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Unplugged and Unpopular

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After Erin Song's parents ban her from using her phone, TV, Internet, and all her screens, she soon discovers mysterious, strange creatures and must foil their plot to take over Earth in this sci-fi graphic novel for tweens. Erin Song lives in a digital world. Everyone has a phone, a tablet, a computer—more screens than you can count. Even with a world of information at her After Erin Song's parents ban her from using her phone, TV, Internet, and all her screens, she soon discovers mysterious, strange creatures and must foil their plot to take over Earth in this sci-fi graphic novel for tweens. Erin Song lives in a digital world. Everyone has a phone, a tablet, a computer—more screens than you can count. Even with a world of information at her fingertips, Erin can’t figure out the secret to popularity at her clique-y junior high school. So when uber-popular Wendy asks for help cheating on a test, Erin jumps at the opportunity. This could be her big break! Unfortunately, she gets caught, and her parents ban her from all her devices. Suddenly, Erin Song is the only girl in the world who’s not allowed to look at a screen. And that’s when Erin notices something funny: small, furry aliens making humans disappear with a weird device Erin’s never seen before. No one else notices them, though—except Erin’s grandmother and two old men who run the local library. They’ve discovered that the aliens are using screens to control the human race, tricking them into thinking they aren’t really there—and that anyone who’s been abducted never existed. Now it’s up to Erin and her grandmother to save the day! But without technology on their side, do they stand a chance?


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After Erin Song's parents ban her from using her phone, TV, Internet, and all her screens, she soon discovers mysterious, strange creatures and must foil their plot to take over Earth in this sci-fi graphic novel for tweens. Erin Song lives in a digital world. Everyone has a phone, a tablet, a computer—more screens than you can count. Even with a world of information at her After Erin Song's parents ban her from using her phone, TV, Internet, and all her screens, she soon discovers mysterious, strange creatures and must foil their plot to take over Earth in this sci-fi graphic novel for tweens. Erin Song lives in a digital world. Everyone has a phone, a tablet, a computer—more screens than you can count. Even with a world of information at her fingertips, Erin can’t figure out the secret to popularity at her clique-y junior high school. So when uber-popular Wendy asks for help cheating on a test, Erin jumps at the opportunity. This could be her big break! Unfortunately, she gets caught, and her parents ban her from all her devices. Suddenly, Erin Song is the only girl in the world who’s not allowed to look at a screen. And that’s when Erin notices something funny: small, furry aliens making humans disappear with a weird device Erin’s never seen before. No one else notices them, though—except Erin’s grandmother and two old men who run the local library. They’ve discovered that the aliens are using screens to control the human race, tricking them into thinking they aren’t really there—and that anyone who’s been abducted never existed. Now it’s up to Erin and her grandmother to save the day! But without technology on their side, do they stand a chance?

30 review for Unplugged and Unpopular

  1. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    Cute, colourful, entertaining.

  2. 5 out of 5

    ♡ ᴅ ʀ ᴇ ᴀ ᴍ ♡ (semi-hiatus)

    3 / 5 stars [ e-ARC received from NetGalley ] Unplugged and Unpopular is a graphic novel with underlying messages about technology and adorable illustrations. The story is about Erin Song who got punished from her parents by not allowing her to use mobile phone or any devices for one month. And when she went to the public library, she found that something was strange and unusual. She could see the monster but no one except two elderly twins who were in the library and her grandmother could see it ❥ 3 / 5 stars [ e-ARC received from NetGalley ] Unplugged and Unpopular is a graphic novel with underlying messages about technology and adorable illustrations. The story is about Erin Song who got punished from her parents by not allowing her to use mobile phone or any devices for one month. And when she went to the public library, she found that something was strange and unusual. She could see the monster but no one except two elderly twins who were in the library and her grandmother could see it too. So, their mission to solve this situation began... ❤️ I must admit that I really like the concept of this book but when I read it, I thought something was still lacking in the book and I also felt the rush in telling stories. And that’s why I didn’t enjoy it and feel connected with the main characters as much as I should. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing this e-ARC to me in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    sue

