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Uncanny X-Men: Wolverine and Cyclops, Vol. 2

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These are dark times for mutants, and they're getting darker by the day. With the X-Men vanished and presumed dead, Cyclops' new team has only just come together — but now they're about to lose one of their own! Elsewhere, the new Black King of the Hellfire Club makes his move! But what is the truth about the club's involvement in the new X-Men's current quest? Meanwhile, These are dark times for mutants, and they're getting darker by the day. With the X-Men vanished and presumed dead, Cyclops' new team has only just come together — but now they're about to lose one of their own! Elsewhere, the new Black King of the Hellfire Club makes his move! But what is the truth about the club's involvement in the new X-Men's current quest? Meanwhile, the mutant race faces elimination at the hands of a vaccine that will erase the X-Gene from future generations. As Cyclops' cleanup mission nears its close, all the problems the X-Men have faced will come together! The Hellfire Club's sinister plans, the culmination of the O.N.E.'s assaults on mutantkind and even the inner struggles within the team. It all ends here. This is forever! COLLECTING: Uncanny X-Men (2018) 17-22


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These are dark times for mutants, and they're getting darker by the day. With the X-Men vanished and presumed dead, Cyclops' new team has only just come together — but now they're about to lose one of their own! Elsewhere, the new Black King of the Hellfire Club makes his move! But what is the truth about the club's involvement in the new X-Men's current quest? Meanwhile, These are dark times for mutants, and they're getting darker by the day. With the X-Men vanished and presumed dead, Cyclops' new team has only just come together — but now they're about to lose one of their own! Elsewhere, the new Black King of the Hellfire Club makes his move! But what is the truth about the club's involvement in the new X-Men's current quest? Meanwhile, the mutant race faces elimination at the hands of a vaccine that will erase the X-Gene from future generations. As Cyclops' cleanup mission nears its close, all the problems the X-Men have faced will come together! The Hellfire Club's sinister plans, the culmination of the O.N.E.'s assaults on mutantkind and even the inner struggles within the team. It all ends here. This is forever! COLLECTING: Uncanny X-Men (2018) 17-22

30 review for Uncanny X-Men: Wolverine and Cyclops, Vol. 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    It's the last ride of the X-Men as they go from fight to fight to fight without breathing or mourning the gazillion of X-Men who died in this. This almost feels like an alternate reality book because you know none of it is going to stick. Jonathon Hickman is on tap to wipe it all away in House of X. Salvador Larocca has lost something to his art since he started tracing faces over in Star Wars. There's just always something off with the faces he draws now that looks unnatural.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tiago

