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Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allan Poe: Stories & Poems

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Retold with illustrations by artist David Plunkert, this high-end paperback edition of Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allen Poe will beguile your sad soul into smiling once again. Well-known, Baltimore based artist David Plunkert will take you on a dark journey into the gothic stories and poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Classic stories of the macabre will take on a whole new meaning whe Retold with illustrations by artist David Plunkert, this high-end paperback edition of Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allen Poe will beguile your sad soul into smiling once again. Well-known, Baltimore based artist David Plunkert will take you on a dark journey into the gothic stories and poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Classic stories of the macabre will take on a whole new meaning when you experience them accompanied by David Plunkert's mystical, and sometimes haunting interpretations. With this edition of the Classics Reimagined series, you'll find these densely written classics boring... nevermore. Whether you're looking to introduce young adults to classic horror tales, or are finding yourself drawn these classic mysteries and chillers, there no better starting point than Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allan Poe. The Classics Reimagined series is a library of stunning collector's editions of unabridged classic novels illustrated by contemporary artists from around the world. Each artist offers his or her own unique, visual, interpretation of the most well-loved, widely read, and avidly collected literature from renowned authors.


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Retold with illustrations by artist David Plunkert, this high-end paperback edition of Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allen Poe will beguile your sad soul into smiling once again. Well-known, Baltimore based artist David Plunkert will take you on a dark journey into the gothic stories and poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Classic stories of the macabre will take on a whole new meaning whe Retold with illustrations by artist David Plunkert, this high-end paperback edition of Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allen Poe will beguile your sad soul into smiling once again. Well-known, Baltimore based artist David Plunkert will take you on a dark journey into the gothic stories and poetry of Edgar Allan Poe. Classic stories of the macabre will take on a whole new meaning when you experience them accompanied by David Plunkert's mystical, and sometimes haunting interpretations. With this edition of the Classics Reimagined series, you'll find these densely written classics boring... nevermore. Whether you're looking to introduce young adults to classic horror tales, or are finding yourself drawn these classic mysteries and chillers, there no better starting point than Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allan Poe. The Classics Reimagined series is a library of stunning collector's editions of unabridged classic novels illustrated by contemporary artists from around the world. Each artist offers his or her own unique, visual, interpretation of the most well-loved, widely read, and avidly collected literature from renowned authors.

30 review for Classics Reimagined, Edgar Allan Poe: Stories & Poems

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roy Lotz

    The Maven Once, in summer, weary, I wanted to discuss a theory, And so walked up to the classroom of my teacher, Lenore. I started gently rapping, wondering if she wasn’t napping, And then I heard the tapping of her feet across the floor; The tap, tap, tap of high-heeled shoes across the floor —And there stood my Lenore “Oh, hello there,” she said yawning as I said to her “Good morning. I have something I’d like to discuss with you, my dear Lenore.” “Well sit The Maven Once, in summer, weary, I wanted to discuss a theory, And so walked up to the classroom of my teacher, Lenore. I started gently rapping, wondering if she wasn’t napping, And then I heard the tapping of her feet across the floor; The tap, tap, tap of high-heeled shoes across the floor —And there stood my Lenore “Oh, hello there,” she said yawning as I said to her “Good morning. I have something I’d like to discuss with you, my dear Lenore.” “Well sit down,” she said and went back to her desk; she looked so relaxed As she collapsed into her large stuffed chair across the floor; And the cushions gave out sighs like a fat man’s snore —And there sat my Lenore. “I think,” I said, so nervous that I found myself quite wordless, “I think the writer you assigned us is a great big bore!” “A bore!” she said, exclaiming, throwing up her hands, complaining And then blaming me with a look of hated and of war; Yes, on her face I saw a veritable declaration of war —On the face of my dear Lenore. “He’s alright,” I said, fearing, trying to ignore her peering And her sharp eyes which her anger did outpour. “He’s just so dreary! All his stories make me weary, And my theory is that he was morbid to the core. Yes, I think Poe was a man morbid to the core!” —I said this, and nothing more. “You just don’t get it!” said she, irate. “Just forget it! You’re as sensitive as a that oaken door!" "He was a genius!” she went on, “I mean, Jesus! How could you ask for more? How could a little, stupid high school student ask for more?” —So said my Lenore. “But," I said defensive, "in Poe, everything is sorrow and is woe Why would I want to read a man who knows nothing more? His stories are all the same, they all concern the insane And the bane of life and love—I mean, what a chore! Getting through a single story is a great big chore!” —So said I to my Lenore.  And in a moment, in her anger, she sprang up, and I saw a dagger Clutched in her hands, pulled from her table drawer. And with a roar, she attacked, and I hastily went back And with a whoosh and with a whack I quickly reached the door. Yes—thank God!—I managed to reach the door! —And escaped my dear Lenore. But, one day, when in my study, I heard something rather funny, Something funny coming suddenly from my chamber door. I opened it and, with a start, I felt a dagger in my heart, Which laid me down, inert, upon my chamber floor. Over me stood the brooding figure of Lenore. —Croaked the maven, "Nevermore."

