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Anne of Green Gables: The Complete Collection

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This book contains the Anne of Green Gables complete collection. - Anne of Green Gables (1908): Anne ages 11-16. - Anne of Avonlea (1909): Anne ages 16-18. - Anne of the Island (1915): Anne ages 18-22. - Anne of Windy Poplars (1936): Anne ages 22-25 - Anne's House of Dreams (1917): Anne ages 25-27. - Anne of Ingleside (1939): Anne ages 34-40. - Rainbow Valley (1919): Anne age 41. This book contains the Anne of Green Gables complete collection. - Anne of Green Gables (1908): Anne ages 11-16. - Anne of Avonlea (1909): Anne ages 16-18. - Anne of the Island (1915): Anne ages 18-22. - Anne of Windy Poplars (1936): Anne ages 22-25 - Anne's House of Dreams (1917): Anne ages 25-27. - Anne of Ingleside (1939): Anne ages 34-40. - Rainbow Valley (1919): Anne age 41. - Rilla of Ingleside (1921): Anne age 49-53.


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This book contains the Anne of Green Gables complete collection. - Anne of Green Gables (1908): Anne ages 11-16. - Anne of Avonlea (1909): Anne ages 16-18. - Anne of the Island (1915): Anne ages 18-22. - Anne of Windy Poplars (1936): Anne ages 22-25 - Anne's House of Dreams (1917): Anne ages 25-27. - Anne of Ingleside (1939): Anne ages 34-40. - Rainbow Valley (1919): Anne age 41. This book contains the Anne of Green Gables complete collection. - Anne of Green Gables (1908): Anne ages 11-16. - Anne of Avonlea (1909): Anne ages 16-18. - Anne of the Island (1915): Anne ages 18-22. - Anne of Windy Poplars (1936): Anne ages 22-25 - Anne's House of Dreams (1917): Anne ages 25-27. - Anne of Ingleside (1939): Anne ages 34-40. - Rainbow Valley (1919): Anne age 41. - Rilla of Ingleside (1921): Anne age 49-53.

30 review for Anne of Green Gables: The Complete Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    J.Elle

    Possibly the best series of all time. Truly charming and heartwarming, especially the scene where "Gilbert and Anne are embracing on the bridge" (for further enjoyment this can also be seen in the movie, especially if you are helping with the KVIE Channel 6 fundraiser). Seriously though, if you enjoyed the movies (with the exception of the third movie which was horrible; I spit on it), I urge you to read these books. There is so much detail and other wonderful characters, like the twins Davey Possibly the best series of all time. Truly charming and heartwarming, especially the scene where "Gilbert and Anne are embracing on the bridge" (for further enjoyment this can also be seen in the movie, especially if you are helping with the KVIE Channel 6 fundraiser). Seriously though, if you enjoyed the movies (with the exception of the third movie which was horrible; I spit on it), I urge you to read these books. There is so much detail and other wonderful characters, like the twins Davey and Dora. And if you are wondering what REALLY happened to Anne as she grew up (since you KNOW that heinous third film could not have gotten it right), read these immediately and be satisfied. When I originally wrote this review, I had basically one goodreads friend and no readers and so much of this review is an inside joke. Now that so many people are appreciating my “spitting on that horrible last joke of a movie”, I feel I should explain. One night, long ago, before the invention of DVR’s, my best friend was spending the night and we were watching Anne of Avonlea on TV. It was during one of those television drives for viewer support and every so often, they stopped the movie to ask for more money. But our love of Anne was great and we endured the periodic sales pitch until the very end, which as you know if you’ve seen the movie, is a shot of Gilbert and Anne finally, FINALLY, kissing on that lovely bridge. Well, we sighed in bliss as very naïve and romantic 15 years old are wont to do and then, the show cut back to the middle age woman who was spearheading the drive and out of her mouth (and let me stop to tell you she sounded an awful lot like Julia Child, British accent and all, so imagine that voice when you read the next line), came this, “Well, wasn’t that a lovely scene, Gilbert and Anne, embracing on the bridge.” And (again as 15 year olds are wont to do, especially ones who’ve stayed up until after 1am watching Anne and consuming far too much garlic cheesy bread and Dr. Pepper), we collapsed into hysterical laughter. It’s a wonder the rest of the family didn’t wake up. And to this day, we still repeat that line. "Oh, KVIE 6 television drive lady, have you any idea of the impact you’ve had on our lives?”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Flannery

