until they reach a turning point in the g Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat??? It cannot end like this!!! Jody Houser does another great comic series with this fantastic volume. We are introduced to the Imperial 204th TIE Fighter wing, with new characters that are instantly recognizable. Also, we have some characters carried over from previous series, like Han Solo: Imperial Cadet. During their missions, they are caught over a treasonous Imperial captain and manage to trace the Rebels that made him change sides, until they reach a turning point in the galactic history... and the story ends! The art is also magnificent, the space battles are beautiful and very clear and easy to understand. Plus the new characters are instantly recognizable, and the tricks he uses to identify them while behind the helmet are very clever! I need more, and the editors say that this will not be the last time we see these characters, and I hope that they are not just talking about the Alphabet Squadron trilogy, but we definitely need more. And if they are written again by Houser and drawn by Roge Antonio, the better!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    This is the start of what could be a pretty good Star Wars graphic novel. The art is fine, and the story goes into what life is like for Imperial pilots, which I'm very interested in. The problem is that there are a lot of characters and I don't know anything about any of them. I remember a little bit about the members of Shadow Wing from the Alphabet Squadron novel (which I loved), but not many specific details about any of them, so nothing here connected for me to the novel. Yrica Quell (Alpha This is the start of what could be a pretty good Star Wars graphic novel. The art is fine, and the story goes into what life is like for Imperial pilots, which I'm very interested in. The problem is that there are a lot of characters and I don't know anything about any of them. I remember a little bit about the members of Shadow Wing from the Alphabet Squadron novel (which I loved), but not many specific details about any of them, so nothing here connected for me to the novel. Yrica Quell (Alphabet Squadron's protagonist) appears for a few pages, but I don't understand how it fits into this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    C.T. Phipps

    TIE FIGHTER is a tie-in book to Alphabet Squadron with the adventures of Shadow Squadron. They are a bunch of unique Imperial characters who all have fascinating issues and problems. They are out to fight the Rebellion, take names, and die for the glory of the Empire. It reminds me a bit of the old TIE Fighter video game from Lucasarts and that's a high compliment. I've read the entire series from issue 1-5 and it's all entertaining if not spectacularly exceptional. I kind of wish it was an ongo TIE FIGHTER is a tie-in book to Alphabet Squadron with the adventures of Shadow Squadron. They are a bunch of unique Imperial characters who all have fascinating issues and problems. They are out to fight the Rebellion, take names, and die for the glory of the Empire. It reminds me a bit of the old TIE Fighter video game from Lucasarts and that's a high compliment. I've read the entire series from issue 1-5 and it's all entertaining if not spectacularly exceptional. I kind of wish it was an ongoing series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    David Dalton

    Kind of different to see a story from the Empire's point of view. This collection is focused on Tie-Fighters. Looks like life in the old Russian KGB style. But these pilots mostly believe in what they are doing. These characters are not mindless drones. We get a good look at them: their families, history, and loves.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    This comic details the adventures of Shadow Wing, a fighter squadron for the Empire. Apparently, this comic is a companion book to Alphabet Squadron, which I am currently reading. It's going to be nice to already have a visual component as I continue in the novel, because I haven't gotten to Shadow Wing yet. Either way, this comic was excellent. Very fast paced and I loved how it made pilots of the Empire seem like they have the same issues as Rebel pilots. Of course they do, but it is nice to se This comic details the adventures of Shadow Wing, a fighter squadron for the Empire. Apparently, this comic is a companion book to Alphabet Squadron, which I am currently reading. It's going to be nice to already have a visual component as I continue in the novel, because I haven't gotten to Shadow Wing yet. Either way, this comic was excellent. Very fast paced and I loved how it made pilots of the Empire seem like they have the same issues as Rebel pilots. Of course they do, but it is nice to see a role reversal. Perhaps more on this review when I finish Alphabet Squadron.... Recommend.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Liam

    I enjoyed this! It's a companion comic to the Alphabet Squadron book, as the main characters are part of the Shadow Wing TIE Squadron that they are hunting in Alphabet Squadron. The art is nice, and having now read Alphabet Squadron there are a few little cameos from characters that appear in there, but so short! Hopefully they choose to continue this in the future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Mediocre read takes place during New Hope. Best thing were the covers...lol

  9. 4 out of 5

    RG

    This just didnt work for me. Havent read much of Houser but hopefully its not like this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ahdom