  2. 4 out of 5

    rebecca ☂

    “‘Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!’ Quoth the Raven, ’Nevermore’” edgar, you spooky bitch, you have captured my heart and pervaded my nightmares. this collection is deliciously written, with haunting contemplations on the darker side of human nature. fav short stories and poems include: ◦ a descent into the maesltröm ◦ the fall of the house of usher ◦ the black cat ◦ hop-frog ◦ ligeia ◦ the raven ◦ annabel lee ◦ the conqueroheart “‘Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!’ Quoth the Raven, ’Nevermore’” edgar, you spooky bitch, you have captured my heart and pervaded my nightmares. this collection is deliciously written, with haunting contemplations on the darker side of human nature. fav short stories and poems include: ◦ a descent into the maesltröm ◦ the fall of the house of usher ◦ the black cat ◦ hop-frog ◦ ligeia ◦ the raven ◦ annabel lee ◦ the conqueror worm

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

    This has taken me years to finish. I found Poe to be a little to intense to read for weeks at a time. I started in in High School, forgot it for the first three years of College, and now I'm done. One thing that I loved about Poe was the intensity and immersion he creates. I've never read a book or story before where I almost dreaded turning the page because I was afraid. However, last story of this book was what nearly stopped me from finishing. The story was over 20 chapt This has taken me years to finish. I found Poe to be a little to intense to read for weeks at a time. I started in in High School, forgot it for the first three years of College, and now I'm done. One thing that I loved about Poe was the intensity and immersion he creates. I've never read a book or story before where I almost dreaded turning the page because I was afraid. However, last story of this book was what nearly stopped me from finishing. The story was over 20 chapters long, and you would read page after page of how boats work and where they were in the ocean, and then suddenly something dreadful would happen with no foreshadowing or warning. Still, I especially enjoyed the poetry, and may look it over again before I pack this away onto my shelves.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anzu The Great Destroyer

    Ok, so I guess I'm taking a break from this. I managed to read half of it, and I guess I'll resume it in a year or so, when the mood returns. I can only say that I really liked what I've read so far. Poe is pretty fucked up in the head and I admire him for that.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Short stories: 4 Stars Novel: 3 Stars Poems: 3.5 Stars RTC

  6. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    Poe is such an October mood/aesthetic. He is October personified.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shane

