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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Tales of Extraordinary Women

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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls is a children's book packed with 100 bedtime stories about the life of 100 extraordinary women from the past and the present, illustrated by 60 female artists from all over the world. This book inspires girls with the stories of great women, from Elizabeth I to Serena Williams.


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Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls is a children's book packed with 100 bedtime stories about the life of 100 extraordinary women from the past and the present, illustrated by 60 female artists from all over the world. This book inspires girls with the stories of great women, from Elizabeth I to Serena Williams.

30 review for Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: 100 Tales of Extraordinary Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Banks

    If I could give this more stars, I would. Yes, I know the title indicates this book is for rebel girls. I am a mother of two fairly rebellious boys - but felt it was every bit as relevant for them as it was for females! After all, why shouldn't boys read about fabulous, inspirational women too? This book is an absolute thing of beauty - 100 accessible, creatively written tales of women who helped to shape the world we live in. The illustrations are superb, and it hits just the right note with my If I could give this more stars, I would. Yes, I know the title indicates this book is for rebel girls. I am a mother of two fairly rebellious boys - but felt it was every bit as relevant for them as it was for females! After all, why shouldn't boys read about fabulous, inspirational women too? This book is an absolute thing of beauty - 100 accessible, creatively written tales of women who helped to shape the world we live in. The illustrations are superb, and it hits just the right note with my two kids (5 and 7). They were initially suspicious that it was going to be one of those 'educational' books, but a few stories in and they were hooked. People with boys, don't be deterred from buying this book, simply because the title indicates a female bias. It's so important that we start recognising the achievement of women (past and present) because they've so often been ignored - and both girls and boys can benefit from this. Also - a word of warning, grown-ups are likely to get a bit hooked on it too. :-)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    "It is important that girls understand the obstacles that lie in front of them. It is just as important that they know these obstacles are not insurmountable. That not only can they find a way to overcome them, but that they can remove those obstacles for those who will come after them." What an amazing project! This book features 100 stories about revolutionary, smart, strong, powerful, charismatic, talented and fearless women and girls throughout history. Pirate Queens and Marine Biologists, "It is important that girls understand the obstacles that lie in front of them. It is just as important that they know these obstacles are not insurmountable. That not only can they find a way to overcome them, but that they can remove those obstacles for those who will come after them." What an amazing project! This book features 100 stories about revolutionary, smart, strong, powerful, charismatic, talented and fearless women and girls throughout history. Pirate Queens and Marine Biologists, Painters and Drummers, Ballerinas and Spies. This is an important and empowering book for girls, big and small, young and old. But let's be honest: all of us can learn from this book. It's not just little girls who can find role models and idols in this book. Boys will gain a lot from reading this as well. If you grow up believing the men and women are equal, this belief will shape they way you treat the people and especially the women around you. Women in positions of power still aren't regarded as a matter of course. They are less respected and receive much more criticism. This book however sets an example, one that has the power to influence the mindset of every tiny human out there, so that they will go out into this world with a fairer, and more respectful view about the women who shape this world every second of every day. Find more of my books on Instagram