    Comics are a great format for a squadron series. THe illustrations in this really help you to feel the action. I am currently reading the last few chapters of Alphabet Squadron and I love how the two stories TIE in together, pun most definitely intended. I have no doubt we will hear more from the 204th in sequel books of the Alphabet Squadron series, which I also recommend. Comics are a great format for a squadron series. THe illustrations in this really help you to feel the action. I am currently reading the last few chapters of Alphabet Squadron and I love how the two stories TIE in together, pun most definitely intended. I have no doubt we will hear more from the 204th in sequel books of the Alphabet Squadron series, which I also recommend.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Geoffrey Payne

    I love the idea of a book-comic crossover in a Star Wars story and I hope they do this again for the other Alphabet Squadron books. The writing was great and wasn’t drawn out like these Star Wars miniseries sometimes are. I only wish it tied more directly into the Alphabet Squadron book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul Decker

    This Star Wars comic follows the Shadow Wing Squadron of the Empire from the Battle of Hoth to the destruction of the second Death Star. This is part of a cross-media tie-in with Alpha Squadron. This book is full of references to other stories and characters, almost to its own detriment. There are a lot of interesting characters and a decent enough story, but there isn't enough focus. Too many peaks at other characters that aren't relevant to this story are given too much spotlight. There's even This Star Wars comic follows the Shadow Wing Squadron of the Empire from the Battle of Hoth to the destruction of the second Death Star. This is part of a cross-media tie-in with Alpha Squadron. This book is full of references to other stories and characters, almost to its own detriment. There are a lot of interesting characters and a decent enough story, but there isn't enough focus. Too many peaks at other characters that aren't relevant to this story are given too much spotlight. There's even an asterick referencing the Solo tie-in comic Imperial Cadet. I wasn't sure which characters were new to this story and which ones were just references. I did enjoy the pacing, though. We really got to see the Shadow Squadron experience some stuff. It's an unusual style having every issue end with a flashback though. I'd love to see these characters reappear. What do they do after the Emperor is gone? I give this book a 3.5/5. It's not enough of a story on its own. It relies too much on references and doesn't do enough on its own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    I liked this mostly because of the POV it has from people within the Empire. I do enjoy stuff like that (Lost Stars, Inferno Squad). The story is a bit simplistic and I haven’t read Alphabet Squadron yet so I don’t know how it fits in, but it was cool following a Tie Squad for a bit

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Feels like a collection of vignettes with not a lot of connecting plot or follow through. It doesn't help that Marvel has made these issues so short. Characters are templates, to be filled out with 5 short (very short) flashback stories, I suppose. It doesn't really work. Too many characters, not enough room to tell their stories. The run ends quite suddenly, with an unintentionally hilariously hamfisted announcement ((view spoiler)[I mean, announcing the destruction of the second Death Star and t Feels like a collection of vignettes with not a lot of connecting plot or follow through. It doesn't help that Marvel has made these issues so short. Characters are templates, to be filled out with 5 short (very short) flashback stories, I suppose. It doesn't really work. Too many characters, not enough room to tell their stories. The run ends quite suddenly, with an unintentionally hilariously hamfisted announcement ((view spoiler)[I mean, announcing the destruction of the second Death Star and the supposed death of the Emperor, over a loudspeaker system.. come on, really..? (hide spoiler)] ). <>(Read as five single issues)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sean Humphrey

    It was touch to choose between 3 and 4 stars. It seemed like the characters didn't really get fleshed out enough for me to care about them like I should have, but I did like the overall story arc and themes. It also appears to tie into Alphabet Squadron, so maybe if I read that book and then come back to this comic I'll be more interested.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Barnes

    Star Fighters This was an interesting view into the Imperial The Squadron the art and Storyline are fantastic definitely recommend. I love this

