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The Forgotten Girl

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"Do you know what it feels like to be forgotten?" On a cold winter night, Iris and her best friend, Daniel, sneak into a clearing in the woods to play in the freshly fallen snow. There, Iris carefully makes a perfect snow angel - only to find the crumbling gravestone of a young girl, Avery Moore, right beneath her. Immediately, strange things start to happen to Iris: She beg "Do you know what it feels like to be forgotten?" On a cold winter night, Iris and her best friend, Daniel, sneak into a clearing in the woods to play in the freshly fallen snow. There, Iris carefully makes a perfect snow angel - only to find the crumbling gravestone of a young girl, Avery Moore, right beneath her. Immediately, strange things start to happen to Iris: She begins having vivid nightmares. She wakes up to find her bedroom window wide open, letting in the snow. She thinks she sees the shadow of a girl lurking in the woods. And she feels the pull of the abandoned grave, calling her back to the clearing... Obsessed with figuring out what's going on, Iris and Daniel start to research the area for a school project. They discover that Avery's grave is actually part of a neglected and forgotten Black cemetery, dating back to a time when White and Black people were kept separate in life - and in death. As Iris and Daniel learn more about their town's past, they become determined to restore Avery's grave and finally have proper respect paid to Avery and the others buried there. But they have awakened a jealous and demanding ghost, one that's not satisfied with their plans for getting recognition. One that is searching for a best friend forever - no matter what the cost. The Forgotten Girl is both a spooky original ghost story and a timely and important storyline about reclaiming an abandoned segregated cemetery.


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"Do you know what it feels like to be forgotten?" On a cold winter night, Iris and her best friend, Daniel, sneak into a clearing in the woods to play in the freshly fallen snow. There, Iris carefully makes a perfect snow angel - only to find the crumbling gravestone of a young girl, Avery Moore, right beneath her. Immediately, strange things start to happen to Iris: She beg "Do you know what it feels like to be forgotten?" On a cold winter night, Iris and her best friend, Daniel, sneak into a clearing in the woods to play in the freshly fallen snow. There, Iris carefully makes a perfect snow angel - only to find the crumbling gravestone of a young girl, Avery Moore, right beneath her. Immediately, strange things start to happen to Iris: She begins having vivid nightmares. She wakes up to find her bedroom window wide open, letting in the snow. She thinks she sees the shadow of a girl lurking in the woods. And she feels the pull of the abandoned grave, calling her back to the clearing... Obsessed with figuring out what's going on, Iris and Daniel start to research the area for a school project. They discover that Avery's grave is actually part of a neglected and forgotten Black cemetery, dating back to a time when White and Black people were kept separate in life - and in death. As Iris and Daniel learn more about their town's past, they become determined to restore Avery's grave and finally have proper respect paid to Avery and the others buried there. But they have awakened a jealous and demanding ghost, one that's not satisfied with their plans for getting recognition. One that is searching for a best friend forever - no matter what the cost. The Forgotten Girl is both a spooky original ghost story and a timely and important storyline about reclaiming an abandoned segregated cemetery.

30 review for The Forgotten Girl

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cece (ProblemsOfaBookNerd)

