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My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education

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From the author of Make Your Home Among Strangers, essays on being an “accidental” American—an incisive look at the edges of identity for a woman of color in a society centered on whiteness In this sharp and candid collection of essays, critically acclaimed writer and first-generation American Jennine Capó Crucet explores the condition of finding herself a stranger in the country whe From the author of Make Your Home Among Strangers, essays on being an “accidental” American—an incisive look at the edges of identity for a woman of color in a society centered on whiteness In this sharp and candid collection of essays, critically acclaimed writer and first-generation American Jennine Capó Crucet explores the condition of finding herself a stranger in the country where she was born. Raised in Miami and the daughter of Cuban refugees, Crucet examines the political and personal contours of American identity and the physical places where those contours find themselves smashed: be it a rodeo town in Nebraska, a university campus in upstate New York, or Disney World in Florida. Crucet illuminates how she came to see her exclusion from aspects of the theoretical American Dream, despite her family’s attempts to fit in with white American culture—beginning with their ill-fated plan to name her after the winner of the Miss America pageant. In prose that is both fearless and slyly humorous, My Time Among the Whites examines the sometimes hopeful, sometimes deeply flawed ways in which many Americans have learned to adapt, exist, and—in the face of all signals saying otherwise—perhaps even thrive in a country that never imagined them here.


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From the author of Make Your Home Among Strangers, essays on being an “accidental” American—an incisive look at the edges of identity for a woman of color in a society centered on whiteness In this sharp and candid collection of essays, critically acclaimed writer and first-generation American Jennine Capó Crucet explores the condition of finding herself a stranger in the country whe From the author of Make Your Home Among Strangers, essays on being an “accidental” American—an incisive look at the edges of identity for a woman of color in a society centered on whiteness In this sharp and candid collection of essays, critically acclaimed writer and first-generation American Jennine Capó Crucet explores the condition of finding herself a stranger in the country where she was born. Raised in Miami and the daughter of Cuban refugees, Crucet examines the political and personal contours of American identity and the physical places where those contours find themselves smashed: be it a rodeo town in Nebraska, a university campus in upstate New York, or Disney World in Florida. Crucet illuminates how she came to see her exclusion from aspects of the theoretical American Dream, despite her family’s attempts to fit in with white American culture—beginning with their ill-fated plan to name her after the winner of the Miss America pageant. In prose that is both fearless and slyly humorous, My Time Among the Whites examines the sometimes hopeful, sometimes deeply flawed ways in which many Americans have learned to adapt, exist, and—in the face of all signals saying otherwise—perhaps even thrive in a country that never imagined them here.

30 review for My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Gonzalez

    This is the kind of book I wish I had around when I was a freshman in college, that might have made navigating the whiteness and white spaces a bit easier. It also would have opened my eyes to some unchecked behavior and thoughts I used to have, too. These are incredibly strong and compelling essays with a touch of humor that speak to today.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    I meant to savor this book and read it over the course of several days, but Crucet is so thoughtful and hilarious I ended up reading it in one sitting. (Though I will definitely be revisiting.) Also, full disclosure, I’m a Cuban-American who grew up in Hialeah and went to the northeast for college, then got my MFA in fiction, so I’ve been counting down the days til publication for this one. I cried a lot. I wish this book had been in the world years ago, and I’m so glad it is now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    Loved! My Time Among the Whites is an instant favorite essay collection. I was immediately captured by Crucet’s writing, and her thoughtful observations about topics ranging from being a first generation college student, to her complicated love of Disney world, to whiteness and institutionalized racism in academia. Crucet is witty and whip smart and convicting. As a white person, this book opened my eyes to places of privilege I wasn’t previously aware of in unexplored nooks of my experience. I Loved! My Time Among the Whites is an instant favorite essay collection. I was immediately captured by Crucet’s writing, and her thoughtful observations about topics ranging from being a first generation college student, to her complicated love of Disney world, to whiteness and institutionalized racism in academia. Crucet is witty and whip smart and convicting. As a white person, this book opened my eyes to places of privilege I wasn’t previously aware of in unexplored nooks of my experience. I also didn’t know almost anything about the ways Cuban immigrants were previously afforded unique privileges over other Latinx immigrants, and while I’m sure this book only scratched the surface I still learned so much. Crucet’s manifold insights on our world and herself, and her vulnerability in confronting the diverse personal topics of this collection make this an easy new favorite. Naturally, I’m now absolutely rattling with excitement to get my hands on Crucet’s novel, Make Your Home Among Strangers! ⁣ ⁣ Tldr - highest recommendation for this one, just wow.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alice

