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Carved from Stone and Dream

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"Frohock seamlessly blends fantasy and WWII history into a heart-wrenching story of war in the action-packed second Los Nefilim novel." —Publishers Weekly (starred review) In this sequel to Where Oblivion Lives, the first entry in the Los Nefilim series set during the Spanish Civil War, a coded notebook containing the identities of Los Nefilim’s spies falls into enemy "Frohock seamlessly blends fantasy and WWII history into a heart-wrenching story of war in the action-packed second Los Nefilim novel." —Publishers Weekly (starred review) In this sequel to Where Oblivion Lives, the first entry in the Los Nefilim series set during the Spanish Civil War, a coded notebook containing the identities of Los Nefilim’s spies falls into enemy hands, and Diago is faced with an impossible choice: betray Los Nefilim or save his family. February 1939 Catalonia has fallen. Los Nefilim is in retreat. With the Nationalist forces hard on their heels, the members of Los Nefilim—Spanish Nephilim that possess the power to harness music and light in the supernatural war between the angels and daimons—make a desperate run for the French border. Diago Alvarez, a singular being of angelic and daimonic descent, follows Guillermo and a small group of nefilim through the Pyrenees, where the ice is as treacherous as postwar loyalties—both can kill with a single slip. When a notebook of Los Nefilim’s undercover operatives falls into a traitor’s hands, Diago and Guillermo risk their lives to track it down. As they uncover a pocket realm deep within the Pyrenees, Diago discovers his family is held hostage. Faced with an impossible choice: betray Los Nefilim, or watch his family die, Diago must nurture the daimonic song he has so long denied in order to save those he loves.


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"Frohock seamlessly blends fantasy and WWII history into a heart-wrenching story of war in the action-packed second Los Nefilim novel." —Publishers Weekly (starred review) In this sequel to Where Oblivion Lives, the first entry in the Los Nefilim series set during the Spanish Civil War, a coded notebook containing the identities of Los Nefilim’s spies falls into enemy "Frohock seamlessly blends fantasy and WWII history into a heart-wrenching story of war in the action-packed second Los Nefilim novel." —Publishers Weekly (starred review) In this sequel to Where Oblivion Lives, the first entry in the Los Nefilim series set during the Spanish Civil War, a coded notebook containing the identities of Los Nefilim’s spies falls into enemy hands, and Diago is faced with an impossible choice: betray Los Nefilim or save his family. February 1939 Catalonia has fallen. Los Nefilim is in retreat. With the Nationalist forces hard on their heels, the members of Los Nefilim—Spanish Nephilim that possess the power to harness music and light in the supernatural war between the angels and daimons—make a desperate run for the French border. Diago Alvarez, a singular being of angelic and daimonic descent, follows Guillermo and a small group of nefilim through the Pyrenees, where the ice is as treacherous as postwar loyalties—both can kill with a single slip. When a notebook of Los Nefilim’s undercover operatives falls into a traitor’s hands, Diago and Guillermo risk their lives to track it down. As they uncover a pocket realm deep within the Pyrenees, Diago discovers his family is held hostage. Faced with an impossible choice: betray Los Nefilim, or watch his family die, Diago must nurture the daimonic song he has so long denied in order to save those he loves.

30 review for Carved from Stone and Dream

  1. 4 out of 5

    T. Frohock

    Hey! Hey! There are glimpses of urban fantasy, of horror, of historical fantasy, as well as a big enough dose of tense action for a Hollywood blockbuster, but ultimately Carved From Stone and Dream is a unique and rewarding pleasure that defies categorisation. --T.O. Munro, the Fantasy Hive If you go to my website, you can read the first chapter (scroll down past the blurb)! Hey! Hey! There are glimpses of urban fantasy, of horror, of historical fantasy, as well as a big enough dose of tense action for a Hollywood blockbuster, but ultimately Carved From Stone and Dream is a unique and rewarding pleasure that defies categorisation. --T.O. Munro, the Fantasy Hive If you go to my website, you can read the first chapter (scroll down past the blurb)!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (bunnyreads)