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nat

    Irecently read Bad Girls Throughout History by Ann Shenand was naturally craving for more when I came across this equally fantastic collection of extraordinary women. Illustrated by sixty female artists from every corner of the globe,Good Night Stories for Rebel Girlsintroduces us to one hundred remarkable women and their extraordinary lives, from Ada Lovelace to Malala, Elizabeth I to Serena Williams. Empowering, moving and inspirational, these are true fairy tales for heroines who definitely I recently read Bad Girls Throughout History by Ann Shen and was naturally craving for more when I came across this equally fantastic collection of extraordinary women. Illustrated by sixty female artists from every corner of the globe, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls introduces us to one hundred remarkable women and their extraordinary lives, from Ada Lovelace to Malala, Elizabeth I to Serena Williams. Empowering, moving and inspirational, these are true fairy tales for heroines who definitely don't need rescuing. Initially I went in a bit worried that this would have the same set of women as in the aforementioned collection, but I needn’t have worried because Good Night Stories features a brand new exciting and enlightening group of women to the table (save for a few classics, of course). And I just have to say that my heart soars every time I learn of books similar to this one that shine light on groups of courageous and inventive women. Plus, the illustrations are hypnotic and ethereal. Speaking of which, here are some of my favorite ladies I loved to learn about: Ameenah Gurib-Fakim (1959–): President and Scientist. Amna Al Haddad (1989–): Weightlifter. Ann Makosinski (1997–): Inventor. Astrid Lindgren (1907–2002): Writer. Lindgren has written some of my favorite childhood tales, so I was beyond ecstatic to read about her in here!! Coy Mathis (2007–): Elementary School Student. It warmed my heart to see a transgender girl represented in Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. It made the book that more accessible. Eufrosina Cruz (1979–): Activist and Politician. The above quote speaks volumes to me. Frida Kahlo (1907–1954): Painter. Grace O'Malley (c. 1530–1603): Pirate. Hatshepsut (1507–1458 BC): Pharaoh. Jane Goodall (1934–): Primatologist. Maud Stevens Wagner (1877–1961): Tattoo Artist. I can't stop staring at the detailed beauty of the above piece, especially once compared to the real picture: This diverse collection of women — from different backgrounds, religions, disabilities, ethnicities, sexualities — was as inspiring as it gets. And not only was their courage and strength legendary, but I found their worldview on life and all its aspects to be very illuminating and comforting. Bottom line: This is the quality content I’m here for in feminist collections. Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission! Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with Ko-fi.com/bookspoils This review and more can be found on my blog.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    This is difficult to review because, while I loved the artwork and the lovely cover, some of the historic people that were featured in this book are very controversial. Many of them are not fit to be held up as role models for young girls! Pirates, shady politicians, drug addicts, tyrants from Ancient History, and downright gross people; I counted 19 bios out of 100 that I had serious problems with, and which I would never allow a child to read about. I liked the bios of the decent people, like This is difficult to review because, while I loved the artwork and the lovely cover, some of the historic people that were featured in this book are very controversial. Many of them are not fit to be held up as role models for young girls! Pirates, shady politicians, drug addicts, tyrants from Ancient History, and downright gross people; I counted 19 bios out of 100 that I had serious problems with, and which I would never allow a child to read about. I liked the bios of the decent people, like Helen Keller, the Bronte sisters, Amelia Earhart, Ada Lovelace, Rosa Parks, and others. However, I felt that some of those bios left out points that ought to have been emphasized, or emphasized points that I thought were inconsequential, or portrayed a mixed message of the person's life. Most of the writing was skewed to a certain political viewpoint that doesn't give a complete picture of the person's achievements or what their life meant in influencing history. I could barely enjoy the good parts of this book because of so many misdirections and illusions about what these good people stood for and what made them famous. And I really didn't enjoy the bios of the people I don't admire, because the writing covered up the true nature of their corrupt lives. Some historic figures that I expected to see in the book were missing too; people like Mother Teresa and Amy Carmichael who saved thousands of children's lives. One thing is for certain, both in the bios chosen to be included and in the way those bios are written, there is a definite political message in this book. This writing is so biased it cannot be called historical writing. These are NOT just some great stories of role models to inspire girls to do amazing things and never give up and believe in themselves. These are stories that send out a very