    I had not heard about this author until this morning. Now after students burned her book in Southern Georgia, I am most interested in reading about her experiences. This past summer I visited Berlin and was on the Bebelplabtz, the site of the 1933 Nazi book burnings. Now this morning, I am reading about book burning in 2019. According to a Washington Post article, The university is not planning to discipline any students for the burning incident, said Jennifer Wise, a university spokeswoman.

  5. 4 out of 5

    La'Tonya Rease Miles

    Using Chekhov's Gun There's an old saying often (misattributed to Shakespeare) that writers should never show a gun in the first act that isn't fired by the final act. Or something like that. In other words, don't bother giving a detail or introducing a theme unless you plan to do something with it later. Otherwise, you are just navel gazing and being kind of a show off. Crucet takes this advice to heart making these collection of essays feel like parts of a greater whole. Using Chekhov's Gun There's an old saying often (misattributed to Shakespeare) that writers should never show a gun in the first act that isn't fired by the final act. Or something like that. In other words, don't bother giving a detail or introducing a theme unless you plan to do something with it later. Otherwise, you are just navel gazing and being kind of a show off. Crucet takes this advice to heart making these collection of essays feel like parts of a greater whole. She introduces herself as a first-generation college student right at the beginning. Describing what is was like for her family to come (and stay) with her throughout new student orientation although at Cornell from Florida. And from there she moves on to other themes that on first pass may seem only tangentially related, but close readers will see that the author's identity as "first-gen" (to college and to the US) drives everything that comes afterwards. Crucet writes in the tradition of Laura Rendon who acknowledges both the blessings and the curses of being first in the family to go to college (unlike Richard Rodriguez who only writes about the burdens). And yet, as the author confesses, many things come with a price. (Paying a price is another theme that comes up later, unexpectedly and heartbreakingly). She is not quite sure if she made the right decision to attend Cornell instead of taking the "free ride" at the University of Florida. She leaves that to the reader to decide. It's a tough call, but I think my favorite section is "Say I Do," especially when she discusses the nuances of wedding DJs in Miami. It was reminiscent of a Richard Blanco's storytelling (he's also name checked here!) and just downright hilarious. I think the people next to me on the plane thought I was crazy. There's tons more I can say, but I will let other folks discover them. I can't wait to read more from this writer.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrienne

    Remarkable essays written by a Cuban American and her brush with “whiteness.” I love the culture clash with her Cuban-born parents. Thanks to the publisher for the advance copy!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gisselle Diaz (gissellereads)

    I loved this book and read it in a few sittings! There were so many ways I related to some of the stories. I laughed, cringed and even teared up while reading it. The essays are thought provoking and funny at times. This book not only talks about White privilege but also about the privilege some of us latinx have because we look white. This is something I think about a lot because I am Puerto Rican and I get told all the time “but you don’t look Puerto Rican” or “You don’t have an accent”. It’s I loved this book and read it in a few sittings! There were so many ways I related to some of the stories. I laughed, cringed and even teared up while reading it. The essays are thought provoking and funny at times. This book not only talks about White privilege but also about the privilege some of us latinx have because we look white. This is something I think about a lot because I am Puerto Rican and I get told all the time “but you don’t look Puerto Rican” or “You don’t have an accent”. It’s something we don’t talk about enough and it was thought provoking and refreshing to read about. I loved the stories about her family. I found myself nodding so much at how I had similar experiences with my mine. At how our families sacrifice so much for us to go to college and get an education but then once you get there everything things change. I wish I had this book when I was in college. I think it would have opened my eyes to certain behaviors. Now I just want to go read Jennine’s fiction books and can’t wait for more books from her. I am so glad I found this book and I hope everyone reads it! Thank you so much to Picador for sending me this free book in exchange for an honest review