    Seriously want to read this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    UPDATED: 4/17/2015, 4/18/2015, 4/19/2015, 4/20/2015 Anytime I have said 7th grade, it was really 8th grade. FINALLY. I HAVE DONE IT. I HAVE FINISHED. I KNOW. I SPENT THREE-FOUR MONTHS ON THIS THING, AND IT'S NOT EVEN THE WHOLE COLLECTION!!! I decided to write notes and give stars to each and every poem and story contained within this book. Those will be typed up later. It's later. Literally minutes later. I started reading Edgar Allan Poe's poems in early January while reading A Series/>Anytime UPDATED: 4/17/2015, 4/18/2015, 4/19/2015, 4/20/2015 Anytime I have said 7th grade, it was really 8th grade. FINALLY. I HAVE DONE IT. I HAVE FINISHED. I KNOW. I SPENT THREE-FOUR MONTHS ON THIS THING, AND IT'S NOT EVEN THE WHOLE COLLECTION!!! I decided to write notes and give stars to each and every poem and story contained within this book. Those will be typed up later. It's later. Literally minutes later. I started reading Edgar Allan Poe's poems in early January while reading A Series of Unfortunate Events. That obviously didn't work so well as I completely abandoned Edgar Allan Poe to finish the story of the Baudelaires. Yeah, if I can help it, I prefer to read one book at a time. I don't know what that says about me. That I can't split my focus? Hm? I'm glad I took notes. I'm bad at remembering things, even if I did focus on it. That to me is scary. I'm sure I liked a lot of passages and quotes and characters that I have no idea I like. Also, since it's been a long time, maybe my thoughts changed, surely my thoughts changed on every poem and story contained within this collections. Okay, let me just get on with it. This is going to be quite long. Whatever is in quotes are my thoughts on that day that I read whatever I read. The rest are any comments now. Poems The Lake-To-, Stars: ** "Fine." So many interpretations on this poem - doing a quick search. I love how everyone sees something different in whatever they read. Still, two stars. Sonnet-To Science, Stars: ** Yup, I definitely read this in school with my questionable 7th grade English teacher (reminder to change every reference to him to 7th grade, not 8th grade - for some reason 8th grade seemed to fit him and registered in my mind as such). Another quick search refreshed my memory about science v. art. The Enlightenment v. the Romantic movement. That I remember learning about in high school. And I've also read about a year ago Robert K. Massie's Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman, and of course that was filled with Enlightenment principles (which I kind of forgot about(quick search: ah, yes, the movement away from the spiritual and towards reason, advances in mathematics and science, democracy, individualism, in-born rights, 1700s, Marie Antoinette, Catherine the Great, Voltaire, deism, separation of power, Johannes Kepler, astronomy - Yeah, that Age was cool. And the Romantic?? Of which I know less about?? Quick search: reason can not explain everything, Victor Hugo (oh shit, the coolness of the Enlightenment may have lost me), Frankenstein (I have to reread that one), questions of absolute good and absolute evil, okay - got it)). So Poe wasn't really a fan of the Scientific Revolution? Oh Poe, the more we discover the more we can wonder!! Fairy-land, Stars: ** (Wrote nothing but the title). Israfel, Stars: **** (A star is drawn write next to the title of the poem in the book and the same thing on my post-it note. It means I liked this one and to pay attention. I also liked the last two stanzas.) "too perfect, moralistic -page 12 flowers are merely flowers - might not do so well on earth with his pure heart, but a mortal's lyre will work well in the sky." Yup. I like it. Quick search: Regrets. Read that someone read that Poe was arrogant and talking about himself. *Reads poem over again.* Shit. But, no! That won't ruin it for me! To Helen, Stars: ** I wrote nothing. Not even the title. The Sleeper, Stars: ** "Meh." I think I also read this one in 7th grade. The Valley of Unrest, Stars: ** Only wrote the title. The City in the Sea, Stars: ** Only wrote the title. The Coliseum, Stars: ** Didn't even write the title. Sonnet-Silence, Stars: ** Again nothing. Dream-land, Stars: ** (This one has a star next to it that I drew on the book and on the post-it). "dreams 22-23" *Rereads poem.* At first I thought, Stephanie, why? And then I saw my note and it came to me. You see, when I just read it, I automatically thought DEATH. But, clearly this is Dream-land. Dreams. I didn't indicate what I especially liked about it, but I'm pretty sure I may have glanced twice at "For the heart whose woes are legion" and "I have wandered home but newly" from "I have reached these lands but newly." Yes, very much like. The Raven, Stars: ***** (Why not?) (It has a star on both book and post-it with an additional comment of "well, duh," because well, duh). "and his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming." This is the poem that Mr. Edgar Allan Poe is known for. Every child that has gone to school in America, in the ol' US of A, has at the very least heard of this poem. Unless it's a very, um, religious school I guess? Almost every schoolchild has had to analyze this poem why? Because it is spectacular. In all sense of the word. I remember particularly the English teacher going over this particular line, "And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor." Emphasis on ghost. Why? Maybe to torture us? To make some of us into Poes so we can write our own cryptic poems? Said the teacher, "you will remember this forevermore." I'm debating if whether I really want to give it five stars (what about Israfel? HMMMMMMMM?), or because I've been groomed to think that it's good, or because I'm in a gothic mood currently. Ulalume: A Ballad, Stars: **** "maybe" - Thanks, Stephanie. *quick read.* *quick search: Found this site: http://www.shmoop.com/ulalume/summary... and it's awesome. I realize that I need to spend more time with these poems. I'm only looking at surface level, which is a good start, but not enough. I'm definitely rusty. If there was some literature club led by a professor, I'd totally go to it. I think I have read this one in 7th grade too. That teacher-man spent at least 6 months of the school year talking about Edgar Allan Poe. The Bells, Stars: ** Wrote neither comments nor the title. A Dream within a Dream, Stars: *** "You are not wrong, who deem That my days have been a dream;" *quick reread.* INCEPTION. Crazy to think I might have read this without any knowledge that a movie like that would come out and instead of thinking about the poem from the movie, I think about the movie from the poem. That does kind of suck. Eldorado, Stars: ** Wrote nothing, nothing, nothing. Annabel Lee, Stars: ***** (Did I write "dick," "duck," or "click" next to the title on my post-it, and why? And also, I know I like this poem, why didn't I mark it??) "and this maiden lived with no other thought than to love and be loved by me" *quick reread.* So simple, so safe. Of course. Another movie, well, two movies come to mind when reading this poem. The first makes more sense, Holes. It has been some time, let me tell you, since I sat down and read Edgar Allan Poe. I've had this book sitting on my shelf since I'm guessing high school, and the last time I remember hearing about Poe in a classroom setting was, again, in 7th grade. TV is both a wonderful and evil thing. Usually I just let it play in the background on some channel while I do other thing that are not reading. Sometimes, or often, channels like to repeat their programs. What movie plays almost constantly for a couple or months maybe every few years or so on one of those channels I let the remote sleep on? Holes. Holes is also a book that I read with the class towards the end of 6th grade. We also had the whole theater to ourselves when the movie was released. Why am I mentioning it? Because in this movie, in a small little scene, Miss Patricia Arquette recites to one of her students, "I was a child and she was a child/In this kingdom by the sea-" and then her soon-to-be-lover cuts her off and surprisingly recites, "But we loved with a love that was more than love/I and my ANNABEL LEE;" and Miss Arquette, "Oh, Sam." Oh, Sam indeed. I really do like that movie. So one day it was playing, and at that time I also had an enormous crush on someone I worked with, heard the lines, typed the lines into Google - lo, and behold! Edgar Allan Poe. That was three years ago. The other movie is Tim Burton's Dark Shadows. I don't know. Don't ask. Well, I guess the cliff thing, and ghostly paleness, and tombs and stuff like that reminds me of the poem. There is no point to all of this. 4/18/2015 Next time, when I read a large book like this, I will review each poem/chapter/whatever section on the day that I finish it. It does wound me that I have difficulty remembering even the passages I really enjoyed. I feel like I have to reread and research better to give Edgar Allan Poe justice. Tales *Reminder that anything in quotes are notes I took while reading. Metzengerstein, Stars: **** "vs. Berlifitzing I liked it. reminded me of the headless horseman. - even and picture of dorian gray though mentions this rivalry. painting of a horse. stables on fire a horse - evil horse." I remember being surprised that I actually really liked it. It was a good way to start Tales. I thought it was quite a simple horror story. I like the combination of rivaling families, war, paintings, fire, horses, madmen - it's a good combination. Compared to other works that I spent months reading, this one does stick in my mind. Bon-Bon, Stars: ** I simply wrote, "non-non. I suppose I didn't like it. MS. Found in a Bottle, Stars: ** "a guy on a ship, a storm. survives the swede. another ship crashes into ship. goes to South Pole." Eh. I remember pieces of this one. It was okay. The Assignation, Stars: ** "Venice. narrator Marchesa di Mentoni + friend commit suicide" Eh. Shadow-A Parable, Stars: ** Wrote nothing, not even the title. Silence-A Fable, Stars: ** Same. It has to take a lot for me to give a piece of literature one star. I would have to have a severe adverse reaction. Two stars are just fine and acceptable. No regrets. I suppose that is worse than having a reaction, having NO reaction, but hey. *shrugs and moves on.