    A digital graphic comic. It’s aimed at Tweens but it does seem a bit on the daft side at times. However the concept is acceptable because we have this girl who so much wants to be liked and accepted. But, she gets herself into trouble at school. The results of that is for her parents to remove all her devices. That surely in this day and age would peeve any child off. But she discovers a whole bunch of things since not being able to use her technology devices! Fun, entertaining and I can see Tweens A digital graphic comic. It’s aimed at Tweens but it does seem a bit on the daft side at times. However the concept is acceptable because we have this girl who so much wants to be liked and accepted. But, she gets herself into trouble at school. The results of that is for her parents to remove all her devices. That surely in this day and age would peeve any child off. But she discovers a whole bunch of things since not being able to use her technology devices! Fun, entertaining and I can see Tweens enjoying this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie Zantopoulos

    Rating and review by 8 yr old I nanny for who loved being able to read an arc I received at ALA. She really loved this graphic novel about a girl who maybe was saved by being grounded! Technology turns evil but when she’s grounded and can’t have any it’s up to her and her grandmother to save everyone! Three star for being mid level scary but it’s a fun story that was fast to read and had really cool art inside. The drawing and colors were awesome and detailed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Schizanthus

    Erin Song lives in Culver City, California, with her parents. She hasn’t managed to crack the popularity code yet. While her best friend Cody doesn’t care about popularity, Erin does. This results in her going against her better judgement and helping the most popular girl in school cheat off her during an exam. When they get caught Erin’s parents ground her. Her punishment? No access to anything with a screen, so basically her entire existence. When she’s no longer attached to her phone Erin Erin Song lives in Culver City, California, with her parents. She hasn’t managed to crack the popularity code yet. While her best friend Cody doesn’t care about popularity, Erin does. This results in her going against her better judgement and helping the most popular girl in school cheat off her during an exam. When they get caught Erin’s parents ground her. Her punishment? No access to anything with a screen, so basically her entire existence. When she’s no longer attached to her phone Erin begins to notice things she never has before, like aliens! It quickly becomes clear that the aliens haven’t come in peace and it’s up to Erin, her grandmother and twin librarians, Joe and Charlie, to save the world. I enjoyed the illustrations and use of colour in this graphic novel. I particularly liked it when a noise was mentioned and words to describe it lined up with what was happening, for example, “breaking glass” was spelled with shards of broken glass. This story takes place in the near future; Erin’s grandmother is pictured as a young woman in the 1980’s and her parents grew up sans internet. While I love that the majority of the heroes live in retirement homes, this story also perpetuates the myth that older people and technology don’t mix. Besides Erin, who’s not using technology because she’s grounded, the only other people in the story who aren’t glued to their devices are elderly. I don’t think librarians will particularly like the comment about how the internet has resulted in libraries no longer being used. This is certainly not my experience as a frequent library user. All of the librarians I know are very tech savvy and I see people of all ages in my local library. There are clues early on in the story about what’s really happening if you pay attention to what’s being said and details in the pictures. I loved that the president in this near future version of America is female and I had fun picking up on the background details, like the movie poster advertising Jaws 26. This naturally reminded me of when Doc’s Delorean arrived in 2015 and Marty McFly encountered the hologram shark from Jaws 19. I really liked the points this story makes about popularity and how invaluable grandparents are in kids’ lives. This graphic novel also includes not so subtle commentary about the overuse of technology, with people so focused on the screen in front of them that they miss out on the reality that’s happening all around them. Considering that this story’s target audience are growing up surrounded by the glow of screens, it makes a good point. My childhood would have been vastly different if I’d had access to the technology kids have on hand today and while I know I would have loved the internet as a kid I’m consistently grateful that social media didn’t exist back in the Dark Ages of my childhood. While the majority of the story flowed well for me, I couldn’t figure out how (view spoiler)[Erin’s grandmother’s retirement home suddenly became an electronics store. Was this somehow part of the mind control? (hide spoiler)] I reread this story to try to make sense of this but I’m still not clear about it. Thank you so much to NetGalley and Oni Press for the opportunity to read this graphic novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ea

