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You Too?

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A timely and heartfelt collection of essays inspired by the #MeToo movement, edited by acclaimed young adult and middle-grade author Janet Gurtler. Featuring Beth Revis, Mackenzi Lee, Ellen Hopkins, Saundra Mitchell, Jennifer Brown, Cheryl Rainfield and many more. When #MeToo went viral, Janet Gurtler was among the millions of people who began to reflect on her past A timely and heartfelt collection of essays inspired by the #MeToo movement, edited by acclaimed young adult and middle-grade author Janet Gurtler. Featuring Beth Revis, Mackenzi Lee, Ellen Hopkins, Saundra Mitchell, Jennifer Brown, Cheryl Rainfield and many more. When #MeToo went viral, Janet Gurtler was among the millions of people who began to reflect on her past experiences. Things she had reluctantly accepted—male classmates groping her at recess, harassment at work—came back to her in startling clarity. She needed teens to know what she had not: that no young person should be subject to sexual assault, or made to feel unsafe, less than or degraded. You Too? was born out of that need. By turns thoughtful and explosive, these personal stories encompass a wide range of experiences and will resonate with every reader who has wondered, “Why is this happening to me?” or secretly felt that their own mistreatment or abuse is somehow their fault—it’s not. Candid and empowering, You Too? is written for teens, but also an essential resource for the adults in their lives—an urgent, compassionate call to listen and create change.


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A timely and heartfelt collection of essays inspired by the #MeToo movement, edited by acclaimed young adult and middle-grade author Janet Gurtler. Featuring Beth Revis, Mackenzi Lee, Ellen Hopkins, Saundra Mitchell, Jennifer Brown, Cheryl Rainfield and many more. When #MeToo went viral, Janet Gurtler was among the millions of people who began to reflect on her past A timely and heartfelt collection of essays inspired by the #MeToo movement, edited by acclaimed young adult and middle-grade author Janet Gurtler. Featuring Beth Revis, Mackenzi Lee, Ellen Hopkins, Saundra Mitchell, Jennifer Brown, Cheryl Rainfield and many more. When #MeToo went viral, Janet Gurtler was among the millions of people who began to reflect on her past experiences. Things she had reluctantly accepted—male classmates groping her at recess, harassment at work—came back to her in startling clarity. She needed teens to know what she had not: that no young person should be subject to sexual assault, or made to feel unsafe, less than or degraded. You Too? was born out of that need. By turns thoughtful and explosive, these personal stories encompass a wide range of experiences and will resonate with every reader who has wondered, “Why is this happening to me?” or secretly felt that their own mistreatment or abuse is somehow their fault—it’s not. Candid and empowering, You Too? is written for teens, but also an essential resource for the adults in their lives—an urgent, compassionate call to listen and create change.

30 review for You Too?

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sagan

    Tough read, yet so necessary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I have the privlege of knowing how freaking awesome the essays are in this tough but necessary anthology. Every single person who contributed mentioned in some way how difficult it was to share their stories. But they are doing it so we can move forward. We need to keep talking and we need to keep listening. #metoo #youtoo

