Hot Best Seller

Another

Availability: Ready to download

An NPR Favorite Book of 2019 A New York Times Best Children’s Book of 2019 An NYPL Best Book of 2019 A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2019 A School Library Journal Best Picture Book of 2019 A BookPage Best Picture Book of 2019 A Horn Book Fanfare Selection of 2019 In his eagerly anticipated debut as author-illustrator, Caldecott and Coretta Scott King honoree Christian An NPR Favorite Book of 2019 A New York Times Best Children’s Book of 2019 An NYPL Best Book of 2019 A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2019 A School Library Journal Best Picture Book of 2019 A BookPage Best Picture Book of 2019 A Horn Book Fanfare Selection of 2019 In his eagerly anticipated debut as author-illustrator, Caldecott and Coretta Scott King honoree Christian Robinson brings young readers on a playful, imaginative journey into another world. What if you… encountered another perspective? Discovered another world? Met another you? What might you do?


Compare

An NPR Favorite Book of 2019 A New York Times Best Children’s Book of 2019 An NYPL Best Book of 2019 A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2019 A School Library Journal Best Picture Book of 2019 A BookPage Best Picture Book of 2019 A Horn Book Fanfare Selection of 2019 In his eagerly anticipated debut as author-illustrator, Caldecott and Coretta Scott King honoree Christian An NPR Favorite Book of 2019 A New York Times Best Children’s Book of 2019 An NYPL Best Book of 2019 A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2019 A School Library Journal Best Picture Book of 2019 A BookPage Best Picture Book of 2019 A Horn Book Fanfare Selection of 2019 In his eagerly anticipated debut as author-illustrator, Caldecott and Coretta Scott King honoree Christian Robinson brings young readers on a playful, imaginative journey into another world. What if you… encountered another perspective? Discovered another world? Met another you? What might you do?

30 review for Another

  1. 5 out of 5

    carol.

    A very appealing book. The (visual) story is interesting and the art phenomenal. There's a "different-but-same" message, or a "unfamiliar-is-familiar" theme that works without being A Message. Sadly, I had no kids around to test it. However, I still think it would make a great children's book. I definitely added to the 'birthday gift' pile. See Carmen's fabulous review for samples of the artwork.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    I am actually going to give this book a five. A little girl wakes up to see her cat going through a portal which opened up in her room late at night. She follows, only to discover that there is a secret world where everyone has an alternate version of themselves. It's quite charming and interesting. The book has no words. RELATED MATERIAL: US - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6857112/ STRANGER THINGS: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4574334/ Let's Get Invisible! by R.L. Stine

  3. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    A wordless story. The cat seems to go through a portal to another dimension perhaps and while there sees all different kinds of perspectives. Honestly, I’m not quite sure what was going on. It seems a girl was walking her cat through an Escher like landscape. There was little sense to it for me. This was not my favorite story or wordless book and I do like wordless stories. Usually in a wordless story, the author gives the perfect scene to get across the story and I didn’t feel like I really knew A wordless story. The cat seems to go through a portal to another dimension perhaps and while there sees all different kinds of perspectives. Honestly, I’m not quite sure what was going on. It seems a girl was walking her cat through an Escher like landscape. There was little sense to it for me. This was not my favorite story or wordless book and I do like wordless stories. Usually in a wordless story, the author gives the perfect scene to get across the story and I didn’t feel like I really knew what was going on. Maybe, I’m just old. The nephew thought it was pretty cool. He seemed to understand it and he came up with an out there story. He gave the book 4 stars. It’s about a cat and he loves cats.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    This is an odd book. It’s wordless and I did love the pictures. Many of them really do look three dimensional and that seems appropriate since the “story” is about a girl and her cat who discover another parallel dimension where they also exist in the middle of the night, so in their dreams? In the girl’s dreams? Anyway, it’s creative and interesting but I liked the pictures more than the slight story they told. I’m thinking that for me it didn’t live up to its ambition?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    Cute illustrations. This would be a nice way to introduce the idea of parallel dimensions to a small child. Not sure how many parents want to do that, but whatever. I liked the fearlessness with which girl and cat encounter new things.

