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Feed

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Feed is the fourth book in the Teebs tetralogy. It's an epistolary recipe for the main character, a poem of nourishment, and a jaunty walk through New York's High Line park, with the lines, stanzas, paragraphs, dialogue, and registers approximating the park's cultivated gardens of wildness. Among its questions, Feed asks what's the difference between being alone and being Feed is the fourth book in the Teebs tetralogy. It's an epistolary recipe for the main character, a poem of nourishment, and a jaunty walk through New York's High Line park, with the lines, stanzas, paragraphs, dialogue, and registers approximating the park's cultivated gardens of wildness. Among its questions, Feed asks what's the difference between being alone and being lonely? Can you ever really be friends with an ex? How do you make perfect mac & cheese? Feed is an ode of reconciliation to the wild inconsistencies of a northeast spring, a frustrating season of back-and-forth, of thaw and blizzard, but with a faith that even amidst the mess, it knows where it's going.


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Feed is the fourth book in the Teebs tetralogy. It's an epistolary recipe for the main character, a poem of nourishment, and a jaunty walk through New York's High Line park, with the lines, stanzas, paragraphs, dialogue, and registers approximating the park's cultivated gardens of wildness. Among its questions, Feed asks what's the difference between being alone and being Feed is the fourth book in the Teebs tetralogy. It's an epistolary recipe for the main character, a poem of nourishment, and a jaunty walk through New York's High Line park, with the lines, stanzas, paragraphs, dialogue, and registers approximating the park's cultivated gardens of wildness. Among its questions, Feed asks what's the difference between being alone and being lonely? Can you ever really be friends with an ex? How do you make perfect mac & cheese? Feed is an ode of reconciliation to the wild inconsistencies of a northeast spring, a frustrating season of back-and-forth, of thaw and blizzard, but with a faith that even amidst the mess, it knows where it's going.

30 review for Feed

  1. 5 out of 5

    anna (½ of readsrainbow)

    feels like a stream of consciousness, feels like texting a friend in the middle of the night, feels like coming home there's so much packed in here! heartbreak, colonialism, dating, climate crisis, relationships with food, modern loneliness, rise of the far right! it's so emotionally taxing while being stupidly funny!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn (sixminutesforme)

    DNF at p42 - I haven’t read the earlier texts in this series so please take my reading with that in mind. I liked the conversational aspect, and structurally the choice to have the book be a continuous poem in conversation with the reader was intriguing. That said, it moved kind of like a Bolaño narrative, in stream of consciousness type directions - there was also uses of abbreviated wording that felt like large portions were written like a text message. This didn’t work for me but it may work DNF at p42 - I haven’t read the earlier texts in this series so please take my reading with that in mind. I liked the conversational aspect, and structurally the choice to have the book be a continuous poem in conversation with the reader was intriguing. That said, it moved kind of like a Bolaño narrative, in stream of consciousness type directions - there was also uses of abbreviated wording that felt like large portions were written like a text message. This didn’t work for me but it may work for another reader so please check out other reviews. Thanks to Tin House for gifting me a copy of this to read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Tommy Pico continues to be my favorite queer poetic voice and "Feed," the fourth book in his series is no exception. Dealing with climate change, love, aliens, and Beyonce, all in his stream-of-consciousness voice that resonates deeply with the experiences of young people, this book is remarkable for continuing the way in which Pico uses words, and the absence of them, to bring color to being a young person in 2019. However, this time Pico's voice is a bit off. Wherein past books he has really Tommy Pico continues to be my favorite queer poetic voice and "Feed," the fourth book in his series is no exception. Dealing with climate change, love, aliens, and Beyonce, all in his stream-of-consciousness voice that resonates deeply with the experiences of young people, this book is remarkable for continuing the way in which Pico uses words, and the absence of them, to bring color to being a young person in 2019. However, this time Pico's voice is a bit off. Wherein past books he has really dove deep into the feeling of romantic and erotic absence queer people feel as they grow up and enter and re-enter love relationships, this collection seems to approach hesitantly, from a cynical p.o.v. Whether because he has succeeded or because he has fallen in love, this book just doesn't seem to capture the emotional depth of crushing and loving and seeking out love that "IRL" and his other books did. Nonetheless, the book continues Pico's voice, a voice that resonates deeply in so many ways, and, so, is definitely a book worth reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andy Oram