    1. Anne of Green Gables The original, the classic. I feel like I know every word in this one but it was no less magical in its rereading. 2. Anne of Avonlea It picks up nicely after the first one with Anne teaching school in Avonlea after Gilbert gives up his post for Anne so she may remain with Marilla and they might keep Green Gables. The arrival of Davy and Dora brings welcome levity after the sad ending of the previous book. 3. Anne of the Island Still rooting for Gilbert. It was 1. Anne of Green Gables The original, the classic. I feel like I know every word in this one but it was no less magical in its rereading. 2. Anne of Avonlea It picks up nicely after the first one with Anne teaching school in Avonlea after Gilbert gives up his post for Anne so she may remain with Marilla and they might keep Green Gables. The arrival of Davy and Dora brings welcome levity after the sad ending of the previous book. 3. Anne of the Island Still rooting for Gilbert. It was heartbreaking watching Anne with Roy. I loved the moment before her graduation from Redmond when she decides to carry Gilbert's lillies instead of Roy's violets. Gilbert's Christmas gift of a pink enamel heart was a sweet throwback to their childhood days. Ruby's death was just heartbreaking. Diana's wedding was also heartbreaking in a different way. It reminded me of how much growing up can hurt in all its exhileration. The ending, with Gilbert and Anne in Hester Gray's garden is beautiful and so fitting an end to their old chum days while being a beginning to their courtship. 4. Anne of Windy Poplars My least favorite, as most of it is in letter-form from Anne to Gilbert. I love Anne and Gilbert and wished I could see more of the courtship but Gilbert hardly appears here and doesn't even speak. I wish LM Montgomery hadn't omitted Anne's "love letter" pages! 5. Anne's House of Dreams Finally, Anne is Gilbert's bride! A beautiful wedding and they're off to their beautiful house of dreams. I love the new characters introduced: Miss Cordelia, Leslie Moore, Owen Ford, Captain Jim. The Dick/George Moore sideplot is interesting. Anne's loss of her first baby is sobering but the joy of her second, successful pregnancy makes up for it. I kind of wish "Jem" had been named Matthew James just because I'm partial to dear, sweet Matthew. I'm so glad Marilla and Mrs. Lynde come to visit the little house of dreams. It wouldn't be the same without them. It was especially heartwarming to see Marilla mothering Anne. 6. Anne of Ingleside This one started to drag a bit because it's much more focused on the kids than Anne. When the last book closed she had one kid, now she has 5 and then 6 when Rilla is born. I just don't like grown-up Anne as much as growing-up Anne, I guess. Aunt Mary Maria and Christine Stuart are two "new" characters, though we did meet Christine in passing in Anne of the Island but she's more fleshed out here. Fleshed out to be annoying, that is. She flirts with Gilbert far too much. I wanted to slap her for Anne. The resolution of the book, with Gilbert reassuring Anne, made laugh because whenever my own husband gets quiet or distant I assume he's plotting how to leave me. Aunt Mary Maria is intolerable. She's like the anti-Aunt Josephine. Aunt Josephine seemed to be cold and easily angered at first but she thawed quickly. Mary Maria never does. Poor Susan. I don't know if I would have been able to hold back from telling her off and I'm pretty non-confrontational. 7. Rainbow Valley Just when I was going to give up on the series because of all the kids, this one redeemed it. Lovely. 8. Rilla of Ingleside I picked this up again and I'm glad I did. Rilla reminded me so much of Anne I now want to get the other post-series books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    I estimate that I must have read this series at least fifteen or so times (and that is probably a rather conservative estimate at best), and actually do tend to read it at least once a year (sometimes even more than once if or rather when I need cheering and comfort). I love everything about the Anne of Green Gables series, and that actually tends to for the most part pertain to L.M. Montgomery's fiction in general. However, because her novels and short stories are such personal favourites, I I estimate that I must have read this series at least fifteen or so times (and that is probably a rather conservative estimate at best), and actually do tend to read it at least once a year (sometimes even more than once if or rather when I need cheering and comfort). I love everything about the Anne of Green Gables series, and that actually tends to for the most part pertain to L.M. Montgomery's fiction in general. However, because her novels and short stories are such personal favourites, I have always found it more than a bit difficult to pen a review (or rather, what I personally would consider an adequate review). I also have the AOGG books listed on my shelves (singly), and will endeavour to write detailed reviews for all of them in the hopefully not too distant future (but that being said, so far, this has only happened with the first two novels, with Anne of Green Gables and Anne of Avonlea). However, I can and will say this about L.M. Montgomery's Anne of Green Gables series, namely that it is one of my favourite all time fiction series, and that I highly recommend it to and for anyone (and equally to and for both children and adults).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Embee