particular philosophic message, and I'll just say, it's not a traditional message. I don't think it's a healthy message. For example, just because you're a world-famous architect, does that give you the right to throw a fit if your plane is late and make everyone in the airport move your baggage and change your ticket? Apparently, yes. That is called "crossing boundaries" and "forging your own pathway". "Getting your own way" is desirable and laudable, according to the authors. I guess if you're special then you deserve special treatment. That's a great lesson for young ladies to learn! (sarcasm) What a way to go down in history for throwing a fit in an airport! In a one-page bio of your life, people will know that you designed great buildings and you were a selfish pain in the butt with no regard for others. And that is praised in this book!! And this is only the least offensive example I could give! Many of the bios include things similar to this that are celebrated as a woman "being a rebel" or gaining her independence or fighting the system or something. This is not the type of bad behavior that inspires me. You can change the world without being rude about it. It saddens me to think that these are the sort of people that are held up in front of us as having led lives that we should emulate. I support independent and strong women, but not like this. Not these women. Not this propaganda. A better version of this concept....100 Extraordinary Stories for Courageous Girls Disclaimer: I received a copy of the book from the author/publisher in exchange for a free and honest review. All the opinions stated here are my own true thoughts and are not influenced by anyone.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This is a seriously cool book. It's the brain-child of two women (I use the word "women" lightly; they each look about 17 on the website) who run the "Timbuktu Labs," which is described as a "children's media innovation lab," which may or may not be a non-profit. I'm thinking not. Their website did not help me confirm or deny. I'd feel better about the whole thing if it WERE a non-profit, because, frankly, the book is pricey and I have a few complaints about it, but for now I want to get back to This is a seriously cool book. It's the brain-child of two women (I use the word "women" lightly; they each look about 17 on the website) who run the "Timbuktu Labs," which is described as a "children's media innovation lab," which may or may not be a non-profit. I'm thinking not. Their website did not help me confirm or deny. I'd feel better about the whole thing if it WERE a non-profit, because, frankly, the book is pricey and I have a few complaints about it, but for now I want to get back to why the book is seriously cool. First, it was printed in Canada and it uses only vegetable and soy based inks. The new hardcover version has a lovely heft to it and each page is delightfully thick. You book lovers know what I mean. . . each page feels alive in your hands. So, on one side of each page is 1 of 100 "Rebel Girls" and on the other side is an original illustration of that "girl." The illustrations are bold and playful and some of them are extraordinary. Each "blurb" about each "Rebel Girl" offers not a biography but a short story about that girl (in most cases they are women who were once rebel girls; in a few cases they are actual girls), and each page contains the birth date, birth place and a quote from that Rebel Girl. My complaints are. . . the individual pages with the stories of Rebel Girls could have been SO much more interesting. For example, Jane Austen's page almost put me to sleep, and I am a JANE DEVOTEE. On Jane's page the authors write, "There was nowhere that Jane would rather be than curled up on a sofa in her father's library, with her nose in a book." Wha?? Why does that a rebel make? Ever thought to mention how many times she had to submit her work under a male pseudonym or how she had to re-submit her work over and over again before she finally wore down publishers enough to print a woman's work? And why did supermodel Alek Wek make it into the collection? Apparently she was formerly a refugee from Sudan who was discovered in a park by a talent scout and went on to become a model. But, why was she a REBEL from that story? If you are going to feature a "Rebel Girl" from Africa, why wouldn't you choose someone like Ayaan Hirsi Ali, who has risked her life while informing the world about female genital mutilation? And. . . how do you make a book about Rebel Girls. . . and leave out Joan of Arc?? For me, she is the ORIGINAL REBEL GIRL, and I can't believe that the book features Joan Jett, but omits Joan of Arc! How do you forget JOAN OF ARC?? I also felt like they could have done a better job with the quotes from each woman. Most of them were dull and these women were not dull! It felt rushed, as though they grabbed the first quote they found when they Googled the name. Even so, this book is a great example of good marketing. These babies will sell like hotcakes, and I'm debating myself if I want my own copy. The Astrid Lindgren pages alone make me contemplate a purchase. The illustration of Lindgren by Justine Lecouffe brought tears to my eyes. She managed to capture the pluck and confidence in a sketch of the aging author. . . just so. Beautiful. And, it turns out that Pippi Longstocking just happens to be THIS Rebel Girl's very first Rebel Girl.