    Sigh. This just wasn't for me. Erin Song is grounded from using electronic devices after cheating on a test in a wild attempt at becoming popular in school, and while that's pretty nope, turns out aliens are kidnapping people by using electronic mind-control. Cue Erin having to save the world. The idea is great, but the execution was lacking a bit. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me an ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    *thank you to Netgalley, Oni Press, Mike Amante and Mat Heagerty for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review* 4 stars. I really enjoyed this! I thought it sounded like a really good idea for a story and I was right. It's about a girl named Erin who ends up getting banned of using her technology such as her Phone, Tablet and Laptop. Now, I grew up as one of those where these items weren't as they are now, until I was a teenager. (I'm 34) And even then it was a big deal for an older *thank you to Netgalley, Oni Press, Mike Amante and Mat Heagerty for an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review* 4 stars. I really enjoyed this! I thought it sounded like a really good idea for a story and I was right. It's about a girl named Erin who ends up getting banned of using her technology such as her Phone, Tablet and Laptop. Now, I grew up as one of those where these items weren't as they are now, until I was a teenager. (I'm 34) And even then it was a big deal for an older teen to have her own phone. Now, I'm seeing toddlers with devices! It's nuts. Anyway, Erin didn't grow up like me, she probably had Instagram the day she was born. (Ok, so a slight exaggeration....but only slight) For Erin, this would have felt like losing a body part. But really what it did was open her eyes to what's really going on in her hometown (and apparently the rest of the world). There were a couple of surprises along the way and I really liked how they showed that technology is like a drug. Now I'm not anti-technology but I do think people spend more than needed time on their devices. I think Middle Grade readers will enjoy this the most but it's really for any age group. It's was fun, witty and I really liked the illustrations. The book has an overall good feel to it and I would definitely recommend it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    I was on the fence to begin with, but I stopped reading when the main character went into an empty library with librarians that claimed "we've been a bit slow the last couple decades. The internet hasn't been too kind to out kind." WTF - when was the last time the author went into a library? The internet has helped us thrive. It doesn't set itself up to be dystopian either, so that excuse is out. And no, I don't care if the librarians come back later and super help out- it's an inaccurate I was on the fence to begin with, but I stopped reading when the main character went into an empty library with librarians that claimed "we've been a bit slow the last couple decades. The internet hasn't been too kind to out kind." WTF - when was the last time the author went into a library? The internet has helped us thrive. It doesn't set itself up to be dystopian either, so that excuse is out. And no, I don't care if the librarians come back later and super help out- it's an inaccurate depiction of a stereotype/misinformation and I am calling that sh*t out. Huge turn off.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily (Obsessed Reader)

    This was a fun little story about technology brainwashing humanity while aliens kidnapped humans right before their eyes. Our main character goes on a journey to rescue the abducted, along with some other unlikely heroes. It was a nice adventure story. I really enjoyed the colorful cartoon-like artwork. I feel like this would make a great live action cartoon! It was a little more juvenile than I expected, although it makes sense with the main character being young herself. It had a great message This was a fun little story about technology brainwashing humanity while aliens kidnapped humans right before their eyes. Our main character goes on a journey to rescue the abducted, along with some other unlikely heroes. It was a nice adventure story. I really enjoyed the colorful cartoon-like artwork. I feel like this would make a great live action cartoon! It was a little more juvenile than I expected, although it makes sense with the main character being young herself. It had a great message behind it as well that is really good for children to hear.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill Kenna