    It's unfortunate I didn't discover this series when I was a young girl. I was introduced to Anne (with an 'e') by the PBS Wonderworks series in the mid-80's... And NO, I was no longer a young girl then, but a married woman, I'm THAT Old!!! So what I'm sayin' is... If you've never read the series... READ IT! Anne is enjoyable at any age. And if you haven't seen the PBS series... SEE IT! It's set in what's quite possibly the most beautiful place in the world, (Prince Edward Island) during a simpler It's unfortunate I didn't discover this series when I was a young girl. I was introduced to Anne (with an 'e') by the PBS Wonderworks series in the mid-80's... And NO, I was no longer a young girl then, but a married woman, I'm THAT Old!!! So what I'm sayin' is... If you've never read the series... READ IT! Anne is enjoyable at any age. And if you haven't seen the PBS series... SEE IT! It's set in what's quite possibly the most beautiful place in the world, (Prince Edward Island) during a simpler time... You can be quite sure Marilla never had to worry about Anne sending naked pictures to Gilbert via her cell phone. Then again, Marilla had to hand wash her clothes and never had the opportunity to order up dinner using only a phone and the number for Pizza Hut!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    The greatest children's series of all time, in my opinion, and not just because she spells her name properly: A-N-N-E. The amazing thing about this series is that almost every girl who has read it so strongly identifies with the main character - girls of completely different personalities. Everyone seems to find something to love about Anne of Green Gables: her love of reading, how he handles having red hair, her adventurous spirit, her constant muddling things. And don't even get me started on The greatest children's series of all time, in my opinion, and not just because she spells her name properly: A-N-N-E. The amazing thing about this series is that almost every girl who has read it so strongly identifies with the main character - girls of completely different personalities. Everyone seems to find something to love about Anne of Green Gables: her love of reading, how he handles having red hair, her adventurous spirit, her constant muddling things. And don't even get me started on Gilbert. A beautiful story of an orphan girl who finds a home and an identity. A side note: The made for TV miniseries version of these books surprisingly does them justice (with the STRONG exception of "The Continuing Story", that takes place during wartime, where the producers decided to abandon the storyline of the original books, and our beloved Anne for no apparent reason has the gaunt look of a heavy smoker and the theme seems to be 'disillusionment' - what were they thinking?).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Stewart

    I dyed my hair red and went on a pilgrimage to Prince Edward Island and cried standing in front of Green Gables. I had deep discussions with one of the tour guides at one of the sites who had gotten her Ph.D in L.M. Montgomery's works and could hold my own because I had read them so many times. These are the books that started my plunge into love for the written word. Anne of the Island is my favorite, Anne of Green Gables is next and then Anne's House of Dreams.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Excellent

  8. 5 out of 5

    KrisAnne

    Okay, so all books in the series are not equal--as time passed, Lucy Maud seemed to become more and more fond of ellipses and romantic descriptions--but I cannot overstate the impact these books had on me as a kid. "Anne of Green Gables" was even the inspiration for an independent study project I did in high school about the "girl's story" genre and its emphasis on orphans, self-made women, the moralizing influence of chicks, and how the seemingly-progressive virtues of intelligence, creativity, Okay, so all books in the series are not equal--as time passed, Lucy Maud seemed to become more and more fond of ellipses and romantic descriptions--but I cannot overstate the impact these books had on me as a kid. "Anne of Green Gables" was even the inspiration for an independent study project I did in high school about the "girl's story" genre and its emphasis on orphans, self-made women, the moralizing influence of chicks, and how the seemingly-progressive virtues of intelligence, creativity, and education still earned women the ultimate reward of marriage in the end. Even with all I know, I still love these books to death, read them almost annually (especially when I am sick or depressed), and dream of someday visiting PEI and standing on the shore with the wind whipping through my (long, flowing) hair.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Karey