* Berenice, Stars: **** (a star next to this one, means I liked it)"narrators OCD, fixated on a perfume Berenice, once beautiful - struck by disease - now ugly. cousins -except for her teeth monomania. concentrate on one thought -gets the teeth." Hahahaha! "Gets the teeth," indeed. Poe's male characters almost always seem to have certain fixations or quirks that make the character enjoyable. Those fixations seem to help set the tone of the story. I love it. Is he crazy? Is it simply a horror story? Elements of both? Yes, I enjoyed this one. Morella, Stars: ** "narrator becomes entranced by Morella (but as time goes by *ahem* she gets older) he wants her to die. She dies + gives birth to a girl. nightmare came true find can't escape her as she is reborn through her daughter." Fine. King Pest, Stars: **** (a star next to this one) "2 seamen during time of Plague. undertaker shop. meets King Pest. waving a thigh bone, with his royal consorts, drinks alcohol out of skulls - as drunk as they are laugh + stare stops the women - killed the men." I remember pieces of this one as well. Very macabre. I think I'm being too stingy with my stars. Just know that four stars mean I really, really, really liked it. For some reason I may be saving the five stars for one particular story. Ligeia, Stars: ** "narrator takes the death of his beautiful, intelligent passionate wife hard gets addicted to opium marries Lady Rowena Trevanion, of Tremaine, They hate each other. becomes sick + hears things. Marriage of money senses spirit. dies comes back to life after thinking about Ligeia." Erryone miserable. As I was flipping through that story in my volume, I noticed I marked a passage I liked in faint pencil. Commit, Stephanie. Worried that I did that to the other stories before, I quickly skimmed those pages but it seemed that passage was the only one that was marked so far. How to Write a Blackwood Article, Stars: ** "Signora Psyche Zenobia, not Suky Snobbs - odd clothing wanted to write well, gets advice from Mr. Blackwood - publishes gothic stories. - tells her to get into a scrape - such as getting into an oven . oh, we all know this is going to go spectacularly well. drown in a gutter, take questionable pills, etc, + other writing tips." I think this is Poe having fun. The next story is the one Zenobia comes up with. A Predicament, Stars: ** "Zenobia completely botches it Oh, lord." I think I remember it being a complete mess. Gets stuck in a clock, I'm pretty sure? Finally, I start to write the dates on when I read stories. "3/16/15 12:20 a.m. I know, it's been a long time things happen, what more can I say." The Fall of the House of Usher, Stars: ***** "His words are fantastic! a wonderful feeling when you just know you will love it ((illegible)) cut out done things yes, good + creepy I do remember the house collapsing, but how could I forget ((illegible))" Yup. If I had been saving five stars for the most special one, this one is it. Of course I read this one in 7th grade. I remember spending a lot of the time analyzing the beginning of the story, not so much the end. I really do like classes that analyze works - I feel like I'm such a poor reader when I'm not analyzing at the level I do when required and led to by class. But 7th grade was awful and that teacher was a dickhead. You know when you read a few sentences of a story and you just know you are going to enjoy it - that's how I felt. In fact I think I put up so long with reading this one because I wanted all my life conditions to be right so that I paid extra-special attention on this one. The thing is that when I read, I have to have certain things in my life in order. It's very difficult for me to focus if I'm worried about a class, didn't exercise, have a messy room, so on. It was a long time before I felt it was acceptable to read it. Does anyone else get like this? If I could rip out the pages of this book, photocopy and maximize the size of the writing, and paste it all over my walls, I would. "3/17/15" William Wilson, Stars: ** "Edgar Allan Poe. wrong words, wrong lines. I don't know a lot about opium, but I guess that Mr. Poe had very bad experiences on it I like poppy seeds I think the reason it was so ((illegible)) to ((illegible)) is that you really have to ((illegible)) yourself in it, which is great, but in small doses Calls himself William Wilson a troublemaker, did something bad another boy has the same name - ((illegible)) of the boy, except for this one boy -same birthday, people thought brothers -copies him, although not a strong voice doesn't quite know what to make of him equal match - perhaps even more clever + wittier - could be his own mind debaucherous thinks very highly of himself spooked, left school rambunctious? Glendinning rich parvenu" I may have lost a post-it. Eh. Oh, yeah, by this point, I noticed that the editor, Benjamin F. Fisher, totally calls Poe out for misquoting things and making up quotes throughout this volume. Also calls Poe out on using big words to make his writing seem more elevated. Dude, I can relate. The Murders in the Rue Morgue, Stars: *** "C. August Dupin + narrator Caesar Augustus Dupin ((I indicated here three stars. I'm finally giving stars to things as I read them.)) A vicious double murder occured smashed up the chimney ((illegible)) + bones broken head slice off in a very Sherlock way Madame L'Espanaye + Camille?? kept reading, almost exactly -have to read up on it" What I was blubbering about in my notes is that this detective story had a very similar feel to Sherlock. In research, I have discovered that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was inspired by Poe's Monsieur Caesar Augustus Dupin. It made me happy. It always interests me which authors like other authors and which ones they don't. I'd like to do more research about Poe and who inspired him and who he inspired, but it makes me anxious about how much research I would have to do only to forget it all as I usually do in the future. "3/19/15" A Decent into the Maelström, Stars: ** No stars, no nothing, just the title. Is this the one where the guy takes him to the edge of the cliff or that whirlpool thing. Both only two stars. Ah, here it is. "3/20/15 checked day before Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was influenced by Mr. Edgar Allan Poe. just one idea into a beloved detective. does Sherlock qualify as fanfiction? ((illegible)). again. And here I continue with a review of Maelström?? "batten down the hatches a man tells narrator the story of a whirlpool + a hurricane + how he survived it." Yay, I was right, but it was one story. Still two stars indicated. *quick search: I was unsure, but I was right. A maelström is a whirlpool. batten down the hatches, idiom = prepare for trouble. Now I know. "3/21/15" Never Bet the Devil Your Head: A Tale with a Moral, Stars:** "'assume now in Purgatory for that assumption'" hahaha? 245 what am I reading? funny? seems snarky damn, taking no prisoners insults authors + poets he's already criticized in the negatively in the past. Toby Dammit. Okay. - says bet the Devil his head. lost his head. a moral to the story, sells it for dog meat." The first and second sentences are the ones I'm referring to on page 245. I was a bit confused. This one seems different from the Poe everyone thinks about when they think of Poe. Did not indicate how many stars. "3/22/15" Eleanora, Stars: ** "225 paragraph narrator(20) Eleanora(15) live in this eden - like hill alley ((hill alley??? I don't know)) she dies + makes a promise to never love someone else. falls in love w/ someone else after living + being true." Happy ending? In a Poe story?! Blasphemous. Continued review in the comments