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    As a first generation American, a daughter of Cuban refugees, this book gave me all the feels. _________________ "The American Dream, commonly told: .... When they are born, you give your kids white American names so that their teachers can't tell what they are before meeting them, so that your kids don't suffer the way you suffered in school, and so that they won't eventually be 'inexplicably' denied apartments and jobs despite their abundant qualifications." (p28-29) As a first generation American, a daughter of Cuban refugees, this book gave me all the feels. _________________ "The American Dream, commonly told: .... When they are born, you give your kids white American names so that their teachers can't tell what they are before meeting them, so that your kids don't suffer the way you suffered in school, and so that they won't eventually be 'inexplicably' denied apartments and jobs despite their abundant qualifications." (p28-29) "Be safe, hide yourself in plain site; live up to the gift - the promise - of your white-girl name." (p. 37) "I've come to see the American Dream for what it really is: a lie my parents had little choice but to buy into and sell to me, a lie that conflated working hard with passing for, becoming, and being white." (p. 40) "Many white people I've met often think of themselves as culture-less, as vanilla: plain, boring, American white. What they are revealing when they say this, which they often do in jest, is how little race impacts their lives, how whiteness is ubiquitous to them, and they mistake the ubiquitousness as a kind of neutrality or regularness that renders their race and culture invisible to themselves." (p. 80) "I never danced, knowing whatever I did with my body on a dance floor would make me stand out among the white folks." (p. 90) "...as a light-skinned Latinx woman, I often accidentally trespass into moments that are essentially displays of white power intended only for other whites. ... White people who misread me as also white sometimes display the kind of pervasive racism usually reserved for whites-only spaces. They inadvertently include me in these white power moments, ones that we aren't supposed to witness, which are perpetrated by the kind of well-meaning white folks - people who genuinely don't consider themselves racists - when they're sure we aren't around to hear them." (p. 110). Spotlighting (p. 166) Masking (p. 171) Somatic expressions of stress (p 177) Cubans and mental health (p. 187)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ericka Clouther