    ARC from Edelweiss – Thank you to Edleweiss, Harper Voyager, and Teresa Frohock for the ARC (release date feb. 25 2020) Diago needs to get Guillermo through the mountains and in to France where the Los Nefilim can regroup, more importantly he needs to keep Guillermo out of Jordi’s reach because Jordi wants Guillermo’s signet. With the ring and his brother dead, Jordi can force an abdication and become King again. To complicate matters, a wrench is thrown into their retreat when a coded notebook i ARC from Edelweiss – Thank you to Edleweiss, Harper Voyager, and Teresa Frohock for the ARC (release date feb. 25 2020) Diago needs to get Guillermo through the mountains and in to France where the Los Nefilim can regroup, more importantly he needs to keep Guillermo out of Jordi’s reach because Jordi wants Guillermo’s signet. With the ring and his brother dead, Jordi can force an abdication and become King again. To complicate matters, a wrench is thrown into their retreat when a coded notebook is lost to the enemy. My first introduction to Los Nefilim was Where Oblivion Lives. I fell in love with the world, the writing, and the characters. I had hoped to go back and catch the first novellas before this book was released, that didn’t happen of course, but I loved that it didn’t matter because these work as self-contained entries into the world. This story is quite different in tone from Where Oblivion Lives. It’s less a Hitchcock mystery/creeping horror and more Cold War Spies sneaking behind enemy lines. At first, I missed the Stradivarius, that haunting song and fevered-dream muzziness that we shared with Diago, as he worked through his memories and on the key in Where Oblivion Lives . But I began to realize that while the environment may have changed, the core aspects that I loved were present. Just maybe not in the same way. The haunting music isn’t as prominent other than in the angel’s song and in their magic, and that creepy horror ambience may not be spilling out of the story as thickly this time around, but it most certainly exists, along with that solid, thoughtful and beautifully stark writing that doesn’t waste a word or pull a punch when it needs to. The dangers to the Los Nefilim feel bigger while also hitting closer to home for Diago, and his family. Diago is always walking a line between his daimon side and his angel side. We see a lot of that struggle for him in this book, with his daimon side being stroked easily by the discomfort that anyone feels; including the people he cares about. He has to keep it tamped down, try to ignore it, lest it overcomes him, but he finds he is having to call on that part of himself more often to help the people he loves. We see Miguel being pushed to the edge – he’s in a bad way and his personality may not be the best due to that. For me, who hadn’t spent a huge amount of time with Miguel as a character, the use of Diago’s memories of Miguel bolstering him through his own dark times, went a long way in showing me the kind of person Miguel usually is, and how much of himself he was losing to the drugs and torture. I think my favourite character in this book though was Nico  – he is faced with the decision to either stick by or betray the one he loved, knowing that either way he will lose that person. I don’t want to go into it too much because of spoilers, but I felt so much heartache for Nico and the struggles he was dealing with in this story. The story is solid – everything from characters right down to the tone is near perfect. At the risk of repeating myself from my previous review of her work, and from my twitter yacking: It’s the details that impress me, the weaving together of events and placement of bread crumbs, small thoughtful comments that get followed through with later, or hit us with horror when the understanding dawns. The yellow scarf that tells us everything about Rafael’s personality while doing dual duty as a scene setter. The hints about Sam that later make my heart pound through my chest when I realize just who it is that our boy is getting ready to meet. And especially the follow-through on Martinez, who could have easily been a throwaway character, but served to show us the impact and repercussions of a tough decision. These are the things that raise a story up to the next level for me but coupled with everything else, just made this a stellar read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    keikii Eats Books

