Hot Best Seller

When You Ask Me Where I'm Going

Availability: Ready to download

Perfect for fans of Rupi Kaur and Elizabeth Acevedo, Jasmin Kaur’s stunning debut novel is a collection of poetry, illustrations, and prose. scream so that one day a hundred years from now another sister will not have to dry her tears wondering where in history she lost her voice The six sections of the book explore what it means to be a young woman/>scream


Compare

Perfect for fans of Rupi Kaur and Elizabeth Acevedo, Jasmin Kaur’s stunning debut novel is a collection of poetry, illustrations, and prose. scream so that one day a hundred years from now another sister will not have to dry her tears wondering where in history she lost her voice The six sections of the book explore what it means to be a young woman/>scream

30 review for When You Ask Me Where I'm Going

  1. 5 out of 5

    Damanpreet Singh

    Five stars. As a brown man, I learned a lot about the challenges that Sikh women face through reading this book and it was a humbling experience. This book needs to reach kaurs, South Asians and the rest of the world. It's so amazing to see our experiences as Punjabis captured in a book like this. The poetry was deep and insightful into the author's mind as a young, Punjabi woman living abroad. The short story of Kiran and her daughter left me wanting more. Even though we only saw a short amount Five stars. As a brown man, I learned a lot about the challenges that Sikh women face through reading this book and it was a humbling experience. This book needs to reach kaurs, South Asians and the rest of the world. It's so amazing to see our experiences as Punjabis captured in a book like this. The poetry was deep and insightful into the author's mind as a young, Punjabi woman living abroad. The short story of Kiran and her daughter left me wanting more. Even though we only saw a short amount of their story, I feel connected to them and reeled from the cliffhanger that Kaur left us on. I hope their story doesn't end there. I can't wait until the rest of the world gets to read this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    The Nerd Daily

    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Beth Mowbray When You Ask Me Where I’m Going is a thought-provoking debut novel which weaves together poetry, prose, and illustrations in a rare and extraordinary fashion. The foundation of this book is the narrative of a young immigrant mother escaping a history of trauma to live undocumented and raise her daughter in North America. This core body of prose is surrounded by poems and artwork that explores and embraces a broad range of issu Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Beth Mowbray When You Ask Me Where I’m Going is a thought-provoking debut novel which weaves together poetry, prose, and illustrations in a rare and extraordinary fashion. The foundation of this book is the narrative of a young immigrant mother escaping a history of trauma to live undocumented and raise her daughter in North America. This core body of prose is surrounded by poems and artwork that explores and embraces a broad range of issues related to culture, immigration, feminism, stigma, and much more. Perhaps a daunting concept to other debut writers, Kaur censors herself little in this book. With a dynamic, resounding voice she explores themes that are profound yet easy to consider and engage with throughout the text. Dividing the book into six sections, Kaur groups the lessons and insight she imparts into topics named primarily for parts of the human body: “skin,” “nerve,” and “heart,” for example. Within these sections she then tackles a multitude of themes that resonate within our contemporary personal and political worlds—race, ethnicity, and discrimination; trauma, abuse, and mental health in the context of interpersonal relationships; the daunting journey of motherhood, made a heavier task by the compounding external factors of today’s society. Perhaps the greatest theme, however, the theme underlying all others, is that of identity. How we define ourselves, our inherent value and worth, as well as how it is defined for us by others based upon their own (often skewed) lens of people and the world around them. Kaur explores the idea of being assessed by one’s appearance rather than what is underneath or held inside. She conveys the pain of being categorized as “other” based on one’s race, ethnicity, or culture and fighting the pressure to fit a certain “mold” formed by the assumptions of others. She explores the process of learning to be comfortable as oneself rather than being trapped by the meaning all too often assigned by others when you are part of a certain group. And she then underlines these ideas by providing a historical context, both personal and global. Tagged for ages 14+, this deeply moving work is sure to draw both young and older adults. Raw and introspective, both painful and uplifting to read, When You Ask Me Where I’m Going seamlessly conveys a vast spectrum of emotions in a very real way that the reader can easily connect with. Much of the subject matter is quite difficult to process, however Kaur does not flinch, does not hide from it. She writes with anger and outrage, with confidence and empathy, with sadness and hope. Her authorial voice is crisp and clear, bold and determined. Kaur expresses a genuine desire to embrace life and to see the world – in fact, to see each human being – do better.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sara Jovanovic