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sahitya

    Trigger Warnings: As a book about the #meToo movement, this deals with themes from catcalling or verbal abuse to rape and incest and everything in between. So, please take care and decide if you are in the right headspace to handle this book. Ive read quite a few books in past couple months that dealt with sexual harassment in the workplace and the rise of the #meToo movement. So, when I saw the announcement of this book in which many YA authors are sharing their own stories and letting young Trigger Warnings: As a book about the #meToo movement, this deals with themes from catcalling or verbal abuse to rape and incest and everything in between. So, please take care and decide if you are in the right headspace to handle this book. I’ve read quite a few books in past couple months that dealt with sexual harassment in the workplace and the rise of the #meToo movement. So, when I saw the announcement of this book in which many YA authors are sharing their own stories and letting young women know that they aren’t alone, I was very excited to read this book. And I really am honored to be a part of this blog tour. This is a painful and difficult read, partly because of the experiences of the authors and how they are still common after all these years, partly also because they brought up many of my own memories which I may have tried to forget. It’s also a very diverse collection of experiences and each author talks about their own way of dealing with their trauma, and that’s definitely an important message for young women that there is no single right way to react or respond. It took me a while to read it completely because I could only handle it in small doses, but nevertheless, it’s a very important book and I would love to give this to any young woman I know. But I also think it’s important for adult readers like me to read because we all have had these experiences and it’s good to know we are not alone. I’m not going to rate any of the individual stories, just share my thoughts on each of them below: It’s our Secret by Patty Blount As a survivor of child molestation, the author asks a very timely question - when her parents asked her to keep it a secret about what happened to her, were they sparing her the ordeal of being dismissed, or were they just sparing themselves? Wishing on Silver Dollars by Jennifer Brown This was painful to read because it’s so relatable and common. The author delves into all the ways girls are sexualized since puberty (which is worse for the curvy girls) and how we are so used to verbal comments and leering and groping that by the time we are ready to start our careers, we just consider this harassment part of our lives. But what hit me most was the author talking about how we feel shame for being harassed when it’s the other person’s fault. This is definitely a lesson that every young woman needs to be told - it’s not your fault. This is How it Ends by Tiffany Brownlee As a young black girl with a sheltered upbringing, the author experienced both racial and sexual harassment and I really felt for her because she too concluded at that young age that it must be her fault. But as an educator currently, she emphasizes that such harassing conduct arises from ignorance or lack of empathy, and it’s necessary to teach kids to respect themselves and others, and exercise self-control. Sugar, Spice and Not so Nice by Jess Capelle The author’s harassment experiences and the way they are dismissed by the adults through the years are all too familiar, and she stresses that despite being taught from childhood that we girls should keep quiet and not make waves and just be nice, we really shouldn’t do that. We have a voice and we should use it to stand up for ourselves and not let anyone get away with harassing us. Bus Stop Witchcraft by Kenna Clifford As a young bisexual woman, the author talks about being a bit luckier to be able to grow up in the generation where #meToo movement is prominent and atleast some women are able to speak about their experiences. And she also talks about the need to speak our stories and make our voices heard. Young but Not Powerless by Eva Darrows The author talks about her experiences with harassment in school from teachers and how much worse it is than if the perpetrators were boys her own age, because these teachers had power over the students. And her mentioning that many girls knew about it and just warned younger girls to be safe, rather than reporting the issues just underlines the harsh reality that sometimes it’s easier to keep ourselves safe than try to get a harasser punished. It Was Me Too by Dana L. Davis As a survivor of childhood sexual assault, the author talks about how she internalized the shame that it was all her fault, and how it completely changed her as a person well into adulthood, how she learnt to just be aloof and hide and never put herself in a vulnerable position. This is another reality for so many women and it was heartbreaking to read about. Anything but Ordinary by Ronni Davis The author talks about the shame in wondering what she might have done and how her not acting her “color” had contributed to her being assaulted, and later on feeling anger and shame for all the instances when she didn’t speak up. There is also the feeling that she can’t use #meToo because what happened to her wasn’t too bad. But ultimately it’s about the fact that every single instance matters and we are not alone. Not that Kind of Girl by Natasha Deen The author talks about boundaries and emotional violence in her teenage years, and how traumatic it can feel when the whole school judges you for something you haven’t done. But she is also very graceful in her message that sometimes restraint is important, we should speak up for ourselves but never say anything in anger that we wouldn’t say in normal situations. How do I look ? By Nicolas DiDomizio As a young gay man in the closet, the author talks about how his shame about his body and weight made him accept the things that were done to him even when he knew they were wrong. And he makes a great point that self worth doesn’t and shouldn’t depend on how you look and I think it’s something we can all keep in mind. Gray Lines by Namina Forna As an African immigrant and also a child survivor of war, the author talks about not understanding the concept of personal space and just not making a fuss when a teacher violated it because she didn’t want to be a problem. But I’m glad that she was quick to recognize grooming and make herself safe after that, so I completely agree with her message that make a fuss and say no whenever anyone disrespects your personal boundaries, and do whatever you need to keep yourself safe. No, Not Me! By Jenna Glass This was definitely an eye opening read because the author talks about how we normalize so many harassing behaviors like flashing or groping or unwanted touching, never realizing that these are also forms of sexual assault. She talks about the importance of talking about these issues and not letting anyone get away with these kinds of actions without consequences. Before Starbucks or Cell Phones by Janet Gurtler The author’s experience was tough to read about, but I was also glad that she had atleast one teacher who listened. But the common theme of shame still comes through, with young girls always wondering if they did something that made the boys or men behave so badly. And I think that’s why the author’s message is important that we shouldn’t keep these things to ourselves, we should talk to and support each other, so that we may one day get to a world where a girl can say it has never happened to me. The One we don’t Talk about by Teri Hall This was absolutely horrific to read about and I don’t have words to describe the strength it must have taken for the author as a young girl to finally tell someone about all the abuse that was happening in her house. As the author says, believe in yourself and never let your abuser convince you that you don’t matter because you do. A Long Overdue Confession by Ellen Hopkins This is mostly the author introspecting her decisions when she was eighteen to have an affair with a married man and how she was taken advantage of due to her naïveté. She also wants to share the story to prevent if possible other younger girls from succumbing to older men’s attention and flattery, particularly those girls who already have body image issues. Bathsheba by Mackenzi Lee Through the Bible story of David and Bathsheba, the author tries to make the point that despite what we’ve been told since childhood, we are not responsible for making men comfortable or for their violent actions; none of our dressing or talking or anything is a reason for men to violate us and we should always remember that. Burn by Saundra Mitchell The author lists instances after instances where she was violated but couldn’t do anything because she felt trapped but her realization after she turned seventeen is something we can all hope for - to start believing in ourselves and finding our voice and never stopping ourselves from expressing our anger. Just Smile by Ali Novak The author’s story highlights the fact that even if we haven’t been physically assaulted, words flung against us can cause equal emotional trauma, and that’s why we should use our own words to tell our stories and never minimize what we’ve been through. Boys Will be Boys By Eve Porinchak Another experience where the boys’ actions are blamed on the girl’s clothes, but I was very glad to know the author had a supportive family and learnt to stand up for herself at a very young age. We all definitely need that conviction. There is Strength in our Voices by Cheryl Rainfield I can’t even begin to understand the strength it must have taken for the author to run away and survive her whole childhood where she was part of a cult and her own family raped and tortured her, but I tip my hat off to her for finding the resilience and the queer community that helped her. And that’s why she insists that it’s important to listen and talk to other survivors, so that we may help others while also helping ourselves and not feeling we’re alone in our ordeal. Pretty Enough by Beth Revis This is a story of the author’s realization that how wrong it was of her to internalize the feelings that only beautiful girls got harassed and because she wasn’t, it meant she wasn’t worth it. She talks about how harmful this divide is and basing self worth on looks is, and asks us all to understand that there is only one side - all of us women who have to stick up for each other and not let anyone else make us feel powerless with their words or actions. My Oklahoma History by Andrea L. Rogers As a Cherokee citizen from Oklahoma, the author uses her tribe’s history as a parallel to how indigenous women are treated - both have a right to their sovereignty but it’s always threatened. And she makes a wonderful point that women don’t need to forgive anyone for the purpose of moving on - forgiveness can be a consideration if someone is making amends but it means nothing if the violator has no regrets. Class Valedictorian by Lulabel Seitz As a young Asian woman who was assaulted by a rich white classmate in high school, the author talks about the ways in which she was silenced and disbelieved by those in power because they didn’t want to discomfort the perpetrator. When she says that money and holding onto old white power structures matter more, I don’t see anything wrong about it because that’s still the world we live in. But I admire her for speaking up even when she was forced not to, and trying to keep doing it for other people even at such a young age. No Right Way to be Wronged by Mischa Thrace This is a different take on all the above experiences but it’s not wrong in anyway. The author talks about how no one is owed our secrets or the details of what happened to us, and it’s totally our choice. It’s ok to not want to be a spokesperson for the cause or tweet about our issues. After her own assault, the author found it easier to deal with it by expressing her anger through learning Muay Thai and just like her, everyone has the right to find their own way of dealing with the trauma, even if it is silence. Notes on Girlhood by Amy Zhang The author talks about all the overwhelming feelings that one is bombarded with after a sexual assault happens, because we aren’t sure how to process the trauma; and navigating it becomes a big part of our life. She talks about being fortunate enough to have a friend group as well as a therapist who helped her untangle all her feelings and feel like herself again a little bit, and that it’s enough for now.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    I wish I had the words to describe where I should begin with the review of this book. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find them. This book was powerful, awe-inspiring and difficult to read. Most of us, if not all, have heard of the #metoo movement whether we have declared ourselves a part of it or whether we've just kept up with the stories that have been shared by brave and powerful individuals. In all honesty I had a very hard time reading this book. It took me ages to get through the stories I wish I had the words to describe where I should begin with the review of this book. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find them. This book was powerful, awe-inspiring and difficult to read. Most of us, if not all, have heard of the #metoo movement whether we have declared ourselves a part of it or whether we've just kept up with the stories that have been shared by brave and powerful individuals. In all honesty I had a very hard time reading this book. It took me ages to get through the stories since I received the e-ARC last year. It's not because it's poorly written, but how do you enjoy stories that are revolved around the trauma inflicted on so many women and men? It was heart-breaking and triggering for me as I too have been raped and sexually assaulted. It's not something that I share often because a few times that I have shared my story people have looked at me in disbelief. It's made me shut down and refrain from using my voice. I commended each and every man and woman that took part in sharing their story in this book regardless of their circumstance or how difficult it was to share their story. Read the rest at: https://bookishrealmreviews.blogspot....