    Thank you to NetGalley for a free review copy. This book is about Erin Song and the technology dependent world that she lives in. After she gets in trouble at school, Erin's parents take away all of her technology! She must travel to the local library in order to do research for a school paper. Outside of the library she sees a weird pink creature capture a human and make him disappear. She goes inside and is stunned to learn that the librarians know what's going on! It's an alien invasion! Now Thank you to NetGalley for a free review copy. This book is about Erin Song and the technology dependent world that she lives in. After she gets in trouble at school, Erin's parents take away all of her technology! She must travel to the local library in order to do research for a school paper. Outside of the library she sees a weird pink creature capture a human and make him disappear. She goes inside and is stunned to learn that the librarians know what's going on! It's an alien invasion! Now Erin and some new friends will have to try and thwart the alien invasion before it's to late. This was an adorable book. I think this will fit into the juvenile graphic novel section of any library. The story moved along nicely and I liked the message that the book is sending. The artwork is really cute too.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Despite the first page, where books were disparaged (part of the plot, I know, but it still irked), this book ended up being quite cute and had a rather powerful, if sometimes subtle, message. The obvious message, look up from your screen devices once in a while to see the reality of the world around you. The subtle one? Older people ROCK and shouldn't be ignored just because they are old. Old doesn't mean useless or stupid. Honestly, I think that message is just as important, if not more so, Despite the first page, where books were disparaged (part of the plot, I know, but it still irked), this book ended up being quite cute and had a rather powerful, if sometimes subtle, message. The obvious message, look up from your screen devices once in a while to see the reality of the world around you. The subtle one? Older people ROCK and shouldn't be ignored just because they are old. Old doesn't mean useless or stupid. Honestly, I think that message is just as important, if not more so, than the don't become dependent on your screens. I really enjoyed the bright colors and the artwork and the storyline was important, but gotten across in a fun and not so serious it bores way. This is the first in what appears to be a series and I would definitely like to read the next one when it comes out. It has a middle/young high school vibe, with popularity being so important to the main character and the violence is somewhat silly, so I would say appropriate for younger readers on up. 3.5 stars, rounded up to 4, because it grew on me and was cute, silly and serious all at the same time. Ironically, I'm posting my review into the interwebs, where it will be read on screened devices, but the book is available in book form, so there is that! My thanks to NetGalley and Oni Press for an eARC copy of this book to read and review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    I loved this comic. We follow Erin, a young girl who’s only dream is to be popular. After trying her hardest to impress the most popular girl in school, she ends up getting sent to detention and a phone call home. To punish her for her bad behaviour, Erin’s parents confiscate her phone/computer/Tv for a whole month. Not knowing what to do with herself now she doesn’t have ‘instagram’ to entertain her, Erin wonders down to the library only to discover there is an alien invasion going on. But, only I loved this comic. We follow Erin, a young girl who’s only dream is to be popular. After trying her hardest to impress the most popular girl in school, she ends up getting sent to detention and a phone call home. To punish her for her bad behaviour, Erin’s parents confiscate her phone/computer/Tv for a whole month. Not knowing what to do with herself now she doesn’t have ‘instagram’ to entertain her, Erin wonders down to the library only to discover there is an alien invasion going on. But, only those who don’t use technology can see it. Can Erin save the day? I loved this short and sweet comic. It was colourful, funny and had a deep message behind the story. Everyone uses mobile phones now and it makes you realise how much we could be missing out on. I also enjoyed the fact that Erin tries hard to fit in but at the end of the book realises she doesn’t need to fit in to be cool. She is who she is. A beautifully written comic for young-middle aged children

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    Thanks to Netgally I was able to receive this ARC for an honest review!!! Average Rating: * (4.4) Plot: (4.0) I loved the premise throughout this whole book. It was easy to follow and the pacing really helped. However the only issue I had with the plot was the beginning, I totally understand that Erin needed to do something really bad in order for her to get technology taken away from her, but I believe what she did is just a personal preference of why I wouldn’t do what she did, otherwise it Thanks to Netgally I was able to receive this ARC for an honest review!!! Average Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐* (4.4) Plot: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (4.0) I loved the premise throughout this whole book. It was easy to follow and the pacing really helped. However the only issue I had with the plot was the beginning, I totally understand that Erin needed to do something really bad in order for her to get technology taken away from her, but I believe what she did is just a personal preference of why I wouldn’t do what she did, otherwise it flowed really well! Characters: ⭐⭐⭐⭐* (4.5) All of the main characters are so CUTE! I also really appreciated Erin’s character development throughout the novel and how it changed her in the end. Enjoyment: ⭐⭐⭐⭐* (4.5) As I said before, I love the premise and I love how well it was executed because I wondered how people were getting brainwashed by the technology. The characters were cute and worked well together! Setting/World: ⭐⭐⭐⭐ (4.0) The world building was done really good as well! A lot of the important questions regarding about the world itself were answered. Art Style: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ (5.0) Absolutely ADORABLE!! I especially love Erin’s outfit and her little hat!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dsamowen

