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Shatter City

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When the world sees Frey, they think they see her twin sister Rafi. Frey was raised to be Rafi's double, and now she's taken on the role . . . without anyone else knowing. Her goal? To destroy the forces that created her. But with the world watching and a rebellion rising, Frey is forced into a detour. Suddenly she is stranded on her own in Paz, a cit When the world sees Frey, they think they see her twin sister Rafi. Frey was raised to be Rafi's double, and now she's taken on the role . . . without anyone else knowing. Her goal? To destroy the forces that created her. But with the world watching and a rebellion rising, Frey is forced into a detour. Suddenly she is stranded on her own in Paz, a city where many of the citizens attempt to regulate their emotions through an interface on their arms. Paz is an easy place to get lost . . . and also an easy place to lose yourself. As the city comes under a catastrophic attack, Frey must leave the shadows and enter the chaos of warfare - because there is no other way for her to find her missing sister and have her revenge against her murderous father.


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When the world sees Frey, they think they see her twin sister Rafi. Frey was raised to be Rafi's double, and now she's taken on the role . . . without anyone else knowing. Her goal? To destroy the forces that created her. But with the world watching and a rebellion rising, Frey is forced into a detour. Suddenly she is stranded on her own in Paz, a cit When the world sees Frey, they think they see her twin sister Rafi. Frey was raised to be Rafi's double, and now she's taken on the role . . . without anyone else knowing. Her goal? To destroy the forces that created her. But with the world watching and a rebellion rising, Frey is forced into a detour. Suddenly she is stranded on her own in Paz, a city where many of the citizens attempt to regulate their emotions through an interface on their arms. Paz is an easy place to get lost . . . and also an easy place to lose yourself. As the city comes under a catastrophic attack, Frey must leave the shadows and enter the chaos of warfare - because there is no other way for her to find her missing sister and have her revenge against her murderous father.

30 review for Shatter City

  1. 5 out of 5

    faith ✨

    We have a title! Personally, I'm not a big fan of it, but you know what? I'm basing that on the fact I've yet to read Impostors. It's silently judging me.

  2. 5 out of 5

    K Whatsherface

    Is this the best book in the series? No. Did it leave me craving more? Yes. It did what a second book in a 4 part series should do. Make you want more. Also I really wouldn't mind getting this book again but from Rafi's POV. Maybe even Col's? Frey is interesting and I love her POV but she cant see everything and there is so much going on. There is a twist in this I kind of figured. Once found out about part of the twist....yeah dont want to spoil it and if I even refer to it for real I probably Is this the best book in the series? No. Did it leave me craving more? Yes. It did what a second book in a 4 part series should do. Make you want more. Also I really wouldn't mind getting this book again but from Rafi's POV. Maybe even Col's? Frey is interesting and I love her POV but she cant see everything and there is so much going on. There is a twist in this I kind of figured. Once found out about part of the twist....yeah dont want to spoil it and if I even refer to it for real I probably will. Over all....next book please

  3. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett

    I wanted to love this book SO MUCH. The Uglies series will always have a special place in my heart as one of the best dystopian series I've ever read. Maybe it's because it was one of the first I read as a teenager of that genre, but to this day I still really think it was as amazing as I remember. I've read the original trilogy at least 3 or 4 times and I never get tired of it. It had incredible characters, an extremely well-imagined and unique world, and a twisty edge-of-your-seat plot that actually I wanted to love this book SO MUCH. The Uglies series will always have a special place in my heart as one of the best dystopian series I've ever read. Maybe it's because it was one of the first I read as a teenager of that genre, but to this day I still really think it was as amazing as I remember. I've read the original trilogy at least 3 or 4 times and I never get tired of it. It had incredible characters, an extremely well-imagined and unique world, and a twisty edge-of-your-seat plot that actually made you think and related to our world in a scary way. Then Impostors came along. And it of course has the well-imagined and unique world because it's the same setting we know and love. And even though the majority of the original characters make no appearance, I actually have really come to love Frey and Boss X and Col and the rest of the characters in this new series. The problem is that the plot is just not exciting or unique. I think Scott Westerfeld is a great author. And I did like the interesting addition of feels and AI cities. But I just think this is the same old YA plot of overthrow the evil government we've seen over and over. There's nothing unique, nothing meaningful, nothing that makes you think wow this could really happen in our world, no exciting twists. I like the hidden/switched twins storyline but I've read that before too. I'm happy to be back in this incredible world I've always loved, but I also kind of think this spin-off series was unnecessary. Of course I'm going to keep reading the series, and I'm hoping this is just a second-book-slump, but I was not wowed by Shatter City.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mitchell