    Super creepy, but also full of heart. This is a middle grade book that educates just as much as it scares, full of superstition, the ingrained racism that still exists in the world of today, and the past full of forgotten people of color who deserve to be remembered.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    The Forgotten Girl reminded me very much of the works of Mary Hahn in its supernatural middle grade style and characters. This book hearkens back to the days of those 80's - 90's middle-grade horror paperbacks from school, as well as considering a historical backdrop and framing things in the dark context of the theme of racial tensions, segregation and the struggle for civil rights. The idea of graveyard segregation was especially interesting and also very sad. There is a cemetery in a rural to The Forgotten Girl reminded me very much of the works of Mary Hahn in its supernatural middle grade style and characters. This book hearkens back to the days of those 80's - 90's middle-grade horror paperbacks from school, as well as considering a historical backdrop and framing things in the dark context of the theme of racial tensions, segregation and the struggle for civil rights. The idea of graveyard segregation was especially interesting and also very sad. There is a cemetery in a rural town near here where my grandparents live, and the tombstones were once segregated racially for the longest time, so it actually serves as a very solid record of the past. The Forgotten Girl captures this prejudice in a way that readers of all ages can understand. The book follows Iris, who sneaks outdoors one winter with her best friend to enjoy the first snowfall of the year. Iris comes upon the gravesite of a little girl like her, and she later begins to find herself plagued with creepy supernatural phenomena that point to a darker mystery. Iris's best friend, Daniel, had been warned by his grandmother to not go out in the snow at night. It becomes apparent that there may have been good reason for it, and Daniel has to decide whether to believe Iris or keep denying that the ghost of Avery Moore is real. This book is pretty dark, but in a good way, and I loved how everything was resolved in the end, as well as how Avery wasn't just reduced to being a spooky villain. It gives the story a lot more depth. The scenery and characters are wonderful, and it's great to see a modern ghost story that encourages readers to explore the past, to play outside and to learn about the history that exists all around them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katerina Kondrenko

    4 out of 10 Not my cup of tea. Too serious for a horror fast-paced read, too paranormal for a serious middle-grade book about racial problems and segregation. Plus I'm tired of cliches when one character loses their parent and changes or when two best friends are girl and boy. Since when authors stopped to write about girlish friendship? Girls in modern books are always enemies. No me gusta. Sisters relationship though I did like. Relatable. Also many thanks for touching such a series topis a 4 out of 10 Not my cup of tea. Too serious for a horror fast-paced read, too paranormal for a serious middle-grade book about racial problems and segregation. Plus I'm tired of cliches when one character loses their parent and changes or when two best friends are girl and boy. Since when authors stopped to write about girlish friendship? Girls in modern books are always enemies. No me gusta. Sisters relationship though I did like. Relatable. Also many thanks for touching such a series topis as segregation.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sylwia (Wish Fulfillment)

    ❖ [booktube wish fulfillment] ❖ [twitter exsixtwosix] ❖ REP (note: I'm white) - protagonist, best friend, and ghost are black - the focus of the story is about segregation and its long-term impact - covert racism is shown through how the protagonist's teachers and classmates regard her - grief and trauma experiences READER HEALTH (note: I'm a therapist and I'm white) - The important topic of segregation is handled with nuance, imo. - Grief is shown through the best friend and through his grandmother; th ❖ [booktube wish fulfillment] ❖ [twitter exsixtwosix] ❖ REP (note: I'm white) - protagonist, best friend, and ghost are black - the focus of the story is about segregation and its long-term impact - covert racism is shown through how the protagonist's teachers and classmates regard her - grief and trauma experiences READER HEALTH (note: I'm a therapist and I'm white) - The important topic of segregation is handled with nuance, imo. - Grief is shown through the best friend and through his grandmother; the awkwardness from others is shown, as well as how grief is a part of daily life. EDUCATION - Again, segregation and racism are discussed. WRITING STYLE - Immediately engaging - Concise - Respectful of the intelligence of young readers; writes middle graders organically - Is clear with important elements but also includes some information that can be analyzed (the conflicts with the protagonist and her sister; the "snow spirits" metaphor, etc.) PLOT - Follows a seamles arc that keeps the reader focused on the story rather than the author; there is a formula but it's only decipherable if you sit back and think about it and not when you're in the story and focused. CHARACTERS - Loved absolutely everyone. - Loved how the 4 year old actually behaved like a 4 year old. ENTERTAINMENT - This was one of those books that I inhaled really fast. - The author's organic writing was almost hypnotizing; I will be reading their next work!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    4.0 Stars This was an atmospheric middle grade ghost story with some wonderful #ownvoices representation. The writing was quite strong and, at times, felt quite poetic. The wintery setting along with "spirits of the snow" certainly added to the chill of the story, although I did not find this one particularly scary. Instead, the strength of this story really came from it's diversity, which is so often lacking from the horror genre. It was interesting to see how the main character's home and schoo 4.0 Stars This was an atmospheric middle grade ghost story with some wonderful #ownvoices representation. The writing was quite strong and, at times, felt quite poetic. The wintery setting along with "spirits of the snow" certainly added to the chill of the story, although I did not find this one particularly scary. Instead, the strength of this story really came from it's diversity, which is so often lacking from the horror genre. It was interesting to see how the main character's home and school life was shaped by her black identity. I enjoyed hearing about hair wrapping and her dancing. Moreso, the story addressed historical segregation, focusing on how black people were so often "forgotten" by society, not just in life, but also in death. I would highly recommend this one to anyone looking for a good middle grade book. This is a very important story to tell in the midst of the current political and social climate in the United States.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Hawley