    To read more reviews in this series and others, check out keikii eats books! Quote: “He’s also not the first youngster we’ve had to kill, and unless I can find some way to persuade my brother into a truce, he won’t be the last. Let’s move.” Review: Getting into trouble is a family affair. Good thing getting out of trouble is one, too. And what an amazing family, as well! Carved From Stone and Dream starts with Diago in the wilderness somewhere between France and Spain in the Pyrenees. The Spanish To read more reviews in this series and others, check out keikii eats books! Quote: “He’s also not the first youngster we’ve had to kill, and unless I can find some way to persuade my brother into a truce, he won’t be the last. Let’s move.” Review: Getting into trouble is a family affair. Good thing getting out of trouble is one, too. And what an amazing family, as well! Carved From Stone and Dream starts with Diago in the wilderness somewhere between France and Spain in the Pyrenees. The Spanish Civil War blew up, and Los Nefilim have had to evacuate. Diago is looking forward to joining up with his family again. But trouble instantly descends upon his head, because they are being hunted by agents of their enemy. And I swear, I've said it before and this time I super, super mean it: this book starts and just Never. Ever. Stops. I was so scared for the characters the entire time. They were never safe, and they never once seemed like they were about to get out of the trouble they started in as soon as we met them in the story. In fact, they just kept getting into more and more trouble. The book has a slightly different feel than Where Oblivion Lives due to this fact. There was danger before, but this is on an entirely different level, with an entirely different set of consequences. And it is frightening as hell. Plus, this really is a family affair. Unlike the previous installments in this series that focused primarily on Diago with some extra, Carved From Stone and Dream shares almost equal time between him, his husband Miquel, and their son Rafael. And they all get into trouble, big trouble. And they're all in trouble in different places. And seriously I was so stressed while reading this. Carved From Stone and Dream is so good because it emphasizes this war that is currently being fought, the lines that are drawn, while also drawing us deeper into the world of the nephilim. It isn't just a human fiasco. But we're also looking towards the future, as well. Look at the date. 1939. It is just that much more scary for that piece of information, which drops in hints throughout the book. As much as Carved From Stone and Dream is terrifying in the moment, the hints it drops for future books scares me even more. And I can't wait. ARC received from Harper Voyager on Edelweiss. This did not affect my review. To read more reviews for this series, check out the Los Nefilim series page!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Carved from Stone and Dream is the fifth entry and the second full length novel in T. Frohock’s Los Nefilim universe. I’ve been a fan of Frohock’s work for ages, and have found the Los Nefilim series to be an absolute gem, filled with relatable characters with complex, believable relationships, within a vividly realised slice of history. So I was quite excited to get my hands on this one, albeit a little worried it wouldn’t live up to my expectations. Fortunately, it met and exceeded them instead Carved from Stone and Dream is the fifth entry and the second full length novel in T. Frohock’s Los Nefilim universe. I’ve been a fan of Frohock’s work for ages, and have found the Los Nefilim series to be an absolute gem, filled with relatable characters with complex, believable relationships, within a vividly realised slice of history. So I was quite excited to get my hands on this one, albeit a little worried it wouldn’t live up to my expectations. Fortunately, it met and exceeded them instead. The story is set in the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War, as broken Republican forces and lines of non-combatant fall back toward France. And in France, we find our Nephilim. They’re the offspring of angels (or demons), individuals able to harness the power of the infernal and the divine to shape the mortal world. They feud and politick as much as anyone else, or perhaps more. It’s possible to see the Nephilim as a stand against a darkness most of us don’t know exists – though equally, one can argue that some of them are as much a part of that darkness as any angel, fallen or otherwise. In any event, the Nephilim and their struggles are deeply embedded in this world, influencing and influenced by its events. Frohock has always been fantastic at worldbuilding, and that hasn’t changed here. The refugee camps for those on the road to Paris are believably appalling. Starving refugees crammed cheek-by-jowl. Turning on each other, turning on themselves, walking out into the sea on the border coast, leaving their worldly goods behind. This is the harrowing aftermath of appalling conflict, brought to life and brought home to the reader. The camps are real. The simmering tensions in the aftermath fo the conflict are real. The atrocities are real. You can turn the page with these people, feel the surf against your legs, look across the sand at weary, broken people trying to find a new home, a new life away from madness and the horror of war. This is a text which is unafraid to evocatively portray the spectre of war, and its consequences. It does so with haunting effectiveness. Time is also spent in France, in a Paris not yet at war. The atmosphere is febrile, the air taut with truth unspoken. There is a certain joi de vivre though, standing in stark contrast to the horrors of the refugees. Still, even Paris is not a safe place; gangs are paid off, crimes committed, oaths taken. Sections of pre-war Paris are here drawn with an exacting precision, and the lush, evocative prose helps to bring Paris darkly to life. This is the post-war world, and if our characters are important to us, and to their own story, there are factions and factors seething away in the background which may yet change everything. The other core component of the story is the characters. I want to give particular space to Diago and Rafael, whose relationship has formed the backbone of the series. It’s at the core of the story here, as well. Separated in the swift tides of conflict, their search for each other is fraught, and the emotions that are drawn forth are genuine, valid, and powerful. The way that both men lean on each other, trust each other, know they can depend on each other is a tonic. That they also have their own vices, their own struggles, that just makes them more real. This is their life, their romance, their relationship. The fear and dread of possible loss is there, but also the casual affection, the longing, the comfortable silences. These are men who complete each other, and the depicition of their love on the page continues to be beautifully, truthfully realised. There are other types of relationship here of course. This is a story which wants to talk about family as much as it wants to talk about friendship, romance, or enmity. Watching Rafael and Diago trying to raise a son has always been as delightful as it is painful. Mistakes are made on all sides, but the struggle, the fact that everyone involved is trying, continues to be a delight, and gives their struggle both weight and emotional impact. Incidentally, it’s an absolute joy to follow their son through these pages, each instalment of the story bringing him a little closer to his family, and pushing him a little further away at the same time. In any event, this is a story which is thinking hard about families, about what ties them together and about what breaks those ties. It feels honest, raw, real. You can stand beside these men as they dig into the depths of their being, struggling to articulate their own truths – and that is both uplifting and humbling. It’s wonderfully done. Oh, and there’s a story too. Did I not mention that? Well, I won’t get into the details, because, of course, spoilers. But there’s a lot that goes on here, in a vibrant world, filled with characters who seem almost too real for the page. There’s betrayal, for sure There’s setbacks, and hurt. There’s blood and tears. But also close friendship, heroism, triumphs against all the odds. There’s secret plots, acts of terrible villainy, shocking revelations, and heart-wrenching heroism. There’s fast-paced action, beautifully crafted magic, and consequences which will grab hold of you and keep the pages turning long into the night. Should you read this? Yes, yes, I think you should.