    Capo Crucet is a Cuban-American woman that's approximately my age that moved to Nebraska, and I'm a Cuban-American that moved to Nebraska, so I was pretty excited to read this collection. I don't have the same Florida ties but I did live in a particularly Cuban-area of New Jersey until I was 6. I could definitely relate to some of the ideas expressed by the author. For example, I also always have to field the "have I ever visited Cuba" question. Capo Crucet didn't explain why that one is tough ( Capo Crucet is a Cuban-American woman that's approximately my age that moved to Nebraska, and I'm a Cuban-American that moved to Nebraska, so I was pretty excited to read this collection. I don't have the same Florida ties but I did live in a particularly Cuban-area of New Jersey until I was 6. I could definitely relate to some of the ideas expressed by the author. For example, I also always have to field the "have I ever visited Cuba" question. Capo Crucet didn't explain why that one is tough (which she probably should have given her audience), so let me do it: the laws regarding travel to Cuba are complicated, and if you seek to do it legally, it's tough. You can't access American cash over there, so currency will be an issue. Additionally, many Cuban-Americans support the embargo against Cuba, so even if you don't personally, get ready to face the ire of many friends and family. But that's not really an answer that you have time to give every single time you're asked, and I get asked a lot. I particularly liked the essay about her marriage, moving to Nebraska, and then crashing a bunch of weddings. I thought it was really vivid and interesting, and her feelings were palpable.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Not familiar with the author but the title grabbed my attention straight away. A parody of those titles where (the usually white) person visits an "unexplored" land or planet, etc. and writes about their time living among the "natives," I thought this would be an interesting. The author takes us through what it's like navigating the US in various spaces while being visibly non-white and not necessarily understanding the nuances of the cultural, political, societal details as such. The first essa Not familiar with the author but the title grabbed my attention straight away. A parody of those titles where (the usually white) person visits an "unexplored" land or planet, etc. and writes about their time living among the "natives," I thought this would be an interesting. The author takes us through what it's like navigating the US in various spaces while being visibly non-white and not necessarily understanding the nuances of the cultural, political, societal details as such. The first essay grabbed me. I could totally relate to the experiences Crucet, even if those exact ones were not my own. But I could totally see how she and her family did not know orientation was for the student, how they hung around (they had rearranged schedules, took vacation time, saved money for the hotel for the week, etc.) to settle her in. Very relateable and understandable. But my interested sort of dwindled from there. None of the other essays really kept me and I know part of it is because I'm not one for essay collections. That said, I'll bet this is for a lot of people, especially maybe younger people in college or graduating still trying to find their place in the world, etc. It wasn't for me. Library borrow was best.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was a timely read; the book is fairly new, and the author has been in the news recently--she spoke at a Southern university and some students took exception, I guess, to her characterization of white privilege and decided burning her books was an appropriate response. ?? Well, I'm glad this copy was available to me because it was a treat--beautifully written and a marvelously well done examination of privilege and the spaces we inhabit. I plan on looking up some of her fiction.

  12. 5 out of 5

    c2 cole

    Interesting ideas on race/ethnicity in society in an easy to read format. It would be interesting to discuss the view and problems presented in the book with the author or in a mixed group. Unfortunately, that isn't likely to happen where I live.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Booktart

    An easy to read collection of essays with the main theme of the author's experience growing up Cuban, her privilege (and lack of privilege, depending on the situation), and her family. I really enjoyed this and found it enlightening as well.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Irene (Read.Rewind)

    4/4.5 Honest, insightful, even funny at time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    Her essays are powerful and engaging. I really want to read her fiction now.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tess Malone

    This is a sharp and searing essay collection that really tackles the uncomfortable nuances of race with personal stories and dark humor. Crucet is best when examining larger racial issues from her personal experience, from being the first generation going to college to her father’s health.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lianne

    This collection of essays was really great. Jennine Capo Crucet writes in a very conversational way -- like she is telling you a story or answering a question: What was your first year of college like? How was your move to Nebraska? How do you like being a professor? -- and once you're hooked, she opens up the story with nuance and depth to explore issues of race, ethnicity, and being a first-generation Cuban-American. I saw her on a panel with Mira Jacob at the Decatur Book Festival, and the ti This collection of essays was really great. Jennine Capo Crucet writes in a very conversational way -- like she is telling you a story or answering a question: What was your first year of college like? How was your move to Nebraska? How do you like being a professor? -- and once you're hooked, she opens up the story with nuance and depth to explore issues of race, ethnicity, and being a first-generation Cuban-American. I saw her on a panel with Mira Jacob at the Decatur Book Festival, and the title of the panel was something about getting into deep experiences through humor. She definitely did that in this collection. It's incredibly timely and I highly recommend it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education by Jennine Capo Crucet is a collection of essays about white spaces, family, and etc. These essays are extremely beautiful. I would read one essay and would have to just take a moment to take it in because it reminded me so much of my mother and my childhood. I honestly was not prepared for how much I would relate to this book and cry. All of the essays will always stay with me, but the one that personally stood out to me was abou My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education by Jennine Capo Crucet is a collection of essays about white spaces, family, and etc. These essays are extremely beautiful. I would read one essay and would have to just take a moment to take it in because it reminded me so much of my mother and my childhood. I honestly was not prepared for how much I would relate to this book and cry. All of the essays will always stay with me, but the one that personally stood out to me was about how her parents chose her name. I say that because not only is it so emotional but extremely hilarious too. It’s a book that I will probably read again because I really saw myself in these essays. I cannot wait for the next book that Jennine writes. This book was a 11/10 and I recommend everyone read this book. *I received an advance review copy of My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education from the publisher through NetGalley; all opinions are my own.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Elizabeth