  17. 5 out of 5

    LiteratureIsLife

    Read this review (and others) at: https://literatureislife.com/2019/12/... Tie Fighter is the graphic novel tie-in prequel to the novel Alphabet Squadron. Originally published as a mini-series, the 5th and final issue of Tie Fighter did not actually come out until after Alphabet Squadron was published. So, it is hard to argue that reading Tie Fighter beforehand is really a requirement. Whereas Alphabet Squadron is about a ragtag group of pilots still more used to being Rebels than New Republic, T Read this review (and others) at: https://literatureislife.com/2019/12/... Tie Fighter is the graphic novel tie-in prequel to the novel Alphabet Squadron. Originally published as a mini-series, the 5th and final issue of Tie Fighter did not actually come out until after Alphabet Squadron was published. So, it is hard to argue that reading Tie Fighter beforehand is really a requirement. Whereas Alphabet Squadron is about a ragtag group of pilots still more used to being Rebels than New Republic, Tie Fighter tells the story from the other side. This mini-series focuses on the Imperial fighter squadron that Alphabet Squadron spends their story hunting: Shadow Wing. Being a mini-series, Tie Fighter is fast paced. There were only 5 issues to tell a story and the author knew that going in. Normally this would raise my hackles a bit, but Tie Fighter also has the benefit of being a prequel comic. It was never the intention of this mini-series to tell the whole story. It is distinctively not supposed to do that; that is the Alphabet Squadron trilogy’s job. Instead, it is a rare look at things from the Imperial side of the war. And it takes place in one of the most interesting time periods in Disney’s new canon: the immediate years following Return of the Jedi. Star Wars as a franchise has a very impressive cast of villains. From Tarkin to Thrawn to Darth Vader and the Emperor, the villains are often much more interesting than the heroes. But not all the baddies are big bads. There are also the boots on the ground (or in this case, wings in the air). Seeing how the common, everyday soldiers do things is rare in Star Wars. And rarer still to see it from the Imperial side. It is always fascinating to see how these people justify their actions when we, as the audience, know how evil the Empire can be. These stories taking place after Episode VI are amazing for how quick the Empire fell given the scope of it. Just a few years prior to this, the Empire reigned supreme. The largest military in galactic history, ruling from one side of the galaxy to the other with an iron fist. And now…they are dying. Things started to fall apart from the moment the Emperor died. And some Imperials are struggling to cope with that. Shadow Wing knows they are part of a dying breed, but they will do their duty. Like the more common Rebel protagonists, they are still people. With hopes and dreams and aspirations and fears. And villains who seem more human are always better for it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Hot TIE fighter action, solid character-building, and a truly compelling look at life as an Imperial - Tie Fighter is a near perfect Star Wars read. I think I would have given it five-stars if it had been a dozen issues instead of five. The character backstories and relationships are a bit shortchanged by the lack of room, though Jody Houser does great work with the space she's given. Tie Fighter is ostensibly a tie-in with Alphabet Squadron and, to a lesser degree, Imperial Cadet, but it has muc Hot TIE fighter action, solid character-building, and a truly compelling look at life as an Imperial - Tie Fighter is a near perfect Star Wars read. I think I would have given it five-stars if it had been a dozen issues instead of five. The character backstories and relationships are a bit shortchanged by the lack of room, though Jody Houser does great work with the space she's given. Tie Fighter is ostensibly a tie-in with Alphabet Squadron and, to a lesser degree, Imperial Cadet, but it has much going for it as a standalone. We follow Shadow Squadron, a quality, if underappreciated, TIE fighter squadron doing clean-up work on the edges of the Galactic Civil War. Through two short storylines, we get to know the members of Shadow Squadron and understand life in the Imperial war machine. The adventures are small, suited to a TIE squadron, and perfectly satisfying. As always in these Empire-focused narratives, the most interesting part is seeing how the various characters sell life in the Empire to themselves. Houser really pulls it off with this crew - I could honestly see some of their points of view! Maybe the Emperor isn't so bad! Really wishing Tie Fighter wasn't a mini-series over here.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Anderson