    Without a doubt one of the strongest collections I read this year. I only recently heard of Jasmin Kaur because of her poem Scream, and I knew I had to check out her debut as soon as it comes out. Her writing style is flawless and she effortlessly manages to incorporate so many strong emotions into her pieces. This was a really unique poetry collection, and one that made me feel a lot. I loved how Jasmine wrote this using many different forms, not strictly poems. They had a depth to them and I loved th Without a doubt one of the strongest collections I read this year. I only recently heard of Jasmin Kaur because of her poem Scream, and I knew I had to check out her debut as soon as it comes out. Her writing style is flawless and she effortlessly manages to incorporate so many strong emotions into her pieces. This was a really unique poetry collection, and one that made me feel a lot. I loved how Jasmine wrote this using many different forms, not strictly poems. They had a depth to them and I loved the topics she wrote about. I can't say I didn't have high expectations for this, but I've managed to get even more than I wanted. And now I just want to read every single thing Jasmine writes next. think about it i am told to stop thinking so much and i wonder why it is that in order to survive in this world i must not use my mind.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaiden Shahi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is very captivating. I really liked how the author used different voices and types of storytelling (poem, short story). The political poems in this book are very relevant to this day and age but the book is timeless. I read this poem to my mom and it made me tear up: a woman once offered me a pencil and i thanked her profusely another offered me life again and again and i never got around to thanking her.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Manveer Sihota

    This book is impeccably written and it’s flow is smoother than butter! It’s always amazing seeing the perspective of women of colour in a society where their voices are often drowned out. On top of that, this book gives voice to a Sikh woman, which is an underrepresented group within an underrepresented group. All in all an amazing read! Definitely recommend.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Harsharin Kaur

    In terms of layout and content, this book is unlike any book that I've read before! I loved how Jasmin didn't stick to the typical structure of a book, and there was an interchange of poetry, prose, illustrations, and short story. The book left me quite somber, and each and every piece of writing had me in a reflective state.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Scrimbit

    This beautiful poets words touch my heart on such a profound level, I always go back to a time in my life where I really needed those kind and gentle words for my fragile soul. As I near 48, the words speak to my 25 year old inner self on levels I'm still discovering and coming to terms with. Thank you Jasmin for taking me back to a place I'm still learning to be at peace with. To a place I am still nurturing, forgiving, learning to love and most of all learning to understand. I always look forw This beautiful poets words touch my heart on such a profound level, I always go back to a time in my life where I really needed those kind and gentle words for my fragile soul. As I near 48, the words speak to my 25 year old inner self on levels I'm still discovering and coming to terms with. Thank you Jasmin for taking me back to a place I'm still learning to be at peace with. To a place I am still nurturing, forgiving, learning to love and most of all learning to understand. I always look forward to your daily writings and most of all cannot wait to finally read this book I have heard so much about. Your beauty bounces off the page and brightens my days. Thank you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tamin Atwal

    Jasmin Kaur speaks and writes very eloquently. Her writing style touches the heart and makes a huge social statement at the same time. Hey writing has the ability to move you to tears. For this I'm so excited to get my hands on this book! 💕 I can't wait.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sahibajot Kaur

    Jasmin Kaur’s ability to capture emotion with such depth, intensity and clarity, creates a reading experience of joy and wonder. Having read nuggets of her poetry on Instagram, I can’t wait to get my hands on this book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    GURVINDER

    Eagerly anticipated! If Jasmin’s previous works are anything to go by, this will surely be an enthralling read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Damanjit Singh