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I finally finished this collection of Edgar Allan Poe's Poems, Tales, and his one and only novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. Overall, I only found the poems worthwhile. This book had about 15 of his poems, and I found that I enjoyed them more than the tales and the novel at the end. Poe's tales I can only describe as "merely interesting". There are some clever stories like the Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, and Thou Art the Man, to name a I finally finished this collection of Edgar Allan Poe's Poems, Tales, and his one and only novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym. Overall, I only found the poems worthwhile. This book had about 15 of his poems, and I found that I enjoyed them more than the tales and the novel at the end. Poe's tales I can only describe as "merely interesting". There are some clever stories like the Murders in the Rue Morgue, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, and Thou Art the Man, to name a few. However, most of them to me were forgettable, and not very enjoyable at all. The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym was entertaining but admittedly, I DNF it completely, but got most of the way through it. It is a story of mutiny, shipwreck, cannibalism, but then it goes into exploring the South Pole and Antarctica and that is where it got tedious for me so I skimmed ahead to the end and then read a plot summary of the end of the novel. Poe is supposed to be the American father of the mystery novel but his mystery stories weren't all that good. I wish I could say more positive things about Poe and this book, and 3 stars may be too high of a rating, but the poems are of high quality and I do recommend them, but that is probably the only recommendation I would make. To sum up this review, I can at least now say that I have read a good amount of Poe's works...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cynda