    A disappointing departure from Rosenberg, his run, much as every other run that came after Bendis have been a failure, and that's not entirely on the writers, most of these bad decisions were clearly caused by editorial pressure, and this last volume is no different. I would give Rosenberg a break, but he clearly dropped the ball on this one, specially on that last issue, it looked amateurish, story and artwise, and the way he ended Cyke/Emma relationship was distasteful at best, a couple that wa A disappointing departure from Rosenberg, his run, much as every other run that came after Bendis have been a failure, and that's not entirely on the writers, most of these bad decisions were clearly caused by editorial pressure, and this last volume is no different. I would give Rosenberg a break, but he clearly dropped the ball on this one, specially on that last issue, it looked amateurish, story and artwise, and the way he ended Cyke/Emma relationship was distasteful at best, a couple that was peaking before Marvel decided to replace the X-Men with the Inhumans, they deserved a cool comeback, or a good ending at the very least, which Rosenberg couldn't deliver, and that's entirely on him. Poor volume, only recommended to X-Men completists.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Super Letdown. After a first good volume, this one goes way down. A few good fighting moments, even some good interactions, but overly wordy for no reason, a bunch of the same old same old death and inhouse fighting, and pacing is just either TOO quick or dreadfully slow.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Ugh. Talk about ending on a bum note. This story just bounces from one pointless character death to the next to the next to the next... The characters mostly act like idiots and out-of-character, half of which is explained away by mind control. It all ends with an incredibly predictable deus ex machina which fails to satisfy in pretty much every way. I just hope the new broom in the X-world spearheaded by Jonathan Hickman can sweep away this mess...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    To be entirely fair to writer Matthew Rosenberg, he had to cut his story short when Marvel rehired Jonathan Hickman to revamp their entire X-Men line. We may never know exactly what Rosenberg had originally planned and how much editorial interfered with what we ended up with. The volume that led into this one was fantastic and I was really loving the direction of the story, with Cyclops and Wolverine building a small team of desperate X-Men who just wanted to remove some of their enemies off the To be entirely fair to writer Matthew Rosenberg, he had to cut his story short when Marvel rehired Jonathan Hickman to revamp their entire X-Men line. We may never know exactly what Rosenberg had originally planned and how much editorial interfered with what we ended up with. The volume that led into this one was fantastic and I was really loving the direction of the story, with Cyclops and Wolverine building a small team of desperate X-Men who just wanted to remove some of their enemies off the playing board after most of their team had seemingly died (they had merely been transported to the alternate universe created by Nate Grey, but nobody left in the normal world knew that). A good chunk of this story was really entertaining and worked well for me (all of the stuff with Emma Frost and how she was handling the Office of National Emergency I quite enjoyed), but there were other parts that didn't work for me at all (mostly the beginning and ending of the story). In the beginning, we learn how Rahne Sinclair died (an event which actually took place off-panel), and it's the cheapest, crappiest death ever, basically just used to tie into modern real-world transphobia. I'm not sure what Rosenberg was trying to accomplish here, but taking a fan-favorite character and then just offing her in an allegory about transgender violence was very poorly done. I realize that the X-Men have always served as an allegory for discriminated minority groups, but the way this was just shoehorned in without serving the overall story caused it to have very little impact and made me wonder if the author just disliked Wolvesbane. And it wasn't really addressed in any meaningful way to give weight to the issue of violence against transgender people either. Speaking of character deaths, they come so hard and fast in this volume that the vast majority of them feel cheap, with characters barely taking the time to acknowledge them after the funeral of Wolvesbane (for someone who claims to love the X-Men as much as Rosenberg does, he sure does kill off an awful lot of them). These events really feel as if they have no importance or purpose on their own merits and are merely about getting the chess pieces into place for Hickman to play with them (or just added for simple shock value and they'll be "reset" when Hickman takes over). The ending is particularly rushed and unsatisfying (not necessarily Rosenberg's fault given how much he had to resolve in a very short time), with several characters charging to their deaths for no reason. I get that he was trying to make everything seem as hopeless as possible before the majority of X-Men made their triumphant here-to-save-the-day return, but it's odd to see several character just throw their lives away when they've fought and survived against far worse odds countless times before. If things were truly supposed to be that hopeless, the story didn't do an effective job of selling it to me, and the character deaths feel unearned. (view spoiler)[And as for Magik, what was the fallout from the demon inside her breaking