    I keep on waiting for Scott Westerfeld to become an overnight success - which I guess would have to be a movie. Goodreads has me as having read 28 of his books. 5 3's, 2 5's and 21 4's. That's pretty consistent. I had forgotten that he had started a new series in the Uglies world. I was worried that I didn't remember enough. No matter, this book managed to remind without an info dump. And with just a fast fun sometimes dark read, with just enough interesting sf to keep it interesting. And hover I keep on waiting for Scott Westerfeld to become an overnight success - which I guess would have to be a movie. Goodreads has me as having read 28 of his books. 5 3's, 2 5's and 21 4's. That's pretty consistent. I had forgotten that he had started a new series in the Uglies world. I was worried that I didn't remember enough. No matter, this book managed to remind without an info dump. And with just a fast fun sometimes dark read, with just enough interesting sf to keep it interesting. And hover boards. The feels were done pretty well. You could definitely read this without having read any of the others, but reading the first imposters book 1 would be better.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mari Johnston

    This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl. Content Warnings: earthquakes, emergency medical needs Holy guacamole. And I thought Imposters was good….. Filled with action that continuously keeps the stakes at an all-time high, Scott Westerfeld gives an incredible examination into self-discovery, family, and the regulation of emotions. Shatter City is the perfect continuation of the Uglies series. Imposters was good but this second installment take/>Content This review and many others can also be found at Musings of a (Book) Girl. Content Warnings: earthquakes, emergency medical needs Holy guacamole. And I thought Imposters was good….. Filled with action that continuously keeps the stakes at an all-time high, Scott Westerfeld gives an incredible examination into self-discovery, family, and the regulation of emotions. Shatter City is the perfect continuation of the Uglies series. Imposters was good but this second installment takes the series to an entirely different level. We saw a glimpse of the Uglies’ personality in Imposters and I’m so excited to say that Shatter City contains so much more. I loved the amount of bubbly speak and new technology we were introduced to. It truly felt like I was back inside Tally Youngblood’s universe. The Smoke lives. Every single page is action-packed and the story moves at an astonishing pace. Westerfeld doesn’t once give you a chance to catch your breath and instead will keep you on the edge of your seat until the last page. The chapters were all fairly short so I felt like I was flying through the book which matched the pacing perfectly. There were twists and turns around every corner and I loved that I was constantly left guessing. It was never so much that I felt confused but instead enough to take me on a wild ride. And that twist on the end? I can’t say much about it because spoilers but I thought I had it all figured out and oh how wrong I was. We’ve played the game of lies for so long, I don’t know how to change the rules. Imposters did a great job of introducing us to these characters and I was impressed with how well Shatter City expanded on them. We learn so much more about each of them and the progression and development they go through feels right and makes sense. Frey, Rafia, and Col all essentially want the same things but they each have very different ways of going about obtaining their goal. Westerfeld brings a great amount of extra depth to each of the characters and explores some important themes regarding familial obligations, technology, emotions, and privacy. Westerfeld’s books have always been a great examination of where the world is at and the direction it’s going and Shatter City is no exception. I do suggest reading Imposters before heading into Shatter City, and while to get the full experience you should also read the Uglies series first, it is possible to jump into this continuation blind. It honestly feels like an Uglies for a new generation while still catering and giving so much to those of us that have been long-time fans of the world. A physical ARC was provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Additionally, all quotes should be checked for changes against the final copy.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Renata

    fuck!!! why is Scott Westerfeld so good!!!! I didn't love Impostors but this one builds up the world and its technologies in such a SMART way, I'm obsessed. I also sort of thought the switched-twin dynamic would get old but honestly????? It kept working??? What the fuck???? Also the REVEAL at the end aaaaaaaa (view spoiler)[ This isn't even the big reveal but the thing about the Pax feels being emojis killed meeeee fuck!!! why is Scott Westerfeld so good!!!! I didn't love Impostors but this one builds up the world and its technologies in such a SMART way, I'm obsessed. I also sort of thought the switched-twin dynamic would get old but honestly????? It kept working??? What the fuck???? Also the REVEAL at the end aaaaaaaa (view spoiler)[ This isn't even the big reveal but the thing about the Pax feels being emojis killed meeeee :') But while I'm under spoiler text omg on one hand burying your gays isn't ideal but on the other hand I'm so ready for GAY REVENGE (hide spoiler)] (LOL I just went back and re-read my review of Impostors where I said, "I suppose this is a new series starter but I found myself wishing for a little bit more of world-building? Like Extras, this seems to be very much about privacy and how having or not having it impacts a society. But hopefully future books will dig into that more." MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Wallflower

    I don't review favorite authors. The first half was a little slow for me, the time in Paz mostly. But I realized by the end it was necessary, to really get a general feel for the city, so we can mourn losing it. The last half I really enjoyed- Westerfeld delivered the action and twists I was looking for, as he always does. It's no wonder Frey longs for the Feels the way she does. It's her way of being able to choose how she can feel, since it seems her whole life, and even now people I don't review favorite authors. The first half was a little slow for me, the time in Paz mostly. But I realized by the end it was necessary, to really get a general feel for the city, so we can mourn losing it. The last half I really enjoyed- Westerfeld delivered the action and twists I was looking for, as he always does. It's no wonder Frey longs for the Feels the way she does. It's her way of being able to choose how she can feel, since it seems her whole life, and even now people are still choosing who she is, for her. Can't wait for the next installment.