    Another Jody Houser comic, another huge yawn. Ok so TIE Fighter isn’t flat out horrible or even close to as bad as some of Houser’s other Star Wars related works, but good God, what a snooze fest. Nothing remotely exciting or fun happens in this series. Nothing cool or Earth shattering. TIE Fighter is supposed to be about the bad guys, the bane of the rebellion, though you wouldn’t know that here. Instead it’s a bunch of badly drawn, contrived characters who move around and have either flat out d Another Jody Houser comic, another huge yawn. Ok so TIE Fighter isn’t flat out horrible or even close to as bad as some of Houser’s other Star Wars related works, but good God, what a snooze fest. Nothing remotely exciting or fun happens in this series. Nothing cool or Earth shattering. TIE Fighter is supposed to be about the bad guys, the bane of the rebellion, though you wouldn’t know that here. Instead it’s a bunch of badly drawn, contrived characters who move around and have either flat out devotion to the Galactic Empire or pure hatred. Nothing in between. There’s no moral ambiguity or grey areas. And speaking of the art...uggggh. I get this might appeal to the fans of the old school, hand drawn stuff of the 70’s, but this was definitely not my cup of tea. In this day and age of digital rendering, there’s no excuse for the pedestrian artwork that was was presented here. I can’t draw to save my life, so of course I probably don’t have room to talk, however I’m also not getting paid to illustrate a mass produced Star Wars graphic novel. I’m really not understanding why Houser keeps getting jobs with Marvel. Between this, the Age of Republic mini series, and the direct adaptation of Thrawn, this is 3 straight duds. There’s far better writers/authors out there that should be given a chance to tell actually decent stories.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    This is by no means terrible, but it left me cold. I've read enough Star Wars that I'm comfortable reading about and sympathizing with Imperials, but the members of Shadow Wing featured here just didn't seem to have any real personality or differentiation. There's a few action sequences and a little bit of infighting and character growth, but most of the book just feels very staid and dull, even when exciting things are happening. The art is decent but not memorable, although some of the shorts This is by no means terrible, but it left me cold. I've read enough Star Wars that I'm comfortable reading about and sympathizing with Imperials, but the members of Shadow Wing featured here just didn't seem to have any real personality or differentiation. There's a few action sequences and a little bit of infighting and character growth, but most of the book just feels very staid and dull, even when exciting things are happening. The art is decent but not memorable, although some of the shorts aren't quite up to par in that department. And they're weird too - there's no rhyme or reason to them - maybe I'm just not familiar enough with Shadow Wing to get why I should be interested in the characters (I've only read Alphabet Squadron, which also led to disappointment because I expected to see Yrica Quell and people from her history, but I don't think anyone except Nuress carries over to the main plot). There are a lot of faces, and they aren't well differentiated enough in art or character to make much impact on me. It's a perfectly serviceable book, but it didn't scratch the Rogue Squadron itch I was expecting it too. I think that's more on me than the book, though, for having the wrong expectations going in.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anna Catherman

    A fun, breezy read that lives up to its premise, TIE Fighter is definitely one of the better Star Wars comics. It's perhaps not the best direct companion to Alphabet Squadron, as there's few mutual characters and the tone here is quite different. But I enjoyed it thoroughly, reading it easily in a day on my phone (yay, Kindle Unlimited!). Multiversity Comics' brief review on the back is spot on; this comic "Gives a view of a sympathetic portrayal of Imperial pilots without requiring us to feel w A fun, breezy read that lives up to its premise, TIE Fighter is definitely one of the better Star Wars comics. It's perhaps not the best direct companion to Alphabet Squadron, as there's few mutual characters and the tone here is quite different. But I enjoyed it thoroughly, reading it easily in a day on my phone (yay, Kindle Unlimited!). Multiversity Comics' brief review on the back is spot on; this comic "Gives a view of a sympathetic portrayal of Imperial pilots without requiring us to feel worse about the Rebellion". There's a lot of canon stories that seem to play with who was right in the Galactic civil war and try to portray the Imperials in too kind a light and/or portray the Rebels in a really bad light. TIE fighter strikes a rare balance between the two. Ordinary soldiers just doing their jobs, trying to protect the people of the galaxy. There's fun moments, banter, and a bit of heartbreak. My biggest problem was that there were too many characters and some of them got lost in the shuffle. Looking forward to continuing this series at some point, probably well after Alphabet Squadron's release as I'll be waiting for the TPB..