    I don't know how I made it through my childhood without reading Anne of Green Gables. But one winter while stuck indoors with my two young children during a very long Montreal winter, I read the whole series. It was like sunshine to my soul, and the images of Anne jumping on the bed not knowing frail little granny was lying on the covers, the image of her getting goose down all over her black dress while she was trying so hard to clean a pillow (or blanket?) and having her crush show up...I I don't know how I made it through my childhood without reading Anne of Green Gables. But one winter while stuck indoors with my two young children during a very long Montreal winter, I read the whole series. It was like sunshine to my soul, and the images of Anne jumping on the bed not knowing frail little granny was lying on the covers, the image of her getting goose down all over her black dress while she was trying so hard to clean a pillow (or blanket?) and having her crush show up...I laughed harder that winter than I did all year. I might have some of the details mixed up, but Montgomery's inimitable wit and humor have stayed with me all these years.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    While I loved the early books, I really disliked books 5 and 6, which are about Anne as a full grown woman. I read the entire series as an 11-12 year old in the 90s and I just could not get over how disappointing her life ended up to me, given all the promise of her youth and how much she had overcome in her life. As the recent Ann Romney (faux-)controversy has rehashed, feminism doesn't necessarily mean you need to go out into the work force, and yes motherhood is a lovely thing, but I still While I loved the early books, I really disliked books 5 and 6, which are about Anne as a full grown woman. I read the entire series as an 11-12 year old in the 90s and I just could not get over how disappointing her life ended up to me, given all the promise of her youth and how much she had overcome in her life. As the recent Ann Romney (faux-)controversy has rehashed, feminism doesn't necessarily mean you need to go out into the work force, and yes motherhood is a lovely thing, but I still hated that it seemed to me Anne ended up falling short of her promise. What is the point of going with her through the triumphs of the classroom and her eventual graduation from college as a woman in the early 1900s just to end up at the same finish line as every other woman on the island? Yes, realistically, the time in which it was written didn't really give women a lot of leeway in terms of profession, but with her incredible people skills and intelligence, why didn't she continue her work as a principal or teacher? Is being a doctor's wife (with the privilege of accompanying him to Europe for a conference) and 6 children the best a woman can hope for even in the imagined world of Green Gables? As a young girl who was thinking of the future and the promise of it, I felt so disappointed and let down at the end of the story. Books are windows into other worlds where we are supposed to be challenged, stimulated and inspired. In my opinion, Montgomery created rare bird with all the promise of stratospheric flight then clipped its wings to keep it close to home. Ultimate advice: Give your young daughter the first four books but save the last few until life has become less of an open ended promise or she will walk away disappointed.

  11. 5 out of 5

    C

    I really have read pretty much everything by L.M. Montgomery, much to my eternal geekiness-- she was my absolute favorite author growing up, and I devoured everything the public library had to offer. Anne started it, of course, but the Emily books and The Blue Castle have become my favorites. Anne, however, is very dear to my heart, and I shall not disparage it in the slightest. Rainbow Valley and Anne of Windy Poplars are probably my least favorites, but I know her heart wasn't really in them. I really have read pretty much everything by L.M. Montgomery, much to my eternal geekiness-- she was my absolute favorite author growing up, and I devoured everything the public library had to offer. Anne started it, of course, but the Emily books and The Blue Castle have become my favorites. Anne, however, is very dear to my heart, and I shall not disparage it in the slightest. Rainbow Valley and Anne of Windy Poplars are probably my least favorites, but I know her heart wasn't really in them. I have always had a soft spot for Anne's House of Dreams and Anne of the Island-- Leslie Moore and Phil Gordon are two of my all-time favorite side characters. I am a little less fond of Anne of Avonlea, mostly because I find the twins hit or miss. Rilla of Ingelside is interesting because we really see Montgomery as a mature writer and woman, and I've come to quite like Rilla as the heroine. Anne of Ingelside is essentially some of her short stories padded with snippets about Anne-- I consider it and Road to Yesterday to be in the same league, although AoI has some darker undertones that I quite like, hints of the adult world and sexuality that belongs more in the Emily books. Anne of Green Gables is one of the most perfect novels I have ever read. Period, end stop.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Camie

    Ok this is right now!! Of course I read every one of these years ago and loved them !!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kerry & naomi