    An essential collection would have to include the only novel Poe wrote, -The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym-. Brutish read. Have tried several times. No good. Not the fault of the collector and publisher. I have to rate the collection. Enjoyed a large majority of the other stories, not only my usual favorietes, but particularly "King Pest". Because I so enjoyed some new favorite Poe stories and would not have found them otherwise, or unlikey, I will rate this collection 3 stars.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    I read the horror tales with which I was already familiar: Berenice, Morella, Ligeia, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Masque of the Red Death, The Pit and the Pendulum, The Tell-Tale Heart, The Premature Burial, and The Cask of Amontillado. Berenice is definitely the best one, but overall a good creepy time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jackballoon

    I am really enjoying this book, so well written and expressive. Thanks to Goodreads and the author for sharing with me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    Its a slow read and you must have a dictionary by your side. I've read not quite half, and I have to say that Poe is one of my favorite authors.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alin

    I think I will pester everyone I know into reading The Black Cat and The Tell-tale Heart, and a couple of the poems. I had always known as a teenager that I loved short horror stories, but I really fell in love with his. Before that, I would listen marveled to random friends telling ghost stories in the evenings. We have a similarly weirdly cold and dark poet in Romania as well, Bacovia, whose poems I also immediately loved. Be advised, this wasn't mandatory reading for me, I think I will pester everyone I know into reading The Black Cat and The Tell-tale Heart, and a couple of the poems. I had always known as a teenager that I loved short horror stories, but I really fell in love with his. Before that, I would listen marveled to random friends telling ghost stories in the evenings. We have a similarly weirdly cold and dark poet in Romania as well, Bacovia, whose poems I also immediately loved. Be advised, this wasn't mandatory reading for me, being a Romanian, but I happened to hear about and read him in high-school.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Edric Unsane