    can't wait to finally read this book! jasmin kaur is a talented story teller, organizer, educator, and poet whose deft economy of words bears the weight of multitudes of human experience.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    I'm not much of a poetry reader, but this book definitely pushed me to re-evaluate my stance on contemporary poetry. Jasmin Kaur packs so many relevant, hard-hitting topics into a small number of words. Each one felt carefully selected and beautifully expressed. Between the illustrations, poetry, and sections of prose, the book is so varied it never gets tiresome. What captivated me most though was the fictional story of Kiran and Sahaara. My only wish is that it was longer! It felt a little dis I'm not much of a poetry reader, but this book definitely pushed me to re-evaluate my stance on contemporary poetry. Jasmin Kaur packs so many relevant, hard-hitting topics into a small number of words. Each one felt carefully selected and beautifully expressed. Between the illustrations, poetry, and sections of prose, the book is so varied it never gets tiresome. What captivated me most though was the fictional story of Kiran and Sahaara. My only wish is that it was longer! It felt a little disjointed smack dab in the middle of this semi-autobiographical poetry and left me with many unanswered questions. Ultimately though, I would recommend this book to anyone looking to branch out and step into poetry. It's the perfect blend, meaning that there were several relatable moments for me as a reader (discussions of trauma, growth, women's empowerment, etc), but there were many parts that were wholly new and unfamiliar as well. Kaur has a very thoughtful, fresh perspective that we don't often hear from—her words hold a certain weight and importance. Very excited for this book to come out this October.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Arjun

    I've been following Jasmin for a long time and have always found her poetry profound and enthralling. I can't wait to get this book!

  14. 4 out of 5

    R Singh

    A very well written book which is very thought evoking - as is always to be expected from any of Jasmin Kaur’s work. A must read!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gugan Kaur

    Jasmin’s work is amazing! Really appreciate the work and space she creates for brown women!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jasjit Mankoo

    Can't wait to finally read this book, I've been a fan of Jasmin Kaur's work ever since I discovered her on Instagram. I'm very excited to own the collection when it is released.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Casey (caseydillabooks)

    A collection of illustrated poems and prose in the vein of #instragrampoets like Rupi Kaur (and less-so Elizabeth Acevedo, as the comp states). I generally find this genre of poetry oversimplified and not particularly artful, but I do appreciate how topical it is and I think it will resonate with teens and those with whom Rupi has struck a cord.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... WHEN YOU ASK ME WHERE I'M GOING is an absolutely gorgeous collection that reaches to touch the soul. In poems, prose, and drawings, Kaur evokes a multitude of emotions from laughter to tears in beautifully written and illustrated words. It is hard to do this collection justice, but I feel as though I have peeked inside someone personal journal and left feeling all new feelings and with such depth. What I loved: Putting into words how much this collect See my full review here: https://www.yabookscentral.com/yafict... WHEN YOU ASK ME WHERE I'M GOING is an absolutely gorgeous collection that reaches to touch the soul. In poems, prose, and drawings, Kaur evokes a multitude of emotions from laughter to tears in beautifully written and illustrated words. It is hard to do this collection justice, but I feel as though I have peeked inside someone personal journal and left feeling all new feelings and with such depth. What I loved: Putting into words how much this collection made me feel is difficult. This book spoke to my soul, and there are so many beautiful poems and written pieces that are complimented by intriguing illustrations. The book covers a number of topics in ways that evoke emotion and thoughts. I really loved it, even when they were not comfortable. Through this book, there are many lessons about feminism and immigration that appeal and educate. I would add warnings for mental illness, sexual assault, domestic abuse, and racism. Final verdict: This gorgeous collection is one I would highly recommend in general, but especially if you want a deep exploration of life. This book feels like a delicious look into a personal journal, and it really pulls the readers in and connects with them and their emotions. Would recommend to older YA readers.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jamie (Books and Ladders)

    See this review and more on Books and Ladders! Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book and chose to review it. This in no way impacts my opinion. I absolutely loved this. It had such a good mix of poetry that spoke from the heart of someone who wanted to be heard as a person and as an immigrant. I loved the mix between the poetry, illustrations, and prose. I feel like I will get more out of this each time I read it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    ellie

    how do you feel today? (like my lungs are not collapsing. like everything is not a mistake. like i am not a mistake. like i do not need to erase myself to fix myself. like i am not a single branch floating in an upset sea. like there is something right out there. that maybe. just maybe. it is for me.) ...we are all colored in different shades of compromise...that fear overrides truth. that we deal ideals like decks of cards / abandoning the hands that no longe how do you feel today? (like my lungs are not collapsing. like everything is not a mistake. like i am not a mistake. like i do not need to erase myself to fix myself. like i am not a single branch floating in an upset sea. like there is something right out there. that maybe. just maybe. it is for me.) ...we are all colored in different shades of compromise...that fear overrides truth. that we deal ideals like decks of cards / abandoning the hands that no longer work / in our favor as easily as lied when / we said we cared about each other