    Note: This is a review of Anne's House of Dreams, not the entire set. I may get to that later... I wanted to review Anne’s House of Dreams by L.M. Montgomery because of one line that affected me deeply the first time I read the book as a child, and that affects me deeply even now. The Plot Anne, whom we all know of Green Gables fame, finally marries Gilbert Blythe. Gilbert has graduated from medical school and the young couple will make their home at Four Winds, Prince Edward Island, where Gilbert Note: This is a review of Anne's House of Dreams, not the entire set. I may get to that later... I wanted to review Anne’s House of Dreams by L.M. Montgomery because of one line that affected me deeply the first time I read the book as a child, and that affects me deeply even now. The Plot Anne, whom we all know of Green Gables fame, finally marries Gilbert Blythe. Gilbert has graduated from medical school and the young couple will make their home at Four Winds, Prince Edward Island, where Gilbert will take over the practice of his aging uncle. Gilbert has rented a small house for them near the shore and a lighthouse, the perfect house for a newly married couple to start their lives together, filled with all of their dreams. The House of Dreams has few neighbors in Four Winds: Miss Cornelia Bryant, a sworn man-hater; Captain Jim who runs the light since he can no longer set out to sea and adventures unknown; Lesley Moore, the beautiful young woman forced into an unhappy marriage and then chained to her mentally retarded husband, Dick, trying to eke out a living on her farm; and Owen Ford who boards with Lesley and Dick one summer and sets out to write the “life-book” of Captain Jim. The plot itself, without revealing too much here, has its high and lows in the lives of Anne and Gilbert and the new friends around them. Montgomery weaves in a little romance, a lot of humor, some tears, and a surprise or two. The Writing Ever since I was a little girl, I’ve been captivated by the image of Montgomery’s Prince Edward Island in my mind. The Nevada desert where I spent my childhood was rather dreary and dusty, without visibly changing seasons. Prince Edward Island came alive for me in all of the Anne books--the beauty and abundance of flowers, tall stately trees, blossoms and brooks, and Victorian hominess. Montgomery’s descriptive prose helped me build my castles in the air, and made me yearn to travel to P.E.I. and see if nature still exists the way that it existed for the author over a century ago. All of L.M. Montgomery’s books have the same effect on me: I chuckle frequently, laugh hysterically on occasion, and always, always, have at least one good cleansing cry of sorrow and one of joy with every book. I read and re-read most of the Anne books (and the Emily books too) as a child and teenager, and even as an adult knowing full well what will happen, I still laugh and chuckle and cry. If that’s not good writing, then I am no discriminator at all. Despite all the idyllic descriptions and Anne’s great capacity for having things work out her way, Montgomery addresses a few topics of concern, mostly through connotation rather than outright statements. Leslie is a battered wife. From the lips of the man-hating Miss Cornelia, we hear the plight of many women who are poor, continually pregnant with children they don’t want and can’t support, and simply made slaves to their husbands and families. Montgomery also shows us the unofficial charities that ran through most communities: spinsters who sew clothes for the unwanted babies and watch other people’s children for an hour or so or old men who take in abandoned animals and lend money to those who can’t pay it back. P.E.I. has its problems like the rest of the world and Montgomery weaves them in as well, if the reader pays attention. Minor Nitpicks (and a few spoilers—you’ve been warned) Montgomery is a little heavy handed with foreshadowing at the beginning of Anne’s House of Dreams, as with most of the later books in this series. I never noticed when I read this novel repeatedly as a child and I cannot honestly determine whether I think the foreshadowing is heavy-handed because I know what’s going to happen or because I’m a more mature audience than in the past. In true Victorian style, Montgomery never mentions outright that Anne is pregnant (horrors!), but sticks to euphemisms like, “their hope for the spring.” Now I catch the meaning at the first mention, though I believe I was slightly more obtuse as a child reader. In a way, the Victorian reserve regarding “unmentionable” topics adds to the charm of the novel. What Gives Me Hope Spoiler Warning! This section reveals not the ending of the book, but a very major piece of the plot. If you have not read the book already, please skip to the next section. I mean it. Anne has a difficult time with the birth of her first child, Joy. Besides the danger to Anne herself, the baby is weak and lives but one day. Anne is heartbroken. Although not for the first time in her life, Anne has to deal with her own very real, very traumatic tragedy. Though she has lost people before who are close to her, namely, Matthew, he was an old man, not a new life. Anne who has had a rather large share of happiness, has to learn again that life is not fair. Yet life goes on. Anne regains her health and aches a little less. One day, Anne smiles again. I thought something would have been missing from Anne’s smile, something that the pain of her loss had taken away and lain in a grave with a little white-gowned baby. Montgomery wrote it thus: “Anne found that she could go on living; the day came that she even smiled again over one of Miss Cornelia’s speeches. But there was something in the smile that had never been in Anne’s smile before and would never be absent from it again.” That something, my friends, is in the smile of one who has known tragedy and doesn’t take the joy for granted anymore. That is what restores my hope and why this line sticks in my mind. Conclusion Anne and her life are as real to me as my own. I’ve been a spectator throughout her life and the lives of her children. I’ve cried and laughed with her, and dreamed with Anne too. If you escaped childhood without reading any of the Anne of Green Gables novels, then read them now or you will never know all that you’ve missed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Baker