  6. 4 out of 5

    April (Aprilius Maximus)

    This is one of the most beautiful books I own! So inspiring and a must-read for all young girls and women!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    This hardback book, is definitely one of the most beautiful books that I own. Just a glance at the front cover honestly makes you just want to read it. I just wish, I could give this book more than five stars. First of all, this book indicates that it is for "Rebel girls" As this may be true, it is also extremely relevant for boys aswell. I think both sexes should read this book and celebrate remarkable and inspirational women. This book contains 100 stories about strong, fearless, motivating , This hardback book, is definitely one of the most beautiful books that I own. Just a glance at the front cover honestly makes you just want to read it. I just wish, I could give this book more than five stars. First of all, this book indicates that it is for "Rebel girls" As this may be true, it is also extremely relevant for boys aswell. I think both sexes should read this book and celebrate remarkable and inspirational women. This book contains 100 stories about strong, fearless, motivating , inspiring, courageous and powerful women throughout history. These range from Elizabeth I to Malala Yousafzai, to Marie Curie to Manal Al-Sharif. What also completely made me love this book even further, are the gorgeous illustrations. It has been illustrated by sixty female artists from around the world, and each illustration, is truly unique from the next. As well some well-known classic women in this, such as Jane Austen and The Bronte sisters, we have some new and refreshing women to read about and inspire us. I was especially interested to read about Astrid Lindgren, who was actually the woman behind the Pippi Longstocking books. I didn't realise this until I had read this book. I also love her quote "Mischief isn't something you think up, it just happens" The collection of women in here is wonderfully diverse. They range from different backgrounds, sexualities, religions and ethnicities, and I think that makes this book more inspiring than it already is. Women in some kind of power, are still less respected than a man would be in that power. Women are far more criticised and really, let's be honest, they are deemed the weaker of the sexes. This book shows us, in a dramatic fashion, that women HAVE and DO change the world. "Let us pick up our books and our pens. They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world" MALALA YOUSAFZAI. Activist. "That's when I realised why princesses in their films were so helpless: They had all been created by men!" BRENDA CHAPMAN. Director.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    What a phenomenal book. Honestly, I expected this to be somewhat gimmicky - I'm a passionate feminist, and a lot of these types of girl power books/projects are - but I was sort of bowled over by my how emotional my reaction was to the acknowledgement of these extraordinary women from all over the world pursuing all different paths. If you've considered reading this but have been hesitant for some reason, I'd say it's more than worth it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Ordered this book through Kickstarter. Meant to give it to one of my nieces, but I loved it too much to give away :) This is the book I wished I had owned when I was a young girl. An amazing book of stories all about successful women. I love that the book is global - women come from all cultures and nations. The book is in English (I think it's available in many languages) for me, but the stories represent such a range of experiences. My only criticism is that some of the stories don't have Ordered this book through Kickstarter. Meant to give it to one of my nieces, but I loved it too much to give away :) This is the book I wished I had owned when I was a young girl. An amazing book of stories all about successful women. I love that the book is global - women come from all cultures and nations. The book is in English (I think it's available in many languages) for me, but the stories represent such a range of experiences. My only criticism is that some of the stories don't have quite as modern analysis or perspectives. For example, a story about a Japanese princess who took power as a woman (though she was ordered not to) and them conquered parts of Korea. I hoped to see at least a sentence or two (the stories are very short) acknowledging the Korean perspective, however, it did not. Mostly though the stories are phenomenal. They are written at about an upper grade school level I would say, 3-6th graders or so. I've adapted them to tell to a younger child pretty easily as well. The art is beautiful and the perfect complement to all the stories. All of the art was done by women artists. Definitely a great book to buy for yourself or to give to a favorite young girl who you want to encourage to dream big. This book feels enduring - it can be read by girls for many years as they grow up!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    The subtitle of this collection is 100 Tales of Extraordinary Women, and it is beautifully done. The short passages cover every continent and every race, religion, and sexuality…that is, the stories are about girls and women with lesbians and transgender individuals identifying as female included. It is ravishingly interesting. Each short passage is a tightly written biography suitable for 9-14 year-olds, informative, and inspiring. Many unusual job descriptions and lifelong purpose are The subtitle of this collection is 100 Tales of Extraordinary Women, and it is beautifully done. The short passages cover every continent and every race, religion, and sexuality…that is, the stories are about girls and women with lesbians and transgender individuals identifying as female included. It is ravishingly interesting. Each short passage is a tightly written biography suitable for 9-14 year-olds, informative, and inspiring. Many unusual job descriptions and lifelong purpose are described, expanding our horizons about the scope of what is possible. As an adult, I didn’t expect to learn as much as I did nor enjoy it as much. This book is about rebels. It challenges us to think again about what we admire and what we don't...and why. It is a fantastic teaching tool. I can imagine a mother reading an entry alongside her preteen (of either sex, by the way) and discussing it for a short while so that the implications of each success sink in: "Why would that person be considered a rebel?" "What do you think about what that person did?" "Do you know anyone who has done things like this?" The mother is going to recognize some of the names and so can add whatever backstory is not in the book. A few examples from the stories are ✦ Inventor Ann Makosinski, a fifteen year-old Canadian who won first prize in Google Science Fair for inventing a flashlight that doesn’t need batteries, wind, or sun--just body heat. ✦ Amna Al Haddad, weight lifter from the United Arab Emirates. She was a journalist and discovered she really enjoyed exercising! She began to work out in a gym with weights for the first time in her life as an adult. She was good at it and began training for the Olympics. ✦ Anna Politkovskaya, the Russian journalist who was murdered for reporting on the truth of what she saw in the brutal civil war in Chechnya. ✦ Jane Goodall is among the women to emulate for having her own mind and studying a subject so deeply that she became the expert. ✦ Hayshepsut was an Egyptian pharaoh who ruled Egypt long before Cleopatra became Queen. Records of her were destroyed after her death, but archeologists were able to piece together a record of her successful rule, the first (and only?) female pharaoh.Included with each biography is a full page color representation of the subject, and a quote of something they said or wrote. Next to the short bio of Misty Copeland, for instance, is a drawing of her in flight during a ballet performance with a quote that reads, “Dance found me.” The authors, Elena Favilli and Francesca Cavallo, studied in Italy and the United States where they founded Timbuktu Labs, a children’s media innovation lab. What’s that? you may well ask. The authors define the mission of Timbuktu as committed to “redefining the boundaries of children’s media through a combination of thought-provoking content, stellar design, and cutting-edge technology.” They designed the first iPad magazine for children. The start-up has created mobile apps and creative content for users in more than 70 countries. It’s more than just new. It’s exciting. The first edition of this book was published in 2016. Since then it has gone through multiple reprintings, and in 2017 Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls 2 was published. There are apparently also coloring books, temporary tattoos, and posters that go along with the books and can be purchased separately. It’s become an industry, with good reason. If you have a girl in the family in the target age range, check it out. Just when you thought your girls were too old for bedtime stories, this may bring it all back.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Inge