  5. 4 out of 5

    Greyson | Use Your Words

    Why are y'all sleeping on this???? #metoo

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine Bolton

    Thank you to Harlequin Teen for my ARC! This book was the YA version of Roxane Gays Not That Bad. And saying its YA does not in anyway mean its watered down; just that the content is more geared towards teens. These essays cover the gamut of sexual assault and harassment. I think this is a great IMPORTANT book for young girls to read. I recognized my own experiences in several of the stories, and found strength, camaraderie and resilience. I wish this book had been around when I was a teenager. Thank you to Harlequin Teen for my ARC! This book was the YA version of Roxane Gay’s “Not That Bad.” And saying it’s YA does not in anyway mean it’s watered down; just that the content is more geared towards teens. These essays cover the gamut of sexual assault and harassment. I think this is a great IMPORTANT book for young girls to read. I recognized my own experiences in several of the stories, and found strength, camaraderie and resilience. I wish this book had been around when I was a teenager.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Rainfield

    1 in 3 girls. 1 in 5 boys. Sexual abuse and assault needs to be talked about. You Too? releases today! 25 authors share their #MeToo stories, with essays by me, Ellen Hopkins, Beth G Revis, Mackenzie Lee, Janet Gurtler, Jennifer Brown, Patty Blount, Jess Capelle, and more! This is a powerful, honest, validating anthology that tells survivors of sexual abuse, rape, sexual assault not they are not alone, and helps people who don't have those experiences see just how widespread it really is. 1 in 3 girls. 1 in 5 boys. Sexual abuse and assault needs to be talked about. You Too? releases today! 25 authors share their #MeToo stories, with essays by me, Ellen Hopkins, Beth G Revis, Mackenzie Lee, Janet Gurtler, Jennifer Brown, Patty Blount, Jess Capelle, and more! This is a powerful, honest, validating anthology that tells survivors of sexual abuse, rape, sexual assault not they are not alone, and helps people who don't have those experiences see just how widespread it really is. Survivors need to know that they're not alone. They need to know that they're not to blame. This anthology can help. Every teen should have access to this book. Every school and library should have one.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sacha

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC! Here's a 1/7/20 update with a complete review: Five stars I got nervous when I saw a description suggesting that this book was a kind of teen version of Roxane Gay's _Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture_ because Gay is a genius and that book is a centerpiece of our culture at this time. How could another collection, particularly one marketed to teen readers, rise to that level? This does. There are many reasons that I think this book is a Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this ARC! Here's a 1/7/20 update with a complete review: Five stars I got nervous when I saw a description suggesting that this book was a kind of teen version of Roxane Gay's _Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture_ because Gay is a genius and that book is a centerpiece of our culture at this time. How could another collection, particularly one marketed to teen readers, rise to that level? This does. There are many reasons that I think this book is a tremendous success. First, the audience awareness is spot-on. The writers tell stories of their experiences as children and as teens, and the settings in which these traumatic encounters and crimes take place are common to the readers of this work: school, home, a friend's house, on the walk home from school, etc. Each essay feels authentic and personal, and the examples within them are incredibly varied. There is discussion of rape, sexual assault, domestic violence, all forms of power-based personal violence, emotional abuse, degradation, incest, and more. Any reader of this work will come away with an important message: if it feels wrong to you, it is. There's a clear theme of validation here, and to me, that - along with the attention to diverse voices - is the most important contribution of this work. I think it's hard to get a book of essays - particularly on this subject - into the hands of teens, but I hope many teens do engage with this work and find the comfort, support, and validation that it can provide.

