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The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook

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Founded in 1994, Sullivan Street Bakery is renowned for its outstanding bread, which graces the tables of New York’s most celebrated restaurants. The bread at Sullivan Street Bakery, crackling brown on the outside and light and aromatic on the inside, is inspired by the dark, crusty loaves that James Beard Award–winning baker Jim Lahey discovered in Rome. Founded in 1994, Sullivan Street Bakery is renowned for its outstanding bread, which graces the tables of New York’s most celebrated restaurants. The bread at Sullivan Street Bakery, crackling brown on the outside and light and aromatic on the inside, is inspired by the dark, crusty loaves that James Beard Award–winning baker Jim Lahey discovered in Rome. Jim builds on the revolutionary no-knead recipe he developed for his first book, My Bread, to outline his no-fuss system for making sourdough at home. Applying his Italian-inspired method to his repertoire of pizzas, pastries, egg dishes, and café classics, The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook delivers the flavors of a bakery Ruth Reichl once called “a church of bread.”


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Founded in 1994, Sullivan Street Bakery is renowned for its outstanding bread, which graces the tables of New York’s most celebrated restaurants. The bread at Sullivan Street Bakery, crackling brown on the outside and light and aromatic on the inside, is inspired by the dark, crusty loaves that James Beard Award–winning baker Jim Lahey discovered in Rome. Founded in 1994, Sullivan Street Bakery is renowned for its outstanding bread, which graces the tables of New York’s most celebrated restaurants. The bread at Sullivan Street Bakery, crackling brown on the outside and light and aromatic on the inside, is inspired by the dark, crusty loaves that James Beard Award–winning baker Jim Lahey discovered in Rome. Jim builds on the revolutionary no-knead recipe he developed for his first book, My Bread, to outline his no-fuss system for making sourdough at home. Applying his Italian-inspired method to his repertoire of pizzas, pastries, egg dishes, and café classics, The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook delivers the flavors of a bakery Ruth Reichl once called “a church of bread.”

30 review for The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alisa Kester

    Love love LOVE the writing. Working on growing my biga now, and can't wait to try his bread!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily Schmader

    I am experimenting with sourdough more and more, so this book was helpful and inspiring. I used the author’s instructions and pictures to begin my own sourdough starter.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Lahey's method of natural levaining looked promising and in practice, indeed proved (no pun intended) to be so. Truccio Sare (one of the bakery's signature breads) is the first recipe I tried from Lahey's book. He writes, "The flavors that result are out of this world—a sweet, chewy tangle of wheat, coffee, dark chocolate, and caramel." How could anyone resist a "chewy tangle of wheat, coffee, dark chocolate, and caramel"? Happily, Truccio Sare is easily as good as Lahey promises. Sure, it takes time. But it"The Lahey's method of natural levaining looked promising and in practice, indeed proved (no pun intended) to be so. Truccio Sare (one of the bakery's signature breads) is the first recipe I tried from Lahey's book. He writes, "The flavors that result are out of this world—a sweet, chewy tangle of wheat, coffee, dark chocolate, and caramel." How could anyone resist a "chewy tangle of wheat, coffee, dark chocolate, and caramel"? Happily, Truccio Sare is easily as good as Lahey promises. Sure, it takes time. But it manages so much of that time on its own. Little babysitting is required. And the results are stellar. I'm not sure I will ever go back to using commercial yeast! There are a number of great looking, clearly laid out recipes - some bread, some accompaniments for bread. Next to try: Pane di lino (golden flax bread), p63 Sesamo, p82 Multigrani, p.99 No-knead, naturally leavened brioche, p107 L'amico di Pollo (roasted Japanese turnips), p170 Punta di Petto di Te (brisket braised in black tea), p175 The breads I wanted to make were inspired by village bakeries in Italy [...] It was big, imperfect, crusty bread. It was not meant for slicing. It was messy and rough and meant to be ripped and dipped and respected and treasured. [...] it embodied thousands of years of agricultural traditions, baking practices, and table manners. I wanted to make bread like it: a dark crackling crust that split open to reveal a creamy white interior whose hot perfumes spilled out in a delirium of aromas. -Introduction, p12 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Natural leavening—also known as sourdough—is responsible for the divine aromas and textures in the Roman breads I long ago fell in love with. Its purpose in bread dough is not to sour it but to leaven. It can take a few days to get the process up and running, but if you are looking for bread with incredible flavors and textures, it is well worth the extra steps. Many bakers are acquainted with a liquid sourdough starter—a slurry of water and flour that is allowed to sour as it fills with beneficial microes. I follow an older and easier method of making sourdough breads. I use "old," soured dough itself, rather than a liquid starter. -Introduction, p16 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ There is something to learn from every mistake. [...] I don't think there is any way to make great bread, every time, without making the occasional dud. [...] [A]n extra loaf can always be turned into breadcrumbs. -A Baker's Reference, p35 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ [A] healthy starter will smell sweet and yeasty, while a sourdough with a problematic community of bacteria will smell rather like extremely malodorous feet. -Making a Starter, p44 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Why refresh a starter? Because you don't want the starter itself; you want the wonderful microbes that live in it—that particular colony of wild yeast and bacteria that you have adopted [...] The refreshed starter will be livelier than the first, and it will ferment much faster. It is important when transferring the starter to a new jar after it has been refreshed that the sides of the jar remain clean. Any starter on the wall of the jar may encourage the growth of surface molds. -Making a Starter, p47 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I infinitely prefer using biga [stiff starter - a naturally fermented dough] to a liquid starter for three reasons: (1) it's what I learned as I traveled around Italy as an impressionable young man; (2) it's more stable than the liquid starter man people use, not to mention cleaner to work with; and (3) it's easier to keep around than a starter: you don't need to feed it, remember it, or stir it. At the bakery we wait at least 24 hours from the time it is mixed before using a new batch of biga, but you can often wait longer—a healthy biga that is tightly covered and stored in the refrigerator will stay ready to use for a week. -"Jim's Biga", Making a Starter, p51 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ There is a town outside of Rome called Lariano. It grows a special kind of wheat, known as Lariano wheat, and the bread made in this town uses whole wheat Lariano flour. [...] You can however, make [the bread] with ordinary whole wheat flour, and it will still have an awesome, complex, earthy flavor. [...] My absolute favorite part is the crust. At a very high temperature, when the crust browns so thoroughly that it is just beginning to blacken in places, the whole wheat begins to caramelize. The flavors that result are out of this world—a sweet, chewy tangle of wheat, coffee, dark chocolate, and caramel. -Truccio Saré (whole wheat sourdough), p93 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Complete details and our take on the recipe for Truccio Sare at blog from OUR kitchen: etherwork.net/blog/bbb-april-2018/