    An absolutely fantastic children's series, that should be read at least once by everyone, regardless of your age. Follow little orphan Anne (don't forget the "e"!) as she joins brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert on their farm. They'd been expecting a boy, but got red haired Anne instead. Her honesty, personality and warmth spreads throughout her village as she grows, touching everyone that she meets. If you've only read the first book - find out what you've missed. The others, as An absolutely fantastic children's series, that should be read at least once by everyone, regardless of your age. Follow little orphan Anne (don't forget the "e"!) as she joins brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert on their farm. They'd been expecting a boy, but got red haired Anne instead. Her honesty, personality and warmth spreads throughout her village as she grows, touching everyone that she meets. If you've only read the first book - find out what you've missed. The others, as Anne grows up, moves away, and then returns to Prince Edward Island, are just as good. My only regret - that my daughter isn't quite old enough to enable us to enjoy them together.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Jensen

    Nothing is better for a girl than to read this series. Nothing! L.M Montgomery is one of those people I'm going to meet after I die. We would have been friends had I lived on Prince Edward Island in the late 1800s. I can read these books over and over again and meet my ten year old self. It was a rite of passage to introduce my daughter to the delightful Anne Shirley and all the beloved characters of Avonlea. I was not disappointed in her reaction. After reading Anne of Green Gables, Isabella Nothing is better for a girl than to read this series. Nothing! L.M Montgomery is one of those people I'm going to meet after I die. We would have been friends had I lived on Prince Edward Island in the late 1800s. I can read these books over and over again and meet my ten year old self. It was a rite of passage to introduce my daughter to the delightful Anne Shirley and all the beloved characters of Avonlea. I was not disappointed in her reaction. After reading Anne of Green Gables, Isabella clasped the book to her chest and said, "Mom, I love these book so much it hurts me." No higher praise than that.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristin- Shabby Chic Reader

    Having seen the movies during my teenage years and having served a mission in Eastern Canada where the books were written, I finally sat down and read the books. I loved them! The tales and adventures of the orphan ,Anne, were full of humor and heartbreak. Some of the humor in the stories for me came from understanding the traditions and personalities of the Canadian Maritime people. These stories are so easy to relate to that everyone will enjoy reading the books. Note: The third movie is Having seen the movies during my teenage years and having served a mission in Eastern Canada where the books were written, I finally sat down and read the books. I loved them! The tales and adventures of the orphan ,Anne, were full of humor and heartbreak. Some of the humor in the stories for me came from understanding the traditions and personalities of the Canadian Maritime people. These stories are so easy to relate to that everyone will enjoy reading the books. Note: The third movie is totally different from the books. The last few books are so much better than the movie and stay true to Anne's demeaner and Character.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Wilson

    I can't believe I didn't read these books sooner! I adored them. Anne is such a unique, captivating character and I loved how themes of faith, family, and imagination were woven throughout the series in natural, believable ways. I will be reading and rereading these for years to come.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    A must read for any Canadian girl. I use lines from this book all the time. When I am having a bad moment I think of Anne- " I am in the depths of despair"

  19. 4 out of 5

    Twila Newey

    Again, for my twelve year old self who loved these books and wore out their covers rereading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    Just like "I'm so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers." I am also so glad to live in a world where Anne Shirley exists. These novels are full of childhood innocence and optimism in the face of adversity. While I highly recommend everyone to read the entire series these are my personal favorite books in the series: Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, and Anne's House of Dreams.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    A favorite classic, worth a re-read for nostalgia's sake.