  8. 5 out of 5

    CJ

    I love that Scott Westerfeld gives personalities to cities, not just people. It's a great element of this universe. I really liked his exploration of Feels--how they can make you feel better, but also make you dependent. Quite an interesting concept. Really liked Boss X, and I really liked Essa as well. She didn't get a whole lot of page time, but she had an impact for sure. And wow, the insights into Rafi's personality...just wow. No spoilers. Eager for book thr I love that Scott Westerfeld gives personalities to cities, not just people. It's a great element of this universe. I really liked his exploration of Feels--how they can make you feel better, but also make you dependent. Quite an interesting concept. Really liked Boss X, and I really liked Essa as well. She didn't get a whole lot of page time, but she had an impact for sure. And wow, the insights into Rafi's personality...just wow. No spoilers. Eager for book three!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lesr Kew

    This was great but not as good as the first one in my opinion. A few times I had to reread what was happening because the actions and words were very “other-worldly”. But it was jammed packed full of adventure and it ended with a bang as well. Emotional.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Pretty good book, but definitely felt like it was laying the ground work for the rest of the series (as most 2nd in a series do). Will continue with the series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Leah (Jane Speare)

    I think I liked Shatter City more than Impostors! Way cool new tech, good ol' slang, and some separation from gushy romance. I sped through this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Libby McDermott Voight

    I know I'm going to love everything Westerfeld writes and Shatter City is no exception. I think a main reason I love his books is that while they're super YA-tropey (in all the best ways) those tropes also get called out on the page. For example in the Uglies series Tally is the typical unaware, selfish teen MC, but Shay especially routinely calls her out on it and we get to see her character growth as Tally becomes more thoughtful and self-aware throughout the series. This book starts with Frey I know I'm going to love everything Westerfeld writes and Shatter City is no exception. I think a main reason I love his books is that while they're super YA-tropey (in all the best ways) those tropes also get called out on the page. For example in the Uglies series Tally is the typical unaware, selfish teen MC, but Shay especially routinely calls her out on it and we get to see her character growth as Tally becomes more thoughtful and self-aware throughout the series. This book starts with Frey putting Col, a boy she just met and fell for, ahead of herself, her sister, and in some ways the war effort by staying in Shreve and pretending to be Rafi. But that's called out on the page in the first chapter and we get to see Frey struggle with her relationship with Col and what it means to protect her sister (or try to) and how to balance her relationship with her sister, with Col, and obligation to the fight against her father. In Shatter City I love the world-building and the glimpses we get of other cities and societies as Frey goes to Paz. In true Uglies fashion this book deals with the themes of conservation, environmentalism, capitalism, and government control versus freedom. Frey is especially struggling with the idea of identity (for good reason as she has to go back and forth between pretending to be her sister and then various versions of herself), found family, and we delve into her emotional intelligence (or lack-thereof.) In a world where you can get surgery and modifications to look and be whatever you want it makes sense that people came up with a way to feel whatever emotions they want with little emoji buttons on their arms to control how they feel. I appreciate that characters do discuss depression and the chemical imbalance that can cause mental and emotional issues. My other favorite part of Westerfeld's writing is that we get so much character development and background without sacrificing the fast-pace of the plot. The story is constantly moving and keeps you on the edge of your seat and I can't wait to read what happens next, I for one hope we get to see more of Frey working alongside Col and her dynamic with Rafi.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    It’s been a while since we’ve been in this series but this second book gives us all the feels you could hope for. (definitely an overused phrase in this story though). Anyhow, like the summary says, we are thrown right back into the middle of a war – where Rafi and Frey are against their father because all he has in mind is to destroy the world for motives unknown aside from a need for power. When we left off, Frey traded places with Rafi in the hopes of saving her love Col, and well, It’s been a while since we’ve been in this series but this second book gives us all the feels you could hope for. (definitely an overused phrase in this story though). Anyhow, like the summary says, we are thrown right back into the middle of a war – where Rafi and Frey are against their father because all he has in mind is to destroy the world for motives unknown aside from a need for power. When we left off, Frey traded places with Rafi in the hopes of saving her love Col, and well, we know how that turned out. The bomb collar was switched from one sister to the other, meaning that identities had to be faked yet again. Frey at least had the chance to be with Col in these unusual circumstances, all while trying to figure out how they could both get out unscathed. Thankfully, Col has his allies on call and they were able to devise a plan to get them out and hopefully on the road to freedom. The challenge here is that Frey is on the hunt for Rafi since her entire life she was raised to protect her sister. She learns that her sister is in a city called Paz, the next target for their father, both for the notion that Rafi is there but also because Paz is a city that believes in true freedom and doesn’t conscribe to the notion of dust or spying. It’s truly free. Their father threatens devastation that no one can fathom, a Rusty weapon that appears like natural destruction and then invasion. What Frey finds when she gets there is a mess. She learns that Rafi is gone and that she’s left everything to Frey in the meantime. she’s set up an apartment, made sure she’s taken care of, but the reasoning behind it is still a semi mystery to Frey. That’s really what a lot of this story is about. There are semi truths or incomplete pieces of information that everyone’s working with and we don’t yet know what’s intentional, what’s accidental and what the end result here could be. There’s so much going on that i don’t know where to start otherwise. We spend time in Paz trying to broadcast that their father is evil and is trying to take over the world, yet he’s a step ahead and while he’s destroyed the city, he appears to be the first to help build it back up. There’s a secret there that they don’t yet know the motivation behind, and when we do figure it out, there’s no surprise. Then there’s the issue of Rafi being out in the Wild, with rebels and we don’t know what her end game is. Trying to locate her gets Frey caught by a neighboring city and held captive in the hopes of securing a stronger network of allies. When she’s freed by Col and his crew, we start to see the story speed up. there are Easter Eggs throughout this story that trigger questions. The Paz AI tells Frey about something called ‘Iron Mountain’ but there’s no context to what it is ,where it is and what it will do. When we get to the wilds, we learn that a few people have deeper insight and it could be a key to unlocking a lot of information. Then there’s a hint that someone that the girls know of may be in the rebels, and that there’s a key link there to Rafi’s focus on being out there. She has heard rumors and if they are true then there may be hope. The way that this specific story line plays out is so shocking though that i’m glad i assumed wrong for the bulk of the time. We are left at a point of hope, yet a point of instability. There’s no clear direction on who will win, if their father can be bested and what that will mean to the world. Relationships continue to grow and build, and there’s something solid and sweet about each friendship and romance. The depth that we get to see psychologically with everyone is really intense as well and that’s a new feature to all of the stories that i’ve read by our amazing author. There’s an interesting idea here that we get throughout both the Uglies and the Imposters series. Originally when you read Uglies, you see that people are never happy with what they have naturally and as a result, they surgically change or enhance everything that’s possible to change about themselves. What we learned there is that it’s not always better and sometimes tech makes things worse. What we have in this series is a tease of that since most of the modifications are now illegal, with only a few Specials remaining for example, but there’s such fear and mis information on what it was that led to the need for Surg. There’s fear of invaded privacy and that you’re never allowed to be free. It makes you wonder if this is going to be our future. The way that we enhance ourselves and the way that we allow innovative technology to watch all of our activities and even help to make life easier…..just a philosophical question today about what’s good and right and worth the stress. Ponder away until we get book 3.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicole (Reading Books With Coffee)