    Every year when my daughter’s school has the Scholastic Book Fair, I always buy a ghost story. I rarely read any children’s/young adult books other than those with my daughter, but for some reason, I’ve always loved these kid’s ghost stories. I thought this one was probably the best I’ve read. It was spooky and even a little menacing without going overboard, but it didn’t pull any punches just because it’s for kids. And I thought the story made good sense (unlike some others I’ve read that reall Every year when my daughter’s school has the Scholastic Book Fair, I always buy a ghost story. I rarely read any children’s/young adult books other than those with my daughter, but for some reason, I’ve always loved these kid’s ghost stories. I thought this one was probably the best I’ve read. It was spooky and even a little menacing without going overboard, but it didn’t pull any punches just because it’s for kids. And I thought the story made good sense (unlike some others I’ve read that really got lost at the climax). I also really enjoyed how this author wove segregation into this story, which would give young readers a chance to learn more about some history.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Actual Rating: 4.5 stars A creepy ghost story plus family, friendship, and untold history makes for a fantastic middle grade read in The Forgotten Girl! On the night of the first snow, Iris and her best friend Daniel sneak out to make snow angels and happen upon a forgotten graveyard. After which, Iris begins to see the ghost of a young girl and they start digging into the history of their small Southern town and the identity of the girl. What they uncover is the untold history of abandoned Black Actual Rating: 4.5 stars A creepy ghost story plus family, friendship, and untold history makes for a fantastic middle grade read in The Forgotten Girl! On the night of the first snow, Iris and her best friend Daniel sneak out to make snow angels and happen upon a forgotten graveyard. After which, Iris begins to see the ghost of a young girl and they start digging into the history of their small Southern town and the identity of the girl. What they uncover is the untold history of abandoned Black cemeteries from the time of segregation, and the stories of brave children. This is definitely creepy, but not overly so. There is a lot of emphasis on strong friendships, beautiful family dynamics, and the complicated reality of having a little sister who wants to be just like you. The story also tackles micro-aggressions in a way that feels relevant to kids in middle school. Iris is the captain of the step team, but is often overlooked in ways that definitely feel like they have a racial bent to them. She has great parents who advocated for her, but that doesn't always solve the problem. In general I found this to be an enjoyable, well-crafted ghost story that sneaks in some really important history and social lessons. Definitely worth a read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Neville Longbottom

    A spooky middle grade ghost story that reinforces the importance of not forgetting the past. When Iris and Daniel discover a forgotten graveyard behind their houses they learn about their town’s history with segregation. I appreciated how there were some parts of this story that were genuinely chilling. However, some of the story beats are pretty predictable for a ghost story. Overall I did really enjoy the story and how it blended middle grade level horror with significant topics.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ONYX Pages

    Sweet, spooky, informative and validating. Well done India!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Akoss

    @Kidlitexchange #partner - I received a copy of this book from the Kidlitexchange network in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. THE FORGOTTEN GIRL Released 11/5/19 On a cold winter night, Iris sneaks out with her best friend Daniel to enjoy the very first snow of the season. In doing so she unknowingly brings home the ghost of a girl like her, a girl forgotten by most whenever she matters the most. This was a delightful page turner and emotional read. Friendships are something I @Kidlitexchange #partner - I received a copy of this book from the Kidlitexchange network in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own. THE FORGOTTEN GIRL Released 11/5/19 On a cold winter night, Iris sneaks out with her best friend Daniel to enjoy the very first snow of the season. In doing so she unknowingly brings home the ghost of a girl like her, a girl forgotten by most whenever she matters the most. This was a delightful page turner and emotional read. Friendships are something I've never been really successful at and seeing it front and center in this book really got to me. I love how the real history of segregation, especially graveyard segregation gets seamlessly woven into this chilling and spooky story. There is something for everyone, kids and adults. I highly recommend you check it out from the library or surprise someone with a copy as a gift.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    This is delightfully chilling while also offering a story about segregation when it came to death prior to the Civil Rights movement. Iris is a great narrator and her relationships with her parents, as well as her best friend and his grandmother, are so real and so 11-year-old. I loved the longing she had to just do her best and be her best at school while also wanting to out perform the mean girl in her class. The ghost story is clever.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Nourse