  5. 4 out of 5

    FanFiAddict

    Rating: 9.0/10 Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance copy of Carved from Stone and Dream (Los Nefilim #5) for review consideration. Receiving a copy of the book did not influence my thoughts or opinions. Frohock once again delivers the goods with her follow-up to the mesmerizing Where Oblivion Lives. Carved from Stone and Dream, while more low-key with the musical overtones, cranks up the volume when it comes to action, pacing, and the grandiose implications of the major players in the Rating: 9.0/10 Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance copy of Carved from Stone and Dream (Los Nefilim #5) for review consideration. Receiving a copy of the book did not influence my thoughts or opinions. Frohock once again delivers the goods with her follow-up to the mesmerizing Where Oblivion Lives. Carved from Stone and Dream, while more low-key with the musical overtones, cranks up the volume when it comes to action, pacing, and the grandiose implications of the major players in the game. It is a story that will tear at your heartstrings and leave you breathless. It is simply spectacular. This story is set some nine (9) years after the events of its predecessor and turns part of the focus away from Diago and Guillermo, two (2) of the focal points in WOL, and gives a hefty amount of spotlight to their children, Rafael and Ysabel. Now in their teens, the children begin to grow into themselves and attempt to forge their own paths, though they do not have the strength or experience necessary to do so. At least, not without their parents’ guiding hands. It is a story with a focus on family, bonding, and relationships, on top of that of war, spies, traitors, and the like. It was a neat experience seeing the relationships between the children and their parents. While the kiddos tend to be bull-headed when it comes to decision making, always rushing in instead of taking a second to think about the implications, their elders are always what feels like just a whisper away, guiding them through life’s complications and the scenarios they find themselves in. While all of this is going on, you have the Spanish Civil War happening with the Battle of Minorca starting and ending, the Los Nefilim in retreat through France, and postwar loyalties being put to the question. Having said all that, it is also a thriller chock-full of daimons, angels, spies, Nazis, portals, magic, and explosions. OH MY. Frohock does a wonderful job juggling the family aspects of the story with the intense surroundings of war, and precisely adds in factual history elements to the story because that is apart of what historical fiction/fantasy is all about. If you haven’t given the Los Nefilim series a shot yet, I encourage you to do so. The novellas are not essential reading material, so you can begin with Where Oblivion Lives. While Carved from Stone and Dream CAN be read as a stand-alone thanks to Frohock’s amazing writing ability, I’d encourage you to read it in order.

  6. 5 out of 5

    T. Frohock

    Hi, everyone! If you're looking for the next Los Nefilim novel, it has its own page at Where Oblivion Lives. Thanks so much! T Hi, everyone! If you're looking for the next Los Nefilim novel, it has its own page at Where Oblivion Lives. Thanks so much! T