    I really liked Shatter City! It was an interesting read, and I was curious to see how things would work out after the way Impostors ended. It didn’t disappoint, and I definitely want to know what happens next. It was interesting to follow both Frey and Rafi. It was pretty interesting to see how they did the good old twins pretending to be each other thing. Even though this series follows Frey, there is part of me that wonders what things are really like for Rafi, and I’d love to see a I really liked Shatter City! It was an interesting read, and I was curious to see how things would work out after the way Impostors ended. It didn’t disappoint, and I definitely want to know what happens next. It was interesting to follow both Frey and Rafi. It was pretty interesting to see how they did the good old twins pretending to be each other thing. Even though this series follows Frey, there is part of me that wonders what things are really like for Rafi, and I’d love to see a chapter or two from her perspective. I don’t think I need a whole book from her perspective, or even a good chunk of any book following her, but a chapter or two could be interesting. We see more of the world that Frey lives in, which was really nice. It makes me wonder how much more of the world we’ll see in the rest of the series, and I can’t wait to see if we’ll stay pretty close to where we’ve been, or if there will be a lot more traveling involved. If she’s going to go after her father, she can’t go far, but she’ll also need allies, so I’m curious to see if anyone will help her, or if they’ll just go along with it. It also makes me wonder about the geography of the world she lives in versus where the original Uglies trilogy took place. Is it close to where Tally’s from, or in a completely different area? I’d kill for a map of Frey’s world just so I know where things are in relation to each other. I feel like Rafi and Frey really come into their own in this book. There’s definitely room for growth and change, of course, but Rafi does some things I would not have expected. And Frey…I felt for her. She has a lot to deal with, especially with the revelations about her brother. I did not see that coming, and I so want more about him and how he got to that point. That’s a story I really want to know, even though I know we’d only get bits and pieces. And that’s assuming we get anything else during the rest of the series. I really hope we see them in a world where they don’t have to deal with their father. It makes me wonder who they’ll become and how they’ll change if he’s someone they don’t have to deal with or worry about. I’m pretty sure we won’t see that but I can’t help but wonder what their world would be like if he wasn’t a factor. I’m also curious to see if we’ll see Tally. She’s definitely mentioned, and her story was definitely finished. But part of me wonders how she is, what she’s up to and if she wants to help get rid of Frey’s dad. I want Frey and Rafi to deal with this on their own, but part of me does want Tally to randomly show up and help out. My Rating: 4 stars. I really liked Shatter City, and I really liked seeing how big this world is.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    @kidlitexchange #partner Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network, the publisher @scholasticinc, and the author @scott_westerfeld for the advance copy of Shatter City. Shatter City will hit shelves on September 17, 2019. This is the second book in the Impostors series and it picks up right where the first leaves off. Frey is trapped in Shreve pretending to be Rafia in order to save Col. During this time, Rafia pretends to be Frey to continue the resistance. Eventually, Frey finds hers @kidlitexchange #partner Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network, the publisher @scholasticinc, and the author @scott_westerfeld for the advance copy of Shatter City. Shatter City will hit shelves on September 17, 2019. This is the second book in the Impostors series and it picks up right where the first leaves off. Frey is trapped in Shreve pretending to be Rafia in order to save Col. During this time, Rafia pretends to be Frey to continue the resistance. Eventually, Frey finds herself alone in Paz searching for her sister while simultaneously trying to thwart her father's plans. The narrative voice in Shatter City, and the Impostors series in general, is enthralling. There is strong focus in the novel on identity, technology, and also family. I enjoyed that this book focused a lot on the dynamics between Frey and Rafia and their relationship. The romance between Frey and Col, while present, seemed to take more of a backseat role in this book (which I honestly didn't mind). I also liked that the rebels played a large role in this book. I was left with a lot of questions at the end of Impostors (which I'm assuming was the plan since it's book 1 in a series) and Shatter City answered several of my questions and even a few I didn't think to ask. One of the things I think I'm enjoying the most in this series is the world building. It's done so well and each chapter seems to reveal something new about the world Frey and Rafia live in. Westerfeld also did a good job of referring back to book 1 and providing background information. While I wouldn't recommend it (because I totally loved book 1), I feel you could read book 2 without having read book 1 and still enjoy it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    Almost from the first page, Shatter City is full of action! Told in the first person, the story follows Frey, the biologically engineered twin of the First Daughter of Shreve, born to serve as her sister’s body double, with no legal identity of her own. Only her sister, their father, and her trainers know she even exists. In this second installment of Westerfeld’s Impostors, Frey’s sister Rafia is missing. Frey must stand in for her under the spotlights, attending parties and getting Almost from the first page, Shatter City is full of action! Told in the first person, the story follows Frey, the biologically engineered twin of the First Daughter of Shreve, born to serve as her sister’s body double, with no legal identity of her own. Only her sister, their father, and her trainers know she even exists. In this second installment of Westerfeld’s Impostors, Frey’s sister Rafia is missing. Frey must stand in for her under the spotlights, attending parties and getting ready to marry the boy she (Frey) actually loves, but who is engaged to her sister in a plan to smooth over the political situation between Shreve and a city their father has recently decimated. Frey knows her father’s way is brutal – She sides with the rebels and must find a way to break free, find her sister, and live as her own true self. This book can be enjoyed without having read the first in the series. Westerfeld does a great job of filling in enough details without boring the reader with too much backstory. There’s also a treat for folks who have read his earlier works, as it becomes clear that these are set within the same universe. There’s also a big reveal at the end that may surprise some readers. This book is for readers who like to jump head first into the action, and don’t mind a little peril and betrayal. There’s romance (but not explicit sex), war, (but not gory on-page violence), and horrible actors (but also noble ones.) For fans of Westerfeld’s Uglies series, Hunger Games, and All Rights Reserved. "So your government knows I'm here." "Certainly not . . . No self-respecting free city would allow politicians to weigh in on refugee issues." [p.128] "I have an apartment?" "Free cities don't let refugees sleep in parks." [p.130]