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brittany | thebookishfiiasco

    ‘she asks when do things start getting better? and i tell her that they don’t until better is demanded. that we are products of struggle and sometimes there is no way to convince the heart that this is beautiful.’ . articulating my experience with this book is difficult to cultivate into a succinct post, and i will try. this book harnesses beauty, trauma, and truth, inside and out. it pulls you in— invites you and hooks you with each word a ‘she asks when do things start getting better? and i tell her that they don’t until better is demanded. that we are products of struggle and sometimes there is no way to convince the heart that this is beautiful.’ . articulating my experience with this book is difficult to cultivate into a succinct post, and i will try. this book harnesses beauty, trauma, and truth, inside and out. it pulls you in— invites you and hooks you with each word and line. this is not a simple, linear story or a straightforward collection of poems. this book encourages you to travel through perspectives and experiences unlike your own and face the realities that are often overlooked or dismissed. it is a beautiful, heavy, and worthwhile experience that i recommend you have. i’m intrigued to see the varying perspectives and thoughts that readers have of this, especially women readers, as i’m feeling like this one is going to be on my mind for some time, and i imagine it would be on yours, too. . thank you, @booksparks for including me in #yafrc2019!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lizz DiCesare

    “i’m not here to be your example of the good girl until i’m your warning sign for the wayward one” To all my fellow fans of poetry and prose, if you haven’t added When You Ask Me Where I’m Going by Jasmin Kaur to your TBR yet, please do so right now! This book is absolutely beautiful. I finished it over a week ago but haven’t been able to write a review yet because how do you even begin to describe a book packed full of so much emotion? I always “i’m not here to be your example of the good girl until i’m your warning sign for the wayward one” To all my fellow fans of poetry and prose, if you haven’t added When You Ask Me Where I’m Going by Jasmin Kaur to your TBR yet, please do so right now! This book is absolutely beautiful. I finished it over a week ago but haven’t been able to write a review yet because how do you even begin to describe a book packed full of so much emotion? I always have a difficult time reviewing books I loved, because all I want to do is scream “THIS BOOK WAS SO INCREDIBLE, IT MADE ME CRY AND STOP AND THINK ABOUT MYSELF AND THE WORLD, AND EVERYONE NEEDS TO READ IT RIGHT NOW!!” If you don’t have enough time to read my full review, I fully stand by this single, all-caps line. In all seriousness though, When You Ask Me Where I’m Going is a stunning debut book. It uses poetry, prose, and illustrations to speak about topics of feminism, identity, love, race, ethnicity, motherhood, and more. It’s rare to see such difficult topics written about so eloquently. The language Jasmin uses is simple, yet packs a punch that will cause you to stop and reflect on yourself, your community, and society as whole. The book is divided into six sections, all named after parts of one’s body/self: skin, muscle, lung, nerve, heart, and light. Each section explores different topics, and ties everything up before moving on to the next part. It’s a nice way of breaking the book up, and allows for breaks in reading if you need it. "SCREAM so that one day a hundred years from now another sister will not have to dry her tears wondering where in history she lost her voice" The theme that stood out the most to me from this book was that of identity. In When You Ask Me Where I’m Going, Jasmin writes at length about her own personal experiences, and those that people within her community have gone through as well. It’s very personal, and will let you stop and reflect on how others are treated, and how it may differ from your own experiences. I’d recommend this book to any woman looking for something to read (since it deals with so many issues and topics we frequently experience), as well as fans of Rupi Kaur. The writing style and tone is similar to Rupi’s poetry, although Jasmin clearly displays her own unique voice in her writing. Thank you to Harper Collins Canada and HCC Frenzy for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. When You Ask Me Where I’m Going was released on October 1, 2019, and is available wherever books are sold.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Claire

    Most of the poetry didn't resonate with me, but this collection is important and will be important to so many people. *Thank you to HarperCollins for providing an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.*

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dipali

    Powerful, poignant and much-needed.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Preeti