    Absolutely brilliant.

  12. 5 out of 5

    CaRo

    Love this book - bought it for my daughter and although she is still too young to understand I just love the idea to read stories of great women to her instead of the princess stories. Don't get me wrong I am a sucker for fairy tales but I want to engourage her from the beginning to have the faith in herself that she can be whatever she wants :D

  13. 5 out of 5

    Greg

    I've read this book and enjoy it. My 6 year old daughter has heard all the stories and wants to be read them again and again every night. There are few books that can achieve the combination: international, non-fiction, positive role-models, engaging. I hope the authors will create a second volume and create an Audible.com version so we can listen to it in the car.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Addie H

    A great collection of stories of extraordinary women that I would like to know more about. I would love to see several of these stories be made into film. That said, the stories are short! 1 page each + plus one page with an illustration of the person it's about. I know this book is aimed at kids 6 and up, but I think we underestimate kids and I would have love to see the stories a couple of pages longer at least.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty ❤️

    Such a beautiful book I can see why it’s the most funded book in crowd funding history. 100 stories of inspirational women aimed at young girls and young adults but so much here to learn fir us older adults too. I loved this

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    This book is beyond beautiful: the cover, the gorgeous illustrations, and the overall design! That being said, I have some problems with it and I cannot blindly give this a 5* review. First of all, some of the women featured here are not actually fit to be role models, and therefore to be in this book, especially one that is dedicated to young girls. Some of them are quite controversial and presented in such a biased, ridiculously cheerful, and positive way, that they end up sending a misguided This book is beyond beautiful: the cover, the gorgeous illustrations, and the overall design! That being said, I have some problems with it and I cannot blindly give this a 5* review. First of all, some of the women featured here are not actually fit to be role models, and therefore to be in this book, especially one that is dedicated to young girls. Some of them are quite controversial and presented in such a biased, ridiculously cheerful, and positive way, that they end up sending a misguided message to girls wondering what it takes to be a rebellious spirit. I was so frustrated when I finished the book that I started looking for people that might point out this exact thing. I found Jean Menzies’ review on her YouTube channel, Jean Bookishthoughts, so I’ll leave the link to her discussion HERE and end this topic before I get even more ranty! Second, I have a big issue with the writing style, for one, and the choices made in writing the bios of these women. It was so darn basic, colloquial, repetitive, and annoyingly unimaginative: I get that the book is generally addressed to children, but I think it underestimates just how smart children really are. They don’t need things to be dumbed down for them or made silly to sound more fun! There were plenty of women I admire in here, but most of the time, the way their lives or accomplishments were presented simply infuriated me: the pages on Jane Austen and Zaha Hadid come to mind, the first one was too with her nose in a book to be bothered to fall in love and get married, and the latter demanded to be put on a different flight because hers was delayed. I mean, are you for real?!? It’s that the best you’ve got??? And don’t get me started on the quotes they chose for some of the women to be featured on the illustration page! It feels like the bios are based on gossip and lore rather than facts or achievements. It’s not a history book, it’s not inspirational, at least not when there’s an underlying political message, and I wouldn’t give it to my teen sister to read, because I always read beforehand everything I recommend to her, and this is not it!

