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The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition: Advanced Methods to Learn, Remember, and Master New Skills, Information, and Abilities

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Scientific Methods to accelerate your learning to save time, beat competition, and get from Point A to point B at the speed of light. Learning is the key to bettering your circumstances and becoming the person you want to be. Skills, information, and abilities will never come to you - it’s up to you to seek them out, and this book shows you how to do so in the most Scientific Methods to accelerate your learning to save time, beat competition, and get from Point A to point B at the speed of light. Learning is the key to bettering your circumstances and becoming the person you want to be. Skills, information, and abilities will never come to you - it’s up to you to seek them out, and this book shows you how to do so in the most effective and efficient manner. Applicable and actionable advice - not just theory and description. Work smarter, not harder. The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition is the definitive resource to get you where you want to be in terms of a new talent, skill, or ability. You may not realize it, but each day is a set of skills and tasks that we repeat. Each hobby and interest is also a set of skills and tasks. This book focuses on what matters in processing information and being able to use it effectively to your advantage. Rapid skill acquisition is how you get ahead in life professionally and personally. Learn to rapidly train your brain and develop muscle memory. Understand the underlying psychology and biology. Peter Hollins has studied psychology and peak human performance for over a dozen years and is a bestselling author. He has worked with a multitude of individuals to unlock their potential and path towards success. His writing draws on his academic, coaching, and research experience. Tactics that top 1% performers and competitors use. • Theories and principles of learning and what we are doing wrong. • How your expectations matter more than your amount of talent. • How to make a plan to strategically deconstruct and analyze information and skills. How to get better results while working less. • Surprising methods to utilize the people and environment around you. • The art of practicing, pivoting, and correcting yourself. • How to stack your skills and become a unique resource. • Take advantage of learning science to best absorb info. Learning slowly and inefficiently will lead to your downfall -- or even worse, being average. We live in a fast-paced world. Will you fall behind or take the lead? The choice is yours -- learning unlocks the doors to everything we want in life. Accelerating that process makes your life easier and more fulfilled. Personally, your intersts and hobbies will grow at a quick pace for more enjoyment. Professionally, your career opportunities will skyrocket because of your newfound proficiencies. Start your journey rapidly by clicking the BUY NOW BUTTON at the top of this page!


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Scientific Methods to accelerate your learning to save time, beat competition, and get from Point A to point B at the speed of light. Learning is the key to bettering your circumstances and becoming the person you want to be. Skills, information, and abilities will never come to you - it’s up to you to seek them out, and this book shows you how to do so in the most Scientific Methods to accelerate your learning to save time, beat competition, and get from Point A to point B at the speed of light. Learning is the key to bettering your circumstances and becoming the person you want to be. Skills, information, and abilities will never come to you - it’s up to you to seek them out, and this book shows you how to do so in the most effective and efficient manner. Applicable and actionable advice - not just theory and description. Work smarter, not harder. The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition is the definitive resource to get you where you want to be in terms of a new talent, skill, or ability. You may not realize it, but each day is a set of skills and tasks that we repeat. Each hobby and interest is also a set of skills and tasks. This book focuses on what matters in processing information and being able to use it effectively to your advantage. Rapid skill acquisition is how you get ahead in life professionally and personally. Learn to rapidly train your brain and develop muscle memory. Understand the underlying psychology and biology. Peter Hollins has studied psychology and peak human performance for over a dozen years and is a bestselling author. He has worked with a multitude of individuals to unlock their potential and path towards success. His writing draws on his academic, coaching, and research experience. Tactics that top 1% performers and competitors use. • Theories and principles of learning and what we are doing wrong. • How your expectations matter more than your amount of talent. • How to make a plan to strategically deconstruct and analyze information and skills. How to get better results while working less. • Surprising methods to utilize the people and environment around you. • The art of practicing, pivoting, and correcting yourself. • How to stack your skills and become a unique resource. • Take advantage of learning science to best absorb info. Learning slowly and inefficiently will lead to your downfall -- or even worse, being average. We live in a fast-paced world. Will you fall behind or take the lead? The choice is yours -- learning unlocks the doors to everything we want in life. Accelerating that process makes your life easier and more fulfilled. Personally, your intersts and hobbies will grow at a quick pace for more enjoyment. Professionally, your career opportunities will skyrocket because of your newfound proficiencies. Start your journey rapidly by clicking the BUY NOW BUTTON at the top of this page!