    Pico brews an intoxicating mix from vignettes, confessions, and a steamy infusion of slang and (sometimes too cute) plays on words. I tried this book right after reading his companion book Junk, which enthralled me and which I liked much better than Feed. They're both long strings of fragments, but Feed offers more stories, more continuity, more pop culture references, and more intrusions of rather predictable political commentary. Less lyricism, less power, less sex. Given the predominance of Pico brews an intoxicating mix from vignettes, confessions, and a steamy infusion of slang and (sometimes too cute) plays on words. I tried this book right after reading his companion book Junk, which enthralled me and which I liked much better than Feed. They're both long strings of fragments, but Feed offers more stories, more continuity, more pop culture references, and more intrusions of rather predictable political commentary. Less lyricism, less power, less sex. Given the predominance of stories in Feed, it's surprising how little they reveal, but by the end one feels a bit of connection to the people who appear over and over: Pico's mother, a female friend, and a lover with which he is breaking up. The pedantic digressions into science or history make you feel trapped by the bore at a cocktail party, but Pico's fascination with inhabitable planets in the universe and the lack of extraterrestrial visitors mirrors his loneliness and lack of a love partner. Perhaps there's hopes in his statement, "The dark, in fact, is teeming with life."

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ian

    This was a breathtaking ride. I read all four pieces in Tommy Pico's Teebs Tetralogy in the past 24-hours, and I am blown away at the depth and breadth of a work that teases itself as being so surface level. I am in awe of the way Pico has managed to create four pieces that feel so separate yet so connected, how each piece stands on its own yet feels perfectly presaged and echoed throughout the rest of the work. I love the way he plays with form, how each work is styled so distinctly yet you can This was a breathtaking ride. I read all four pieces in Tommy Pico's Teebs Tetralogy in the past 24-hours, and I am blown away at the depth and breadth of a work that teases itself as being so surface level. I am in awe of the way Pico has managed to create four pieces that feel so separate yet so connected, how each piece stands on its own yet feels perfectly presaged and echoed throughout the rest of the work. I love the way he plays with form, how each work is styled so distinctly yet you can tell they all come from the same artist. The number of references and allusions he fits into these pages speaks to such a deep well of knowledge and experience. I don't feel qualified to speak on the quality of poetry, but I can say that what I read was a piece of art.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Will Rhino

    A truly stunning standalone, but an even more impressive conclusion to this tetralogy. I'm so happy I picked up IRL and continued to this grand finale book of poetry.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Billy