free? We never find out as we cut to another scene and never learn more about this. It clearly won't matter for Hickman's upcoming story, but it's not exactly satisfying to this one. (hide spoiler)] Despite these negatives though, much of this really WAS fun to read. I really like the team that Rosenberg put together and how they interact with each other. Their overall mission was really enjoyable to read and as I mentioned before, all of the stuff with Emma Frost was really great (particularly the issue that went back and showed what she'd been up to for the past several months). The art (particularly the issues by Salvador Larroca) was fantastic as always, but a couple pages near the end of the volume where they switch artists are jarringly bad. The climactic ending is probably not the best moment for the worst art to appear. Ultimately because of how everyone knows that Hickman's story that's going to change everything is right around the corner and because of how this was rushed to conclusion in preparation for that Hickman revamp, the events of this volume feel like they simply don't matter at all. Which is a damn shame, because I was loving where Rosenberg's story was going in the last volume (of course, things would have inevitably changed considerably after the majority of X-Men returned from Nate Grey's alternate universe anyway, so it's hard to say what this story would have been like going forward had it been allowed to continue). I'd like to see Rosenberg get another crack at the X-Men however and have the creative freedom to properly tell a complete story. 2.5 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    The clock is ticking, and time is running out for the X-Men. As the ONE draw closer, Emma Frost makes her move, and the X-Men continue to strike off names from their hit list. But they're losing team members thick and fast, and it's only a matter of time before the faith that the remaining team have in Wolverine and Cyclops shatters beyond repair. I think some context helps with this volume. With Jonathan Hickman's run on the horizon, it was basically carte blanche for Matthew Rosenberg to do wha The clock is ticking, and time is running out for the X-Men. As the ONE draw closer, Emma Frost makes her move, and the X-Men continue to strike off names from their hit list. But they're losing team members thick and fast, and it's only a matter of time before the faith that the remaining team have in Wolverine and Cyclops shatters beyond repair. I think some context helps with this volume. With Jonathan Hickman's run on the horizon, it was basically carte blanche for Matthew Rosenberg to do whatever the hell he wanted, kill whoever he wanted, and have a blast doing it - and you can tell that he is. You can tell that he loves writing these characters, but he also knows what this freedom means, and he's running with it right to the end. Reading this in single issues was quite shocking, considering the high body count. But in hindsight, it makes total sense, and in the process Rosenberg manages to rope in as many X-characters as he can along the way, whether to kill them off or just have them do epic things (like Emma Frost - Rosenberg writes a mean Emma Frost), so there's something for everyone here. On art is Salvador Larocca, with his usual your-mileage-may-vary tracey-faces. as well as Carlos Gomez and Carlos Villa who I could not tell apart if you paid me. The art's fine, but the Larocca issues are the better ones. If you take this at face value, you'll probably come away with a sour taste in your mouth. But with some context, and a little suspension of belief, this run on Uncanny X-Men is great fun. It may feel inconsequential, especially after reading Powers Of X and House Of X, but that doesn't make it any less fun while it lasts.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Matthew Rosenberg's X-Men run continues to head straight downhill, ending up in the dumpster. The biggest problem is the excessive compression, which makes this volume almost farcical. It's like reading a few years worth of X-Men comic in summary, as they bounce from one villain to another, one plot to another. And there's really no overarching thread to hold everything together: this is just an author pushing characters around in the worse way. And then there's the murderfest that continues in th Matthew Rosenberg's X-Men run continues to head straight downhill, ending up in the dumpster. The biggest problem is the excessive compression, which makes this volume almost farcical. It's like reading a few years worth of X-Men comic in summary, as they bounce from one villain to another, one plot to another. And there's really no overarching thread to hold everything together: this is just an author pushing characters around in the worse way. And then there's the murderfest that continues in this volume, as Rosenberg executes another few fan favorites. But it's all so decompressed that there's no time to mourn anyone, except for a single funeral at the start. Sometimes, a character's elimination is so abrupt that it's easy to forget. It's a shame: Rosenberg offers up some great continuity. A lot of it is little stuff, bringing pack minor characters like the Nasty Boys and the Upstarts. But he also nails the post-Schism antagonism between Scott and Logan and more importantly starts the process of rehabilitating Emma's character. But his writing just isn't up to snuff, and whenever we move from character to plot, this volume takes a big header. (And the biggest plot of the comic, of a newfound hatred for mutants, in the end seems to go nowhere, exacerbating the issue.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    RG