  17. 5 out of 5

    I'mogén

    I was so excited to read this! What an inspiring little book it is! I did love how straight to the point this book was. It absolutely inspired me to research some of the women who really inspired or interested me, but I do wish that we focused on each woman a little bit more, maybe resulting in less women in the book, but carried on into the sequel. This was because in a few cases I felt like I was lacking the weight of their achievement because it didn't have a load of context. Its I was so excited to read this! What an inspiring little book it is! I did love how straight to the point this book was. It absolutely inspired me to research some of the women who really inspired or interested me, but I do wish that we focused on each woman a little bit more, maybe resulting in less women in the book, but carried on into the sequel. This was because in a few cases I felt like I was lacking the weight of their achievement because it didn't have a load of context. Its understandable though, considering the concept, as the title states (bedtime stories- implying short bursts of night time inspiration/entertainment). I really liked how appreciative the authors are of the early kickstarter supporters and the illustrators. I found the latter very clearly credited and found myself recognising the artists styles as they contributed more than once to the book! Their art style all flowed together yet equally highlighted individual talent, which I enjoyed. The women's stories we received were very inspiring and I really appreciated the little details such as place of birth and birth/death dates, as I found that it gave them further recognition and showed how much research and effort was put into this book. Just to name a few random inspiring women in this book, some that stuck out to me was Melba Liston (trombonist), Michaela Deprince (ballerina), Sonita Alizadeh (rapper- I listened to her song "brides for sale" and it was so powerful) and Yoko Ono (artist- I'm intrigued in watching some of her films). Of course there were so many more inspiring women in here that ranged from spys, to activists, to queens and more! Honestly, I just found this to be such a powerful little book, packed with so much inspiration for little girls and boys. The only down fall being not enough substance for me. Nevertheless, I'll totally be introducing this to my little nephew when he gets to reading age so that he can learn to appreciate and respect women, which will shape his adult years! Pick it up, give it a go and enjoy! >(^_^)< Gén

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    Loved it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 4 STARS (Review Not on Blog) This is a fabulous book, period. It is great for both children and adults (of any gender). The artwork is so gorgeous, I want to buy another copy just to frame the pages. The book has great women from history and present that have been brave and smart. Each woman has a page write-up and is great for story time. Rebel girls not only entertains and provides history but also gives women a place in history they so long have deserved. I highly recommend this book!

  20. 4 out of 5

    rachel ☾

    Okay. Well. This is awkward. I thought this would be right up my alley. Feminist history stories? Please! ... but I didn't realise this was a collection of short stories. I thought it was a collection of short bios of rebel women in history, and look, it is technically. However, the language is so simple that it read like fiction. I know that is not a bad thing in itself - stories about women from across the globe doing amazing things are powerful, especially for the target demographic - but I Okay. Well. This is awkward. I thought this would be right up my alley. Feminist history stories? Please! ... but I didn't realise this was a collection of short stories. I thought it was a collection of short bios of rebel women in history, and look, it is technically. However, the language is so simple that it read like fiction. I know that is not a bad thing in itself - stories about women from across the globe doing amazing things are powerful, especially for the target demographic - but I wanted more fact than fiction. Yes, it did introduce me to a lot of important figures. I marked down a lot of names I want to research, which is the intent of this collection, I assume. The bios were just too short for my taste and the language too juvenile, almost sensationalised. I needed nuance. I also need to point out that Coy Mathis - the only trans girl in the collection - was misgendered. Overall? I loved the idea of this but I am too much of a history nerd to appreciate this fully. I needed more fact than fiction - and definitely more art! Blog • Goodreads • Twitter • Instagram