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Wright

    5/5 stars — starkly gripping historical fantasy that reads like a war movie with the toxic glorification stripped away T. Frohock’s Los Nefilim series has been playing the long game with my feelings. In the novellas and Where Oblivion Lives, I cared about Diago, Miquel, and Raphael. When they were in danger, I bit my nails and read on, hoping for a happy ending. But sometime between reading Where Oblivion Lives and picking up Carved from Stone and Dream, they put down roots in my heart. The time 5/5 stars — starkly gripping historical fantasy that reads like a war movie with the toxic glorification stripped away T. Frohock’s Los Nefilim series has been playing the long game with my feelings. In the novellas and Where Oblivion Lives, I cared about Diago, Miquel, and Raphael. When they were in danger, I bit my nails and read on, hoping for a happy ending. But sometime between reading Where Oblivion Lives and picking up Carved from Stone and Dream, they put down roots in my heart. The time skip between the first novel and this one means Raphael is a teenager; I found myself mourning those years I didn’t get to read about like he was my own family member. Maybe it’s that the stakes were higher in this book than previous ones and maybe Frohock’s been working on her emotional-prose right hook. Either way, this book is one that will stick with me for a long time. Carved from Stone and Dream is a genre-blending gem that injects an already fraught era of history with elements of fantasy and horror. In 1939 Europe, two families, the organization to which they belong, and their allies face off against an old foe with new and terrible friends. The enemy nefilim are bent on digging up an ancient and powerful enemy. A drug turns nefilim into berserkers…if it doesn’t destroy their minds first. And in glimpses of the future, the threat of the Holocaust looms. Diago and Guillermo’s trip to the French headquarters of the uprooted Spanish nefilim takes a detour when they pursue a traitor and discover a massive enemy operation spearheaded by Guillermo’s estranged brother, their longtime foe Jordi Abelló. Meanwhile, Miquel goes toe to toe with his mental limits during his own run-in with Abelló’s supporters. I enjoyed that Diago and Miquel operated separately in this novel because it showed how well their characters complement each other. Diago is forced to embrace his daimon side, which thrives on negative emotions, and pushes its addictive call back with healthy coping mechanisms his husband spent years helping him learn. Miquel confronts his limits and grows as a character because of Diago’s past support. (“In another incarnation, Miquel might have fought to the death, but Diago had taught him to retreat in strength.”) Ironically, it’s by letting them operate alone that we see the importance of their relationship. Ysa and Raphael have grown into quick-witted, foul-mouthed teenagers, and both are forced into responsibilities beyond their years by the war. Raphael, determined to prove his worth to Los Nefilim, tails a suspected enemy and finds his way into hell on earth. Ysa, acting as leader of Los Nefilim in her father’s absence, struggles to be more than her age and gender in the eyes of her father’s soldiers. The latter leads to bits like this: “You forget, Carlos, Mamá is a doctor, and I’ve assisted her in the clinic. We’ve treated the shits as well as gunshot wounds. So there’s little you can say to shock us ladies.” (And now you can join me in being excited that the next book in the series will focus on Ysa!) I gush about the magic system every time I review a Los Nefilim book, but the gorgeous tactile descriptions and technical specificity of the music-related terms took this novel’s action scenes to an even higher level. Parts like this gave me chills: “Guillermo jerked his gloves from his hands and snatched a beam of the day’s last light. Twisting the pale gold shaft into a ball, he shouted his song.” Infiltrating an enemy compound in a pocket realm culminates in a lightning-paced magical skirmish near the end of the book, so that’s just a taste of the incredible fight scenes. I have a notoriously hard time doing justice to the books I’ve loved most when it comes review time, so I’m going to wrap up with a list of things I appreciated. - the author’s note at the start that acts as a “previously on” refresher section of previous books’ plot highlights. My terrible memory thanks you! - this opening paragraph: “Winter hit the Pyrenees hard with ice as treacherous as postwar loyalties. Both could kill with a single slip.” - Carme, master sigil-trap-setter and an all-around badass - clever foreshadowing all over the place (No spoilers, but Guillermo’s signet and lighter in the first chapter? His discussion of the power of symbols??) - strong, powerful men being emotionally vulnerable together and supporting each other. Characters and a plot that directly challenge toxic masculinity. (“Be aware of your feelings. Nurture your empathy for others, and the evil within you will die.”) - the prose! This is another thing I always say about Frohock’s writing, but she’s a master wordsmith who can make you flinch in disgust or crack a smile at the unlikeliest time. - For Frohock’s signature horror element, we’ve got the Grigori: disgraced angels who will burn the world to free themselves from the abyss that is their prison. Samyaza, his tin mask, and what’s underneath the mask will have me jumping at shadows for quite a while. - the queen of the Les Néphilim has a female consort, and there are allusions to the third member of Raphael and Ysa’s “three musketeers” friend group also being attracted to women. Further, Raphael is shown as attracted to multiple genders. To readers seeking intelligently constructed historical fantasy, gritty narratives that don’t glorify war, characters who dismantle gender stereotypes and denounce racism and fascist violence: this book is for you. Although it can be read alone, I highly recommend starting at the beginning with the Los Nefilim novella trio, or at the very least with Where Oblivion Lives. I’m going to go out on a slight limb and say this will likely appeal to fans of Naomi Novik’s Temeraire series, because if her storytelling style and the Napoleonic war with dragons are your thing, WWII with angels and angel-daimon hybrids will probably also be up your alley. Content warnings: war-typical violence, mentioned rape, mutilation, racism, torture, body horror, scorpions, intended rape of a child, drug abuse, mentions of an abusive relationship between side characters, allusion to Holocaust death camps ** I received a copy of this book from the author in exchange for an honest review. **

  8. 5 out of 5

    David H.

    I had been expecting something closer to the last book in terms of timing and scope, but instead, we got a story where 90% of it takes place in less than 36 hours. This was basically a historical thriller, and it was great. It was so tightly plotted, while it never left me out of breath, I just wanted to keep GOING (the only reason I didn't read this in one sitting was because I have a kid and also had to go to work). This also takes place several years after Where Oblivion Lives, so the kids ar I had been expecting something closer to the last book in terms of timing and scope, but instead, we got a story where 90% of it takes place in less than 36 hours. This was basically a historical thriller, and it was great. It was so tightly plotted, while it never left me out of breath, I just wanted to keep GOING (the only reason I didn't read this in one sitting was because I have a kid and also had to go to work). This also takes place several years after Where Oblivion Lives, so the kids are a bit older now (Rafael is a great little 14-year-old). I'm very curious to see how Miquel's experience in this one will translate to the next book (if it does), as he probably had the roughest time of anyone in this book. Anyway, if anyone reading this happened to have read any of the other Los Nefilim stories: please keep going! I need more people to read this so I can talk to them about it. (And if you haven't read any of them yet--start with Los Nefilim (or one of the individual novellas), and then catch up, please.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ash | Wild Heart Reads

