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Peppers of the Americas: The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor [a Cookbook]

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Winner of the 2018 International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) Cookbook Award for "Reference & Technical" A beautiful culinary and ethnobotanical survey of the punch-packing ingredient central to today's multi-cultural palate, with more than 40 pan-Latin recipes from a three-time James Beard Award-winning author and chef-restaurateur.From piquillos and Winner of the 2018 International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) Cookbook Award for "Reference & Technical" A beautiful culinary and ethnobotanical survey of the punch-packing ingredient central to today's multi-cultural palate, with more than 40 pan-Latin recipes from a three-time James Beard Award-winning author and chef-restaurateur.From piquillos and shishitos to padrons and poblanos, the popularity of culinary peppers (and pepper-based condiments, such as Sriracha and the Korean condiment gochujang) continue to grow as more consumers try new varieties and discover the known health benefits of Capsicum, the genus to which all peppers belong. This stunning visual reference to peppers now seen on menus, in markets, and beyond, showcases nearly 200 varieties (with physical description, tasting notes, uses for cooks, and beautiful botanical portraits for each). Following the cook's gallery of varieties, more than 40 on-trend Latin recipes for spice blends, salsas, sauces, salads, vegetables, soups, and main dishes highlight the big flavors and taste-enhancing capabilities of peppers.


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Winner of the 2018 International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) Cookbook Award for "Reference & Technical" A beautiful culinary and ethnobotanical survey of the punch-packing ingredient central to today's multi-cultural palate, with more than 40 pan-Latin recipes from a three-time James Beard Award-winning author and chef-restaurateur.From piquillos and Winner of the 2018 International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP) Cookbook Award for "Reference & Technical" A beautiful culinary and ethnobotanical survey of the punch-packing ingredient central to today's multi-cultural palate, with more than 40 pan-Latin recipes from a three-time James Beard Award-winning author and chef-restaurateur.From piquillos and shishitos to padrons and poblanos, the popularity of culinary peppers (and pepper-based condiments, such as Sriracha and the Korean condiment gochujang) continue to grow as more consumers try new varieties and discover the known health benefits of Capsicum, the genus to which all peppers belong. This stunning visual reference to peppers now seen on menus, in markets, and beyond, showcases nearly 200 varieties (with physical description, tasting notes, uses for cooks, and beautiful botanical portraits for each). Following the cook's gallery of varieties, more than 40 on-trend Latin recipes for spice blends, salsas, sauces, salads, vegetables, soups, and main dishes highlight the big flavors and taste-enhancing capabilities of peppers.

30 review for Peppers of the Americas: The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor [a Cookbook]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 5* of five The simple glory of eating peppers is their surprising, underutilized versatility. Nothing is more delicious than a juicy piece of cantaloupe sprinkled with a salt, sugar, dried pepper blend. Oh wait, squeeze some lime juice on it first! The pass out from the pleasure of savoring the sweethottart explosion in your brain. I grew up on the Texas/Mexico border and was indoctrinated early in the ways of hot and spice, to my resolutely Anglo mother's mild horror and refined disgust. Rating: 5* of five The simple glory of eating peppers is their surprising, underutilized versatility. Nothing is more delicious than a juicy piece of cantaloupe sprinkled with a salt, sugar, dried pepper blend. Oh wait, squeeze some lime juice on it first! The pass out from the pleasure of savoring the sweethottart explosion in your brain. I grew up on the Texas/Mexico border and was indoctrinated early in the ways of hot and spice, to my resolutely Anglo mother's mild horror and refined disgust. (She also disapproved of fried foods, another thing I can't get enough of; her goddesses were Elizabeth David and MFK Fisher, worthy objects of veneration, but not to the exclusion of Madhur Jaffrey and Maria Ninfa Rodriguez Laurenzo.) I was thrilled with the recent rise of the sriracha cult, I am a huge fan of Tabasco, pretty much if it's under 250,000 scovills I'm on board and above that if there's a pitcher of milk nearby. This volume is a gorgeously illustrated single-subject encyclopedia. It is history, sociology, mixology, on and on, in an oversized trim and printed so beautifully you won't want to use it in the kitchen. Resist this impulse. Make turkey in mole coloradito (p317) to shake up your American Thanksgiving table with a truly American dish. Besides, it's so delicious it slips under my no-turkey table rule which is a major feat. Live in a pepper desert? Page 330 has you covered...Author Presilla gives you her online sources for all things pepper. There's a gallery of fresh peppers for the aesthetes, complete with potted histories and good guidance on what to expect from each. I would give this beautiful item to a coffee-table cook without a second thought. I'd far prefer to give it to someone with a need for heat whose sophistication of palate has gone beyond a squirt of something red from a bottle, whose horizons need broadening, and who can benefit from a thorough, well-organized "Cooking With Peppers" guide to comfortable handling and effective preparation of these magical, savory, versatile fruits.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Critterbee❇