    I didn't like this. The plot was all over the place, plus Rosenberg is too dialgoue heavy at times.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sans

    Well. That was...certainly a book I read!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    - Emma, you're the most duplicitous creature I've ever encountered. Is there even a term for someone like you? - Survivor.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Among the many things in corporate superhero comics which are difficult to explain to the uninitiated, there's the concept of 'stories that matter'. In a sense, anything which any reader enjoys, matters to them, and that's a good result for any piece of art. In another, when a franchise character is liable to be put through variations of the same paces ad infinitum, with even death only a temporary obstacle, then no story matters: whatever changes now will undoubtedly be undone sooner or later, Among the many things in corporate superhero comics which are difficult to explain to the uninitiated, there's the concept of 'stories that matter'. In a sense, anything which any reader enjoys, matters to them, and that's a good result for any piece of art. In another, when a franchise character is liable to be put through variations of the same paces ad infinitum, with even death only a temporary obstacle, then no story matters: whatever changes now will undoubtedly be undone sooner or later, and the most any writer can hope for is that their contribution lodges deeply enough with enough of the right people that some echo of it will show through in future generations of the palimpsest. All the same, it's an odd experience reading a fairly recent comic from just before a major, and thus far very successful, reboot – a little like dancing with phantoms. Some such stories are conscious farewells, and all the more poignant for knowing they can be an end of reader's hearts even if they can't actually finish the story – Alan Moore and Curt Swan's Whatever Happened To The Man Of Tomorrow?, or Lance Parkin's The Dying Days. Others are just particularly gruelling exercises in killing both time and characters. I don't want to compare the experience of reading Matthew Rosenberg's X-Men work to slogging through Boethius' Consolations, where the only real consolation is knowing the author was brutally executed as soon as he finished; I really like some of Rosenberg's other work, even his other Marvel work, whereas to the best of my knowledge Boethius never did even a Punisher miniseries, let alone a proper run. But there is a similar joy in knowing that this joyless litany of loss and death won't last - that just like the various dark future stories it so closely resembles, it's heading straight for a great big reset button.

  12. 4 out of 5

    C

    Somehow, I never reviewed volume 1 - not sure how that happened, but consider this a review of both. Ok. It's a super grimdark story, deaths right and left... At this point, it is basically an alternate universe x-book (heck, with whatever the heck is going on in Hickman's crazy reboot, what isn't at this point?). So it has a sort of been there, done that sort of thing going on. And in the grand canon scheme of things, this one just doesn't matter with all of the resurrections and craziness on t Somehow, I never reviewed volume 1 - not sure how that happened, but consider this a review of both. Ok. It's a super grimdark story, deaths right and left... At this point, it is basically an alternate universe x-book (heck, with whatever the heck is going on in Hickman's crazy reboot, what isn't at this point?). So it has a sort of been there, done that sort of thing going on. And in the grand canon scheme of things, this one just doesn't matter with all of the resurrections and craziness on the horizon. I've also had a hit or miss feeling with Rosenberg's books that I have read. But... But... It is just so good despite all of that. Rosenberg freaking nails these characters. Scott, Logan, Emma, Sinister - they seem so completely spot on. And he brings in so many characters we haven't seen for a long time (I mean, the flipping Nasty Boys make an appearance. That's a deep cut.) It isn't light on heavy dialogue (something I struggle with in modern comics. What can I say? I dig words.) and the dialogue rings true. There are some excellent twists (even one that "fixes" a problem I had with a character in an earlier volume of his) and they don't come out of thin air. A lot will say this story doesn't matter because of the reboot. But in that sense, do any of these stories matter? I think this one is really well-written and that is what matters most to me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Like the previous volume, this is a really dark book, thematically. The X-Men (and all mutants really) are truly at the end, more so than every before. The team struggles with surviving, what measures they should take, the hows and whys of what they are doing. Most of what you generally see in an X-Men comic (at least in the first couple decades) but compressed down to within 6-12 issues. The problem is that stuff happens really fast, including lots of characters dying. I mean lots. Some in more Like the previous volume, this is a really dark book, thematically. The X-Men (and all mutants really) are truly at the end, more so than every before. The team struggles with surviving, what measures they should take, the hows and whys of what they are doing. Most of what you generally see in an X-Men comic (at least in the first couple decades) but compressed down to within 6-12 issues. The problem is that stuff happens really fast, including lots of characters dying. I mean lots. Some in more creative, natural ways than others. At this pace, I step back and think much of what happens in the book is both for shock value and also knowing that the book will end soon and everything will be undone, so this story has free reign to do what it wants. The other idea is that this book sets up the X-Universe exactly where Hickman wants it to be for House of X/Powers of X, which at this time haven't read yet. There are some interesting moments, but I think in a year or two this short run will be forgotten.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Read as single issues. Ugh. Rosenberg's run just doesn't do it for me. The pacing is off, the dialogue goes nowhere, and that isn't even going into the unfortunate events that take place during this arc. Pass.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Scratch