    This is a charming book with a heartfelt message and delightful art. Mat’s characters are lovable, and Tintin’s artwork really pops off the page. This is a totally accessible book for young kids who aren’t huge readers yet!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hristina

    The style of this graphic novel was fantastic, I really enjoyed how it was colored, it seemed bright and fun. I liked the story too, it was intriguing, and it was executed really well. It was enjoyable and entertaining, an afternoon well spent. If you're interested in picking it up, definitely do it. *Copy receive through NetGalley in exchange for a fair review *Rating: 4/5 stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nola

    4.5 stars. I really enjoyed this graphic novel. Erin Song isn't exactly unpopular, but she'd not in the popular group at school either. She has the chance to level up when popular girl Wendy asks her to help her cheat on an exam. However, they get caught and Erin's parents ban her from all electronic devices for a month - no smart phone, no lap top, no internet. This is Erin's worst nightmare until she makes a startling discovery. In her now 'unplugged' world she can see that aliens are 4.5 stars. I really enjoyed this graphic novel. Erin Song isn't exactly unpopular, but she'd not in the popular group at school either. She has the chance to level up when popular girl Wendy asks her to help her cheat on an exam. However, they get caught and Erin's parents ban her from all electronic devices for a month - no smart phone, no lap top, no internet. This is Erin's worst nightmare until she makes a startling discovery. In her now 'unplugged' world she can see that aliens are abducting humans in a plan to take over the world. They're controlling everyone through their devices. No one believes her except for some similarly 'unplugged' seniors. Can Erin and the oldies save the human race? This was a great story. Most teenagers would share Erin's angst at being separated from social media and the internet, but the sci-fi element gives it an interesting twist. The writing and illustrations are engaging and there's a lot of humour in addition to deeper themes (e.g. the advantage of turning off the devices every now and then and actually talking to people and noticing what's around you; and also the fact that seniors still have a lot to offer and shouldn't be written off because of their age). The message isn't heavy-handed, but comes across in an interesting way. I got a little confused at one point as to why Erin and her parents had different views about what had happened to Grandma even before Erin was 'unplugged'. That didn't make sense to me, though I may have missed something. However, apart from a couple of slightly confusing bits, the overall story was good. It would probably best suit age groups of around 10-14, though there's also a lot for older teens and adults to enjoy. If you're looking for something fun, but with some depth, this graphic novel fits the bill. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing an Advanced Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    *Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the review copy.* Aw, how cute was this? I loved the plot and the underlying messages. The artwork was super cute and the writing was just funny enough. Solid read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shawna Thompson

    So much fun! Unplugged and Unpopular is a laugh a page. I could see it working well for kids who are past Dog Man but not quite to Raina. If you don't fall in love with the character Grandma you might not have a pulse! Tintin Pantoja's art is so much fun and makes the action feel big. There's a valuable message about limiting screen time that is hidden behind enough fun sci-fi that kids might just take it in. I received an arc of the book from a friend who attend ALA Annual.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    1.5/5 Unplugged and Unpopular is about Erin Song, who doesn't understand why she's so unpopular. She would do anything to become more popular, including helping the most popular girl in class cheat on a test. When she was caught, her parents grounded her and banned all technology. Without the distraction of technology, Erin starts noticing strange things happening around her (like aliens running amok, and people going missing). It's up to Erin to get to the bottom of this mystery and possibly 1.5/5 Unplugged and Unpopular is about Erin Song, who doesn't understand why she's so unpopular. She would do anything to become more popular, including helping the most popular girl in class cheat on a test. When she was caught, her parents grounded her and banned all technology. Without the distraction of technology, Erin starts noticing strange things happening around her (like aliens running amok, and people going missing). It's up to Erin to get to the bottom of this mystery and possibly save the world! I read the uncorrected proof so the dialogue and other aspects in the book might change a bit. Overall though, I wasn't too impressed with this book. The graphics were cute but the story moved at a choppy pace and the dialogue and transitions between different scenes didn't flow very well. I also found Erin to be extremely rude and unlikeable (it's no wonder she's unpopular!). This is a middle-grade book but the characters were so two-dimensional and the dialogue was so simple and childish, it's probably more suitable being marketed as a children's book. eARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Yes, yes, yes, we know, if you onlky have your face in your phone all the time you miss stuff. In this slightly heavy handed story, Erin, and all her friends are always in front of some sort of electronic device, as are her parents. But there are clues that there is something odd going on, while everyone is staring at their screens. For one thing, there is a photo of the family, with a young man in it, and yet her parents say she is an only child. And then, Erin has her electronic privileges taken Yes, yes, yes, we know, if you onlky have your face in your phone all the time you miss stuff. In this slightly heavy handed story, Erin, and all her friends are always in front of some sort of electronic device, as are her parents. But there are clues that there is something odd going on, while everyone is staring at their screens. For one thing, there is a photo of the family, with a young man in it, and yet her parents say she is an only child. And then, Erin has her electronic privileges taken away for a month, and she learns there is something odd going on in the non-digital world. Aliens. Aliens are kidnapping people, and no one is noticing, until Erin does, because she is no longer watching a screen, and getting hypnotized by the aliens. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hadewych