    This massively in-depth, exhaustive encyclopedia of everything capsicum is a very interesting reference on the history of people and peppers, with in-depth information on history, biology, trade, cultivation, selection and preparation of pepper. Starting with the earliest evidence of human ingestion of peppers, bulldozing through the tumultuous history of the Americas, and ending up at present day availability and usage, this book does not miss anything. Towards the end of the book, there are This massively in-depth, exhaustive encyclopedia of everything capsicum is a very interesting reference on the history of people and peppers, with in-depth information on history, biology, trade, cultivation, selection and preparation of pepper. Starting with the earliest evidence of human ingestion of peppers, bulldozing through the tumultuous history of the Americas, and ending up at present day availability and usage, this book does not miss anything. Towards the end of the book, there are some interesting recipes for rubs, pastes, and sauces, as well as some main and side dishes that showcase peppers. **eARC Netgalley**

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robert Durough, Jr.

    While not the pepper encyclopedia I was hoping for, I still found Maricel E. Presilla’s Peppers of the Americas to be informative and helpful. For those with the same hopes I had for the book, Presilla explains that this book is “not an encyclopedic catalog, but a highly subjective record of my own garden and kitchen encounters with these remarkable plants” (p.vii). Keep that in mind when considering whether or not to pick this one up. The first eighty pages or so are full of dense text on While not the pepper encyclopedia I was hoping for, I still found Maricel E. Presilla’s Peppers of the Americas to be informative and helpful. For those with the same hopes I had for the book, Presilla explains that this book is “not an encyclopedic catalog, but a highly subjective record of my own garden and kitchen encounters with these remarkable plants” (p.vii). Keep that in mind when considering whether or not to pick this one up. The first eighty pages or so are full of dense text on history and archaeology related to peppers. There are then about 115 pages of peppers with pictures accompanied by Presilla’s subjective (see above), yet helpful notes—these pages are periodically peppered with pertinent prose on past and present particulars. About twenty-five pages of dried peppers written in similar fashion, seven pages of very general pepper gardening and tending, and 100 pages of working with peppers (vinegars, powders, recipes, etc.) conclude the book’s content. I really like peppers, especially hot ones, and have grown and sold them in the past; so, I’ll probably find this book a bit more interesting than those who are looking for something more specific and complete. There were a tremendous number of varieties I’d not yet heard of, including a few I’m going to need to track down and try, and I appreciated Presilla sharing her experiences with them (taste, cooking, etc.). I certainly look forward to trying some of the sauces and ground spice mixes, but what I appreciate most are the properties and attributes of the fresh and dried pepper varieties. *I received this book from Blogging for Books for this review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cat