    I could not put this book down and devoured it in a day. Not only was it beautifully written with compelling and real characters that I fell in love with, The Forgotten Girl also taught me about segregation and forgotten cemeteries. The Forgotten Girl is the exact book I wished I’d had growing up, and I can’t wait to tuck it away for my kids to read in a few years.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shellie Mae

    This is a unique story in which segregation is discussed with an element of spookiness.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Edelweiss Plus Iris and her best friend and neighbor, Daniel, live in a North Carolina neighborhood that abuts a woods. One night, they sneak out to play in the snow, something that Daniel's grandmother, Suga, doesn't like. They make snow angels, and venture further into the woods where they find an abandoned grace for Avery Moore, who died back in the 1950s at about their age. Iris starts to have a creepy feeling that Avery is haunting her, and there are inklings that she has perhaps E ARC from Edelweiss Plus Iris and her best friend and neighbor, Daniel, live in a North Carolina neighborhood that abuts a woods. One night, they sneak out to play in the snow, something that Daniel's grandmother, Suga, doesn't like. They make snow angels, and venture further into the woods where they find an abandoned grace for Avery Moore, who died back in the 1950s at about their age. Iris starts to have a creepy feeling that Avery is haunting her, and there are inklings that she has perhaps gotten to Iris's young sister, Vashti, as well. Daniel and Iris have a school project on local history, and start investigating abandoned graves in the area only to realize that at the time, cemeteries were segregated, and many of the African American ones were plowed over or abandoned. Daniel has an especial interest because his father has passed away, and Iris has had several instances in the past where the school "inadvertently" left her out of things because she is one of the few African Americans in the school. She's busy with step team, but throws herself into the investigation, even interviewing Suga and finding out some secrets about both her and Avery's past. Avery becomes increasingly insistent with her hauntings, and Iris soon realizes that she must help put her spirit to rest by assuring that she is not forgotten. Strengths: You would think that most middle grade books would have well developed characters with have easily discernible plots that are fairly easy to understand and remember; you might be wrong. I've read a lot this summer (writing this review 8/14/19) that are so crammed with characters and cover so many subplots that even I get confused! Many of my students struggle with reading and prefer graphic novels, but maybe part of it is that middle grade books are trying to deliver too many political/social-emotional messages! The Forgotten Girl was sort of brilliant in that respect-- it was a solid ghost mystery that drew in local history and civil rights issues in an easy to understand, relatable way. I didn't feel bludgeoned when I finished it, and I enjoyed the friendship, the strong family ties, and the picture of integration in one town. Weaknesses: This was a good, well constructed story; I just didn't find it very scary. What I really think: I will purchase for the creepy, Mary Downing Hahn style cover and the discussion of segregation during the 1950s.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anniek

    This was really scary and really good. I listened to the audiobook in one sitting, and it was a really eerie experience. It was also amazing to see this girl uncovering "forgotten" parts of history and standing up for herself and these forgotten people. Plus, I really loved the relationships in this book, especially the one between Iris and her little sister, that had a lot of development and was so heartwarming.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Not only was this book creepy, but it was filled with history and heart. The author did an amazing job of weaving together a ghost story, a haunting, and dealing with prejudice and black history. Such a great read. Review coming soon on my blog.