  9. 5 out of 5

    C. McKenzie

    This collection of short stories reveals a sad truth about our society where young women are still objectified, and in some cases, abused. Each story is different, but there are underlying themes that run though many of them. "It's the woman's fault" is one, guilt is another, and shame. Some made me cry, some made me angry, but all of them made me aware.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Powerful anthology about others experiences with the Me too movement and how it doesn't just effect one person. Written as 25 different essays they are heartbreaking, inspiring, and moving. Difficult to read at times but well worth reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sara (A Gingerly Review)

    Amazing. So glad I read this. FRTC

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sam (she_who_reads_)

    READ. THIS. BOOK. Its not easy, but it is so so important READ. THIS. BOOK. It’s not easy, but it is so so important

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pallavi

    RATING: 4/5 STARS This is a very powerful anthology. It's not the most pleasant read, but it's not supposed to be. The stories contain sadness, fear, anger, and betrayal. But they also convey an important message about what it means to be female in a way that is brutally honest but also optimistic. This is the first #MeToo book I've read that has been specifically targeted to teens. It has a great variety in the topics addressed, but at the core there is a common thread shared by all the RATING: 4/5 STARS This is a very powerful anthology. It's not the most pleasant read, but it's not supposed to be. The stories contain sadness, fear, anger, and betrayal. But they also convey an important message about what it means to be female in a way that is brutally honest but also optimistic. This is the first #MeToo book I've read that has been specifically targeted to teens. It has a great variety in the topics addressed, but at the core there is a common thread shared by all the narratives. "It's my hope that the little girl in women of all ages will have the courage to tell their stories as well, take the necessary steps to heal, and claim the right to shine bright once again." A sincere thanks to NetGalley and Inkyard Press for providing an advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Social: @_shelf.awareness on Instagram

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pam Vickers

    A must read!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Leelynn (Sometimes Leelynn Reads) ❤

    Disclaimer: I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you to Netgalley, YA Bound Book Tours and Inkyard Press for this free copy. All quotes in this review are taken from the Advanced Reader Copy and may change in final publication. I dont think you realize how much this anthology seriously hurt my heart. Especially since this novel is compiled of all essays from different authors and they told their real life experiences dealing Disclaimer: I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. Thank you to Netgalley, YA Bound Book Tours and Inkyard Press for this free copy. All quotes in this review are taken from the Advanced Reader Copy and may change in final publication. I don’t think you realize how much this anthology seriously hurt my heart. Especially since this novel is compiled of all essays from different authors and they told their real life experiences dealing with sexual abuse, sexual harassment, discrimination, racism. Just terrible things that as we were growing up, we didn’t realize that this was actually as bad and unspeakable as we thought until we grew up. I feel like the one that I could relate to the most on various levels was the essay by Brownlee, because of the racism that she endured being a Black girl growing up. It’s interesting because in California, the racism wasn’t really as prevalent as when she lived in New Orleans, and it’s “funny” because that’s what I felt when I moved from Hawaii to Virginia. Just a very different group of people and while I also didn’t have to endure the sexual assault that she did during a school dance of all places, I could only imagine the shame she felt finding that out. Her story was just really one that I read and couldn’t help but see me in her. I also really felt like Gurtler’s decision to make THAT essay the FIRST essay to read. Five years old, and being asked if she was lying. Being told that if she were to tell others, then they would blame her for what happened. My god. That part really just broke my heart, as did this entire novel because of the content and the fact that all of these stories took place in real life. As stated in the very beginning of this novel, before the essays even start, the trigger warnings are clear and please take care of yourself before you start to read this novel. And I’m telling you now, the first essay will be a hard one to get through mostly because of her age when she was molested. Yes, she was molested. Just please be careful when you start to read these essays. It’s also so hard to even really rate this novel because how can you put a rating on people’s experiences? I wouldn’t even want to have a negative feeling towards anything because I mean, who am I to really say anything about it, I guess? It’s hard. I had feelings throughout this whole novel for sure, and while this rating isn’t based on anything but my feelings on the novel and nothing else – no grammar issues, no pacing issues, nothing remotely constructive at all – I just had to really make sure that I was in the right mindset for this novel. Thank goodness I was.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brooklynne