    This is an amazing story of the pepper i all it's wonderful glory! Pepper lovers will enjoy it. I did and I am NOT a great pepper fan. I like to see the peppers that are being discussed. But tons of great info! Fans of peppers will love this book! Lots of great photos of the individual peppers, too!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    I recently mistook a habanero for one of those mini-bell peppers and popped it in my mouth. It brought me to my knees. Obviously, I need to know more about peppers for my own safety. So, I was thrilled to see Ten Speed Press has a new book to save me and those like me from future disasters. Peppers of the Americas is a huge and beautiful book about those mighty flavor bombs that fall under the rubric of “peppers.” Maricel Presilla has been dubbed the Queen of Capsicum and it seems to be a I recently mistook a habanero for one of those mini-bell peppers and popped it in my mouth. It brought me to my knees. Obviously, I need to know more about peppers for my own safety. So, I was thrilled to see Ten Speed Press has a new book to save me and those like me from future disasters. Peppers of the Americas is a huge and beautiful book about those mighty flavor bombs that fall under the rubric of “peppers.” Maricel Presilla has been dubbed the Queen of Capsicum and it seems to be a well-deserved title. The book is a deep dive into the peppers of the Americas. The introduction is full of the biology of the peppers, including a beautiful illustration of a pepper labeling all the pieces. There are lovely illustrations in the more scientific part of the book, showing how we can tell peppers apart by the calyx (where the stem attaches), the flower, and the seeds. There is a fascinating section on the archeological history of peppers, then its history of expansion and exploration carried around the world. Presilla talks about the five domesticated peppers and their essential traits and varieties. She grows her own and even explains how to grow peppers from seed. There are two huge galleries of peppers, regular and dried. Who knew there could be so many peppers and we have not even left the Americas. There is also an extensive collection of recipes, most of them from Latin America for everything from spice blends and vinegars to stews, casseroles, and so much more. The end of the book is full of resources where you can buy seeds, seedlings, and peppers to get started. The pictures by Romulo Yanes and the botanical illustrations by Julio J. Figueroa are beautiful. The book is one you will enjoy paging through looking at pictures and reading about the peppers. The information for each individual pepper describes their flavor and uses and then describes what they look like. Peppers of the Americas is a rich reference book for people who like to know more than how to use the foods they eat. There’s a bit of science, a bit of history, information on preserving and making condiments, as well as identification and cooking information. It does not tell us everything, though. When I decided to write about my habanero mishap, I wondered if it needed a tilde or not, and looked for an answer in the book. Alas, no joy. I discovered from Google that habanero is named for Havana, so there is no tilde, and my desire to add one is a hyperforeignism. I like the bits of folklore and tradition, like the “birds-eye”, a bit of smashed pepper at the bottom of a bowl before serving soup to flavor all the soup. There are also several recipes for flavored vinegars, pastes, and salts you can make for flavorings. Many of the recipes are complex, though thankfully there are a few relatively easy ones as well.There are several delicious sounding recipes. They are discouraging for the home cook, though, because they are over-particularized. What I mean is that a recipe will call for a Kirby cucumber instead of a cucumber, “Columbian panela, Mexican piloncillo, or light muscovado sugar” instead of sugar. When I read the recipe, I know I can make it with my ordinary ingredients, but it comes across as though it’s been posted with “Keep Out Home Cooks!” signs all over the place. To be honest, even at New Seasons, there is no wide selection of peppers, so the specificity is discouraging. How much worse will the recipe be with a pepper in the family, not that specific pepper? What about the sugars? Can I use a regular cucumber? These kinds of recipes create doubt and difference. I read them and feel as though the book was not written for me. I received a copy of Peppers of the Americas through Blogging for Books. It is published by Lorena Jones Books by Ten Speed Press. Peppers of the Americas at Penguin Random House Maricel E. Presilla on Twitter La Cucharamama – Presilla’s restaurants. https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rosemary Standeven