    I received a copy of this comic at NetGalley. In this comic we follow Erin who isn't a popular girl. She and the rest of the population are addicted to their phones. When Erin has been punished and her mobile devices are taken away, she is forced to do her homework in the library. When she wants to enter the library she sees an alien. I found that the story was sometimes a little confusing and that it went too quickly, but I really recommend this comic to everyone who is addicted to their phones. I received a copy of this comic at NetGalley. In this comic we follow Erin who isn't a popular girl. She and the rest of the population are addicted to their phones. When Erin has been punished and her mobile devices are taken away, she is forced to do her homework in the library. When she wants to enter the library she sees an alien. I found that the story was sometimes a little confusing and that it went too quickly, but I really recommend this comic to everyone who is addicted to their phones. This comic has a really important message and actually everyone needs to get this message. This comic is perfect for kids who don't like to read long story's, because the comic is really short and the comic is approachable for kids.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Really entertaining read! Cool illustrations, fun dialogue and lovable characters while also addressing themes such as the role of technology, equality and ageism in society.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mehsi

    I received this graphic novel from Netgalley in exchange of an honest review. Review to come in October.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Beulah Jenifer

    A thrilling, graphic novel on aliens, invasion and an unpopular school girl! Owen Song lives in a gadget world all about mobiles, tablets, laptops, and internet. She's unpopular in school always teased and bullied. On a particular day, she's bullied and goes to the Principals office and later gets grounded for a month without gadgets and internet at home. She sees aliens, and strange things happen around her. She along with her grandma and grandpa twins has to save this world, from aliens. An A thrilling, graphic novel on aliens, invasion and an unpopular school girl! Owen Song lives in a gadget world all about mobiles, tablets, laptops, and internet. She's unpopular in school always teased and bullied. On a particular day, she's bullied and goes to the Principals office and later gets grounded for a month without gadgets and internet at home. She sees aliens, and strange things happen around her. She along with her grandma and grandpa twins has to save this world, from aliens. An alien invasion, granddaughter grandma duo ... a public library with twins! Exciting, super adorable graphic novel to enjoy! Loved the illustrations! So detailed and colorful. Pick the book for a cool read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jakob Free

    Even though this book skews toward a younger audience, I quite enjoyed it. It's got a great central premise, a compelling protagonist, snappy dialogue, and wonderful art. Would definitely recommend this to parents of younger children looking to get them started on comics.