  4. 5 out of 5

    Clwseattle

    I've been using Jim Lahey's 'no knead' style of bread baking since I read his My Bread. The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook is a good addition to his first book. Some of the recipes seem a bit complicated and long, but once you try one or two you will get the hang of what he's explaining. I always use a scale for baking so I'm very appreciative that he gives ingredients in weights. Grams are so much more accurate for consistency than ounces. This is not just a bread book, but a more comprehensive book w/>The I've been using Jim Lahey's 'no knead' style of bread baking since I read his My Bread. The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook is a good addition to his first book. Some of the recipes seem a bit complicated and long, but once you try one or two you will get the hang of what he's explaining. I always use a scale for baking so I'm very appreciative that he gives ingredients in weights. Grams are so much more accurate for consistency than ounces. This is not just a bread book, but a more comprehensive book with some interesting recipes from his bakery. I'm excited to try the Pizza Bianca Alla Romano. 4 stars, B+ for The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook

  5. 4 out of 5

    Donna Siebold

    I don't much care for sourdough bread and I don't have the patience to deal with a starter, in general. However, there were two recipes in particular that I really enjoyed from this book. The first was the milk bread recipe and the second the golden flax seed bread. Both of them were delicious and I really liked Mr. Lahey's no-knead approach to the bread. I may have to reconsider my attitude towards biga and give some of the other recipes a go!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    From the description I got really excited about this book. I was even more excited when I found this in the library. Can I just say What a let down!!!! First of all, there were hardly any pictures. Second of all the measurements were in grams? Third?... the techniques all seemed to be for someone who went to baking school. I did not enjoy this book as much as I had hoped.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Malani

    Tortino di Crusca was delicious and easy. Just watch the baking time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Can’t wait to start my biga, bake and eat one of these gorgeous breads.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Viriam

    A very good bread book, by someone who lives bread. I learned a lot.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    I reviewed this book on my blog.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Virginia

    Beautiful clear recipes.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Lo

  13. 4 out of 5

    Neil McGinness

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tania French

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Delightful cookbook that I got for Christmas. I learned about biga and I use it now instead of wet sourdough starter. I, too, spent time in Italy so it was nice reading his recipes pay homage to his experiences and the cultural cooking. I wish it had more pictures ideally pictures for every recipe including what he think are simple breads, like the white sourdough bread.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark Phillips

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  18. 4 out of 5

    H.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Jimenez

  20. 4 out of 5

    Media-Upper Providence

  21. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Rhule

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  24. 4 out of 5

    June O'Meara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chant

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily Schroeder

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joellen Muntz

  29. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Allen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Emily

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