    I am so impressed with this beautiful book. People will compare it to Rupi Kaur's poetry but I feel that Jasmin goes so much deeper on topics like immigration, feminism and mental health. She does not shy away from her Punjabi heritage and I appreciated that. Her poetry is amazing and her prose are stunning as well. I can't wait to read more by Jasmin Kaur. A huge thank you goes to the publisher for providing me with an advanced digital copy of this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Huge thank you to Harper Collins Canada for this ARC! I had the pleasure of listening to Jasmin Kaur speak at a recent Harper Collins Frenzy event in Toronto. Listening to Kaur speak about her life, the racism and sexism she has dealt with growing up, was both difficult as it was moving. Jasmin Kaur's debut novel is all about looking at life from various angles. This collection of mixed media features poetry, artwork, and short stories by Kaur, that depict life growing up in Abbot Huge thank you to Harper Collins Canada for this ARC! I had the pleasure of listening to Jasmin Kaur speak at a recent Harper Collins Frenzy event in Toronto. Listening to Kaur speak about her life, the racism and sexism she has dealt with growing up, was both difficult as it was moving. Jasmin Kaur's debut novel is all about looking at life from various angles. This collection of mixed media features poetry, artwork, and short stories by Kaur, that depict life growing up in Abbotsford, British Columbia. Sharing stories of racism to personal trauma, Kaur exams what it means to be a young Sikh world in a world where everyone makes assumptions about you before you even have the chance to speak. Kaur's poems are raw and uncomfortable, but they also shed light and offer glimpses of hope as well. Kaur's conversations about feminism, mental health, immigration, and sexual assault will resonate with a lot of readers. "When You Ask Me Where I'm Going" dares readers to look at their surroundings and challenges them to do better and be a better person.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura Gardner

    “Babygirl / didn’t your mother/ ever teach you / that when these hips / widen into the earth’s arch, / this body will no longer be yours?” When You Ask Me Where I’m Going is a unique book that is very difficult to read as a whole, but absolutely shines at the sentence and phrase level. The basic plot is that Kiran has been traumatized in her native India and flees to Canada. Kiran is undocumented and lacks a support system, but decides to have her baby Sahaara despite her mother’s insisten “Babygirl / didn’t your mother/ ever teach you / that when these hips / widen into the earth’s arch, / this body will no longer be yours?” When You Ask Me Where I’m Going is a unique book that is very difficult to read as a whole, but absolutely shines at the sentence and phrase level. The basic plot is that Kiran has been traumatized in her native India and flees to Canada. Kiran is undocumented and lacks a support system, but decides to have her baby Sahaara despite her mother’s insistence on an abortion. The reader is also afforded a look into Sahaara’s life as a typical Canadian teenager who nevertheless worries about her mother’s lack of status in Canada. The first third and last third of the book are written in poetry and occasionally accompanied by ink drawings. The middle section of the book is written in prose. Themes explored include colonization, female objectification, and immigration. If taken as a poetry collection, the reader will find something brilliant, heartbreaking, beautiful or inspiring on nearly every page. Taken as a whole, it’s a bit of a jumble and feels disconnected. The illustrations and combination or prose and poetry make for an interesting format overall, however. I think some readers will really love this book, but it is not for everyone. I do believe that some of the individual poems in this book are gorgeous and sure to be the exact right message a reader needs to hear about the importance of resilience and self-love. To whom would you recommend this book? Students who like Rupi Kaur will likely enjoy this collection The book lacks narrative structure for the most part and the middle prose section feels out of place with the rest of the poems. Many readers will be confused by the lack of background information or clear characters. It’s nearly impossible to follow the storyline. The reader must piece things together on their own, which most readers are not equipped to do with this level of text.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emily (emilykatereads)