    I think the first thing I want to say is I wish there was no need for a book like this. I wish we lived in a society that the stories contained in this anthology were tales of days gone by. Unfortunately, that is not the case. This a book that is hard to read at parts, it doesnt pull punches but instead hits you right where it hurts. Women around the world will read these stories though and nod their heads with the sad knowledge that this is the way the world is. But one thing I do know for I think the first thing I want to say is I wish there was no need for a book like this. I wish we lived in a society that the stories contained in this anthology were tales of days gone by. Unfortunately, that is not the case. This a book that is hard to read at parts, it doesn’t pull punches but instead hits you right where it hurts. Women around the world will read these stories though and nod their heads with the sad knowledge that this is the way the world is. But one thing I do know for certain is that we need to stand together. To protect each other. To amplify the voices of those who are so often robbed of their ability to speak. There are still many #MeToo fights to be fought – and we need to fight them together. From Intro by Janet Gurtler This anthology of 25 essays is a mixture of tales of sexual assault, experiences of the ongoing sexual harassment that makes up women’s lives and powerful stories of how we are ending this NOW. I wish I could talk in-depth about each story in this anthology but if I were to do that we would be here all day! I do want to highlight some of my favourites, Sugar and Spice and Not So Nice, is a great story about how we can stand up and say no, how we can stay firm and remind everyone that this is not okay behaviour. Bus Stop Witchcraft was an uplifting essay from a young person on how we can join together every woman and work together to change the world and make it a better place. The One We Don’t Talk About is a heartbreaking tale of incest and how even in this day of #MeToo we still sweep this under the rug. Finally, Burn was such a beautiful written essay speaking volumes of taking back your story and your power and rising like a phoenix. Sadly there were a few things I found disappointing, firstly there is one essay in here by a cismale and I found this essay to be so deeply problematic in the way it was written. I do believe that we need to be talking about male sexual assault but this essay, in my opinion, comes across as extremely tone-deaf, as we hear about how he listened to boys mock girls and he never says anything and is silently complacent in this. In addition to this, I found that many of the essays were tales about when they were girls written by middle-aged women that I felt will not truly connect with teens of today. I wish there had been so more diversity as there are not really anyone that talks about identifying as LGBTQIA. But the biggest thing would be that I think the ebook is about 10 essays too long and I personally felt more beaten down than uplifted by the end of it. Overall though it serves it’s purpose, to create solidarity and strength among us all and remind young women they are not alone. A Powerful book that hopefully inspires a powerful generation, so that we can stop asking You Too?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    Thank you to Netgalley & Harlequin Teen for providing me with an e-ARC of You Too? in exchange for an honest review. Content Warning: A book focusing on sexual assault is obviously going to have some trigger-y material. Theres rape, theres sexual assault, theres pedophilia, theres abuse, theres incestuous rape; the list goes on. However, if you think you can handle it, then I definitely recommend reading regardless of the content warning. But, I never want anyone to be uncomfortable, so if Thank you to Netgalley & Harlequin Teen for providing me with an e-ARC of You Too? in exchange for an honest review. Content Warning: A book focusing on sexual assault is obviously going to have some trigger-y material. There’s rape, there’s sexual assault, there’s pedophilia, there’s abuse, there’s incestuous rape; the list goes on. However, if you think you can handle it, then I definitely recommend reading regardless of the content warning. But, I never want anyone to be uncomfortable, so if this is something you can’t handle at this time, then totally understandable! Be safe, mentally & physically, my ghouls. ♥ It’s hard to review a book based on real-life & personal essays. I will never undermine another person’s story, regardless of writing style or whatever. So, this ‘review’ is more of a why you should read it & why I deem it as important, and not necessarily based on the actual words on the pages. If that makes sense. I knew You Too? wouldn’t be an easy read. I had an inkling that I would cringe & I knew that some of the stories within would make my stomach turn. Sexual assault is a topic that is so, unfortunately, relevant in our world, and it needs to be something that we discuss more. It shouldn’t be taboo to talk about it. Men and women should be able to stand up & be like, “hey this happened to me –” without fear of not being believed & without fear of being judged for whatever reason. The #MeToo movement was such an eye-opening moment for so many people. It was a time where those who’ve been sexually assaulted realized that they weren’t alone & that their story did matter; regardless of how ‘minimal’ they considered it compared to others. You Too? is a collection of essays from a group of authors sharing their #MeToo stories. I find it to be such an important read, as they share what happened, how damaging it was to them & some of the responses they received from people they loved & trusted. It really opens your eyes to see the emotions & thoughts that people hide when it comes to sexual assault. So, yes. As uncomfortable as this book may be, I definitely recommend You Too? I recommend it for those who’ve been sexually assaulted. I recommend it to those who have not. I recommend it to your daughters & to your sons. It’s time that we finally start talking about sexual assault.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lynda Dickson