    Read as single issues. Ah, the feels. So many bad things happened. The deaths of favorite characters, combined with the earlier deaths of favorite characters from previous installments. It was just a lot. And yet, even with all the death and terrible things, there was ONE glorious moment fans have been waiting for for about 15 years. And just a tiny sliver of hope for the future. Obviously, advertisements for House of X and Powers of X say they are going to completely revamp the X-Men status quo. Read as single issues. Ah, the feels. So many bad things happened. The deaths of favorite characters, combined with the earlier deaths of favorite characters from previous installments. It was just a lot. And yet, even with all the death and terrible things, there was ONE glorious moment fans have been waiting for for about 15 years. And just a tiny sliver of hope for the future. Obviously, advertisements for House of X and Powers of X say they are going to completely revamp the X-Men status quo. You can tell, because they played fast and loose with the status quo in this run of Uncanny X-Men. Surely all these deaths can't be permanent. Right?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Don't want to go too deep into this, as the Jonathan Hickman stuff afterwards issues the X-Men into a new era of absolute amazingness. But... this Volume is a good read nonetheless and deserves remembered for a few key things. Highlights: - Wolverine and Cyclops continue to grow their team while the majority of the X-Men are off in the Age of X-Man area. All is not so great though, as both Wolfsbane and Chamber both are killed. While both of those deaths are reversed by HOX/POX, there is a long st Don't want to go too deep into this, as the Jonathan Hickman stuff afterwards issues the X-Men into a new era of absolute amazingness. But... this Volume is a good read nonetheless and deserves remembered for a few key things. Highlights: - Wolverine and Cyclops continue to grow their team while the majority of the X-Men are off in the Age of X-Man area. All is not so great though, as both Wolfsbane and Chamber both are killed. While both of those deaths are reversed by HOX/POX, there is a long stream of names in the comic that address all the previous killed X-Men that brought slight tears to my eyes. - Emma Frost proves again that she is one of the most manipulative people EVER. First by making the X-Men forget who she is, including Cyclops!, but only so she could protect her own ass and the Hellfire Club. BUT... that ability was only a setup to facilitate one of the two things about this Volume that matters: Emma being able to make the world completely forget about mutants. - The other thing? The return of the X-Men from Age of X-Man. AND (one of the best panels in comics that I have ever seen, but that is because of my love for them) The reunion of Cyclops and Jean Grey which has been a LONG TIME COMING... Overall, a good ride here... but wait to read HOX/POX. That's fundamental and X-Men direction altering forever.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    To conclude his short lived run Rosenberg goes on a murdering spree. Impressive kill ratio; mutants fall down faster than in a Game of thrones season. My interest died nearly as fast. It screams shock value half the time, people going kamikaze for no apparent reason (view spoiler)[Havok (hide spoiler)] or dying for stupid ones (view spoiler)[Wolfsbane (hide spoiler)] . All this mutant massacre is overstuffed with long dialogues served in a convoluted mind-numbing plot of no consequence since Hickm To conclude his short lived run Rosenberg goes on a murdering spree. Impressive kill ratio; mutants fall down faster than in a Game of thrones season. My interest died nearly as fast. It screams shock value half the time, people going kamikaze for no apparent reason (view spoiler)[Havok (hide spoiler)] or dying for stupid ones (view spoiler)[Wolfsbane (hide spoiler)] . All this mutant massacre is overstuffed with long dialogues served in a convoluted mind-numbing plot of no consequence since Hickman has relaunched the series. So why bother? Art is so-so at best to boot so there's no reason to bother with this if you're nothing but a completist.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Laissez Farrell