  6. 5 out of 5

    DaNae

    If Mr. Rogers and Escher conspired to create The Upsidedown.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    The highlight of this wordless book by Robinson are its illustrations, which are somewhat evocative of Eric Carle. However, Robinson adds a couple of interesting things: first, a broad cross-section of children from different backgrounds and second, looking at things from different perspectives (in almost an Escher-like way.) The story did not make much sense, at least to me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    How would you respond if given the chance to temporarily leave your normal life and enter a world where even the laws of physics are different? The girl in this book has that chance one night when a portal opens in her room while she's asleep in bed. Her cat—wearing a red collar—notices the portal first, when an identical cat in a blue collar steps through. The girl's cat follows the other feline back through the portal, and so does the girl, stepping into a world of eccentric sensory delights. How would you respond if given the chance to temporarily leave your normal life and enter a world where even the laws of physics are different? The girl in this book has that chance one night when a portal opens in her room while she's asleep in bed. Her cat—wearing a red collar—notices the portal first, when an identical cat in a blue collar steps through. The girl's cat follows the other feline back through the portal, and so does the girl, stepping into a world of eccentric sensory delights. The rules of gravity aren't the same in this white-walled world. Stairs wind up, down, or around, and you can traverse them with ease even upside down. Walking through portal after portal, the girl and her cat see a diverse array of kids enjoying dozens of activities, none in any hurry to return to their own worlds. After coming face to face with the blue-collared cat again, accompanied by a girl who looks just like our main character but with a blue design on her shirt instead of a red one, the two pairs bid each other a silent adieu and go back to the worlds from which they came. The night's experience is sure to broaden their horizons. Reminiscent of Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen's Sam and Dave Dig a Hole, Another isn't a bad book, as far as the illustrations go. Christian Robinson's ability to turn elementary shapes into something more is remarkable, a feature I loved about Last Stop on Market Street, which earned him a 2016 Caldecott Honor. It's healthy to get away from real life for a little while now and then, as the girl in this story does, traveling to new dimensions physically or just in your thoughts to gain perspective. That message is muted almost to the point of nonexistence in this book, which is why I hesitate to rate it even one and a half stars, but I enjoy Christian Robinson's illustrations. Another isn't much of a story, but it's an impressive art gallery.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I guess I just didn't get it? I like the illustration style though.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

    The illustrations deserve 5 stars. I can't devote an afternoon trying to understand what Robinson is trying to convey in Another. Too many other child friendly books to review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aaliyah

    My daughter said, "Mom, this book doesn't have any words, what do you want me to do?" I said they want you to be creative and make up your own story. :)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeimy

    Wordless, fantastic, with just a hint of Escher.

  13. 5 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    Another is a wordless picture book that details the adventures of a young girl who follows her cat through a portal into a world where everybody has a double. It's fun to look at. The illustrations, done with a combination of painting and collage, are colourful and engaging. The children depicted are diverse. But... this didn't wow me. I got the story, but it seemed a little sparse. The interaction between the girl and her double seemed almost like an afterthought; I thought more could've been Another is a wordless picture book that details the adventures of a young girl who follows her cat through a portal into a world where everybody has a double. It's fun to look at. The illustrations, done with a combination of painting and collage, are colourful and engaging. The children depicted are diverse. But... this didn't wow me. I got the story, but it seemed a little sparse. The interaction between the girl and her double seemed almost like an afterthought; I thought more could've been done with that. Wordless picture books often tug on my heartstrings. This one didn't have much of an emotional impact at all, really. It's definitely a nice book for representing lots of different kids. And it might make a nice winding-down book for bedtime. Other than that, though, I'm afraid I found this one a little forgettable.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    Brilliant use of perspective and white space in this one! No doubt each reading of this book will spark wonder, curiosity and imagination.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Wordless whimsy that didn't grab me. A bit of Eric Carle and MC Escher influence to the illustration.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ms. B

    Is it a little girl's dream, imagination or a mirror that leads to a parallel world in this wordless picture book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sandy Brehl

    This wordless book literally opens minds to the prospect of parallel universes, to mirror images and reflections of self in others, to open-minded insights into worlds beyond our own. Even though this is initiated at night, in a very dark bedroom, and ends there, too, there is nothing frightening about the possibilities presented. The various movements and reflections and adventures require readers to twist and turn the physical book, making the original or "assumed" perspective take on new This wordless book literally opens minds to the prospect of parallel universes, to mirror images and reflections of self in others, to open-minded insights into worlds beyond our own. Even though this is initiated at night, in a very dark bedroom, and ends there, too, there is nothing frightening about the possibilities presented. The various movements and reflections and adventures require readers to twist and turn the physical book, making the original or "assumed" perspective take on new aspects. This will work well with older readers, too, in exploring and constructing verbal narratives, in exploring the science of parallel realities, of symmetry and balance, and in delving into details of the diversely populated "other" world. The expansive white backgrounds and calming movement of the central characters are reassuring and underlie the analogy that opening our minds can yield welcome results and even return us to our starting points with a greater sense of self and safety. I really love this one!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kifflie

    A wordless picture book. A girl and her cat find a portal to an alternate dimension, where kids and their doubles encounter each other. Eventually she finds her alternate self. This book may have you twisting it around to see the illustrations clearly. It's a cute concept and well executed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Trippy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Edward Sullivan