  22. 4 out of 5

    David

    During the mid to late 90s, there was a series of graphic novels company, all centring around the pilots of Rogue and (later) Wraith Squadron, and 'spun-off' from the immensely popular X-Wing and TIE fighter games by the now-defunct Lucasarts company. That's all gone by the wayside (and recatogorised as Legends) ever since Disney bought out Lucasfilm. I picked this one up when it was on sale for part of 2020s Comixology 'May the Fourth' (be with you) sale, having previously read the novel it leads During the mid to late 90s, there was a series of graphic novels company, all centring around the pilots of Rogue and (later) Wraith Squadron, and 'spun-off' from the immensely popular X-Wing and TIE fighter games by the now-defunct Lucasarts company. That's all gone by the wayside (and recatogorised as Legends) ever since Disney bought out Lucasfilm. I picked this one up when it was on sale for part of 2020s Comixology 'May the Fourth' (be with you) sale, having previously read the novel it leads into (that novel being Alphabet Squadron). As such, this story follows a group of Imperial pilots - rather than the more common point of view of Rebel pilots - flying various missions for the Empire, leading up to the battle of Endor and receiving word of their defeat. Yes, the art is really rather good. Yes, the story is really rather bland.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    I had to double check that this wasn't a sequel to something else I hadn't read. It's a prequel to Alphabet Squadron, which I did read, and some of the characters here are familiar. But most of them are not, and the comic seems to do little to establish them and their relationships. Not enough for me, anyway. It doesn't help that I thought it was a complete arc but apparently it isn't; maybe I'll start from scratch when the whole thing is done. It is an ambitious story, reminiscent of the old Em I had to double check that this wasn't a sequel to something else I hadn't read. It's a prequel to Alphabet Squadron, which I did read, and some of the characters here are familiar. But most of them are not, and the comic seems to do little to establish them and their relationships. Not enough for me, anyway. It doesn't help that I thought it was a complete arc but apparently it isn't; maybe I'll start from scratch when the whole thing is done. It is an ambitious story, reminiscent of the old Empire comics in its focus, though with a slightly different (less assured and interesting) narrative approach and framing of Imperial loyalty (IIRC, Tie Fighter is more focused on interpersonal loyalty, where Empire has a stronger sense of institutional roles?). It isn't quite as good or creative overall, but my biggest issue I think comes from having a hard time keeping track of who everyone is. If that issue were addressed I think I would enjoy it more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sophie Jones

    I quite enjoyed this comic. It had all the things a Star Wars fan enjoys; Empire, rebels, space fighting. This comic focuses on a Tie Fighter crew that works for the Empire. They are sent on a mission to reclaim one of their vessels which has gone rogue. You listen to the crew as they chat politics and if the war is worth fighting. There are sections of this comic where you travel back in time to learn more about each crew member - Though, these sections aren't always that insightful. The art is I quite enjoyed this comic. It had all the things a Star Wars fan enjoys; Empire, rebels, space fighting. This comic focuses on a Tie Fighter crew that works for the Empire. They are sent on a mission to reclaim one of their vessels which has gone rogue. You listen to the crew as they chat politics and if the war is worth fighting. There are sections of this comic where you travel back in time to learn more about each crew member - Though, these sections aren't always that insightful. The art is amazing. I really enjoyed looking at the panels and the fighting scenes but the story is a bit lackluster and typical of Star Wars - there is no new ground that's covered. However, despite the small story its still interesting to know what the grunts were doing whilst the Death Star was destroyed. The characters are so-so and the volume ends of a cliff hanger. A must for Star Wars fans but nothing new.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Victor Hugo

    I just read #StarWars TIE Fighter, after reading Alexander Fred’s Alphabet Squadron. It was a “cross event” marketing campaign by Marvel Comics and Del Rey, which I expected to fill some gaps regarding the book. While Alphabet Squadron has an amazing story and it is such an amazing homage to X-Wing book series, TIE Fighter is quite dull and reminded me why I wasn’t reading mainstream comics anymore (by the way, if you want to read some Star Wars comics, go to Dark Horse titles instead of Marvel; I just read #StarWars TIE Fighter, after reading Alexander Fred’s Alphabet Squadron. It was a “cross event” marketing campaign by Marvel Comics and Del Rey, which I expected to fill some gaps regarding the book. While Alphabet Squadron has an amazing story and it is such an amazing homage to X-Wing book series, TIE Fighter is quite dull and reminded me why I wasn’t reading mainstream comics anymore (by the way, if you want to read some Star Wars comics, go to Dark Horse titles instead of Marvel; they did know what they’re doing). TIE Fighter has this story, it seems written with haste. It’s impossible to feel connected or to sympathize with any of its characters, which is a shame. And I’m really sad to say this, but it has also an inconstant art, ranging from beautiful covers to low budget comic book publishers.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Waskett