    Carved From Stone and Dream dials the intensity and action up to 100 from the word go. The stakes are higher than ever, the losses greater and betrayal poses a constant threat. Though I have given all of the Los Nefilim books five stars I think Carved From Stone and Dream is my five-iest five stars out of all of them. It was so wonderful being back in Diago's world. We meet them several years on from the last time we saw them, they got their backs against the wall but they are Los Nefilim and th Carved From Stone and Dream dials the intensity and action up to 100 from the word go. The stakes are higher than ever, the losses greater and betrayal poses a constant threat. Though I have given all of the Los Nefilim books five stars I think Carved From Stone and Dream is my five-iest five stars out of all of them. It was so wonderful being back in Diago's world. We meet them several years on from the last time we saw them, they got their backs against the wall but they are Los Nefilim and they will not go down without a fight.  I will hunt you...in this incarnation, and all others. I will find you. Rafael plays a larger role in Carved From Stone and Dream, finding himself right in the middle of the danger. On the threshold between boy and man, Rafael is struggling to find his footing - particularly with those that whilst trying to keep him safe inadvertently stifle him. But being Diago and Miquel's son he isn't about to let himself be sidelined when his parents are in danger.  What I will forever love about these books are the strength of the characters, the importance placed on their bonds with each other and the strength they draw from each others love. Miquel and Diago in particular will always hold my heart - I said something along these lines in one of my goodreads updates but every time Miquel refers to Diago as his husband the world gets a little brighter. The writing as per usual is beautiful. It pulls you right in and brings the story to life with a colourful intensity. The characters and the setting are so wonderfully drawn. Frohock has created something truly brilliant and it's always such a joy to inhabit this world (even when it hurts).  That is my oath and I will teach you to fear the dark. I don't tend to spoil the plot of books much, if at all in my reviews - but just know that you absolutely need to be reading this book and the series in general. The writing, the characters, the world - you do not want to miss this.  Rep: Diago and Rafael are bi, Miquel is gay and there are multiple queer side characters.  *I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own* This review and more can be found at https://wildheartreads.wordpress.com/

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    Review to follow

  11. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    Yes! This book was everything I was hoping it would be. Once again Frohock brings her amazing writing and voice to this riveting tale of the Los Nefilim. The stakes are even higher for Diago and Miguel, and now Rafael takes an even larger role. This book had some great action in it, but the heartbeat is still the characters. I really love the blend of historical fiction with dark fantasy. The way the angels and daimons cast their spells through songs and glyphs is just so cool. I can't wait for th Yes! This book was everything I was hoping it would be. Once again Frohock brings her amazing writing and voice to this riveting tale of the Los Nefilim. The stakes are even higher for Diago and Miguel, and now Rafael takes an even larger role. This book had some great action in it, but the heartbeat is still the characters. I really love the blend of historical fiction with dark fantasy. The way the angels and daimons cast their spells through songs and glyphs is just so cool. I can't wait for the last book!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maša

    Spanish Civil War found our protagonists on the defensive, fleeing to France. Alas, on the Pyrenees, something foul is afoot. This continues to be great alternate history with magic that comes from music (my favorite magical trope, but usually poorly done - not so here!), engaging characters, and tight plot that usually makes me read deep into the night. I look forward to continuing this story for however long the author continues with it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Abi Walton

    Although it took me a while to finish Carved from Stone and Dream thoroughly enjoyed the second book in the Los Nefilim series. I am now going back and reading the short stories in this universe. I was captivated from the first page and adore Diago and his husband Miquel and their son. It is a wonderfully dark but touching book filled with all the angst you expect for the Nefilim series. If you need a good read that will pull at your heartstrings in all the right way Carved from Stone and Dreams Although it took me a while to finish Carved from Stone and Dream thoroughly enjoyed the second book in the Los Nefilim series. I am now going back and reading the short stories in this universe. I was captivated from the first page and adore Diago and his husband Miquel and their son. It is a wonderfully dark but touching book filled with all the angst you expect for the Nefilim series. If you need a good read that will pull at your heartstrings in all the right way Carved from Stone and Dreams is the book for you but you probably need too read Where oblivion lies first just to truly get the sense of this intricate world of Angels and Demons