    I loved this book, and before I was even half way through the ARC computer download I pre-ordered a hard copy from Amazon. I have been a fan of peppers – particularly the hot ones – for a long time. Mainly to cook with and to eat, but also to admire the look of the fresh fruit. But even so, I was really gobsmacked by the incredible variety and beauty of the many peppers pictured and described in this book. With each picture is an idea of how the pepper is best used, what sort of heat, flavours, I loved this book, and before I was even half way through the ARC computer download I pre-ordered a hard copy from Amazon. I have been a fan of peppers – particularly the hot ones – for a long time. Mainly to cook with and to eat, but also to admire the look of the fresh fruit. But even so, I was really gobsmacked by the incredible variety and beauty of the many peppers pictured and described in this book. With each picture is an idea of how the pepper is best used, what sort of heat, flavours, perfume etc that is commonly has, often where it grows, and sometimes a bit of history attached to that particular cultivar. I wanted to grow and taste every single one of the peppers – though I have had to realise that won’t really be possible. Still I can dream. And that is just the dictionary part in the middle of the book. The book begins with an exhaustively researched and fascinating history of peppers, starting with their first appearance in Bolivia and Peru, and then tracking their branching into the five main species: Capsicum annum; C. frutescens; C. chinense;, C. pubescens and C. baccatum, by looking at archaeological findings going back eight thousand years and up to the Hispanic conquests, and then the writings of Spanish and Portuguese invaders, missionaries and travellers, onto the spread to the rest of Europe (particularly through the monasteries), to India, Asia, to Africa – basically everywhere – through recipe books, travellers, physicians and botanists reports … This is a completely new way to examine the history of Columbus’ trips to discover the Americas – via the continent’s food and food related customs. From there, it is a history of how the now regarded as traditional chilli laden cuisines of Thailand, Szechuan China evolved, and how the agribusiness of producing peppers has grown and mutated worldwide, along with its potential ecological and social repurcussions. The final section is the recipes. I have tried a few, such as the excellent “Red Snapper in a Spicy Creole Sauce”, “Panfried Pork Steaks in Guajillo-Puya Adobo” and the very moreish “Spicy Pickled Cucumber” (made that one twice). There are several that I still want to try, but will wait until I get the hardback book – and the correct peppers. The recipe section by itself is not especially outstanding – though it does contain a wide range of good recipes. But in combination with the encyclopaedia of peppers, you get a real insight into why you are asked to use particular peppers, what flavours, aromas and particular heat you should expect from the recipe, and which peppers could be used as possible substitutes. I feel I will now have the tools I need to re-examine recipes from other books, which also use peppers, to improve my cooking and understanding. As someone who has previously mainly categorised chillies according to their heat, I have had my eyes opened to how much I have been missing out on. Unlike the author, I cannot readily buy a variety of fresh peppers at local markets (despite living in London), but luckily can order some by mail order from The South Devon Chilli Farm (my order went in today!). So, soon I will embark on more pepper laden meals, and hopefully start growing some too. This is an exceptional book for anyone interested in cooking, the history of food, world history, archaeology, botany, beautiful plants … Basically, it has something for everyone. I can hardly wait until my own hard copy arrives on my doorstep. I received this copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  7. 5 out of 5

    Virginia Campbell

    Learn from the best. “Peppers of the Americas: The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor” is written by Maricel E. Presilla, a three-time James Beard Award-winning author and chef-restaurateur who is an expert on Latin American cooking. A world-traveler, food historian, and botanical explorer, the author explains the origins of chile peppers and how they migrated the globe to become an essential food in the cuisines of many cultures. This encyclopedic volume is a masterful study of Learn from the best. “Peppers of the Americas: The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor” is written by Maricel E. Presilla, a three-time James Beard Award-winning author and chef-restaurateur who is an expert on Latin American cooking. A world-traveler, food historian, and botanical explorer, the author explains the origins of chile peppers and how they migrated the globe to become an essential food in the cuisines of many cultures. This encyclopedic volume is a masterful study of all things peppers, and it is beautifully photographed and illustrated. Ms. Presilla, who grows more than 200 varieties of peppers at her New Jersey home-base, provides tips on pepper growing, handling, drying, smoking, storing, fermenting, and pickling—also on making chile salts, dried powders, and pastes. The recipes are what you would expect from an accomplished chef, and they include such dishes as: “Tropical Shrimp Ceviche with Yuca”; “Pepper Steaks with Pepper Leaf Chimichurri”; “Big Tamale Pie Filled With Chicken in Chile Ancho Adobo”; “Chipotle-Vanilla sauce over Stuffed Piquillo Peppers”; “Red Snapper in a Spicy Creole Sauce”; “Panfried Pork Steaks in Guajillo-Puya Adobo”; “Oaxacan Tomatillo and Dried Chile de Arbol Salsa over marinated, glazed slow-roasted slab bacon in a hot hibiscus and chocolate adobo”; “Guatemalan-Inspired Melon and Pineapple Salad sprinkled with dried chile cobanero and cacao nibs”; and “Spicy Pickled Cucumbers”. Definitely written by a well-versed aficionado, with great love of subject, “Peppers of the America” will add heat, color, flavor and a treasure trove of information about a fiery food that will warm your cooking spirit and have you finding your own new ways to pepper up your culinary repertoire. Book Copy Gratis Lorena Jones Books via Blogging for Books