    I did not like the content of the book but I did like the essays. We start out going to college and choosing to go to Cornell on a partial scholarship was chosen over going to University of Florida on a full scholarship. Her whole family went with her to drop off and stayed for weeks. No where in the welcome packet did it say when parents leave after drop off. Not even someone at freshman orientation telling them to leave was a clue....................... OK, I have to stop right here I did not like the content of the book but I did like the essays. We start out going to college and choosing to go to Cornell on a partial scholarship was chosen over going to University of Florida on a full scholarship. Her whole family went with her to drop off and stayed for weeks. No where in the welcome packet did it say when parents leave after drop off. Not even someone at freshman orientation telling them to leave was a clue....................... OK, I have to stop right here at the beginning and say, "Give me a break". Being from an Italian immigrant family myself, I am calling shenanigans. I too was the first one to go to college and wasn't even supported in my decision. Italian girls don't go to college, it will hurt her in the marriage market. (Insert eye roll). So her parents took paid vacation and could afford to offset her expenses? COME ON! Not many normal working class people can say that. I conclude her parents are from the upper class of Cuba. Must be nice. The rest of the essays are just as clueless. Having trouble fitting into life with "whites" and yet chooses and marries a whiter-than-white boy. Her complaints of finding a bilingual DJ/Band for her wedding?????????????? She had trouble finding a Spanish/English speaker? COME ON! Other observations: - Braces aren't for a lifetime, most of us had our teeth move back. - Many visits to Disney? How about I saved my own money as an adult for 1 trip. - Had trouble with her first English paper? Welcome to everyone's club. - People asked if you ever visited Cuba, when living in Miami? - EVERYONE IS FROM SOMEWHERE ELSE! - Highlighting the 2016 Presidential race? Yes we are all upset about the rise of anti-immigration and racism. You might have noticed that even people who are in the targeted groups are also part of the new rising anti-everything groups.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I loved Jennine Capo Crucet's Make Your Home Among Strangers and have seen her speak before. I was shocked by the response of students to one of her talks on a university campus, and knew I had to read her new essay collection. These pieces have their roots/a central theme in whiteness and privilege, but Capo Crucet doesn't crucify white people. She spotlights the differences between Cuban and white culture—weddings, funerals, expectations, etc.—and voices her own assumptions about people, recognizing he I loved Jennine Capo Crucet's Make Your Home Among Strangers and have seen her speak before. I was shocked by the response of students to one of her talks on a university campus, and knew I had to read her new essay collection. These pieces have their roots/a central theme in whiteness and privilege, but Capo Crucet doesn't crucify white people. She spotlights the differences between Cuban and white culture—weddings, funerals, expectations, etc.—and voices her own assumptions about people, recognizing her own privilege, giving her the ability to interrogate the system and her role in perpetuating it, and allowing her to teach others to get to that point. For example, she is often asked to speak for all Cubans and their stance on an issue, but when she asks her white students "what do white people think about [x]?" they don't have an answer, and laugh because there is no thinking about this group as homogenous. She is up front about how Cubans in Miami have different privileges than other Latinx communities. Growing up around people that looked like her and seeing Cubans in a multitude of jobs gave her a certain expectation of how Cubans are viewed in other parts of the country. It wasn't until leaving Florida the she realized she was "Latinx" to many people in the U.S. Themes/topics include: passing being a first-generation college student privilege naming conventions/how people make assumptions about names Disney peddling the "American Dream" and erasing your own wants assumptions about cowboys being a voyeur intergenerational traits and so many more