  17. 5 out of 5

    PScribe

    This book was an amazing debut by the author. There were parts when I was on the edge of my seat trying to figure out what was going to happen next. There were more times where I reacted out loud to what the characters were doing, much to the amusement of my husband. I wasn't sure how it was all going to come together once we got to the first climax. I will admit I was worried that it would end up being a rush job to tie everything together but personally I found it came together quite nicely. T This book was an amazing debut by the author. There were parts when I was on the edge of my seat trying to figure out what was going to happen next. There were more times where I reacted out loud to what the characters were doing, much to the amusement of my husband. I wasn't sure how it was all going to come together once we got to the first climax. I will admit I was worried that it would end up being a rush job to tie everything together but personally I found it came together quite nicely. This is a book that I would have loved just as much as if I were the projected age group for it, and it did remind me of some of the suspense/horror novels I read as a young book dragon. The change here is that it also educated about something that I honestly didn't know about even as an adult. And I like how the kids were believable. I felt every bit of unfairness that Iris went through, even looking at it through an adult gaze and could see how she felt the way she did. There were some plot points I that I could see coming and yet I was surprised by a few of the curve balls that were lobbed at us. This was a fantastic book for me. It touched all the points I want in a horror novel for this age group and even brought up a hint of nostalgia of reading when I was younger. Sometimes it's easy to lose the magic of reading and this is one of the books that reminded me why I liked reading as a younger person and why I still love it now. So kudos should be given for that alone. If I were a teacher I would read this to my class or at the very least start a book club so we could read and discuss it. Would recommend. Would re-read. Glad I bought my own copy, because it's a keeper.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Danielle: Braillerose

    This was a really cute, wintry, and slightly creepy book aimed at early teenagers or middlegraders. This is not the type of book I'd normally pick up, but I wanted something light, quick, spooky and christmassy, and I also found out ar a lot of adult and young adult readers still pick up middle grade righteads from time to time. This book had the perfect amount of crecpiness, family fun, christmassy magic and also historical and cultural information. This is great for the slightly more adventuro This was a really cute, wintry, and slightly creepy book aimed at early teenagers or middlegraders. This is not the type of book I'd normally pick up, but I wanted something light, quick, spooky and christmassy, and I also found out ar a lot of adult and young adult readers still pick up middle grade righteads from time to time. This book had the perfect amount of crecpiness, family fun, christmassy magic and also historical and cultural information. This is great for the slightly more adventurous younger readers who like learning about history and culture and who have a fairly high tolerance for creepy books. However this book, though creepy, is deffinately suitable for kids aged 11 plus, and could be enjoyed by people of all ages. Please head to my youtube channel, Braillerose Booktube, for a review viceo that should be posted soon. I'd love it 1from you could subscribe and follow my channel, I'm a blind booktuber and I have a great lineup of videos which will be posted very soon.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cara

    Brown has created a great ghost story that simultaneously explores the past, the present, and relationships that tie us all together. Iris can see some parallels between the segregated community of the past (schools and graveyards) and how she is treated as one of the only Black people at her school (“forgotten” for an awards ceremony), which can help readers see how the past still affects everyday life. The dialog and relationships between the characters are well-drawn and relatable, and the wr Brown has created a great ghost story that simultaneously explores the past, the present, and relationships that tie us all together. Iris can see some parallels between the segregated community of the past (schools and graveyards) and how she is treated as one of the only Black people at her school (“forgotten” for an awards ceremony), which can help readers see how the past still affects everyday life. The dialog and relationships between the characters are well-drawn and relatable, and the writing in general is high-caliber. The action scene at the end is terrifying and makes this a five-star ghost story. This book is recommended for children in grades 4-6 who are looking for a scary tale that also has real weight to its plot.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Casson