30 review for The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition: Advanced Methods to Learn, Remember, and Master New Skills, Information, and Abilities

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stefan

    Neither scientific nor practical. There are loose anecdotes and half correct regurgitations of concepts developed by smarter people and that's basically it. Learning is hard but worth it, there that's the book for you. It isn't even a good overview of existing methods, so I don't know who that book is for. In my opinion this book is absolutely wasted time, pseudo science, and bad self-help garbage.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Boni Aditya

    What value does this book add? Yes, it does add some value, in that it carefully captures various aspects of learning into clear frameworks. Almost all the knowledge in the book is taken from elsewhere. The author has made zero contributions or original contributions to this book, except that he has organized it carefully into a small readable book. Almost everything from this book is taken from other books, all of which I have read already, for example, he takes from Cal Newport a few concepts, What value does this book add? Yes, it does add some value, in that it carefully captures various aspects of learning into clear frameworks. Almost all the knowledge in the book is taken from elsewhere. The author has made zero contributions or original contributions to this book, except that he has organized it carefully into a small readable book. Almost everything from this book is taken from other books, all of which I have read already, for example, he takes from Cal Newport a few concepts, then he takes a few concepts from The Talent Code and then more concepts from Flow and on and on. He takes one concept after the other, but he organizes them very well. If you wish to save a lot of time and get the side headings right or get the keywords rights, then this book might help, but if you wish to get a deeper understanding of learning, this book is only the beginner's manual or an introductory work. It won't go to the depth required to understand these concepts. This book reminded me of another such book, the PERSONAL MBA, where the author tries to capture all the keywords in MBA in one book, in a desperate attempt to boil down a two-year course into a small book, he manages to get all the definitions, speaking very rapidly. Books:  democracy and education and introduction to the philosophy of education The Talent Code Flow Purpose Demand and supply Talent Current circumstances Life situations Stages of learning 1. Unconscious incompetence - don't know what you don't know 2. Conscious incompetence - basics 3. Conscious competence - proficiency not natural yet 4. Unconscious competence - expert Learning - chan Deliberate practice Interleaved practice

  3. 5 out of 5

    Enzo

    Some of the things on the book are common sense. But you really have to think about it to see what the book wants you to learn. The thing is its not really science. Its more about following well meaning advice. It kinda of threw me off a couple of times but I muddled through it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Muhamed

    The book feels like a comprehensive collection of blog posts on the topic of learning and skill acquisition. There are many practical tips. I knew many already but to have them all in one place was a great reminder.

  5. 5 out of 5

    LeRaquin

    The critical right answers. Peter Hopkins has given me a fresh breath; towards learning. Throughout my life I have achieved success in many endeavers. Along the way there have been many failures. The failures produced corrective action and that made them benifical. This book has organized a clear path to quickly acquire new skills in a short time with complete comprehension and knowledge. Being born in 1939; I am still learning and acquiring new skills. For the last two years, I have had a mental The critical right answers. Peter Hopkins has given me a fresh breath; towards learning. Throughout my life I have achieved success in many endeavers. Along the way there have been many failures. The failures produced corrective action and that made them benifical. This book has organized a clear path to quickly acquire new skills in a short time with complete comprehension and knowledge. Being born in 1939; I am still learning and acquiring new skills. For the last two years, I have had a mental block in learning a Cad / Can program. With information from this book; that block is broken. I changed my attitude to knowing nothing. It was like magic. Concepts fell into place and I suddenly found I knew more about the subject that had escaped me for so long. Thanks for writing this book!