    Something very different from the Star Wars library. Focusing on a unit in Shadow Wing and their battles against the Rebellion as well as Splinter Empire Units. Guest appearances by Commander Nuress, Yrica Quell and Major Keize link with the Novel Alphabet Squadron, but this focuses on Squadron 5 and the pilots are an interesting bunch, with Teso and Jeela being stand out characters with a lot more to them than first appears. What really makes it for me though is that through the writing and the c Something very different from the Star Wars library. Focusing on a unit in Shadow Wing and their battles against the Rebellion as well as Splinter Empire Units. Guest appearances by Commander Nuress, Yrica Quell and Major Keize link with the Novel Alphabet Squadron, but this focuses on Squadron 5 and the pilots are an interesting bunch, with Teso and Jeela being stand out characters with a lot more to them than first appears. What really makes it for me though is that through the writing and the characters you actually feel for the Imperials and worry about their survival and I even found myself cheering them on in battle with X-Wings, though I was very disappointed with myself after! I'm hoping they turn up in the Novelisations as well, if they haven't already!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Koan

    This was an interesting and short read. While I appreciate the unique looks at the empire's point of view, I'm getting slightly bored with it. They don't add enough to each issue to make it really interesting and they didn't give it enough time(enough issues) to really make me invested in the characters. The story itself was told well and was interesting. The plot was fun and pretty run of the mill. Some of the characters were interesting and it was a bit of a shock what some of the twists were. O This was an interesting and short read. While I appreciate the unique looks at the empire's point of view, I'm getting slightly bored with it. They don't add enough to each issue to make it really interesting and they didn't give it enough time(enough issues) to really make me invested in the characters. The story itself was told well and was interesting. The plot was fun and pretty run of the mill. Some of the characters were interesting and it was a bit of a shock what some of the twists were. Overall, this is a fun comic series, but it really should have been longer. I really look forward to reading Shadow Fall next month and finding out what happens to these characters. 6.5 out of 10.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Hamilton

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sadly, this book promised much but delivered little. Promoted as a TIE-in (pun intended) to the Alphabet Squadron novel, a handful of cameos from Yrica Quell, Soran Keize and Commander Nuress are the only links to a much better story. The main problem here is the lack of character development that a five issue series allows. Only three principal characters have any real depth to them, and two of those are almost immediately blown up, which makes it very difficult to care whether the rest survive Sadly, this book promised much but delivered little. Promoted as a TIE-in (pun intended) to the Alphabet Squadron novel, a handful of cameos from Yrica Quell, Soran Keize and Commander Nuress are the only links to a much better story. The main problem here is the lack of character development that a five issue series allows. Only three principal characters have any real depth to them, and two of those are almost immediately blown up, which makes it very difficult to care whether the rest survive until the end or not. One can only hope that the likes of Broosh, Kahi and Brebtin show up in volumes 2 or 3 of the Alphabet Squadron to give this volume some retroactive depth.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    It is my understanding that this is an Alphabet Squadron tie-in and I haven't read that yet so perhaps that's why this didn't click for me. I say my understanding because aside from a variant cover shown in the gallery, no mention is made of the book, Alphabet Squadron. I also say my understanding because this absolutely feels like it is short 1 or 2 issues. There's an engaging plot and great art of space battles but it starts in media res and just sort of ends. Like not a proper conclusion so m It is my understanding that this is an Alphabet Squadron tie-in and I haven't read that yet so perhaps that's why this didn't click for me. I say my understanding because aside from a variant cover shown in the gallery, no mention is made of the book, Alphabet Squadron. I also say my understanding because this absolutely feels like it is short 1 or 2 issues. There's an engaging plot and great art of space battles but it starts in media res and just sort of ends. Like not a proper conclusion so much as they were giving a 30 minute presentation in a 15 minute time frame and stopped talking when they ran out of time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Lahn

    Great art, and interesting characters, but too short to be as engaging as Stackpole's Rogue Squadron series for Dark Horse. Felt like they set a lot of things up, and then killed off those threads in the next issue. Maybe some of these characters will show up later in the Alphabet Squadron novels. Otherwise it feels like the pilot of a tv show and the series finale rolled into one, with none of the development in between. Started out as a four star review but I talked myself down to three. Maybe Great art, and interesting characters, but too short to be as engaging as Stackpole's Rogue Squadron series for Dark Horse. Felt like they set a lot of things up, and then killed off those threads in the next issue. Maybe some of these characters will show up later in the Alphabet Squadron novels. Otherwise it feels like the pilot of a tv show and the series finale rolled into one, with none of the development in between. Started out as a four star review but I talked myself down to three. Maybe after I finish Alphabet Squadron it'll change my perspective.

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