    The Forgotten Girl by India Hill Brown Is an intriguing story about a young girl, Iris and her best friend Daniel. Daniel’s grandmother has many superstitions and she forbids the children to go outside alone in the snowy night because she fears the spirits of the snow will feed off of therm. Don’t get me wrong I enjoyed reading this book but I was hoping for more of a thriller. I thought maybe since it was a thriller it would be a little more creepy but it wasn’t. It did have some interesting pa The Forgotten Girl by India Hill Brown Is an intriguing story about a young girl, Iris and her best friend Daniel. Daniel’s grandmother has many superstitions and she forbids the children to go outside alone in the snowy night because she fears the spirits of the snow will feed off of therm. Don’t get me wrong I enjoyed reading this book but I was hoping for more of a thriller. I thought maybe since it was a thriller it would be a little more creepy but it wasn’t. It did have some interesting parts but it took awhile to get to them. I gave this book a 3 out of 5 stars because it really wasn’t what I was hoping for but I can understand why some people would disagree. In my opinion this book might suit a young age group than mine even tho it was recommended for my age.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ryleigh Green

    at first I was confused with what was happening In this book at first but I realized that it all leaded back to segregation and even though Iris was black and it was modern day that she was still being forgotten and treated differently. when I first started reading this book I thought that iris would be the forgotten girl but then she wasn't and I thought that was really confusing. this book was very suspenseful because you didn't know what was going on at times or what was going to happen until at first I was confused with what was happening In this book at first but I realized that it all leaded back to segregation and even though Iris was black and it was modern day that she was still being forgotten and treated differently. when I first started reading this book I thought that iris would be the forgotten girl but then she wasn't and I thought that was really confusing. this book was very suspenseful because you didn't know what was going on at times or what was going to happen until it already happened. I highly recommend this book to read because it was very good and enjoyable to read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kenneth - PerfectionistWannabe.com

    [I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.] I really liked this ghost story. Not only do you get a little scary story, but you also learn about abandoned and segregated graveyards. For those who want your children to learn about segregation, then I recommend this story. It starts with a graveyard, but then you learn about the first kids that were part of the desegregation of schools. It's a little bit of a history lesson mixed in with a scary ghost story. A great way to teach kids.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Excellent book about two kids studying a segregated graveyard in North Carolina. They discover a ghost of a girl who was one of the first kids to attend a desegregated school in 1954. She disappeared in a snow storm and discovered dead. Avery the ghost wants to be remembered again and the history of the graveyard and the problems of segregation dealt with and not forgotten.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mindy

    This is a 5 star book or fkids 3rd - 5th. I really enjoyed it (even though I'm an adult.)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Connors

    This is a great ghost story for middle schoolers. Spooky, strong characters and an intriguing plot line make for an engaging read. I look forward to talking this up with my students.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

    Interest Level: 3-6; Reading Level: 5.2 Do you believe that ghost are real? Iris has to believe they are real, even if her best friend, Daniel, doesn't. Despite Daniel's grandmother's warning to never go out at night in the freshly fallen snow, Iris and Daniel sneak out late at night to play in the snow. They are having a great time until Iris lays down to make a snow angel. That is when she realizes that she is laying on top of a grave... and that is when the air around them changes. The grave b Interest Level: 3-6; Reading Level: 5.2 Do you believe that ghost are real? Iris has to believe they are real, even if her best friend, Daniel, doesn't. Despite Daniel's grandmother's warning to never go out at night in the freshly fallen snow, Iris and Daniel sneak out late at night to play in the snow. They are having a great time until Iris lays down to make a snow angel. That is when she realizes that she is laying on top of a grave... and that is when the air around them changes. The grave belongs to a girl named Avery Moore, a girl their own age. This may sound crazy since they are playing in the snow at night, but a chill went through Iris that had nothing to do with the snow. From that point on eerie things start happening to Iris - she begins having scary nightmares, she is seeing shadows of a girl, and when she wakes up her window is open. Iris and Daniel begin researching the graveyard and they find out that it is a neglected and forgotten Black cemetery from back to segregation times. This was a time when blacks and whites were separated in live.. and death. As things start to become more intense and more dangerous for Iris, Daniel has to make a decision to either believe her or lose her. Will Iris, who feels forgotten in her own school, be led to become a forever friend with Avery? In their research will they find that Avery has a personal relationship to one of their family members? If Iris resist the urge to become a forever friend in death with Avery, will Avery go after other members of her family? Read this incredibly spooky, creepy, and page turning story that you won't be able to put down until the truth comes out!! The Forgotten Girl will definitely have a space (or two or three) on my library shelves. I was listening to this book in my car to and from work. I would sit in the car for way longer than I should have because I could not stop listening to this book. This book is so scary and there were times just when you think things couldn't get worse for Iris, the ghost of Avery takes it to a whole different level! This book is incredible and is a must read!! Follow me: Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.com/ Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra... Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr... Twitter - @laurieevans27 https://twitter.com/laurieevans27?lan... Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1... Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/auburngirl2... YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCulD... Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/in/laurie-ev...