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lili

    I received this book as a digital advance reader copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Peppers of America was the first book on NetGalley that I did not finish in the allotted fifty-five day review period. Although the book offered a comprehensive education on peppers – including the history of peppers, a catalog of different types of peppers, gardening advice, and recipes for cooking with peppers – I couldn’t get past page fifteen. And it was a struggle for me to get that far. I received this book as a digital advance reader copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Peppers of America was the first book on NetGalley that I did not finish in the allotted fifty-five day review period. Although the book offered a comprehensive education on peppers – including the history of peppers, a catalog of different types of peppers, gardening advice, and recipes for cooking with peppers – I couldn’t get past page fifteen. And it was a struggle for me to get that far. The Introduction of the book didn’t engage me and didn’t excite me about reading the remaining 350 pages. Every time I thought about reading the book, I decided to do something else. This has never happened to me before with a NetGalley digital advance reader copy. Prior to reading the book, I surveyed it quickly by clicking through all the pages from the beginning to the end. There really was no section in the book that compelled me to muddle through to reach it. The catalog of different peppers of America had some lovely pictures of the peppers, but the write ups seemed very academic. None of the recipes that I skimmed during my survey particularly piqued my interest as a must try, which is unusual since I am typically a very adventurous home cook. I wish I could put my finger on what turned me off to this book, but I really can’t. The author seemed self-aggrandizing with as many times as she mentioned being invited to cook for the White House, but that was just a minor annoyance. I’ve read more ego-centric cookbooks and have been able to get past that in order to finish in time. I hope this book finds its audience, as it seems like it definitely seems to fill a gap in the landscape of culinary literature. However, I am not its audience.

  9. 5 out of 5

    DelAnne Frazee

    Title: Peppers of the Americas - The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor Author: Marciel E. Presilla Publisher: Ten Speed Press Published: 6-13-2017 Pages: 352 Genre: Cooking, Food & Wine Sub-Genre: International; Mexican; Cookbooks ASIN: B01M05S52M ISBN: 9789389578922 Reviewed For: NetGalley and Ten Speed Press Reviewer: DelAnne Rating: 5 Stars When cooking I love to use peppers. This is a great book that tells of most peppers, where they come from, their uses and heat strength. There re Title: Peppers of the Americas - The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor Author: Marciel E. Presilla Publisher: Ten Speed Press Published: 6-13-2017 Pages: 352 Genre: Cooking, Food & Wine Sub-Genre: International; Mexican; Cookbooks ASIN: B01M05S52M ISBN: 9789389578922 Reviewed For: NetGalley and Ten Speed Press Reviewer: DelAnne Rating: 5 Stars When cooking I love to use peppers. This is a great book that tells of most peppers, where they come from, their uses and heat strength. There re also recipes included. From Vinegar, sauces along with main and side dishes. Be sure to check out the Big Tamale Pie. It is sure to be a crowd pleaser. My rating for "Peppers of the Americas - The Remarkable Capsicums That Forever Changed Flavor" is 5 out of 5 stars. Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/Peppers-Americ... B&N Link: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/pepp... GoodReads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3... The Reading Room Link: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.ph... Twitter Link: https://twitter.com/DelAnne531/status...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lilith Day