  6. 4 out of 5

    T

    I started this book and immediately was unimpressed. It's one of those books that spends the time selling itself a fair degree, contradicting itself at times, and then it began an overview of the various learning styles so that you could understand them all. That's more a summary of the current scientific understanding of how learning might be structured/understood/broken down, not something useful! I gave up an hour or two in; anyone who's interested in this should probably read Make It Stick: I started this book and immediately was unimpressed. It's one of those books that spends the time selling itself a fair degree, contradicting itself at times, and then it began an overview of the various learning styles so that you could understand them all. That's more a summary of the current scientific understanding of how learning might be structured/understood/broken down, not something useful! I gave up an hour or two in; anyone who's interested in this should probably read Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning which is the real version of what this book advertises itself to be.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Josh Maulucci

    I wasn't very in depth, but it was a nice overview of the subject. I would say this is a great introduction to a lot of these ideas, and if you like what you see (hear), it's a good jumping-off point for a deeper dive.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shhhhh Ahhhhh

    As a primer, certainly not bad. As someone familiar with a lot of the methodology here, it definitely glossed over details but I don't think that's necessary for the type of book it's trying to be. The fine-grained details for everything they mentioned can be found through simple googling using the terms given in the book. This was a bit of a refresher for me and, as usual with books of this srot, a reminder that I'm not leveraging what I know nearly enough to maximize my productivity. The basic As a primer, certainly not bad. As someone familiar with a lot of the methodology here, it definitely glossed over details but I don't think that's necessary for the type of book it's trying to be. The fine-grained details for everything they mentioned can be found through simple googling using the terms given in the book. This was a bit of a refresher for me and, as usual with books of this srot, a reminder that I'm not leveraging what I know nearly enough to maximize my productivity. The basic recommendations are as follows. Prioritize problem-based learning using things like case studies and challenges. Perform elaborative interrogation by asking 'why' until you reach a point where you no longer have a meaningful answer. Practice interleaved learning by not focusing on a single topic/subtopic but mixing them (it feels like you're learning less but your performance increases). Use spaced repetition to overcome the forgetting curve (not mentioned in the book and should have been) and embed knowledge easily without unnecessary repetition. Practice deliberately by specifically identifying and working on sticking points rather than repeating an entire sequence over. Schedule your own performance reviews/ self checks to ensure progress towards goal. Use the Feynman technique by explaining an idea in plain english, finding your own blind spots (when you come upon something you can't put into plain english), and finally creating an analogy as the surest sign of your grasp of the concept (not mentioned was the feynman map which is a manual form of this sort of johari window exploration). Increase your value, utility, and indispensability by stacking a unique combination of high level (but not necessarily top level) skills that complement one another (unfortunately unstated/ understated is to maximally leverage your existing strengths in order to more rapidly acquire related skills, also called ladder-jumping or, when successful, called mario-piping).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    This is my second book by Peter Hollins. The first was Build a Better Brain. The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition is similar in that it combines the research of the "why" with the instructions to complete the "how". The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition is much more aggressive in what you should and should not do where as the Build a Better Brain was more academic. I strongly believe that the skills and methods the author writes about should be taught in the middle school level, if not This is my second book by Peter Hollins. The first was Build a Better Brain. The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition is similar in that it combines the research of the "why" with the instructions to complete the "how". The Science of Rapid Skill Acquisition is much more aggressive in what you should and should not do where as the Build a Better Brain was more academic. I strongly believe that the skills and methods the author writes about should be taught in the middle school level, if not earlier. How to learn is much more important than what too learn. Russell Newton is a fantastic narrator. His voice and diction are well suited for this type of material.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Potter