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sachi Argabright

    MY TIME AMONG THE WHITES is an honest and insightful collection of essays from Cuban American writer and professor, Jennine Capó Crucet. Known for her acclaimed works of fiction, this collection reflects on Crucet’s life and what it truly means to be a person of color in the America of today. This slim collection blew my expectations away. I thought this would be a heavy read, but it was very approachable and easy to read. While she covers serious issues, it’s not too “academic” and i MY TIME AMONG THE WHITES is an honest and insightful collection of essays from Cuban American writer and professor, Jennine Capó Crucet. Known for her acclaimed works of fiction, this collection reflects on Crucet’s life and what it truly means to be a person of color in the America of today. This slim collection blew my expectations away. I thought this would be a heavy read, but it was very approachable and easy to read. While she covers serious issues, it’s not too “academic” and is relatable and witty. This collection covers a wide range of important topics: racism, white washing and erasure, being a first generation college student, the importance of voting, stigmas about mental illness, sexism and sexual assault. I found her perspective as a Cuban American living in Miami to be very interesting. As someone who grew up in the Midwest (and never been to Miami), I was surprised when she noted that being Cuban in Miami is the equivalent of being “white” because they are in the majority. She writes that she lived in her own bubble, and was shocked that Cubans didn’t have much representation when she moved to areas outside of Miami. She also brings up an excellent point that when the system is so skewed towards white privilege, moving towards a more equal system will feel “unfair” to white people. Leveling out will be spun as “taking away.” That’s why so many are quick to label her “racist against white people,” but what she says is true. An essential read that everyone should pick up!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Beck

    I loved this book of essays. The daughter of Cuban refugees, Crucet writes about her relationships with her family, whiteness and white supremacy, being a first gen college student, working in academia, and the consequences of sexual violence. I especially liked reading about her lifetime adoration of Disney World (and the consequences of buying into the fantasy), as well as her essay on trying to account for both Cuban and white cultural mores while wedding planning (and her subsequent wedding I loved this book of essays. The daughter of Cuban refugees, Crucet writes about her relationships with her family, whiteness and white supremacy, being a first gen college student, working in academia, and the consequences of sexual violence. I especially liked reading about her lifetime adoration of Disney World (and the consequences of buying into the fantasy), as well as her essay on trying to account for both Cuban and white cultural mores while wedding planning (and her subsequent wedding crashing habit after moving into an apartment building that doubles as a wedding venue). Her essay on her parents naming her after a Miss America runner up was wonderful as well. Highly recommended. Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for the advanced copy!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    A searing look at white privilege based on the authors personal experiences as a first generation Cuban American navigating college and post graduation life. As uncomfortable as this book will make a lot of people the truth is that it’s supposed to make us uncomfortable. We need hard truths sometimes to shake things up and make real change. I also know this book will provide a lot of comfort for those that too find themselves a fish out out of water for when they feel unworthy or lost among a se A searing look at white privilege based on the authors personal experiences as a first generation Cuban American navigating college and post graduation life. As uncomfortable as this book will make a lot of people the truth is that it’s supposed to make us uncomfortable. We need hard truths sometimes to shake things up and make real change. I also know this book will provide a lot of comfort for those that too find themselves a fish out out of water for when they feel unworthy or lost among a sea of only white faces. This is a great book for enhancing a different perspective and to prompt further discourse.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    After some white students at Georgia Southern University burned this book in an informal protest, I had to read it. What ideas are that threatening? It's a collection of essays about navigating the world as a first generation student, as a person of color, and as a member of an immigrant family from Cuba. My favorite is the first one -- about the author's experience getting into and going to Cornell -- but some others about travel are also interesting. There are several essays about tourist dest After some white students at Georgia Southern University burned this book in an informal protest, I had to read it. What ideas are that threatening? It's a collection of essays about navigating the world as a first generation student, as a person of color, and as a member of an immigrant family from Cuba. My favorite is the first one -- about the author's experience getting into and going to Cornell -- but some others about travel are also interesting. There are several essays about tourist destinations that craft an "American Experience," and now I'm reconsidering my own travel with that frame in mind.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susanne