  21. 5 out of 5

    Farhana Sufi

    I think no matter how I praise this book, and the effort and thoughts behind it, words will fall short. I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book since earlier this year. Bless the soul who remembered to buy a copy for me and gift it as well. I do have terrific friends. But let's get back to the book. It is arranged alphabetically and includes 2 pages dedicated for one extraordinary woman each, a total of hundred woman over the history of mankind. The first page is a short biography on an I think no matter how I praise this book, and the effort and thoughts behind it, words will fall short. I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book since earlier this year. Bless the soul who remembered to buy a copy for me and gift it as well. I do have terrific friends. But let's get back to the book. It is arranged alphabetically and includes 2 pages dedicated for one extraordinary woman each, a total of hundred woman over the history of mankind. The first page is a short biography on an exceptional lady each, written in a way easily understandable for children below 10 and of course for older readers. The second page holds a bright colored illustration of that lady. I will get back to the stories, but let me praise the artists and illustrations first! Each is unique, no two are alike. 60 female artists from around the world illustrated these famous girls, women and teenagers. The authors are Italian friends (both female) now living in the USA and run an initiative called the Timbuktu Labs. The book holds the stories of 100 exceptional females from our history and across the globe as I stated. I will criticize first - Some important (in my opinion) women are missing - e.g Heidi Lamar, a versatile actress and scientist; Mother Teressa; very few women from South Asia or Asia in general (one queen from Korea, one from Japan, one ancient scientist from China made the list). While two american first ladies (Hilary and Michelle) make the list. Actually half the women are either Italian or from the States. But USA is a multinational country and has the most versatility. However, the Queen of Jhansi, Laxmi Bai is there. Also a boxer from India makes the list. Andd let's be practical, it is difficult to select just 100 inspiring women from the history of mankind. A bit unfair too! I hope there are a part 2 and more of this book in future. Now for the praises - It includes pirates (2 actually!), spies (multiple, inspiring ones who have dedicated their lives for the freedom of speech and country). Sports women, ballerinas, who have beat the odds and become winners. Scientists like Jane Goodall to a Supreme Court judge. Architect Zaha Hadid and fashion designer Coco Chanel and many others from other professions - women who were arrogant but also correct. Outspoken, firm in their decisions, brave women have been chosen. Women who have defied their respective societies to prove clothing or feminine appearances and characteristics according to their society's norms can be meaningless and women are equal in every way to men, such women have been highlighted in this book. Over and over it repeats words and thoughts that make you think about racism and women who have overcome it. It includes refugee girls who have proven what being alive as a woman should be to us, people who live a life of benefits. It has a small boy who is transgender and forces you, an adult to look at the issue in a non-biased way and will teach a child to be tolerant and acceptable to life and humanity. Serena Williams says - "I smile a lot, I win a lot, and I am really sexy." As a teenager I had never thought Serena sexy, because I was prejudiced by our society's mindset. She was so large, so muscled! Now, 15 years later, even before I read her words, I see and believe in her sexiness, because she is healthy, powerful, a badass sports woman and yes, she always has a smile on her face. I wish I had this book growing up. I knew my confidence in being a girl, a woman would never waiver if I had read this then, if I had this growing up. But this book, these women will be my inspiration when I am feeling down from now on. If you don't own a copy, please do. And I would recommend an original because half the fun is gone unless you experience the beautiful colorful illustrations. Indian amazon has this for sale right now. And if we could make a bookpage to deliver it at the correct price (approx. 700-800 Taka including shipping) then it would have been great because dear bookpages and bookshops, no matter what you guys are saying, you are selling this at a গলাকাটা double price in Bangladesh.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Francesca

    I just bought this book as a present for my nieces and had a look see. Beautifully illustrated and showcasing women from all over the world and ages this is inspirational and a must have in any home with children. For our young girls to be inspired and for our young boys to be inspired and for ourselves to also be inspired and found both old and new women to aspire too. Me I found Marie Curie - when I was little a wanted to be a scientist because of her, my unfortunate lack of mathematics I just bought this book as a present for my nieces and had a look see. Beautifully illustrated and showcasing women from all over the world and ages this is inspirational and a must have in any home with children. For our young girls to be inspired and for our young boys to be inspired and for ourselves to also be inspired and found both old and new women to aspire too. Me I found Marie Curie - when I was little a wanted to be a scientist because of her, my unfortunate lack of mathematics understanding didn't quite support that. But I also found Frida Kahlo and Coco Chanel and Virginia Woolf and Maria Montessori all heroes of mine at various stages of my life and that was amazing! Buy this book folks, for your kids, yourselves and as a present for others.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vishakha ~ ReadingSpren ~

    What a lovely, amazing book! Mathematicians, physicists, pirates, Japanese empresses, Artists, Warriors, 21st-century teenagers - you name it. So many names I never knew about, but should have known about. Our history books are not kind to achievers who are women, but nevermind, she still persists. My only, teeny-tiny problem was, a lot of the stories were not nearly as descriptive or informative as they could have been, even considering that this is meant for children. I had to Google for all What a lovely, amazing book! Mathematicians, physicists, pirates, Japanese empresses, Artists, Warriors, 21st-century teenagers - you name it. So many names I never knew about, but should have known about. Our history books are not kind to achievers who are women, but nevermind, she still persists. My only, teeny-tiny problem was, a lot of the stories were not nearly as descriptive or informative as they could have been, even considering that this is meant for children. I had to Google for all the extra info. Still, all kids need this in their hands. :) My Bookstagram