  26. 4 out of 5

    J.D. DeHart

    Colorful, vivid — a wonderful text to share with young readers (or just enjoy). The art is eye-catching, for sure. Yet another strong graphic novel offering from this publisher.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Digital Arc copy provided by netgalley. Unplugged and unpopular is a cute hilarious graphic novel with a deep underlying message. It tells a story from a preteens p.o.v where technology literally took over the world, thanks to aliens. Everyone around her is so stuck on their phones/tv screens to actually notice the real world around them. The world that's now infested with little purple aliens trying to splice their genes together and create one giant super army. Luckily enough the preteen Erin Digital Arc copy provided by netgalley. Unplugged and unpopular is a cute hilarious graphic novel with a deep underlying message. It tells a story from a preteens p.o.v where technology literally took over the world, thanks to aliens. Everyone around her is so stuck on their phones/tv screens to actually notice the real world around them. The world that's now infested with little purple aliens trying to splice their genes together and create one giant super army. Luckily enough the preteen Erin gets in trouble which gives her time away from the screens in time breaking their hold on her and giving her a chance to really see what's going on around her. Essential she has to team up with the most unlikely and underappreciated group, the elders. Because in a world full of technology no one wants to listen to elders speak anymore and elders want nothing to do with this fast pace technological world this gives Erin a chance a glimpse of hope at making things right. Erin ends up saving the world with a group of retired senior citizens and a handful of everyday objects transformed by the genius minds of her grandma's boyfriend and his twin. In the end Erin realizes how much cooler her life really was before she became obsessed with the technology & others opinions. She finds the happiness in her life she thought she was missing. However it ended a bit open and I would love to see where else it would go with a spliced human/alien army. 4.5 stars Great read for middle schoolers! Beautiful color scheme and I loved the style very entertaining read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    The Georgia Book Belle

    *I received a copy of this graphic novel via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* There is so much beyond our glowing screens. Apparently aliens are one of those things. I’m Unplugged and Unpopular, the main character Erin, lives in a not so distant future where all we have is computer screens. Tablets, TVs, computers, cell phones, and more have replaced things like regular books. Everyone is glued to their devices. When Erin is grounded for helping the popular girl cheat on a test, she is *I received a copy of this graphic novel via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review* There is so much beyond our glowing screens. Apparently aliens are one of those things. I’m Unplugged and Unpopular, the main character Erin, lives in a not so distant future where all we have is computer screens. Tablets, TVs, computers, cell phones, and more have replaced things like regular books. Everyone is glued to their devices. When Erin is grounded for helping the popular girl cheat on a test, she is away from all screens and begins to see aliens. Apparently, these aliens use screens to hypnotize humans and change their memories so they can abduct people without anyone noticing. Okay... well.. this sounds promising... but it missed the mark. Graphic novels are insanely popular, especially in middle schools. I have read my fair share and there can be plenty of hits and misses. This for me was a miss. The book tried to shove a lot of unbelievable information into a little over 100 pages. I know graphic novels aren’t supposed to be long, but things felt rushed which made it all ridiculous. For example: towards the end the old guys gather an army. It’s very poorly explained where these people came from and why they were so easily persuaded to join. Things just happen way too fast. I am a believer that any form of reading is reading. There is no such thing as a bad book when it gets kids to read. I can see some of my middle school kids eating this up, but for me I fell short.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amber Smith

    I was given this free review copy graphic novel at my request and have voluntarily left this review. I loved this so much! I loved Erin. She was a fun and lovable character. The artwork was fabulous. I would definitely read something else by Mat Heagerty! The story was different and unique. I loved the concept. When you first meet Erin she is just like every young teen, but she grows so much in this graphic novel!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Vantine

    The main characters are a spunky teen and her grandmother. It's a kid friendly take on The Matrix with unplugging standing in for the red pill. The art is fun and engaging. However, libraries are not dusty places filled with technophobic old people. Programs like Girls Who Code are taught in libraries. It's also the place where most people without home computers get access to the internet. My library is filled with kids and teens who only have access to the internet outside of school because we The main characters are a spunky teen and her grandmother. It's a kid friendly take on The Matrix with unplugging standing in for the red pill. The art is fun and engaging. However, libraries are not dusty places filled with technophobic old people. Programs like Girls Who Code are taught in libraries. It's also the place where most people without home computers get access to the internet. My library is filled with kids and teens who only have access to the internet outside of school because we exist. People in their 60's and 70's are able to use smartphones, tablets, and computers. The idea that everyone below a certain age is addicted to their screens and everyone above a certain age is afraid of technology is not the best one to put forward.

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