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Note: I read an ARC (advance reader copy) which may differ slightly from the final published version. This book is historical horror/dark fantasy with a strong military component. Set in early 1939, close to the end of the Spanish civil war and before the outbreak of World War II, it centers on the nefilim, beings with part mortal and part supernatural ancestry. The setting and the fantastical elements are distinctive and very well drawn. The story and action are compelling: the book held me fro Note: I read an ARC (advance reader copy) which may differ slightly from the final published version. This book is historical horror/dark fantasy with a strong military component. Set in early 1939, close to the end of the Spanish civil war and before the outbreak of World War II, it centers on the nefilim, beings with part mortal and part supernatural ancestry. The setting and the fantastical elements are distinctive and very well drawn. The story and action are compelling: the book held me from the first page and didn't let go. But it is the characters that matter most to me. This is the third book with Diago and Miquel and their son Rafael, one of my favorite fictional families, and, as with the previous books, also highlights the deep friendship between Diago and Guillermo. I love these characters. I think about them in between books. There are a lot of books with solitary heroes or heroines, and many others where people are divided by misunderstandings and dramatic strife before finally coming together. I often enjoy those books, but I crave stories where people help each other without reservation. Even though "Carved from Stone and Dream" takes the characters into some very dark places (very dark -- be warned), they continue to care for each other. Highly recommended. 5/18/2020 note: I just finished re-reading this, and enjoyed it every bit as much the second time round. I love these characters and how they care for each other. About my reviews: I try to review every book I read, including those that I don't end up enjoying. The reviews are not scholarly, but just indicate my reaction as a reader, reading being my addiction. I am miserly with 5-star reviews; 4 stars means I liked a book very much; 3 stars means I liked it; 2 stars means I didn't like it (though often the 2-star books are very popular with other readers and/or are by authors whose other work I've loved).

  15. 4 out of 5

    THE BIBLIOPHILE (Rituranjan)

    A thrilling installment to Where Oblivion Lives, packed with tension and supernatural flavour. The writing is excellent and atmospheric, capturing the dark tone of the story with a fluidity that keeps the pacing saturated with suspense. I enjoyed reading it. Miss Frohock brilliantly weaves the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War, and the World War 2 into her narrative. She also subtly touches on the immigration issues. The volatile political ambience of the 1940s is integrated into the action surro A thrilling installment to Where Oblivion Lives, packed with tension and supernatural flavour. The writing is excellent and atmospheric, capturing the dark tone of the story with a fluidity that keeps the pacing saturated with suspense. I enjoyed reading it. Miss Frohock brilliantly weaves the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War, and the World War 2 into her narrative. She also subtly touches on the immigration issues. The volatile political ambience of the 1940s is integrated into the action surrounding the plot, and the characters that try to navigate against the treacherous odds. I loved the fact that, we get to see the dangerous squabbles afflicting the supernatural and the mortal world. However, I would like to know more about the angelic interferences, and the role of various factions of the Nephilim in this deadly conflict of power. The characters were well-defined as well. What intrigues me more is the Antagonist Jordi. He's one hell of an Machiavellian freak. The personal relationships of the characters are skillfully handled, bringing out the complex emotions and personalities that shapes their action in the conflict that's raging in the world. The fearsome aspect of the Grigori was quite effectual in making the plot more riveting. I also liked the way how Rafael has grown out from his innocent shell, and helps in the final turn out of the events, that afflicts his parents and the choices of the Los Nefilim. The most significant aspect of this series is the depiction of the supernatural entities and their shadowy world. I don't think I have read anything that treats angels, nephilims, demons in such a creative way. The essence of magic is also beautiful, being centered around music. I would love to read more of Los Nefilim, and hope that the next books will be more epic, and quench my thirst of historical supernatural fantasy novels.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joe Crowe

    This is the next book in a series, so read the previous one, Where Oblivion Lives, first: It's really good. I reviewed it here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3... This series is a supernatural action saga set in the Spanish Civil War. So you can learn history stuff as well as read about angels fighting demons. That's two kinds of books in one, an excellent value. This one, like book 1, is a fun, thrilling story that reads fast. It's the kind of book (and series) that you'll go back and re-r This is the next book in a series, so read the previous one, Where Oblivion Lives, first: It's really good. I reviewed it here: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3... This series is a supernatural action saga set in the Spanish Civil War. So you can learn history stuff as well as read about angels fighting demons. That's two kinds of books in one, an excellent value. This one, like book 1, is a fun, thrilling story that reads fast. It's the kind of book (and series) that you'll go back and re-read. The author has clearly had an absolute blast constructing the world and these characters and couldn't wait to get back to them. You'll feel the same way.

  17. 4 out of 5

    David Pomerico

    I’m biased, but I think this is even better than the first in the series.