  17. 4 out of 5

    Xin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What a journey Shatter City was... While I was moderately underwhelmed for the majority of Imposters, that was entirely turned upside down by Shatter City. Writing this review, I'm still fresh off the high of finishing the book, so it may just be the emotions talking. Frey's growth, conflicts and doubts within this novel really re-kindled the appreciation that I had for the Uglies trilogy. Character development is definitely one of Scott's strong suits and that definitely shines through in Shat What a journey Shatter City was... While I was moderately underwhelmed for the majority of Imposters, that was entirely turned upside down by Shatter City. Writing this review, I'm still fresh off the high of finishing the book, so it may just be the emotions talking. Frey's growth, conflicts and doubts within this novel really re-kindled the appreciation that I had for the Uglies trilogy. Character development is definitely one of Scott's strong suits and that definitely shines through in Shatter City. The potential of the Pazx city and the ethical considerations that come with it drove this book from a four star to five. In my opinion, anyways. While "feels" at face value, is not the most complex of concepts. Yet the way it is addressed in Shatter City brings depth and sophistication to it. Oh, and the scene with X. I adore how Scott had set us up with a scenario, addressed the obvious assumption and completely resorted it with an unexpected yet logical resolution is way too satisfying. Honestly, I have nothing but praise and could probably sit here and rave about it all day. It sure won't be as fun as a re-read... ...whenever I can get my hands on it next, it's all borrowed out (4 copies) at my school library. Now I regret returning it before second reading. Argh! >:(