    This poetry and prose collection contains some really powerful work. The overall structure just didn't quite leave me in love with the collection. The pieces individually, however, are what I'm totally on board with. This book is divided into sections, moving from poetry, to prose, back to poetry. Kaur narrates the struggle of being a Sikh women and the hardships faced as an oppressed women. She gives a voice to her story. Then the prose sections tells the story of Kiran and her daugh This poetry and prose collection contains some really powerful work. The overall structure just didn't quite leave me in love with the collection. The pieces individually, however, are what I'm totally on board with. This book is divided into sections, moving from poetry, to prose, back to poetry. Kaur narrates the struggle of being a Sikh women and the hardships faced as an oppressed women. She gives a voice to her story. Then the prose sections tells the story of Kiran and her daughter. The two navigate a life in North America while the mother is undocumented and what the implications of that are for them. The writing here is incredibly timely, and will be sure to pull at heartstrings. Whether the words give voice to things some readers may have never seen in books before, give them a place they can see themselves represented, or bring a new light to other readers who don't know this story and are introduced to it and can sympathize with Kaur's words. This book will do something for everyone. Where it fell short to me was the structure. The writing is phenomenal, and I took it in piece by piece and appreciated the words, but when I step back and think of this as a collection, it doesn't work as well for me. Even as I read through some larger chunks at a time, it didn't feel like I was reading one cohesive collection, it felt broken up. The sections weren't as defined by their content, but rather they blended together. As individual poems, though, I highly recommend checking out this one. It would be a great book to keep by a bedside table, and take in a poem or two at a time. Intake it slowly. Swallow it. Absorb it. Let the words sink in. That's the way this collection is best suited. *ARC provided by publisher for honest review*

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    3.5 Stars Rather than a novel, this is a collection of poems, illustrated poetry and prose by Jasmin Kaur, a young woman whose roots are in the Punjab and in Canada. The poetry reflects the female experience as a Sikh and a brown person dealing with all kinds of contemporary issues including systematic rape, feminism, racism and colonialism, and finally the need to love oneself as well as loving others. The first third of the book is particularly negative as though the author has 3.5 Stars Rather than a novel, this is a collection of poems, illustrated poetry and prose by Jasmin Kaur, a young woman whose roots are in the Punjab and in Canada. The poetry reflects the female experience as a Sikh and a brown person dealing with all kinds of contemporary issues including systematic rape, feminism, racism and colonialism, and finally the need to love oneself as well as loving others. The first third of the book is particularly negative as though the author has a big chip on her shoulder – perhaps even a two by four – about her circumstances living as a Kaur in a Canadian Punjabi community. The second section is prose and focuses on Kiran who flees India to her aunt and uncle’s home in British Columbia because she is pregnant and does not want to abort the child – a girl she names Sahaara and who becomes the focus of the rest of the book as a high school student of color in a Canadian high school. The third section of the book marks a return to poetry which is surprisingly pleasant and lyrical and heartfelt in its clarity. The poems illuminate a minority that is rarely visible in Canadian society except for continued controversy over obvious religious symbols. The book is receiving a lot of praise but ultimately the format doesn’t work. The poetry is intense and full of passion but Kiran and Sahaara’s middle story feels like an interlude of clunky writing which ends awkwardly. Perhaps, this should have been two books so that the prose portion could have been more fully developed. This is a debut that bodes well for future cultural conversations.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Princess Ivory

    Fav poems/parts of the poem: there can be healing in what we hold in our hands. in how we hold our two hands. but we must loosen our fists first. Someone once told me that pressure makes diamonds what she forgot to mention was that although what they become can never be scratched, their walls are so hardened that they will shatter whatever they please, as tough as the pressure that let them be so maybe that’s why my insides look so much a struggle Fav poems/parts of the poem: there can be healing in what we hold in our hands. in how we hold our two hands. but we must loosen our fists first. Someone once told me that pressure makes diamonds what she forgot to mention was that although what they become can never be scratched, their walls are so hardened that they will shatter whatever they please, as tough as the pressure that let them be so maybe that’s why my insides look so much a struggle that should have set me free. If the words are a responsibility, a burden, a curse, a dying thing. If the words do not free you, why do you hold on to them? My generation aches to capture everything down to the aesthetics of a meal. The trouble is, there is no way to preserve life in a photograph. What would happen then? when we can’t pick up our own pieces let alone each other’s? How often were we turned to entirely different frequencies while we claimed to hear each other’s words? Our minds have always slipped past one another. just close enough to graze and catch nothing more than static. "you are the most unlikely outcome of the most unlikely universe. the place where atoms and wonder met. gathering into muscle and heart nerve and skin lungs and light. you are overwhelming." "be easy with yourself. with your healing. know that this journey will very often look more like hills and valleys than a paved road. go within. find all the flowers and still water tucked beneath your chest." "we only know how to love in retrospect we attune our lungs to the sound of mourning as we recall all the signs that we chose to ignore ask yourself how many more times the earth will cry out to us before she finally goes silent."

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.