    Thank you to Macmillan-Picador and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Beautiful, intimate prose that deeply touched me - I am not a POC, but grew up a foreigner and cultural outsider in the US, raised by parents that were in many instances clueless about what that meant for me as their (oldest) child. The remarkable openness with which the author reflects on her upbringing, what shaped her, and the mindsets she encounters is in turn hilariously funny, touchingly vu Thank you to Macmillan-Picador and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Beautiful, intimate prose that deeply touched me - I am not a POC, but grew up a foreigner and cultural outsider in the US, raised by parents that were in many instances clueless about what that meant for me as their (oldest) child. The remarkable openness with which the author reflects on her upbringing, what shaped her, and the mindsets she encounters is in turn hilariously funny, touchingly vulnerable, achingly familiar, and a challenge to those that do not need to contend with being obviously an outsider. Highly recommended!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I wanted to read this after some students in Georgia burned the author's books after she spoke there. I'd say there's a bit of shared thematic content between this group of essays and her novel, Make Your Home Among Strangers, but this is a quick read and moves farther into the present. Not surprisingly, the Georgia incident is not the first time she's had to deal with white tears at a college when she has been brought there for the campus read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    A very good collection of essays written by Jennine Capo Crucet, which made me realize how much I didn't know about Cuban-Americans. She mostly (but not only) explores how it took her to actually leave Miami (and go live in Nebraska of all places) to realize she had pretty much always thought of herself as white, being fair skinned and Cubans being so plentiful in her area. Living in a very very white part of the country sadly taught her she was seen as "other" by way too many people. A very good collection of essays written by Jennine Capo Crucet, which made me realize how much I didn't know about Cuban-Americans. She mostly (but not only) explores how it took her to actually leave Miami (and go live in Nebraska of all places) to realize she had pretty much always thought of herself as white, being fair skinned and Cubans being so plentiful in her area. Living in a very very white part of the country sadly taught her she was seen as "other" by way too many people. Another thing I liked in My Time Among the Whites is how Crucet's love for books and literature shines throughout the whole book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I first read about this book in a Chicago Tribune book review and was already intrigued to read. Then I saw a news article about college students at a school in Georgia getting so upset with what the author had to say about white privilege they were burning copies of her book - one of her previous books was chosen as the freshman read by the school. https://twitter.com/crucet/status/118... All I can say is, I hope those children reflect a little more and later regret their actions. In these essays, the author is funny, insight I first read about this book in a Chicago Tribune book review and was already intrigued to read. Then I saw a news article about college students at a school in Georgia getting so upset with what the author had to say about white privilege they were burning copies of her book - one of her previous books was chosen as the freshman read by the school. https://twitter.com/crucet/status/118... All I can say is, I hope those children reflect a little more and later regret their actions. In these essays, the author is funny, insightful, reflective and honest. I now want to read her other works, and she has a new fan in me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessicarr

    My favorite things about this book were noticing that there is a squiggly red line under her name, marking it as "misspelled" in Word and other composition applications. And her title notes her time among the "whites," alluding not only to life as a Cuban American among white Americans in the Northeast and Midwest but also to her sense of self as having been a form of white growing up in Miami.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Holom

    In this collection of essays the author recounts a broad range of experiences, from being the first in their family to attend college to lessons learned through Disney. The essays are interesting and varied. I recommend this collection. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for the ARC. The opinions in this review are honest and my own. #MyTimeAmongTheWhites #nonfiction

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