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carina Carnagey

    At the end of the last book Frey rescued her sister, but stayed at her dad's house so she could rescue Col. She put the bomb necklace on and told her dad what would be better than to marry the enemy. So at the beginning of this book Frey is pretending to be Rafi and is in the middle of planning her wedding to Col where she plans to kill her dad at her wedding. But not everything goes to plan. Most of this book is in Paz and Frey gets feels and a lot of the book is based about these fe At the end of the last book Frey rescued her sister, but stayed at her dad's house so she could rescue Col. She put the bomb necklace on and told her dad what would be better than to marry the enemy. So at the beginning of this book Frey is pretending to be Rafi and is in the middle of planning her wedding to Col where she plans to kill her dad at her wedding. But not everything goes to plan. Most of this book is in Paz and Frey gets feels and a lot of the book is based about these feels, which is really interesting how Frey has to continuously make herself feel certain feelings to get herself through the day. And they compare it to how the rusties were sad or suicidal. The whole feel thing in the book is really interesting. A lot of references to the uglies series like the Smoke lives! And there is even a Crim in this book briefly. I like seeing the little references to the uglies series and even Tally is referenced in this book even though she is "not coming to save us" The end is kind of missing, like oh i is done? There isn't a cliff hanger but it doesn't really get you interested for the next book. You know Frey is going to go do more but it just seems like oh okay. It left me empty at the end of the book. But overall it is a good book, there is a little twist in the book that I thought I knew what it was but I didn't.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Melanie Dulaney

    “The Smoke Lives!” (Yea!!) In Book 2 of Scott Westerfeld’s Impostors series, readers are going to get plenty of hover board action and some pretty outstanding AI and cool gadgets to entertain and intrigue readers who are new to the world after Tally Youngblood and those who have loved it since the Uglies first hit the YA dystopian shelves. It is highly recommended to wait on this installment until after reading Impostors, but it is not necessary to have the foundations from the four book Uglies “The Smoke Lives!” (Yea!!) In Book 2 of Scott Westerfeld’s Impostors series, readers are going to get plenty of hover board action and some pretty outstanding AI and cool gadgets to entertain and intrigue readers who are new to the world after Tally Youngblood and those who have loved it since the Uglies first hit the YA dystopian shelves. It is highly recommended to wait on this installment until after reading Impostors, but it is not necessary to have the foundations from the four book Uglies series. That being said, this fan excitedly turned the page after any rebel declared that the smoke lived and hoped that Tally was going to make her appearance and those who have not read her series will not feel that anticipation! Libraries with other Westerfeld works and/or an avid dystopian fan base will absolutely need this title and despite its classification as YA, Westerfeld keeps profanity and sexual content at a near zero level. In truth, I don’t see any objectionable material in this series for middle grade readers with the ability to understand the technology described and the complex plot twists, but as professional reviews classify it as YA, I cannot place it on my 4th-5th shelves. Thanks so much for the dARC, Edelweiss! It was a pleasure to get an early look.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ricky

    The sequel to Impostors brings us to the midpoint of Westerfeld's latest series in finer form than its predecessor in all the ways, and not just the fact that Shatter City is a significantly cooler title. There's also the ways in which this book finally starts growing into its own thing, distinct from all the other books in the Uglies-verse that came before it - and as on point as the social commentary of the original series is, Shatter City raises the stakes by introducing us to Paz, a city built on the ruins of Baja Calif The sequel to Impostors brings us to the midpoint of Westerfeld's latest series in finer form than its predecessor in all the ways, and not just the fact that Shatter City is a significantly cooler title. There's also the ways in which this book finally starts growing into its own thing, distinct from all the other books in the Uglies-verse that came before it - and as on point as the social commentary of the original series is, Shatter City raises the stakes by introducing us to Paz, a city built on the ruins of Baja California where the population uses implants to regulate their emotions in such a way that it eerily comes off more like drug addiction than anything else. And as Frey and Col start to gain allies in this free city - a place where liberty is so prized - they both get to become even more badass than their Book 1 selves in all the ways, ready to wage war against certain warlike First Families willing to set the remains of the world on fire just to watch them burn. Even more so than in Impostors, Shatter City leaves me wondering so much what Westerfeld has in mind for the rest of the series - two books to go now!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    This series is fun but just does not compare to the first go round in this universe, the Uglies series. There are two princesses of Shreve, an evil dictator state, because the evil dictator wants an heir and a spare. That was a closely guarded secret for 17 years (I.e., their lifetimes). Now it’s out and they’re openly opposing their cruel father, who is busily trying to shatter the happy city-states that oppose him. But they’re separated for most of the book which is a shame, since the relation This series is fun but just does not compare to the first go round in this universe, the Uglies series. There are two princesses of Shreve, an evil dictator state, because the evil dictator wants an heir and a spare. That was a closely guarded secret for 17 years (I.e., their lifetimes). Now it’s out and they’re openly opposing their cruel father, who is busily trying to shatter the happy city-states that oppose him. But they’re separated for most of the book which is a shame, since the relationship between the two sisters is the most compelling part of the scenario. Some interesting imagination of technology here, especially rows of buttons that look like emoticons embedded into people’s wrists that make them feel a certain way (Calm, Morning Buzz, Eloquent, Melancholy, Resolute, etc) when the buttons are pressed. Action adventure galore. But the original Uglies series made me think, had a certain fatefulness about it almost as if Westerfeld were discovering the story instead of inventing it. This just does not come up to that level.