    Garbage all the way down.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David

    I cannot say that I was not entertained by the whole thing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ross Alon

    Worst at least as the previous volume. Even the art sucks. Bring on Hickman! Seriously, if you ever considered skipping a book, it's this one.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Waskett

    The Second Volume is here and is set to link to the X-Men's advenrtures in Age of X-Man. We follow our Earthbound X-Men with Cyclops and Wolverine really getting back into the back and forth of friendship and distrust. Emma Frost steps back into her role as hero/villain. Dani tries to maintain some calm. We get another military Colonel thinking he can control the X-Men and we get a solution to the X-Men's feared and mistrusted by humans issues - kind of! We lose some more beloved characters, thoug The Second Volume is here and is set to link to the X-Men's advenrtures in Age of X-Man. We follow our Earthbound X-Men with Cyclops and Wolverine really getting back into the back and forth of friendship and distrust. Emma Frost steps back into her role as hero/villain. Dani tries to maintain some calm. We get another military Colonel thinking he can control the X-Men and we get a solution to the X-Men's feared and mistrusted by humans issues - kind of! We lose some more beloved characters, though it is the X-Men so I reckon we'll see them again in a few years if not sooner. Though SPOILER, poor Banshee really deserves better! A great read for new and old X-Men fans and I do like the way some of the so-called minor characters get to have their moment in the spotlight.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lillian Francis

    Really not happy about the number of X-Men that die in this issue. Alex? Really? He's the better Summers brother. I want him back. And Jamie. And it pisses me off to find out that everything was Emma manipulating things again. Haven't we already had this storyline. At least I now know Anole didn't betray the mutants of his own free will. Oh, and while I'm in full on rage mode, WTF is with Jean striding out and planting one on Cyke. Ever heard of consent, bitch. Good God, I hate her so much.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    Hoo, doggy, did this series go off the rails. This gets so bad in its final arc, if you told me that Marvel asked Rosenberg to purposely torpedo this book in order to make Jonathan Hickman's upcoming relaunch feel even more refreshing, I would believe you. Because the alternative - that this is actually the story that Rosenberg wanted to tell, and how he wanted to tell it - is too depressing to even consider.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike McDevitt

    Cool mutant action, but I found it almost totally incomprehensible. I'm missing some major pieces of backstory. What reality is this? Why is Cyclops alive? Why is Dark Beast a cyborg? Am I supposed to take any or all of the many gruesome "deaths" seriously? If not, fine- two stars for a horrifying alternate world. If so, then one star.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This is one of the few X-Men things that I enjoyed reading prior to Hickman taking over the franchise. But it really feels a bit rushed. He had to do a lot of drastic things last minutes and quickly before the reset button was pressed. If this had a little more time to breathe, it would have been a bit better.

  26. 5 out of 5

    B

    I liked the ragtag setup and the crazy heightened stakes. But the reveal of the Big Bad was kind of deflating. (view spoiler)[ Just another general I've never heard of. (hide spoiler)] Also not sure I bought the ending where they undid the big switcheroo. And poor Juggernaut. The author essentially nerfed him every time. Anyway, a fun series that became too Emma Frost and wrapped up too hard. I liked the ragtag setup and the crazy heightened stakes. But the reveal of the Big Bad was kind of deflating. (view spoiler)[ Just another general I've never heard of. (hide spoiler)] Also not sure I bought the ending where they undid the big switcheroo. And poor Juggernaut. The author essentially nerfed him every time. Anyway, a fun series that became too Emma Frost and wrapped up too hard.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    I have mixed feelings...its is stacked on an event but not part of the event as it comes to the end before Hickman. I feel like I have seen some of this before and sadly just not dialed in X-men yet.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Problematic metaphor of Rhane's death aside, I just did not have any interest in this. It was all "rip 'em apart despair" and I just did not care.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Oof. The worst X-Men story I’ve read in a while. Luckily it leads into the Hickman reboot.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    It isn't bad, and it isn't great; but, it's the X-Men, so I liked it.

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