    I love peppers. I add them to my foods all the time. I like the sweetness red peppers add to my soups. I also use black pepper for flavor, and green peppers make a great stir-fry. However, I did not realize how many pepper's there really were. This book is more than a cookbook. When you will read some recipes, this is more of an overview of the pepper itself. You will find some amazing facts, varieties, and tips along the way. If I had to sum it up, this is more of a textbook of peppers. Overall, I love peppers. I add them to my foods all the time. I like the sweetness red peppers add to my soups. I also use black pepper for flavor, and green peppers make a great stir-fry. However, I did not realize how many pepper's there really were. This book is more than a cookbook. When you will read some recipes, this is more of an overview of the pepper itself. You will find some amazing facts, varieties, and tips along the way. If I had to sum it up, this is more of a textbook of peppers. Overall, I will have to say this is one of the most interesting and unique book reviews I have written. I love learning and learning about peppers was something I did not think I would ever do. I enjoyed this read and would recommend it. I received this cookbook in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are mine and were in no way influenced by outside sources. I am a professional blogger at LittleLadyPlays

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Lassiter

    Great cookbook for pepper lovers!! All the information you would want on peppers, and lots of recipes as well. Try the Big Tamal Pie Filled With Chicken in Chile Ancho Adobo! If you want to grow peppers, all the information you need is here. Just want to be able to identify them? This book has you covered. If you love peppers, I highly recommend this book! I received a copy of this book through the Blogging for Books program for my honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Madison Loveday

    When I cook, I love to use peppers so I was super excited when this book came in the mail! This huge in-depth encyclopedia of everything capsicum is a very interesting reference on the history of peppers with in-depth information on history, biology, trade, cultivation, selection and preparation of peppers. Towards the end of the book, there are some interesting recipes for yummy rubs, pastes, sauces, and some main and side dishes that showcase peppers. Go check out this amazing book on Amazon When I cook, I love to use peppers so I was super excited when this book came in the mail! This huge in-depth encyclopedia of everything capsicum is a very interesting reference on the history of peppers with in-depth information on history, biology, trade, cultivation, selection and preparation of peppers. Towards the end of the book, there are some interesting recipes for yummy rubs, pastes, sauces, and some main and side dishes that showcase peppers. Go check out this amazing book on Amazon here: http://amzn.to/2wBZHjc Full Blog Review: http://bit.ly/2y9QS1j

  13. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    Gorgeous, MASSIVE book on EVERYTHING pepper related. Note: there are more peppers native to North America than I ever thought! This book was amazing. Don't forget the recipe section at the end. It was my absolute favorite in the book and bumped it up to its 5 star rating. The recipes the author included are spectacular ranging from very simple salts to extravagant, intricate dinners.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Polly Krize

    I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Super reference on peppers of all kinds! As in depth as possible, the history and development of peppers globally is contained in this book, along with outstanding photography. Interesting recipes for rubs, sauces, etc. is here too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gooshe Net

    This book has ten interesting chapters about peppers; A pepper epiphany, the silent gardeners, Pepper anatomy and heat, The capsicum clan, Peppers into words, The World travels of peppers, Gallery of fresh peppers, Gallery of dried peppers, Into the pepper garden and Cooking with peppers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Craig Thompson

    Through Review This is an amazing summary of the kinds of peppers available to amateur chefs such as myself. No recipes but plenty on insights into the different flavor profiles of many many peppers.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brock Rhodes

    Wonderful content. Comprehensive and entertaining.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Bring 'em on .... with lots of cheese to dull the pain!!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cristy

    Read Harder Challenge #9: A book published prior to January 1, 2019, with fewer than 100 reviews on Goodreads.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Julien THIBAUT

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Garcia

  22. 4 out of 5

    Callie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gregorio Pedroza

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Treherne

  25. 5 out of 5

    Toasty

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jared Ross

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brendan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Wagoner

  29. 5 out of 5

    Aliasger Talib

  30. 4 out of 5

    Eric Dowdle

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