  22. 5 out of 5

    thi

    4/5 - YAY - recap: Frey is her twin sister, Rafi’s shadow and took her place for diplomatic reasons only for their father to devise a scheme leaving Frey as collateral but the two manage to reveal their identities to the public - NOW: Now Frey’s on the inside, successfully posing as Rafi, meanwhile Rafi, posing as Frey is out and being hunted down - The intricacies of political power play, the public perception of these two sisters, and their own struggles with their identities is 4/5 - YAY - recap: Frey is her twin sister, Rafi’s shadow and took her place for diplomatic reasons only for their father to devise a scheme leaving Frey as collateral but the two manage to reveal their identities to the public - NOW: Now Frey’s on the inside, successfully posing as Rafi, meanwhile Rafi, posing as Frey is out and being hunted down - The intricacies of political power play, the public perception of these two sisters, and their own struggles with their identities is SO intriguing 😩👌🏼 - I love the bubbly talk so much I will never get tired of it; “Why are you so brain-missing?” “Apologies that they’re so manners-missing” “Her dad’s totally norm-shredding” - I love the universe’s sci-fi, from a nostalgia point but also in general it’s really fun and high tech but as always explores the technical lag and rebellion of civilizations that don’t entirely comply - It’s fast paced, and super fun - I CAN’T WAIT FOR MORE!!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Thank you to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for providing me with a copy for review. This has in no way influenced my opinion. Last year, I was so excited about Impostors, and revisiting the Uglies world. This year. I am heartily disappointed on this return to Shreve and Frey's struggles. This is very much a book two book - the world expands, we meet some new characters to help us on our journey, a bit of new tech, some backstory expansion. My issue is that Frey, Rafi, and Col are sepa Thank you to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for providing me with a copy for review. This has in no way influenced my opinion. Last year, I was so excited about Impostors, and revisiting the Uglies world. This year. I am heartily disappointed on this return to Shreve and Frey's struggles. This is very much a book two book - the world expands, we meet some new characters to help us on our journey, a bit of new tech, some backstory expansion. My issue is that Frey, Rafi, and Col are separate for so much of the book (and in the case of Rafi and Col, totally out of the narrative - no POV flips to check in or anything), that I found it hard to root for our scrappy underdog team. The stakes didn't seem sufficiently high to me, and most of the story felt like padding. I look forward to book 3 course correcting the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becca Newman

    I was so fortunate to get an ARC of this book at BookCon2019!! Meeting Scott Westerfeld was so great!! I was just meh about Imposters, so I was hoping this book would pick up with the depth of storytelling and twists that I remembered from my first read through of the Uglies series. This book delivered what Imposters did not. It brought back my nostalgia but told an entirely new narrative in the world I loved. I adore the Frey/Rafi relationship. I appreciate that a family connection is the primary focus as opposed to ro I was so fortunate to get an ARC of this book at BookCon2019!! Meeting Scott Westerfeld was so great!! I was just meh about Imposters, so I was hoping this book would pick up with the depth of storytelling and twists that I remembered from my first read through of the Uglies series. This book delivered what Imposters did not. It brought back my nostalgia but told an entirely new narrative in the world I loved. I adore the Frey/Rafi relationship. I appreciate that a family connection is the primary focus as opposed to romantic interest. The city of Paz was so fun to be immersed in, and the concept of Feels added a fun new tech to the world. Also non-binary representation continues!! I don't think anything will live up to the original Uglies series, but this book came pretty darn close.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nichole Oothoudt

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. @kidlitexchange #partners Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own. Thank you @scholasticinc for a review copy of Shatter City by @scott_westerfeld — book 2 in the Imposters series — set to release 9/17/2019. Frey escapes to the city of Paz in search of her identical twin sister, Rafi. Soon, the city is attacked by a massive earthquake — one Frey is pretty sure her father has orchestrated. Frey finds hersel @kidlitexchange #partners Thanks to the @kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book - all opinions are my own. Thank you @scholasticinc for a review copy of Shatter City by @scott_westerfeld — book 2 in the Imposters series — set to release 9/17/2019. Frey escapes to the city of Paz in search of her identical twin sister, Rafi. Soon, the city is attacked by a massive earthquake — one Frey is pretty sure her father has orchestrated. Frey finds herself in the middle of many battles - one with rebels, one with Col and his army, one with the hunt for her missing sister, one with who she is and what she’s supposed to do. True Westerfeld style....Lots of action-packed scenes leave the reader wondering what’s coming next. Great read for those who enjoyed its sister series, Uglies. Can’t wait for the next one to come out — because obviously there’s s next one! Yay!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Trisha Perry