    I had not read Poe's works since I was in High School. I loved them then and, come to find out, I love them still. If you haven't read any of Poe's stories or poems, I highly recommend doing so, they're worth experiencing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Billy Clark

    Why it has felt like many lustra have passed since I first hearkened of this collection-of which occurrence I am most pleased- and, through chronological excavation, I, your narrator, at this epoch of writing, have finally reached a conclusion! And yet, for a while, I saw only a tinkering of adjectival madness but, luckily, a faithful thesaurus was at hand to do my bidding and now, at this current time, if only you could see the lustre of my eyes as I reminisce of reading those foregone pages-oh Why it has felt like many lustra have passed since I first hearkened of this collection-of which occurrence I am most pleased- and, through chronological excavation, I, your narrator, at this epoch of writing, have finally reached a conclusion! And yet, for a while, I saw only a tinkering of adjectival madness but, luckily, a faithful thesaurus was at hand to do my bidding and now, at this current time, if only you could see the lustre of my eyes as I reminisce of reading those foregone pages-oh the delights I have experienced! (Perhaps, also, a little mesmerism is at play as I have not, until this moment that is, I have not, nor ever before, to my conscious memory, written a review like this). I shall, however, hasten to a conclusion and, with it, a hierarchal listing of the tales long gone: The Murders in the Rue Morgue 10/10 The Pit and the Pendulum 10/10 ;48 Gold Bug 10/10 The Black Cat 9.5/10 Berenice 9/10 Bon-Bon 8.5/10 (underrated!) The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar 8/10 (also underrated!) Hop-Frog 8/10 Ligeia 7.5/10 The Tell-Tale Heart 7.5/10 The Fall of the House of Usher 7.5/10 William Wilson 7.5/10 Morella 7/10 The Masque of the Red Death 7/10 MS. Found in a Bottle 7/10 The Oblong Box 7/10 The Sphinx 7/10 The Premature Burial 6.5/10 Never Bet the Devil your Head 6.5/10 The Purloined Letter 6.5/10 A Descent Into the Maelstrom 6/10 Silence - A Fable 6/10 Shadow - A Parable 6/10 Eleonora 5/10 Tale of the Ragged Mountains 5/10 Metzengerstein 5/10 The Cask of Amontillado 5/10 King Pest - A Tale Containing an Allegory 5/10 The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether 4.5/10 The Assignation 4/10

  17. 4 out of 5

    Whitney

    Poe was a literary genius

  18. 4 out of 5

    Misha

    Feb 14 2010. I just re-read "The Tell-Tale Heart" for the first time since high school. I took American lit in 11th grade, which would have been 89-90, so it's been 20 years since I read this story. It's one that's always stayed with me, although as a much more mature reader now than at 16, I find the pacing too rapid. I'd like it better if it came to a slower boil, but I suppose that's a matter of taste. But I do appreciate that what Poe did with the unreliable narrator and the use of psycholog Feb 14 2010. I just re-read "The Tell-Tale Heart" for the first time since high school. I took American lit in 11th grade, which would have been 89-90, so it's been 20 years since I read this story. It's one that's always stayed with me, although as a much more mature reader now than at 16, I find the pacing too rapid. I'd like it better if it came to a slower boil, but I suppose that's a matter of taste. But I do appreciate that what Poe did with the unreliable narrator and the use of psychology was ground-breaking for the 1840s. That's why his stuff will never go out of fashion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    The ONLY reason I gave it three stars is because I'm just not a fan of horror stories. I think Poe is one of the greatest writers of his time and his poetry is genius. I just can't always read his subject matter.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexandria

    Edgar Allan poe annotted and illustrated entire stories and poems edition is great I love it.wow its a great book for poe fans.cant wait to read all the stories and poems thank you for the beautiful book happy holidays.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    You can only read so much of Poe if you aren't all Gothic thinking and a horror story fan. I was into it, until I wasn't. Then I was done.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    Loved some stories and poems in here, others didn't interest me at all. Here are my rating for every individual story: Tales Ms. Found In A Bottle - 2 stars A Descent Into The Maelström - DNF'd this one, 1 star The Gold-Bug - 2 stars The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar - 3 stars The Murders in the Rue Morgue - 3 stars The Fall of the House of Usher - 4 stars The Purloined Letter - 3 stars The Tell-Tale Heart - 5 stars The Black Cat - 5 stars *trigger warn Loved some stories and poems in here, others didn't interest me at all. Here are my rating for every individual story: Tales Ms. Found In A Bottle - 2 stars A Descent Into The Maelström - DNF'd this one, 1 star The Gold-Bug - 2 stars The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar - 3 stars The Murders in the Rue Morgue - 3 stars The Fall of the House of Usher - 4 stars The Purloined Letter - 3 stars The Tell-Tale Heart - 5 stars The Black Cat - 5 stars *trigger warning for animal abuse* The Imp of the Perverse - 2 stars The Premature Burial - 2 stars The Cask of Amontillado - 5 stars, my favorite in the entire collection The Pit and the Pendulum - 3 stars The Masque of the Red Death - 3 1/2 stars The Man of the Crowd - 2 stars Hop-Frog - 4 stars William Wilson - 4 stars Ligeia - 2 stars Morella - 3 1/2 stars Metzengerstein - 3 stars The Narrative of A. Gordon Pym - Skipped this one (Poe’s only novel), will probably go back and read it at a later date Poems Tamerlane - 3 1/2 stars To Helen - 2 stars The Raven - 5 stars Ulalume - 3 stars Annabel Lee - 5 stars The Bells - 3 stars The Conqueror Worm - 2 stars The City In The Sea - 4 stars A Dream Within A Dream - 3 stars Eldorado - 3 1/2 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lucie Webb

    Lots of dead women, discovering how people have died, and burials. First time reading anything by Poe, and again appreciated the background information provided about his life and the context of the writings. Poe took some getting used to especially with his short stories, but I ended up really enjoying half of them including: Bernice, Morella, A Descent into the Maelström, The Pit and the Pendulum, The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether. The novel The Na Lots of dead women, discovering how people have died, and burials. First time reading anything by Poe, and again appreciated the background information provided about his life and the context of the writings. Poe took some getting used to especially with his short stories, but I ended up really enjoying half of them including: Bernice, Morella, A Descent into the Maelström, The Pit and the Pendulum, The System of Doctor Tarr and Professor Fether. The novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym was in parts a fun swashbuckling adventure, and then a few pages of longitude and latitude description that dragged. Again I liked about half of the poems including: Israfel, The Sleeper, Dream-Land, The Raven, A Dream within a Dream, Eldorado.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    It really is a pity the stories aren't rated individually, because the second half of the collection of stories was superb. The first half seemed rather incomplete, like Poe got bored writing them and hastily concluded them. As for the poems, I did not care for most of them. My favorite poem from the collection, "The Raven", seemed to be written in an entirely different way than the other poems. Altogether, I highly recommend this work. It contains a little bit of many things - not only poetry a It really is a pity the stories aren't rated individually, because the second half of the collection of stories was superb. The first half seemed rather incomplete, like Poe got bored writing them and hastily concluded them. As for the poems, I did not care for most of them. My favorite poem from the collection, "The Raven", seemed to be written in an entirely different way than the other poems. Altogether, I highly recommend this work. It contains a little bit of many things - not only poetry and short stories, but mysteries and horror. I really enjoyed it overall.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dagmar SIgrid de Nijs - Blake

    Reading Poe is a decadent passion I have had for quiet some time. Therefore, my rating would likely be skewed. I believe he is a great thinker and could write to others that have not had a "perfect" life. Thank you, Edgar Allen Poe for giving of yourself to make humanity feel as though they are not alone

  26. 4 out of 5

    Avery (ThePagemaster)

    Every time, around October/Halloween, I read Edgar Allan Poe. I've read a good portion of his stories and all of his poems, but I tried my best to read ALL of Poe's works, or at least, his lesser known works. Though, I haven't succeeded this year, it still feels nice to read Poe--who I consider, my favorite writer of all time.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ♛ Cameron ♛

    My rating was to be expected considering this is a compendium of all his stories so there are some good and some bad. This gets a pretty neutral rating.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Adriel

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Valentine

    A well written book. Enjoyed reading it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Taryn

    Okay, did not read this completely. I did read a few stories recommended to me and did enjoy. For now, I will return this to my library.

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