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cande

    One snowy night, Iris and her best friend, Daniel, sneak out to play in the woods. What’s a fun adventure quickly becomes quite chilling when Iris discovers a gravestone for Avery Moore, a girl of their age. They run inside their houses, frighted by this site of a lonely grave so close to their homes. Things started to get more terrifying when Iris starts to have these vivid nightmares and her window keeps opening at night. Using a school project as an excuse, Iris and Daniel starting investigati One snowy night, Iris and her best friend, Daniel, sneak out to play in the woods. What’s a fun adventure quickly becomes quite chilling when Iris discovers a gravestone for Avery Moore, a girl of their age. They run inside their houses, frighted by this site of a lonely grave so close to their homes. Things started to get more terrifying when Iris starts to have these vivid nightmares and her window keeps opening at night. Using a school project as an excuse, Iris and Daniel starting investigating Avery and the gravestone. They find out it was actually a segregated cemetery, that has been abandoned and forgotten. This story combines ghost stories with discussions about segregation and feeling isolated from the world. Iris is a smart, Black girl who is always being left out from school activities and projects. And she’s so tired of feeling forgotten at her own home where her parents are so focused on her little sister. When she realizes Avery’s ghost is following her, asking her to be remembered, Iris feels closer to this other lonely girl. But things start to get out of control very quickly because Avery is tired of waiting. This such a spooky but gut-punching story, too. I very much enjoyed the tone of the story and how well it combines the feelings of being ignored and forgotten with systematic racism. This story is so kind to the characters’ feelings, truly listening to their pains. Sprinkle with a troublemaker ghost and the reality of cemetery segregation. More review on my blog, Latinx Magic

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Loved this book. Black Lit Readathon challenged me to read a book outside my comfort zone. I'm not into horror / thriller / creepy, but I correctly assumed I'd be able to *mostly* handle juvenile creepy. I think the creepiness of the cover is a little over the top. While the book has half a dozen highly creepy moments, the cover is the creepiest part. I love the parallel of the girl buried in a forgotten graveyard and the girl who is often *accidentally* forgotten by her school. I'm not a fan of Loved this book. Black Lit Readathon challenged me to read a book outside my comfort zone. I'm not into horror / thriller / creepy, but I correctly assumed I'd be able to *mostly* handle juvenile creepy. I think the creepiness of the cover is a little over the top. While the book has half a dozen highly creepy moments, the cover is the creepiest part. I love the parallel of the girl buried in a forgotten graveyard and the girl who is often *accidentally* forgotten by her school. I'm not a fan of historical fiction, but I love when a story like this weaves history in.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    “It was strange, knowing that a little girl was buried back there. So close to her bedroom window. She had to know why, to know what happened to her. Maybe that’s why she had that dream. And the only way to stop herself from having it again was to face it head on.” (Pg. 47) This book trailer was an absolute hit at our school—the kids wanted this but didn’t buy it LOL and after a few weeks on the shelves I decided to take it home to read and again rekindle the book love..so yeah another Scholasti “It was strange, knowing that a little girl was buried back there. So close to her bedroom window. She had to know why, to know what happened to her. Maybe that’s why she had that dream. And the only way to stop herself from having it again was to face it head on.” (Pg. 47) This book trailer was an absolute hit at our school—the kids wanted this but didn’t buy it LOL and after a few weeks on the shelves I decided to take it home to read and again rekindle the book love..so yeah another Scholastic book fair selection with an awesome cover depicting a gorgeous black girl with flowing hair in the snow with the visually captivating book trailer drawing you in---I can’t tell you how many kids wanted this to be a movie or thought it already was..its all about the past meeting the present, snow and a little girl dead for a long time with a mystery to uncover.. This is the story of Iris and her best friend Daniel—Iris has always been fascinated by snow and afraid of the dark however she very vividly describes how the snow illuminates the dark and late one night she convinces her best friend to explore the winter wonderland of Easaw, North Carolina…They sneak out of the house and uncover the forgotten grave of a little girl named Avery Moore and so begins Iris’s nightmare/dreams, the unexplained visions of a girl in her window and the strange urge to learn more and more.. Iris and Daniel begin to uncover the town’s secrets and find out that there was a segregated graveyard long forgotten about which leads Iris to realize that the ghost girl Avery is trying to help her and those buried there be remembered..Avery was not just a forgotten black girl she was also one of the first black children to integrate an all-white school making her memory all that much more important—great insight into what it means and why its important to leave a legacy and hits Iris as the only black girl in her school and a Step Team captain. “If there was no trace of Avery even going to this school when she was one of the nine who desegregated it, the same thing was on track to happen to Iris, her step team, her project. She wouldn’t let that happen.” (Pg. 124) This book also does a great job of exploring fear and loss as Daniel recently lost his father and there are many poignant moments when he has to deal with losing someone so close to him- “Derek, Jamal and Daniel all hung out frequently, sometimes even calling on Iris when they needed to make the basketball teams even. But after Daniel’s dad died, it was hard for them to really talk about it. They didn’t know what to say to one another, didn’t know how to talk about it. They were afraid of crying. Afraid of consoling. He knew it wasn’t their fault. It seemed as if they were all afraid of something.” (Pg. 163) As the book goes on there are side plots of mean girls, school committees, baby sisters and big sister drama and a grandma whose memory and practical advice helps with Avery as the story also makes you question whether this ghost is here for evil or good… I liked this one as it was a fast read that makes you think, and want to be proactive on remembering others and dealing with loss..Recommended, thank you Scholastic Book Fairs!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Hnatiuk