    You Too? is a collection of 25 essays, mostly by published authors, with an introduction by editor Janet Gurtler, who also includes her own story. In 2018, #MeToo stories began exploding across my social media feed, bringing back memories of the harassment I experienced as a young woman coming of age in the late seventies and early eighties. As such, she set out to collect stories from a diverse group of writers who were willing to share their personal encounters. Most of the authors tell their You Too? is a collection of 25 essays, mostly by published authors, with an introduction by editor Janet Gurtler, who also includes her own story. “In 2018, #MeToo stories began exploding across my social media feed, bringing back memories of the harassment I experienced as a young woman coming of age in the late seventies and early eighties.” As such, she “set out to collect stories from a diverse group of writers who were willing to share their personal encounters.” Most of the authors tell their stories for the first time in these pages, often feeling that what they experienced wasn’t “bad enough” to be included in this anthology. It’s tough reading about the verbal and physical abuse experienced by these girls (and one boy) via the words and actions of boys and men, not only because of their sex but for their color, nationality, sexual orientation, even body size. They were made to feel like they had done something wrong and were left feeling both fear and shame. They reflect on these incidents and regret not having acted at the time and reporting the behavior of their abusers. This is the message they wish to convey to the young readers who may currently be experiencing the same sort of abuse: “I should have been using my voice and standing up to harassment. […] Call out harassers. Speak for those who are too afraid, and let others speak for you when you can’t. There can be consequences for harassers and predators of all types - and there should be.” On a positive note, these women all came out stronger because of what they endured. And, guess what? Me too. Should be compulsory reading for all teens - both girls and boys - and their parents. Warnings: coarse language, sexual references, rape, incest, LGBTQA themes. I received this book in return for an honest review. Full blog post (8 January): https://booksdirectonline.blogspot.co...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Reviewed on my blog, Becky on Books, on 1/6/19. You Too? was not an easy read--and it absolutely shouldn't be. It made me uncomfortable, it made me cry, and it made me think. It made me remember things I didn't really want to remember, and it made me want to give a copy of this to every young person I encounter, male and female. There are authors in here I already knew, and authors who were new to me who I'm absolutely going to be looking for more from. There was even an author I'd watched in a Reviewed on my blog, Becky on Books, on 1/6/19. You Too? was not an easy read--and it absolutely shouldn't be. It made me uncomfortable, it made me cry, and it made me think. It made me remember things I didn't really want to remember, and it made me want to give a copy of this to every young person I encounter, male and female. There are authors in here I already knew, and authors who were new to me who I'm absolutely going to be looking for more from. There was even an author I'd watched in a viral video in 2018. (It made me cry then, and I cried again reading her story here.) You Too? is a book of secrets, of confessions, and of truths. It's not an easy read, but it's a book that demands to be read, shared, and discussed. Bring tissues. Rating: 4 1/2 stars / A I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    T.B. Caine

    I was given an ARC by Netgalley in exchange for a fair review. This was a very powerful collection, and I think it should be mandatory reading for anyone and everyone. The collection was strongest towards the end where it felt like the essays had more of a succinct closing. One issue I did have that is taking it from a 5 to a 4 stars is that some of the essays do get extremely repetitive in their last pages. You could easily skip a few pages in each of the story and wouldn't miss a beat because I was given an ARC by Netgalley in exchange for a fair review. This was a very powerful collection, and I think it should be mandatory reading for anyone and everyone. The collection was strongest towards the end where it felt like the essays had more of a succinct closing. One issue I did have that is taking it from a 5 to a 4 stars is that some of the essays do get extremely repetitive in their last pages. You could easily skip a few pages in each of the story and wouldn't miss a beat because it felt like they were retreading the same thoughts to fit into a word/page count. Close to half of the stories I found myself skimming through the last pages of each just because they were the same thoughts over and over. Still an extremely solid collection and my favorites were the one about Bathsheba and the one that has more of a witchcraft/witchy twist to it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

    Inspired by the #MeToo movement, twenty five voices share their own stories in Janet Gurtler's latest anthology You Too? In a powerful push to let young adults know they are not alone, these stories tackle sexual assault in a deeply meaningful way, from diverse voices young and old, from authors we know and ones we don't quite yet. Before I begin, of course I need to say that this anthology includes a lot of potential triggers, so please be aware of a content warning for sexual assault, rape, Inspired by the #MeToo movement, twenty five voices share their own stories in Janet Gurtler's latest anthology You Too? In a powerful push to let young adults know they are not alone, these stories tackle sexual assault in a deeply meaningful way, from diverse voices young and old, from authors we know and ones we don't quite yet. Before I begin, of course I need to say that this anthology includes a lot of potential triggers, so please be aware of a content warning for sexual assault, rape, incest and exploitation, so please be aware of this. Personally, these topics are quite sensitive but immensely important to me. I made sure to read this anthology in small amounts, when I was in the right headspace. It was so powerful and meaningful to me and has had a positive impact on my mental health but make sure you do what is right for you. You Too? Is made up of twenty five essays, each one telling a different story that centres around sexual assault. They each tackle the subject in a different and powerful way, sharing their different and yet so similar experiences and discussing the impact and inference of these experiences. This anthology discusses rape culture, pedophilia, objectification, racism, toxic masculinity, society's expectations pushed on girls, homophobia, speaking up and so so much more in such an important, timely and poignant way. It's hard to review non fiction like this, past saying how so so very important this anthology is. I hope it reaches the hands of teen girls everywhere, boys too. I hope everyone reads it and I hope it helps them feel less alone, helps them understand, helps them to speak up and to notice and to help themselves. This anthology made me cry of happiness, of sadness, in anger, and I am so so glad to have read it. I really hope that you will pick up this novel, for yourself, but also for everyone who has experienced sexual assault, who can say "yes, it was #metoo.". I hope this book succeeds so that more can follow, and I am so thankful it exists.

  22. 5 out of 5

    ACME TEEN BOOKS Kids, YA & NA Too!

    **WARNING: This book does contain trigger themes involving rape/incest/sexual harassment/abuse.** You Too? is a collection of short stories and it gives us all a good dose of reality: In today's world, it is far too common that females from childhood to the teenage years, (as well as oft documented adulthood) are still objectified, and in way too many cases, abused. As if the experiences themselves weren't nightmarish enough, the message they often receive is "It's the girl's fault", that they **WARNING: This book does contain trigger themes involving rape/incest/sexual harassment/abuse.** You Too? is a collection of short stories and it gives us all a good dose of reality: In today's world, it is far too common that females from childhood to the teenage years, (as well as oft documented adulthood) are still objectified, and in way too many cases, abused. As if the experiences themselves weren't nightmarish enough, the message they often receive is "It's the girl's fault", that they should feel guilty and worse yet, ashamed of themselves. As the mom of teenage girls, this breaks my heart. I believe that all teenage girls should be given the chance to read it. The fact that this book helps to bring the issue into the light and lets the girls know that they are not alone, is the first step to handling, treating and correcting the problem. #MeToo #YouToo 5 ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ A huge thank you to Inkyard Press, Net Galley and Lola's Blog Tours for providing me with this copy to read. I am voluntarily leaving my review and all opinions are my own.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Meaghan Hurn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Honesty. Passion. Strength. Powerful. These are only four of the many descriptive ways to describe this book. No, it's not easy ti read, but it is necessary. It allows the reader to fully understand the different ways the #metoo movement hit home for millions around the world and how it still continues to resonate. This review may be shorter than we normally write, and it's simply because the adjectives above describe it much better than we ever could. Read.This.Book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Montague