  18. 5 out of 5

    K.V. Johansen

    Dark, grim, tense, and ultimately hopeful, despite the looming spectre of the Second World War. (Read an ARC to blurb it; not going to post the blurb here; will let T. do with that as she wills.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tommy

    Another strong read. This one was tense! Excellent worldbuilding, as always.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Bryant

    Writers are architects, working in different materials. Teresa works in filigreed wrought iron, creating stories that are elegant , beautiful, and strong. Continuing the tale of the Nephilim Diago ( actually a nephilim/ daimon hybrid) his husband Miguel, and Diago’s son Rafael- now all separated as a result of the Spanish Civil War ( a partial result of the conflict between the angelic factions who influence human history) and each must find themselves as they struggle in the period between the Writers are architects, working in different materials. Teresa works in filigreed wrought iron, creating stories that are elegant , beautiful, and strong. Continuing the tale of the Nephilim Diago ( actually a nephilim/ daimon hybrid) his husband Miguel, and Diago’s son Rafael- now all separated as a result of the Spanish Civil War ( a partial result of the conflict between the angelic factions who influence human history) and each must find themselves as they struggle in the period between the Spanish Civil War and World War 2. Teresa flawlessly melds fantasy with fact, obviously doing her historical homework with the period so you feel part of what is unraveling. Characters are fully realized and further refined from her previous work Where Oblivion Lives. This is a wonderful melange of genres and if you have never read her work before you are completely missing out on an under appreciated author who deserves status on best seller lists everywhere.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Meerkat

    This is one of the few times where I've been genuinely concerned if a character is going to make it out in the end. Which is almost silly since Diego and Miquel made it out alright in the the previous books but when you throw in the heightened tension of Franco and evil angels trying to kill everyone and you know Nazi's it cranks up the oh gods meter up quite a lot. The how will they make it out of this base, how will they make it out of Spain and to France. Will they be safe. It doesn't skimp o This is one of the few times where I've been genuinely concerned if a character is going to make it out in the end. Which is almost silly since Diego and Miquel made it out alright in the the previous books but when you throw in the heightened tension of Franco and evil angels trying to kill everyone and you know Nazi's it cranks up the oh gods meter up quite a lot. The how will they make it out of this base, how will they make it out of Spain and to France. Will they be safe. It doesn't skimp on the details of how Franco came to power and the effects it had. With saying that I absolutely loved this latest addition to the book I love how much Rafael has grown in this book but he is still a cocky teenager out to prove himself and that he still has to face the consequences of that. The war isnt leaving anyone unscathed in this. I liked how Nico changed in this book and that he was more than just Jordi's lover that he was a scientist albeit one that did terrible terrible things. I also liked how Diego was able to connect with his demonic nature and powers but not lose himself to feelings of pain and darkness that he was able to find the necessary balance he needed in this lifetime. The relationships in this series are what gives it its backbone of queer found family and queerness in general with the French nefil queen and her lady consort. It is this casual queerness that is ever expanding with each book that makes me relish each page of this series. The relationship of Diego and Miquel is complex and fascinating and not an entirely smooth road which I like because they havent to work through the weight of 4 different past lives occasionally rearing their heads to throw a rench in things. This series continues to impress me with its ferocity and also gentleness that characters can go through great trauma and come out the other end with their support network helping and holding them. Hopefully everyone makes it through the war mostly in tact as we've reached the point before the invasion of France by the germans.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    Carved From Stone And Dream frankly takes an already outstanding series, and kicks it up a notch. We're in the heat of things right from the get-go, and I had moments of finding my heart pounding relatively routinely. The careful crafting of this series has long had me invested, involved in the lives of Diego, Miguel, Guillermo, and in this novel, the fascinating Nico. I can't really gush enough about this book - I adore Frohock's prose, her storytelling instincts, and the way these characters h Carved From Stone And Dream frankly takes an already outstanding series, and kicks it up a notch. We're in the heat of things right from the get-go, and I had moments of finding my heart pounding relatively routinely. The careful crafting of this series has long had me invested, involved in the lives of Diego, Miguel, Guillermo, and in this novel, the fascinating Nico. I can't really gush enough about this book - I adore Frohock's prose, her storytelling instincts, and the way these characters have been crafted. There's so much additional drama because of the desire for safety of these characters, and some damn mental health support. The feel of the book as a whole is different from the previous, kind of spy-novel type, which I enjoyed greatly, and I enjoy the fresh feel that it gave the novel. There are many different plotlines happening, and the subtlety many are handled with keep the reader on their toes - paying attention to little details, trying to piece together what's happening behind the scenes, what's coming, what this or that off-screen character is up to. I have long recommended this series to just about everyone, and will continue to do so. Los Nefilim is an absolute gem, one of my absolute favorite series for a million reasons. The amount of mounting tension, the character investment, the worldbuilding here all have me eager for any and all Los Nefilim lore and story I can get, and have me re-reading this novel again.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Glinda Harrison

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sumayyah

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lucas

  26. 5 out of 5

    Damian Erskine

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Ames

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mitch

  29. 5 out of 5

    Georgia

  30. 4 out of 5

    jeliy

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