  24. 4 out of 5

    melmarian

    Rather than 'reinvents fairy tales', I think it is more accurate to say that this book tells true stories about 100 (yes, a hundred!) inspiring and extraordinary women from all over the world, written in a special way so you can read every chapter as a bedtime story to your child. Every chapter also comes with an illustration from 60 female artists (again, from every corner of the globe). It's very hard to dislike this book. Reading this as an adult, I found myself searching for more information Rather than 'reinvents fairy tales', I think it is more accurate to say that this book tells true stories about 100 (yes, a hundred!) inspiring and extraordinary women from all over the world, written in a special way so you can read every chapter as a bedtime story to your child. Every chapter also comes with an illustration from 60 female artists (again, from every corner of the globe). It's very hard to dislike this book. Reading this as an adult, I found myself searching for more information about these extraordinary women, and at the same time hoping that one day, I can be one myself.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    YES YES YES YES!! I’m ashamed by the number of women featured in this book who I had not previously heard of but am so thankful that I got to learn about them through THIS book. It’s a must have book for every child (and adult). I have to admit I shivered whilst reading Margaret Thatcher’s page. I know her being the first female prime minister in the UK is a huge step for gender equality but I just wish it could be someone else. Regardless, this book is fantastic and I will treasure it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    I received a copy of Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls from Penguin Random House New Zealand to review. This book is written for children so the ‘once upon a time’ did annoy me after a while but I still enjoyed reading it. Especially because I’d never heard of a lot of the women in this book. I’ve lost count of how many post-it notes are in my copy. The illustrations, which are amazing, are all done by women across the world. I don’t have a favourite because they are all brilliant but the one of I received a copy of Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls from Penguin Random House New Zealand to review. This book is written for children so the ‘once upon a time’ did annoy me after a while but I still enjoyed reading it. Especially because I’d never heard of a lot of the women in this book. I’ve lost count of how many post-it notes are in my copy. The illustrations, which are amazing, are all done by women across the world. I don’t have a favourite because they are all brilliant but the one of Michelle Obama still stands out for me. I think Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls is such an amazing book for young girls and even boys to read. Or have read to them. I think boys should read this too, especially young boys, so they can hear about all about the amazing women in this book too. There are so many amazing stories in this book, from all over the world. And it’s not just women in the book, there are young women/teens and even a ten-year-old girl. I don’t think I can do this book justice, it’s just amazing. I wish I could afford to hand out a few copies of Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls to people who want to read themselves or to their kids but all I can do is recommend finding a copy because it is so worth it. I cannot recommend this book enough.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dorian

    really wish I liked this more than I did. It seemed like any and all negative events were edited out. I know it's written for kids, but they can handle some of it, especially if your goal is to let them be rebel girls. This also became part of a larger amount of factual inaccuracies I noticed. I would have also preferred fewer women described with more detail, as now each page was basically just "born in this place. was told not to do the thing. did the thing anyhow." Edit: came back to say I did really wish I liked this more than I did. It seemed like any and all negative events were edited out. I know it's written for kids, but they can handle some of it, especially if your goal is to let them be rebel girls. This also became part of a larger amount of factual inaccuracies I noticed. I would have also preferred fewer women described with more detail, as now each page was basically just "born in this place. was told not to do the thing. did the thing anyhow." Edit: came back to say I did love the art work!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    A wonderful book full of gorgeous illustrations which are very life-like. Each story begins with 'Once there was...' which immediately pulls you into the tales and summarises what each woman is famous for (her contribution to the wider world). Some stories are heart-wrenching, others are horrific, and others are uplifting. All of the tales are inspiring and empowering! A perfect book for young girls to read and savour before they go to bed - if you put your mind to it, you can do anything :)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andreea Zelenyak

    One book, 203 pages, a hundred stories, a hundred faces, a hundred women....you can be the 101 woman, the 101 story! This is a book that inspires you; gives you courage; gives you hope; it makes you fearless; it makes you think out of the box; it makes you feel powerful; it makes you dream; it makes you smile; it makes you sad...this is a book that makes you feel proud to be a woman!! I really recommend this one! It's a hell of a ride (read) !!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Beatrix

    Amazing! Loved it!

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