  22. 4 out of 5

    L.B. Scott

    I loved these books as a child. I think I read them all 3-4 times and I need to re-read them as an adult.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Cook

    Finished book #1, Anne of Green Gables. Delightful. Finished book numbers 2 and 3. Still delightful!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cranky - The Book Curmudgeon

    ***** 5 Cranky Stars ***** Precocious, ginger haired, freckle faced 11 year old Anne Shirly explodes into the lives of spinster Marilla and bachelor Matthew Cuthbert, owners of the farm Green Gables in Avonlea on Canada's Prince Edward Island. The Cutheberts had sent away to the orphanage for a home boy to help aging Matthew with the farm, instead they got Anne who entered their lives like a whirlwind and just stayed there whirling! Anne attracts mishaps and mischief like a magnet but her ***** 5 Cranky Stars ***** Precocious, ginger haired, freckle faced 11 year old Anne Shirly explodes into the lives of spinster Marilla and bachelor Matthew Cuthbert, owners of the farm Green Gables in Avonlea on Canada's Prince Edward Island. The Cutheberts had sent away to the orphanage for a home boy to help aging Matthew with the farm, instead they got Anne who entered their lives like a whirlwind and just stayed there whirling! Anne attracts mishaps and mischief like a magnet but her inherent good humor and good intentions wins the hearts of all who get to know her. The collection contains 8 novels which follow the life of Anne Shirley from school girl to Collage student to teacher, from girl to young woman. Her courtships and friendships, her trials and successes. Her friendships with a myriad of colorful people. The books tell of the days when children could still be children, when mothers made all their children's clothes and fathers mended their shoes, the days when children had chores to do and did not expect payment for it. When life was lived and not raced through; initially no phones but letters written between friends, no planes or motor cars, people walked or traveled by horse drawn vehicles, long distances were traveled by train or boat. The 8 novels cover Anne's childhood, her marriage, becoming a mother and experiencing devastating loss. The later books concentrate more on Anne's children but she remains a central figure in all of them. I last read these books as a teenager and my decision to reread them was a treat to myself, the books are written in the beautiful language of the time and the author had a lovely descriptive way of getting her stories told. I highly recommend reading these books either for the first time or re-reading them. Literature that has stood the test of time. Charming, uplifting, the collection deserves 5 stars, collectively and individually.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I'm going to write about a book where an orphan girl grows up. And I admit, that, on its own, doesn't sound like much. And, she is talkative, ambitious, smart, willful, and imaginative. (and as someone pointed out has ADD). There is nothing untold exciting that happens, and if you don't buy into loving Anne at the beginning you might find this a dull read, but she touched me, and I really wanted to know what would happen to her. This is such a classic children's book, that I am surprised I haven't I'm going to write about a book where an orphan girl grows up. And I admit, that, on its own, doesn't sound like much. And, she is talkative, ambitious, smart, willful, and imaginative. (and as someone pointed out has ADD). There is nothing untold exciting that happens, and if you don't buy into loving Anne at the beginning you might find this a dull read, but she touched me, and I really wanted to know what would happen to her. This is such a classic children's book, that I am surprised I haven't read this before now. Written in a time of buggies and new fangled electricity, this is a pleasant slice of rural life on Prince Edwards Island. I'm not sure if this would appeal to modern children. Written with long monologues by Anne, it might be too much. But, I'm used to Victorian books, love E. Nesbit, Charles Dickens and all those other long-winded Victorian writers. Note, though is is a collection, I have read only the first book in the collection. Not sure if I will read the others, yet. I might need a break from historical rural Victorian fiction. (as it is all I have been reading for the past two months). And, strangely, I wasn't bothered by the clear separation of "women's" and "men's" tasks, the way I have been in other books. I suppose because Anne never says she "can't" do something, because she is a girl. If anything, she strives to be the best at what she does, competing with both boys and girls in academics. So, if you have never read this, try the first chapter. If Anne seems too dull, or boring, or annoying, don't read the rest. But, if you find her cleaver, and want to know more about her, do give it a try.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    After a lifetime of loving the movies I finally decided to read the books (thanks to my niece who was reading them at age seven....sad when I'm being outdone by the little ones....) And I'm glad I read them all. However - and I think this is the first time I've ever uttered this - I think I like the movies more than the books. Yep, true statement. The first book was fun - it made me giggle with Anne and her shenanigans. But the subsequent books just weren't as fun as I thought they would be. I After a lifetime of loving the movies I finally decided to read the books (thanks to my niece who was reading them at age seven....sad when I'm being outdone by the little ones....) And I'm glad I read them all. However - and I think this is the first time I've ever uttered this - I think I like the movies more than the books. Yep, true statement. The first book was fun - it made me giggle with Anne and her shenanigans. But the subsequent books just weren't as fun as I thought they would be. I did enjoy "Rilla of Ingleside" and all the WWI happenings by the Canadian women back home, and there were great moments in all of them. But overall, I would say just watch the movies. (But do watch the movies if you haven't yet, because they would be getting five stars for sure.) Oh, and some of the female acquiescence fairly drove me crazy. And some of the short stories in "Chronicles" were just weird..... Still, I love Anne Shirley and am certainly happy we got to spend a little more time together.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    I love this series. I have read them over and over again, and particularly liked to take them with me when traveling. Even if I forgot a book, these were some I could always find on the bookshelves of relatives. The story of orphaned Anne Shirley and the people in her world never fails to enchant and relax me. I frequently turned to these books for comfort after moving during the last part of my 7th grade year to a junior high full of unfriendly people. Thanks to L.M. Montgomery, I never felt as I love this series. I have read them over and over again, and particularly liked to take them with me when traveling. Even if I forgot a book, these were some I could always find on the bookshelves of relatives. The story of orphaned Anne Shirley and the people in her world never fails to enchant and relax me. I frequently turned to these books for comfort after moving during the last part of my 7th grade year to a junior high full of unfriendly people. Thanks to L.M. Montgomery, I never felt as lonely as I might have and I will always be indebted to her for that. The final two books I did find to be a bit of a struggle as there is less of Anne and more of her children, but I particularly fell in love with Rilla of Ingleside after finding and reading an antique copy that had some lovely old illustrations. Great series! I even have a guy friend who read these and loved them as well. Books for everyone, and after reading you will feel good; good about life, good about yourself, and good about mankind in general. That's pretty rare in a book these days.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Moondrops