    Reading FEED feels like receiving a meandering text message from your funniest friend, or if Twitter didn't have a character limit. Tommy Pico's genius is present in the way he is able to catch the reader off-guard with uproariously funny lines that lead into serious philosophical quandaries, such as the difference between loneliness and being alone, or the possibility of intelligent life on other planets. FEED is a book that is at once raunchy, irreverent, haunted by the contemporary moment, Reading FEED feels like receiving a meandering text message from your funniest friend, or if Twitter didn't have a character limit. Tommy Pico's genius is present in the way he is able to catch the reader off-guard with uproariously funny lines that lead into serious philosophical quandaries, such as the difference between loneliness and being alone, or the possibility of intelligent life on other planets. FEED is a book that is at once raunchy, irreverent, haunted by the contemporary moment, and reaches for profundity at every turn.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Tommy Pico is a genius of craft, of turning the thing on its head and exploring it from all sides, of wit, of the auditory and the visual, of somehow tackling it all at once—scarring headlines, food, extraterrestrial life, selfhood, dating, friendship, ecology, dick jokes—and somehow keeping it cohesive, smooth, stream-of-consciousness-yet-completely-polished, exhilarating, funny, and honest. This book-length poem is an absolute masterpiece.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Witty, lyrical, and generally irreverent this was a pretty solid poetry collection. I tend to like it when poets don't take themselves too seriously, and it seems like Tommy Pico is one such poet! Some of the rhymes feel a little too easy here and there, which made me sigh a bit, but all-in-all, this a strong set of poems. Loved the dick-butt reference too, so if you're a fan, be sure to check this one out.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Do not get me wrong, this collection sizzles & sears. Of the tetra however, this is my least favorite content-wise. Some of the more obvious rhyming & puns were not my style, but that isn’t to downplay or dismiss Pico’s clever weaving & placement of text. Looking forward to what’s next— as I have said before about Pico’s work, if I were teaching again, I would absolutely make room for this in a workshop.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Pico's latest work is another stream of poetic consciousness that explores being friends with your ex, hookups, family life (and death), and the philosophies of what lies beyond Earth's orbit-- or if there's anything at all. Interspersed within it all are real life news headlines that land a punch to the gut every time you see them, a reminder of what's happening in our world during our seemingly ordinary lives. Pico manages to include his wit and humor despite all of the seriousness inside.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Harper Miller

    Another phenomenal collection. Tommy Pico’s poetry makes me so incredibly happy. Reading his poetry is like being on a roller coaster. I’m high, entertained, my stomach does these insane flips, I can’t stop grinning and the thrill of it all is unforgettable. I will devour anything this man writes. So much talent.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Dear reader, Once again I don't know where the feeling is or what to do with it I love Tommy Pico's books of poetry. They are so intentional, so tightly constructed, so funny and sad, and Feed is no exception.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    811.6 P598f 2019

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    stunning, gorgeous, beautiful, perfect, funny, hot, heart wrenching, lots of existential dread about space and the void! i loved!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Erik Caswell

    brilliant as usual. nations are always outlived by their cities. whew. on to the next planet

  17. 4 out of 5

    Frances Dinger

    This book addresses the question of how do we love each other in the face of catastrophic climate change in a way I have not seen. It's hopeful without sugar coating reality and, as always with Pico, equally funny and profound.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    Yes please, may I have another?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mo

    ARC given by Edelweiss+ for Honest Review I've enjoyed Tommy Pico's work before so I was super excited to pick up his most recent book! Feed is the fourth book in the Teebs tetralogy and follows the same "stream of consciousness" free-form flow that Pico has molded into his own. Feed focuses on the nourishment of the body, mind, and soul. The book is interspersed with music tracks, recipes, headlines, and chants that all create a well rounded and hearty piece. If Pico wanted to feed then he ARC given by Edelweiss+ for Honest Review I've enjoyed Tommy Pico's work before so I was super excited to pick up his most recent book! Feed is the fourth book in the Teebs tetralogy and follows the same "stream of consciousness" free-form flow that Pico has molded into his own. Feed focuses on the nourishment of the body, mind, and soul. The book is interspersed with music tracks, recipes, headlines, and chants that all create a well rounded and hearty piece. If Pico wanted to feed then he really hit the nail on the head!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I want to say that this is my favorite of Tommy Pico’s books yet, and I wonder if that’s because there is a stronger (or at least more obvious) narrative in this one. The book feels like a letting go, in the best and most filling way. I just loved it. ‪I want to say that this is my favorite of Tommy Pico’s books yet, and I wonder if that’s because there is a stronger (or at least more obvious) narrative in this one. The book feels like a letting go, in the best and most filling way. I just loved it.‬

  21. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  23. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tom Hrycyk

  25. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Hendrixson

  27. 5 out of 5

    MEP

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brennan

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael La Guerra

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Vance

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