    I am grateful that Saskatoon Public Library has a subscription to Hoopla that allowed me to listen to this book. Readers who enjoy spooky creepy themes will be more than happy with this title. Iris is a young black girl who loves step and her best friend is Daniel who lives next door. When Iris and Daniel sneak out at night to play in the snow by the woods, they get more than they bargained for - they discover a graveyard. When Iris makes a snow angel above something hard they soon figure out it I am grateful that Saskatoon Public Library has a subscription to Hoopla that allowed me to listen to this book. Readers who enjoy spooky creepy themes will be more than happy with this title. Iris is a young black girl who loves step and her best friend is Daniel who lives next door. When Iris and Daniel sneak out at night to play in the snow by the woods, they get more than they bargained for - they discover a graveyard. When Iris makes a snow angel above something hard they soon figure out it is the grave of Avery Moore a young girl the same age as them Almost immediately afterwards, Iris has difficulty sleeping and has nightmares imagining a girl is watching her. It doesn’t take long for Iris to realize that they have awoken and disturbed Avery and now she is demanding that she not be forgotten. A new school project asking students to learn more about their community, leads Iris and Daniel to investigate the gravestones and why it was abandoned. As their research continues they discover that Daniel’s grandmother was Avery’s best friend and that she died in a snowstorm Iris also feels a personal connection to Avery in that Avery is The Forgotten Girl of the past and Iris feels like she could be The Forgotten Girl of the present the way her school continues to make her feel invisible and overlooks activities she participates in. This motivates her to make people aware of the graveyard and Avery. Avery is upset that she has been erased and demands that Iris do something about it. As things escalate, Iris quickly realizes with growing terror that not only is Iris in danger but so is her younger sister. The only ones that may be able to save them is Daniel and his grandmother. What makes this book unique is that while it is a spooky ghost story, Avery Moore is a forgotten girl who was one of nine black students who were integrated into Iris’s school. So now intertwined with the ghost story we are seamlessly learning about segregation and the Civil Rights Movement. The other strong component is the relationship between Iris and Daniel. Readers will be able to relate to their friendship which presented realistically with its own ups and downs. I think there will be many students who will love the spookiness of the story and at the same time it opens the door to discuss important topics relevant today.

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