    I read this series in my junior high days. I am now in my mid to late twenties. I spent hours living in the world created by the stories of Anne and her adventures. Memories of these books have never faded with time. It brought many happy day dreams and worlds to explore in my minds eye. Even though, this series is not from the genre of fantasy per se. It has enduring qualities of real life stories from the perspective of a girl named, Anne. She brings magic and wonder to her world through her I read this series in my junior high days. I am now in my mid to late twenties. I spent hours living in the world created by the stories of Anne and her adventures. Memories of these books have never faded with time. It brought many happy day dreams and worlds to explore in my minds eye. Even though, this series is not from the genre of fantasy per se. It has enduring qualities of real life stories from the perspective of a girl named, Anne. She brings magic and wonder to her world through her wonderful imagination and spunky spirit. As the reader, one goes through the loss and joyous moments with Anne as she grows into a women, and then eventually her children. It is a must read for anyone.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    The Anne of Green Gables Series was something I started reading just before my road trip to Prince Edward Island. I read the first four books before and during the trip and finished them in the weeks after. Although they are considered children's literature, they are timeless and amazing. Anne's enduring spirit, her continuous struggle "to be good" and her amazing impact on everyone she's in contact with are all things that we can relate to in this day and age and that inspire us to emulate, or The Anne of Green Gables Series was something I started reading just before my road trip to Prince Edward Island. I read the first four books before and during the trip and finished them in the weeks after. Although they are considered children's literature, they are timeless and amazing. Anne's enduring spirit, her continuous struggle "to be good" and her amazing impact on everyone she's in contact with are all things that we can relate to in this day and age and that inspire us to emulate, or at least make us smile. What's wrong with having a series of books that just makes you feel good, with no sexual overtones or political implications? Beautiful, escapist reading that brings you back to a much simpler time. Anne is a beautiful heroine and role model for girls of all ages.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    I have to say that Anne of Green Gables is by far the best book in this collection. The rest area closer to a 3 because they turn out to be rather formulaic, but Anne of Green Gables is THAT good that it brings the whole collection up to a solid 4 due solely to my nostalgia and love for young Anne. And who doesn't love a story with a happy ending?! All Anne books have RIDICULOUSLY happy endings, except the final book featuring Rilla which seems much more realistic and may have been the I have to say that Anne of Green Gables is by far the best book in this collection. The rest area closer to a 3 because they turn out to be rather formulaic, but Anne of Green Gables is THAT good that it brings the whole collection up to a solid 4 due solely to my nostalgia and love for young Anne. And who doesn't love a story with a happy ending?! All Anne books have RIDICULOUSLY happy endings, except the final book featuring Rilla which seems much more realistic and may have been the inspiration for the terrible 3rd movie of Anne: The Continuing Story. These books (and the first two Anne movies) are great friends when you are sick. Highly recommend for anyone spending a lot of time near a toilet or in their bed!

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