    Rafi and Frey are still working to untangle their lives, but if daddy can't have one the other is just as good as long as there is one for the people to see and to do his bidding. So with bomb strapped to Frey's neck she waits and plots till she can escape and turn the tables on her murderous father. But plans change when she escapes to the city of Paz than what seems to be a giant earthquake hits the city and she is caught helping and surviving, until she discovers surviving is going to become Rafi and Frey are still working to untangle their lives, but if daddy can't have one the other is just as good as long as there is one for the people to see and to do his bidding. So with bomb strapped to Frey's neck she waits and plots till she can escape and turn the tables on her murderous father. But plans change when she escapes to the city of Paz than what seems to be a giant earthquake hits the city and she is caught helping and surviving, until she discovers surviving is going to become much more. Wow the twists and turns and suspense in this book are never ending and huge, as is the action. I love the characters and how they are realistic in what they want and what they will do in order to get it, no fake stuff here. This is my favorite YA world since the Ugly days and it just keeps on getting better.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scottie Draughon

    I have been a fan of Scott Westerfield’s writing since I read UGLIES for the first time. The world he has created through these two series is intricate and fascinating. Every time I read one of the books I am fully immersed. SHATTER CITY is the sequel to IMPOSTERS, and I found that it surpassed it as far as narrative goes. The subplots are woven in seamlessly with the major conflict, and all of the characters, as well as the world itself, become more fully fleshed out and developed than they wer I have been a fan of Scott Westerfield’s writing since I read UGLIES for the first time. The world he has created through these two series is intricate and fascinating. Every time I read one of the books I am fully immersed. SHATTER CITY is the sequel to IMPOSTERS, and I found that it surpassed it as far as narrative goes. The subplots are woven in seamlessly with the major conflict, and all of the characters, as well as the world itself, become more fully fleshed out and developed than they were in IMPOSTERS. The book manages to deal with some serious topics without being too overbearing, even touching on addiction (if that’s not too spoiler-y). As always, I enjoyed reading this and cannot wait to see what happens next.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kirsti Call

    "The vast silence rings my whole body. My lungs are full of dust, my vision swimming." Although I haven't read the first book in this series, I found this book engaging and understandable as a stand alone. Frey and Rafia are twins with a complicated relationship. Although they are genetically identical, they couldn't be more different. Frey is an assassin, created to keep Rafia safe. Rafia is obsessed with appearances, manipulative, and a born leader. Politics, war, and an evil father "The vast silence rings my whole body. My lungs are full of dust, my vision swimming." Although I haven't read the first book in this series, I found this book engaging and understandable as a stand alone. Frey and Rafia are twins with a complicated relationship. Although they are genetically identical, they couldn't be more different. Frey is an assassin, created to keep Rafia safe. Rafia is obsessed with appearances, manipulative, and a born leader. Politics, war, and an evil father make this book fraught with conflict and intrigue. The story is well written, engaging, and fun to read. I can't wait to go back and read the first book in the series. I received a copy of this from Scholastic in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tealia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Felt like a filler second book with several side stories to prepare for the other books. Spoilers ahead.. like ALOT. So I'm a tad confused. The story has kind of jumped around a bit, I get it's the second book in the series but I feel there were many sideline stories that weren't worth the extra chapter. Wayyyy too much on 'the feels' and in the city and not enough of a war at the end to make it worth a real fight. I thought the whole book was about her escaping but ends up she Felt like a filler second book with several side stories to prepare for the other books. Spoilers ahead.. like ALOT. So I'm a tad confused. The story has kind of jumped around a bit, I get it's the second book in the series but I feel there were many sideline stories that weren't worth the extra chapter. Wayyyy too much on 'the feels' and in the city and not enough of a war at the end to make it worth a real fight. I thought the whole book was about her escaping but ends up she hangs out for a month then gets rescued and that's just in the first 50 pages or so. Like, what? What was the point? I feel we were taken off course a few times to fill in the story. Anywho, I'm excited for the next books and I want to reread the uglies just to refresh myself on the uglies old tech.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laianna

    A fast-paced, engaging addition to the Imposters series, itself a sequel series to the beloved Uglies trilogy (and Extras). I am so happy to be back in this familiar world and I love Frey, a badass successor to my all-time favorite antiheroine of YA literature, Tally Youngblood. As usual, Scott Westerfeld‘s simple, action-packed writing style draws the reader into the adventure from the very first page. I read Shatter City in one sitting and my only regret is that I now have to wait in suspense A fast-paced, engaging addition to the Imposters series, itself a sequel series to the beloved Uglies trilogy (and Extras). I am so happy to be back in this familiar world and I love Frey, a badass successor to my all-time favorite antiheroine of YA literature, Tally Youngblood. As usual, Scott Westerfeld‘s simple, action-packed writing style draws the reader into the adventure from the very first page. I read Shatter City in one sitting and my only regret is that I now have to wait in suspense to find out what happens next. A must-read for anyone still stuck on the Uglies trilogy, even if by this point you’re the same age as Tally herself.

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