    Wow. This was extremely powerful. The #MeToo movement sparked a very important discussion that needed to be addressed a long time ago. This is a collection of essays from YA and MG authors, was inspired by this movement that hit the world in 2017.  As more and more stories started to come out, it made you think about your own life and experiences. The things that you brushed off as normal, were actually not okay. Physical assault or verbal assault. A common thread that was woven throughout all of Wow. This was extremely powerful. The #MeToo movement sparked a very important discussion that needed to be addressed a long time ago. This is a collection of essays from YA and MG authors, was inspired by this movement that hit the world in 2017.  As more and more stories started to come out, it made you think about your own life and experiences. The things that you brushed off as normal, were actually not okay. Physical assault or verbal assault. A common thread that was woven throughout all of the stories in this anthology was the shame people felt and the blame they put upon themselves: Did I dress to provocatively? Was I too forward, trusting? Was it my fault? Why didn't I speak up? For some of these authors, the trauma they experienced as children shaped the rest of their life and how they perceived themselves and men. Others only just realized the incidences that they may have brushed aside over the years were more significant and alarming than they thought. This movement has opened the eyes of so many people to the harsh realities that people face—not just for women and not just in the entertainment industry. However, there is still a long way to go. Predators are still getting away with their crimes, and victims are still being dismissed when coming—if they even come forward at all. This is such an important piece of work that should be read by all teens. It could be so beneficial in more ways than people might realize.  ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Books and discussions on this topic are so important for a variety of reasons; but most important of all to let anyone know that they are not alone. Everyone has a story, though we might not want to admit it even to ourselves or think we don't because it's nothing compared to what others have had to go through. Maybe we didn't think much about it, even if it did leaves us uncomfortable or maybe we've repressed it after all these years. I spent a lot of the first half of this book just continually Books and discussions on this topic are so important for a variety of reasons; but most important of all to let anyone know that they are not alone. Everyone has a story, though we might not want to admit it even to ourselves or think we don't because it's nothing compared to what others have had to go through. Maybe we didn't think much about it, even if it did leaves us uncomfortable or maybe we've repressed it after all these years. I spent a lot of the first half of this book just continually going "Ugh!' It was to a point where I thought that would be my review, just "Ugh!" It's not an easy thing to read, which is why so many don't want to talk about it either, and that is exactly why books like this need to exist. These 25 essays cover #MeToo from a variety of angles proving that it's not just one thing and that it can mean different things to different people who have had to experience the same thing.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    A truly wonderful and timely read. The essayists were all brave for sharing their stories and I while I applaud them, my heart goes out to them as well. Thank you all for sharing your stories and for Janet Gurtler bringing them all together. P.S. This book was given to me to review for School Library Journal. You can check out the review in the February issue or online at SLJ.com

  27. 5 out of 5

    Clare Bird

    You Too? by Janet Gurtler I give You Too? by Janet Gurtler 5 out of 5 birds! I received this months ago from Netgalley but had such a hard time opening hence the delay.... But I'm so glad I did! I think everyone should read it. My eyes were open to new ways of thinking. Ideas that were not even presented during my time earning my Women's and Gender Studies Certificate. I'm an avid reader of books that contain heavy subjects of sexual assault, and this book didn't contain many details of assault, You Too? by Janet Gurtler I give You Too? by Janet Gurtler 5 out of 5 birds! I received this months ago from Netgalley but had such a hard time opening hence the delay.... But I'm so glad I did! I think everyone should read it. My eyes were open to new ways of thinking. Ideas that were not even presented during my time earning my Women's and Gender Studies Certificate. I'm an avid reader of books that contain heavy subjects of sexual assault, and this book didn't contain many details of assault, but the authors thought around them. I was drawn in to each essay and wanted to thank each author individually because of what and how they shared. Their voices are changing the world I and my children live it. This book of essays made it clear to me that in my parenting in both my parents and daughters that it's my job to teach them that they can say NO unapologetically, the meaning of consent, and that they don't need to feel shame because of someones actions. The one store that I can't stop thinking about is Bathseba by Mackenzi Lee. I've heard that story so many times and not once have I thought it wasn't her fault. I have so much more to say about this but I'll leave it there. I enjoyed this a lot. I wish I would have read it as a younger girl- it's heavy material- but most of the things that happened in this book happened at young ages. I recommend co-reading or read/discuss with your teens both male and female. It's eye opening. Thank you Netgalley for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review. #amreading #mrsbirdswords #booklover #Bibliophile #bookaddict #bookreccomendation #goodreads #nonfiction #bookshelf #book #bookaholic #feministreads #feminist #metoo #netgalley #youtoo #janetgurtler