    A playful, imaginative, completely charming wordless adventure following a little girl and her cat as they venture into another world.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Joan Marie

    This one's a big question for me. The storyline is confusing. It appears to be saying something about dreamland, but stilll... I was hoping for something more.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shaye Miller

    I read this book long after my youngest went to sleep, which is such a shame. Because I believe we usually get more out of wordless picture books when we read them with children. Their perspectives and untainted imaginations are so fantastic to witness. But what I gathered from my reading of this story was the feeling of shifted reality. There are multiple perspectives mixed with pure imagination — and the cat leads the way for most of the story. The pictures made me think of a combination of I read this book long after my youngest went to sleep, which is such a shame. Because I believe we usually get more out of wordless picture books when we read them with children. Their perspectives and untainted imaginations are so fantastic to witness. But what I gathered from my reading of this story was the feeling of shifted reality. There are multiple perspectives mixed with pure imagination — and the cat leads the way for most of the story. The pictures made me think of a combination of Salvador Dali’s paintings mixed with Willie Wonka’s chocolate factory. And if my children ever happen to disappear into a mysterious hole in the wall, I sure hope they take a beloved pet along to guide them on their (safe!) journey back to reality. The illustrations for this book were rendered in paint and collage, with digital editing. For more children's literature, middle grade literature, and YA literature reviews, feel free to visit my personal blog at The Miller Memo!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and in the case of Christian Robinson's "Another" this phrase could not fit better! Each stroke of a pencil or paint brush, each clipping from a hole punch or pair of scissors, and the way each color is used with such consideration and flare shows how talented and visionary Robinson is in his craft as an artist and storyteller! Whether your little one is learning to read, or your mature one is a seasoned book-lover, everyone will find something They say a picture is worth a thousand words, and in the case of Christian Robinson's "Another" this phrase could not fit better! Each stroke of a pencil or paint brush, each clipping from a hole punch or pair of scissors, and the way each color is used with such consideration and flare shows how talented and visionary Robinson is in his craft as an artist and storyteller! Whether your little one is learning to read, or your mature one is a seasoned book-lover, everyone will find something whimsical and fun in "Another". P.S. Did anyone else think of the film "Us" by Jordan Peele when reading this?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Beautiful, imaginative, and playful, with the young protagonist following her cat - and another cat, identical except for its collar - through a portal into another world, where laws of physics don't necessarily work out in the same way as "reality". Robinson is one of my favorite illustrators and this colorful, creative wordless picture book about exploring an alternate world doesn't disappoint. As an added bonus, the children featured are diverse, including, among others, a differently-abled Beautiful, imaginative, and playful, with the young protagonist following her cat - and another cat, identical except for its collar - through a portal into another world, where laws of physics don't necessarily work out in the same way as "reality". Robinson is one of my favorite illustrators and this colorful, creative wordless picture book about exploring an alternate world doesn't disappoint. As an added bonus, the children featured are diverse, including, among others, a differently-abled boy in a wheelchair and a little girl in hijab. It is always exciting when you work in a library to be able to share books with your customers that depict children who look like them; that feature makes this book a special treasure. A New York Times/New York Public Library Best Illustrated Children's Book for 2019.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Christian Robinson's author/illustrator debut! This is a wordless book, so the "writing" is in the story that is told through the pictures. His cut-paper pictures remain some of the kid-friendliest around. I love how this book makes use of (what looks like) hole punches, as the little protagonist's hair beads and as other things in the environment. This through-the-looking glass story would be fun paired with "Sam and Dave Dig a Hole" as far as discussion of what happens.

  26. 5 out of 5

    The Reading Countess

    Fanciful. The artwork is frame-able. Robinson is a trusted name on the illustrating side of the business. Now with his debut where he serves as both author AND illustrator, he firmly secures his hold as a trusted book Sherpa. This wordless picture book begs for multiple readings. There are so many nuances to the story missed in one sitting. I especially enjoyed the depiction of a wide range of children. Important.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A playful wordless book exploring parallel universes where everyone has an-other - someone who is *almost* just like them, but not exactly. This was fun to explore with my Storytime kiddos as a non sciencey “universe of stories” book this summer. Robinson’s colorful polka dot heavy illustrations inspired lots of conversation as the kids told the story in the pictures.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alyx Campbell

    I really had no idea what this book was trying to say until I went back and read the jacket synopsis, but honestly, I didn't care that much because without fail Christian Robinson's illustrations evoke so much joy for me.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deb (Readerbuzz) Nance

    A little girl follows her cat into a mirror where the two of them discover another world. In the other world, there are a cat that looks like the girl's cat as well as a girl who looks like the girl. It's a fun little adventure.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Forever a sucker for Christian Robinson's art, but mostly just made me want to play Portal.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.