    Here we have a surprisingly simple step-by-step guide that will walk you through an exceptionally in-depth and analytical process of learning and improving new skills. As this is non-fiction, my only real demand of the narrator is that he was an easy voice that is pleasant to listen to, which Russell Newton fits well. Some of the processes detailed in the book seem rather obvious, while others were things I had never considered before. For anyone who enjoys methodical, analytical processes, this Here we have a surprisingly simple step-by-step guide that will walk you through an exceptionally in-depth and analytical process of learning and improving new skills. As this is non-fiction, my only real demand of the narrator is that he was an easy voice that is pleasant to listen to, which Russell Newton fits well. Some of the processes detailed in the book seem rather obvious, while others were things I had never considered before. For anyone who enjoys methodical, analytical processes, this will absolutely lay a fantastic groundwork that will lead you to the skillset you're looking for.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dan Lucking

    OK as a reminder of stuff I've mostly already heard, nothing revolutionary At one point he mentions the law of diminishing returns and "that if you've already read 4 books on a subject, the fifth one is unlikely to give you much new information" If this is your nth book on productivity/learning, just stop it! Go and actually do something instead! (hopefully I will remember this next time)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bernard Shaw

    A Super Self Help Book A well written and concise self help book that manages the balance between too much detail and brevity well. Some reviewers commented about it regurgitating common sense, but aren’t most subjects common sense when they are presented to the reader well?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Con Spyropoulos

    very good thoroughly recommend it Book details all aspects required to learn a new skill from study methods, social aspects, frame of mind. Very good for someone trying to maximise their learning retention.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Khalid Phaisongkham

    Great book Well researched. I found a lot of help ideas and strategies for rapid skills acquisition. Now it’s about taking action. This is definitely one of those books you have to go over again

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Mcdowell

    The Science of Rapid Skills I really enjoyed this book and I highly recommend this to anyone that wants to improve their lives. Read it and practice it and you will improve your learning skills.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kari Mccrory

    Good summary of the science of learning. I particularly appreciate the summaries at the end of each chapter and the end of the book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Richard Bowman

    The author has a series of books on Learning, I've found each helpful and easy to follow.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Enlightening Well informed breakdown of the learning processes. Practical, useful content. I highly recommend this read for someone who needs a fresh approach for skill acquisition.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Avinash Pandey

    # When you wish to explore why few people do same things better and faster compared to others#

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peter G Vermouth

    Boring Didn't say anything that isn't obvious or just p!son common sense. You could have written something better. Go do it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Much much much better than Josh Kaufman's book! Recommended.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jonas Vestre

    Great, lets get started Nice, tackles solid methods, while using diverse analogies. Short, right to the heart of the matter. I would definitely recommend.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vishal Kapoor

    Excellent Excellent book that enhances skills at many levels. I was surprised at the concepts stated and wished I had know this earlier

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    Realistic Learning Method Love the breaking learning into pieces and the concept that you get what you give. Free time vs skill acquisition, etc.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rishi

    Not really advanced tho

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sloan

    A nice and quick general overview of some well known learning techniques. Nothing groundbreaking for anyone that has looked into the subject before.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hemel

    A short and concise book that helps build the framework for rapid skill acquisition. As with all teachings, the real benefits come with regular practice. Whilst the methods may not always be original, Peter Hollins does a good job of breaking down and formalising the things that we may have thought about and perhaps, didn't know how to put into action. It is a good read for those that are looking for the best ways to learn skills across a range of subjects but want to find the right structure A short and concise book that helps build the framework for rapid skill acquisition. As with all teachings, the real benefits come with regular practice. Whilst the methods may not always be original, Peter Hollins does a good job of breaking down and formalising the things that we may have thought about and perhaps, didn't know how to put into action. It is a good read for those that are looking for the best ways to learn skills across a range of subjects but want to find the right structure for themselves to do so quickly. As Peter highlights, we all learn in different ways and finding the appropriate method for yourself is the first step in acquiring new knowledge.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patty Helena

    Absolutely amazing how a book can open up one's eyes to realize how many mistakes one has made. If you want to grow and change for the better, if you want to gain better habits and create more skills that bring your further in life, then this book is for you.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason Comely

    Can't quite give it four stars, as I'm familiar with all the methods in this book. It's well written and an excellent primer for anyone not already well-versed in this stuff.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dawid

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