  28. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Harvey

    *Please note, this book was given to me in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own and honest. The best word I can use to descrive this collection of stories, would be powerful. The stories cover a wide range of experiences and each voice is important and impactful. I think one thing that this book does amazingly well, is that it didn't shy away from anything, and while at times this can mean that reading it can be a little uncomfortable because of the subject matter. *Please note, this book was given to me in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own and honest. The best word I can use to descrive this collection of stories, would be powerful. The stories cover a wide range of experiences and each voice is important and impactful. I think one thing that this book does amazingly well, is that it didn't shy away from anything, and while at times this can mean that reading it can be a little uncomfortable because of the subject matter. I also think that it's the best kind of uncomfortable, because these are stories that needed to be told. Voices that needed to be heard and subjects that shouldn't be hushed up to save people from feeling uncomfortable, because nothing will ever chance, if people don't speak out. I think this book is a great collection of essays that continue to spark a coversation that needed to be sparked. For me, I'd say ultimatelty that this is a powerful book that should be read. It does a great job as showing the different kinds of assult and the impact that it has on people.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Mandina

    Because I have my own #MeToo story, I was definitely interested in reading this book and being able to recommend it to others. While I didn't completely finish the book, it's not because it wasn't worthwhile to read. It's because after a while the stories started to depress me a bit. Yes, I definitely connected with and felt so much about the stories and authors was true for me as well. And I do think it is an important book to have and for others to read. But for me I couldn't keep going Because I have my own #MeToo story, I was definitely interested in reading this book and being able to recommend it to others. While I didn't completely finish the book, it's not because it wasn't worthwhile to read. It's because after a while the stories started to depress me a bit. Yes, I definitely connected with and felt so much about the stories and authors was true for me as well. And I do think it is an important book to have and for others to read. But for me I couldn't keep going because in the end, I just was getting more and more depressed. However I still will try to purchase it for my school library, because I think it is helpful to read and know that other people have dealt with situations that still today we don't always feel we can talk about or actually confront those who have done these things to us. There was even something in one of the stories that was very much that thought, that she wondered if she had only spoken up sooner or even done more if she could have saved others who might have had to go through what she did. There was also in one story something that really stuck out to me because it is something I have struggled with as well. There was a guy I who was a part of a group of friends I had from my part time job about 10 or so years ago. He said something that really stuck out to me, about how a girl only thinks a guy flirting is creepy when she is not attracted to him. In the one story that made me think of this comment, the author talked about how her boss, a boy that was like 19 when she was still 16 or 17, who was her boyfriend, did treat her special at work because she flirted back with him and let him touch her. Gave her extra time off, better jobs to do, etc. She quit when they broke up because it was too hard to see him every day. Her next job she found and was told shortly after that she'd only been hired because of her large chest. She was also told by those same fellow female coworkers if she would just flirt back and play along with the much older male manager's flirting and advances, she would again get lots of special privileges like easy tasks, more weekend days off, and the like. But with this much older man, it was creepier to her and unwanted. And in the end, when she did not give in, she ended up losing her job, and the other women who did use those tactics to their advantage were not happy with her putting up the resistance and causing problems. Another big topic that came across and really stuck with me was about how we are taught as women not to be rude or make a big deal out of things. I currently work with a man who is about 20 years older than me, and he has always done things or said things that kind of are creepy in a sexually forward manner at times. But because it isn't anything major, no touching or any threats because he's not in a role of power to me, and other than those occasional comments he's really a pretty nice guy, I don't do anything. Even though other girls, younger than me, making him at least 40 years older than them, have expressed similar feelings about it. I should say something, I should, right? But is it worth it? That's the way our society works. And I hate it. But am I still a part of the problem not saying anything myself? So those are the things that made me not finish the book for myself. Although I did read through a few of the stories of authors that I have read before and wanted to support them as well. I do highly recommend it. Just know that it will be a hard read for a lot of it, but worth it, and these stories deserve to be heard. Review first appeared on Lisa Loves Literature.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley and Inkyard Press in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. You Too? is a complicated book to review because of the intensity of its content. These stories are deeply important and I have so much respect for the women in this book who have had the courage to come forward and share their stories. I want to be clear that in the review going forward, any judgement made of the Disclaimer: I received this book for free from NetGalley and Inkyard Press in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. You Too? is a complicated book to review because of the intensity of its content. These stories are deeply important and I have so much respect for the women in this book who have had the courage to come forward and share their stories. I want to be clear that in the review going forward, any judgement made of the book as a whole are no reflections on the power, truth, and importance of each of these stories. It is so vital these stories are out there, because each one peels back a small window into knowing we are not alone. And it is important these women are able to share their stories. We have to acknowledge that these things do happen and take measures to make sure they never ever happen again. I think, for myself, there are some things I would have done differently in the compilation of the stories. If there was a theme in how they were arranged, I didn’t catch it. Because of this.. there were a few stories in the middle addressing the same topic but did not have the same traumatic images that they were less impactful. I’m specifically thinking of Beth Revis and Mackenzi Lee’s contributions here – both stories were meaningful, but were lost in the fray. I feel as though this compilation could have easily been broken into sections – there were so many powerful stories from women of color! – to better serve each of the individual voices. Obviously I’m not a publisher and I’m sure the order was made for a reason, but I do feel they could have been organized in a more impactful way. Otherwise, there’s not a whole lot to say about this book. These stories and powerful and important and I think it’s very good for teen girls to be able to read this collection and see themselves and know they are supported – that they are not alone and that the things that have happened to them are not okay. The stories themselves are repetitive in format… but in a way I think that adds to the message that these horrible things are common and overlooked and that the same things happen to a lot of people and… they must stop. I do also want to recognize that as an ARC, the formatting and the order of the stories may change. The ebook I received used hashtags (#) instead of spaces and was missing characters every time the text went italic, so I know there is still some work to be done.

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